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1

U.S. Exports of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Exports; Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Supply and Disposition;

2

Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Yield Refinery Yield (Percent) Product: Liquefied Refinery Gases Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 PADD 1 4.4 5.1 4.9 4.9 4.6 2.1 1993-2013 East Coast 4.4 5.3 5.1 5.1 4.9 2.2 1993-2013

3

Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

Zhou, P.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

Zhou, P.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases (Thousand Barrels per Day)

6

Light Collection in Liquid Noble Gases  

SciTech Connect

Liquid noble gases are increasingly used as active detector materials in particle and nuclear physics. Applications include calorimeters and neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for neutrinoless double beta decay, direct dark matter, muon electron conversion, and the neutron electric dipole moment. One of the great advantages of liquid noble gases is their copious production of ultraviolet scintillation light, which contains information about event energy and particle type. I will review the scintillation properties of the various liquid noble gases and the means used to collect their scintillation light, including recent advances in photomultiplier technology and wavelength shifters.

McKinsey, Dan [Yale University

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

9

Refining District Oklahoma-Kansas-Missouri Natural Gas Liquids ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refining District Oklahoma-Kansas-Missouri Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases Stocks at Natural Gas Processing Plants (Thousand Barrels)

10

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The control systems analyze of the Romanian refinery gases desulphurization plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the control aspects concerning Romanian gases desulphurization plants. The paper has been divided into four parts. First part presents the structure of the Romanian gases desulphurization plants. The second part contains the steady-state ... Keywords: absorption, control, hierarchical, identification, industrial, modeling, unisim

Cristian Patrascioiu; Daniel Mihaescu

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reading Comprehension - Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases Properties of Solids, Liquids, and Gases A solid has a definite _________ mass texture volume and a _________ 3D irregular definite shape. The particles in a solid are _________ free to move around motionless packed tightly together . Particles in a solid move by _________ sliding past one another vibrating back and forth slightly jiggling around . _________ Viscosity Amorphous Crystalline solids soften before melting. The particles in this type of solid are not arranged in regular pattern. Amorphous solids _________ do don't have a distinct melting point. Crystalline solids have a _________ distinct color and shape distinct pattern and melting point . Liquids have no _________ volume mass shape of their own. A liquid takes the shape of its container. Without a container liquids spread into a wide,

13

Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

Anderson, D.F.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Photosensitive dopants for liquid noble gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ionization type detector for high energy radiation wherein the energy of incident radiation is absorbed through the ionization of a liquid noble gas and resulting free charge is collected to form a signal indicative of the energy of the incident radiation, an improvement comprising doping the liquid noble gas with photosensitive molecules to convert scintillation light due to recombination of ions, to additional free charge.

Anderson, David F. (Wheaton, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

16

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

17

U.S. Exports of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 21: 21: 20: 26: 19: 24: 17: 149: 21: 76: 58: 50: 1982: 67: 51: 74: 77: 43: 106: 37: 61: ...

18

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company is investigating the direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels via partial oxidation. This report describes work completed in the first quarter of the two-year project (first quarter FY 1990). Task 1 of the work, preparation of the Project Management Plan, has been completed. Work was started and progress made on three other tasks during this quarter: Task 2. Modification of an existing Amoco pilot plant to handle the conditions of this project. Minor modifications were made to increase the maximum operating pressure to 1500 psig. Other more extensive modifications are being designed, including addition of an oxygen compressor and recycle system. Task 3.1. Evaluation of a Los Alamos National Laboratory methane oxidation kinetic model for suitability in guiding the experimental portions of this project. Task 3.2. Process variable (e.g. temperature, pressure, residence time) studies to determine optimal partial oxidation conditions. 1 fig.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mechanics of liquid and gas, or mechanics of the inertless mass II. Real liquids and gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The second part of the monograph investigates mechanical motion of real liquids and gases. Besides that, this contains two examples of practical applications of the theoretical statements for engineers. The first example is a new algorithm for calculating a concrete form of blade for a centrifugal pump. This blade form will make the work of any pump maximally efficient for a given density of liquid or gas. Principal constructive scheme of the device for measuring dynamic power of the pressure is the second example. This monograph is addressed to specialists in the field of theoretical and practical hydrodynamics and adjacent sciences.

I. Z. Shkurchenko

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

Refinery Net Production of Liquefied Refinery Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

La. Gulf Coast: 6,043: 6,574: 5,527: 5,960: 5,850: 5,083: 2005-2013: N. La., Ark: 80: 84: 64: 42: 46: 15: 2005-2013: New Mexico: 78: 71: 53: 62: 62: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams  

SciTech Connect

We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Absolute rate measurements of two-photon process of gases, liquids, and solids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to rapid improvements in high-power laser performance, two-photon absorption processes have become a very useful tool for studying the molecular structures of various gases, liquids and solids. However, measurements of absolute two-photon absorption cross sections were more or less ignored previously because of their small size. In this work, we obtained not only the two-photon absorption spectra, but also measurements of their absolute cross sections for various gases, liquids, and solids. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Chen, C.H.; McCann, M.P.; Payne, M.G.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Field evaluation of sampling methods for pressurized geothermal liquids, gases, and suspended solids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many different sampling methods were tested and compared for collecting samples for measurement of brine chemistry, gases, and suspended solids from pressurized geothermal systems. The tests were conducted on the 6-2 wellhead and a test loop at the Department of Energy's Geothermal Test Facility at East Mesa, California. The recommended methods for single-phase liquid or single-phase steam (with gases) are presented, together with detailed procedures. The results of testing methods for sampling two phase liquid-steam systems showed significant errors can result. It was recommended that two-phase flowing wells be directed to a full flow separator and the single-phase liquid and single-phase steam sampled separately using the recommended methods.

Shannon, D.W.; Cole, M.W.; DeMonia, D.D.; Divine, J.R.; Jensen, G.A.; Kindle, C.H.; Koski, O.H.; Smith, R.P.; Woodruff, E.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various option will be performed as experimental data become available. The project is of two year's duration and contains three major tasks: Project Management Plan, Pilot Plant Modification, and Comparison of Preliminary Data With Los Alamos Model: We will determine if the kinetic model developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory can be used to guide our experimental effort. Other subtasks under Task 3 include: Pressure/Temperature/Reaction Time Effects; Study of Different Injection Systems: Different schemes for introducing and mixing reactants before or within the reactor will be evaluated theoretically and/or experimentally; Study of Different Quench Systems; Effect of Reactor Geometry; Effect of Reactor Recycle; and Enhanced-Yield Catalyst Study. 5 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

28

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Explanatory Notes Survey Methodology Description of Survey Form The Form EIA-820, “Annual Refinery Report,” is the primary source of data in the “Refinery ...

29

Refinery Capacity Report 2007  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

30

Refinery Capacity Report 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

31

Refinery Capacity Report 2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

U.S. Refinery Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Liquefied Refinery Gases: 11,903: 12,936: 13,591: 20,226: 24,599: 26,928: 2005-2013: ... Asphalt and Road Oil: 10,230: 9,328: 8,595: 9,973: 9,494: 9,914: 2005-2013 ...

33

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

34

Tables - Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tables: 1: Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2009: PDF: 2: Production Capacity of Operable ...

35

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 116-129 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is

K. C. Kwon

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio

K.C. Kwon

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of ... "Annual Refinery Report." 49 Energy Information Administration, Refinery Capacity 2011. Title: Refinery ...

38

Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Refinery District API Gravity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Refinery District API Gravity (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Degree)

39

Retrofitting analysis of integrated bio-refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bio-refinery is a processing facility that produces liquid transportation fuels and/or value-added chemicals and other products. Because of the dwindling resources and escalating prices of fossil fuels, there are emerging situations in which the economic performance of fossil-based facilities can be enhanced by retrofitting and incorporation of bio-mass feedstocks. These systems can be regarded as bio-refineries or integrated fossilbio- refineries. This work presents a retrofitting analysis to integrated bio-refineries. Focus is given to the problem of process modification to an existing plant by considering capacity expansion and material substitution with biomass feedstocks. Process integration studies were conducted to determine cost-effective strategies for enhancing production and for incorporating biomass into the process. Energy and mass integration approaches were used to induce synergism and to reduce cost by exchanging heat, material utilities, and by sharing equipment. Cost-benefit analysis was used to guide the decision-making process and to compare various production routes. Ethanol production from two routes was used as a case study to illustrate the applicability of the proposed approach and the results were bio-refinery has become more attractive then fossil-refinery.

Cormier, Benjamin R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 526,996 566,851 559,032 581,600 578,456 543,388 1981-2013 Crude Oil 445,937 474,296 474,991 497,241 489,887 468,825 1981-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 12,805 11,759 12,769 13,227 13,760 16,794 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 4,949 4,341 4,752 4,734 5,331 5,666 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 7,856 7,418 8,017 8,493 8,429 11,128 1981-2013 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 2,668 1,880 1,998 2,014 2,083 4,711 1981-2013 Isobutane 5,188 5,538 6,019 6,479 6,346 6,417 1981-2013 Other Liquids 68,254 80,796 71,272 71,132 74,809 57,769 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 32,667 34,665 34,097 35,446 36,356 33,881 1981-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 6,204,500 6,277,893 6,169,893 6,345,372 6,422,710 6,406,693 1981-2012 Crude Oil 5,532,097 5,361,287 5,232,656 5,374,094 5,404,347 5,489,516 1981-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 184,383 177,559 177,194 161,479 178,884 186,270 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 64,603 55,497 59,100 56,686 63,385 63,596 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 119,780 122,062 118,094 104,793 115,499 122,674 1981-2012 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 48,292 50,024 48,509 43,802 47,571 52,246 1981-2012 Isobutane 71,488 72,038 69,585 60,991 67,928 70,428 1981-2012 Other Liquids 488,020 739,047 760,043 809,799 839,479 730,907 1981-2012 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons

42

Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two of Shell Canada's refineries have logged about six years total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery facilities. The flare gas recovery systems were designed to recover the normal continuous flare gas flow for use in the refinery fuel gas system. The system consists of liquid knock-out, compression, and liquid seal facilities. Now that the debugging-stage challenges have been dealt with, Shell Canada is more than satisfied with the system performance. A well-thought-out installation can today be safe, trouble-free, and attractive from an economic and environmental viewpoint. This paper highlights general guidelines for the sizing, design and operation of a refinery flare gas recovery facility.

Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Mass-transport considerations pertinent to aqueous-phase reactions of gases in liquid-water clouds  

SciTech Connect

Reactions of gases in liquid-water clouds are potentially important in the transformation of atmospheric pollutants affecting their transport in the atmosphere and subsequent removal and deposition to the surface. Such processes consist of the following sequence of steps. Mass-transport of the reagent gas or gases to the air-water interface; transfer across the interface and establishment of solubility equilibria locally at the interface; mass-transport of the dissolved gas or gases within the aqeuous phase; aqueous-phase chemical reactions(s); mass-transport of reaction product(s) and possible subsequent evolution into the gas-phase. Description of the rate of the overall process requires identification of the rate-limiting step (or steps) and evaluation of the rate of such step(s). Identification of the rate-limiting step may be achieved by evaluation and comparison of the characteristic times pertinent to the several processes and may be readily carried out by methods outlined herein, for known or assumed reagent concentrations, drop size, and fundamental constants as follows: gas- and aqueous-phase diffusion coefficients; Henry's law coefficient and other pertinent equilibrium constants; interfacial mass-transfer accommodation coefficient; aqueous-phase reaction rate constant(s). A graphical method is described whereby it may be ascertained whether a given reaction is controlled solely by reagent solubility and intrinsic chemical kinetics or is mass-transport limited by one or another of the above processes. In the absence of mass-transport limitation, reaction rates may be evaluated uniformly for the entire liquid-water content of the cloud using equilibrium reagent concentrations. In contrast, where appreciable mass-transport limitation is indicated, evaluation of the overall rate requires knowledge of and integration over the drop-size distribution characterizing the cloud. 68 references, 16 figures.

Schwartz, S.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2} in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is mai

K. C. Kwon

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Natural gas liquids consumption, production, and reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas liquids are condensates that occur during production and liquids recovered during processing, and they are classified as lease condensate or natural gas plant liquids (NGPL). There has been a decline in total domestic production, but an increase in ethane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) during the past decade. Statistical tables illustrate trends in the production of NGPLs and liquefied refinery gases (LRG), imports and exports, and marketing and sales. World production data show that, while the US now produces close to 41% of world output, the production trends in other areas are increasing as ours decline. 10 tables. (DCK)

Sala, D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

46

Withdrawal of gases and liquids from an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ oil shale retort is formed within a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale. A production level drift extends below the fragmented mass, leaving a lower sill pillar of unfragmented formation between the production level drift and the fragmented mass. During retorting operations, liquid and gaseous products are recovered from a lower portion of the fragmented mass. A liquid outlet line extends from a lower portion of the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar for conducting liquid products to a sump in the production level drift. Gaseous products are withdrawn from the fragmented mass through a plurality of gas outlet lines distributed across a horizontal cross-section of a lower portion of the fragmented mass. The gas outlet lines extend from the fragmented mass through the lower sill pillar and into the production level drift. The gas outlet lines are connected to a gas withdrawal manifold in the production level drift, and gaseous products are withdrawn from the manifold separately from withdrawal of liquid products from the sump in the production level drift.

Siegel, Martin M. (Broken Arrow, OK)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Status of Texas refineries, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a survey of current operations of the Texas refineries during the 1979-82 market slump using publicly available data from the US Department of Energy and the Texas Railroad Commission. The report looks at the small inland refineries, the large inland refineries, the small coastal refineries, the large coastal refineries in Texas, and the Louisiana coastal refineries. The report suggests that about 200 mb/d of inland capacity and 1.3 million b/d of coastal capacity has been permanently idled.

Langston, V.C.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Texas Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity : Operable ... Idle refineries represent refineries where distillation units were completely idle but not ...

49

Colorado Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity : Operable ... Idle refineries represent refineries where distillation units were completely idle but not ...

50

Flare-gas recovery success at Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect

It appears that some North American refining companies still cling to an old philosophy that flare gas recovery systems are unsafe, unreliable, uneconomic, or unnecessary. Shell Canada's recent experience with two modern systems has proven otherwise. Two of Shell Canada's refineries, at Sarnia, Ont., and Montreal East, Que., have now logged about 6 years' total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery units. The compression facilities in each utilize a two-stage reciprocating machine, one liquid seal drum per flare stack, and an automated load control strategy. The purpose was to recover the normal continuous flow of refinery flare gas for treatment and use in the refinery fuel gas system.

Allen, G.D.; Chan, H.H.; Wey, R.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

52

Applicability of fan spray nozzles to stripping insoluble gases from viscous liquids  

SciTech Connect

Fan spray nozzle stripping appears to be a practical technique for separating dilute volatile solutes from nonvolatile solvents. In particular this technique can be used to strip molecular tritium and tritium fluoride at extremely small concentration (in the parts per million range) from molten salts used as blanket materials in a fusion reactor. Under adjusted operating conditions of the fan spray as it leaves the nozzle, a high percentage of the theoretically maximum achievable stripping would take place from the expanding sheet of the fan spray as it leaves the nozzle and before it breaks up. Although the only available experimental data are for aqueous solutions, a new theoretical analysis of the fan spray sheet demonstrates the applicability of this technique to nonaqueous liquids. The equation derived from this analysis relates the theoretically achievable mass transfer efficiency to the properties of the liquid flowing through the fan spray nozzle and to the operating conditions of the nozzle. Any fluid with viscosity higher than or equal to that of water would be expected to follow this equation as long as a fan-shaped sheet is formed under the operating conditions of the nozzle.

Tseng, H.H.; Johnson, E.F.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Optimization of refinery hydrogen network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tighter environmental regulations and more heavy-end upgrading in the petroleum industry lead to increased demand for hydrogen in oil refineries. In this paper, the method proposed to optimize the refinery hydrogen network is based upon mathematical ... Keywords: hydrogen management, optimization, refinery, superstructure

Yunqiang Jiao; Hongye Su

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

55

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery District API Gravity (Weighted ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery District API Gravity (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Degree)

56

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery District API Gravity (Weighted Average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery District API Gravity (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Degree)

57

Appalachian No. 1 Refinery District Sulfur Content (Weighted ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appalachian No. 1 Refinery District Sulfur Content (Weighted Average) of Crude Oil Input to Refineries (Percent)

58

EIA-820 ANNUAL REFINERY REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA-820, Annual Refinery Report Page 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ... production outside the refinery gate. Note: capacity should include base stocks and process oils

59

Indiana Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Idle refineries represent refineries where distillation units were completely idle but not permanently shutdown as of January 1 of the year.

60

Number of Idle Refineries - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Idle refineries represent refineries where distillation units were completely idle but not permanently shutdown as of January 1 of the year.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

California Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Idle refineries represent refineries where distillation units were completely idle but not permanently shutdown as of January 1 of the year.

62

Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

U.S. Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 Finished Motor Gasoline 44.4 44.1 44.4 43.9 43.9 44.9 1993-2013 Finished Aviation Gasoline 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 10.0 9.1 9.3 9.4 9.8 9.6 1993-2013 Kerosene 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 1993-2013 Distillate Fuel Oil 28.4 29.4 28.7 29.2 29.3 29.7 1993-2013 Residual Fuel Oil 3.3 2.9 2.8 2.8 2.5 2.6 1993-2013 Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.5 1.5 1993-2013 Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 1993-2013 Special Naphthas 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.2 1993-2013 Lubricants 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1993-2013 Waxes

64

U.S. Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.3 4.0 4.1 1993-2012 Finished Motor Gasoline 45.5 44.2 46.1 45.7 44.9 45.0 1993-2012 Finished Aviation Gasoline 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 9.1 9.7 9.3 9.3 9.4 9.5 1993-2012 Kerosene 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012 Distillate Fuel Oil 26.1 27.8 26.9 27.5 28.9 29.1 1993-2012 Residual Fuel Oil 4.2 4.0 4.0 3.8 3.4 3.2 1993-2012 Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.3 1.0 1.3 1.4 1.3 1.3 1993-2012 Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.3 1.2 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.6 1993-2012 Special Naphthas 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 1993-2012 Lubricants 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 1993-2012 Waxes 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012

65

Improved 3-omega measurement of thermal conductivity in liquid, gases, and powders using a metal-coated optical fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel 3?thermal conductivitymeasurement technique called metal-coated 3? is introduced for use with liquids

Scott N. Schiffres; Jonathan A. Malen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

67

Puerto Rico Refinery Desulfurization, Gasoline Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Desulfurization, Gasoline Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

68

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

69

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

70

Oklahoma Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

71

Mississippi Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

72

Georgia Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Georgia Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

73

Minnesota Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Minnesota Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

74

Biological treatment of refinery wastes  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study of the treatment situation at a Thai refinery that used an API separator with no equalization tank, followed by an activated-sludge system, showed that only 42% of the total COD and 57% of the soluble COD was degradable. In a study of the possibility of additional treatments, an aerated lagoon showed promising results. The wastewater composition of the three main Thai refineries was surveyed.

Mahmud, Z.; Thanh, N.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

New Jersey Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity : Operable ... Idle refineries represent refineries where distillation units were completely idle but not ...

76

Motiva Refinery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refinery Refinery Motiva Refinery May 18, 2006 - 10:45am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Bodman Much of my time lately has been devoted to explaining why the price of gasoline has risen so sharply. President Bush understands the pinch this is creating for American consumers and has come forward with a variety of steps to address the problem. Rapid economic growth in emerging economies like China and India-and the growth here in the U.S.-have pushed up demand. Political unrest in some oil-producing regions has tightened supply. The transition from winter gasoline to summer blends, and the phase out of the additive MTBE in favor of ethanol, have increased the pressure on the market. Most significantly, we have very little spare refining capacity in this

77

Refinery suppliers face tough times  

SciTech Connect

Despite a handful of bright spots in hydroprocessing and petrochemical sectors, economic woes plague much of the refinery and petrochemical catalysts business, as suppliers are feeling the impact of mature markets and refiners` ongoing cost cutting. Industry experts say the doldrums could spur further restructuring in the catalyst business, with suppliers scrambling for market share and jockeying for position in growing sectors. Expect further consolidation over the next several years, says Pierre Bonnifay, president of IFP Enterprises (New York). {open_quotes}There are still too many players for the mature [refinery catalyst] markets.{close_quotes} Others agree. {open_quotes}Only about seven [or] eight major suppliers will survive,{close_quotes} says Robert Allsmiller, v.p./refinery and petrochemical catalysts at United Catalysts Inc. (UCI; Louisville, KY). {open_quotes}Who they [will be] is still up in the air.{close_quotes}

Rotman, D.; Walsh, K.

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Refinery Capacity Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries ... Sources & Uses Petroleum Coal Natural Gas Renewable Nuclear Electricity Consumption

79

Louisiana Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

80

Delaware Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Washington Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

82

Ohio Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

83

Mississippi Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

84

Utah Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

85

Number of Operating Refineries - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

86

Montana Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

87

Oklahoma Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Oklahoma Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

88

Alaska Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

89

Florida Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

90

Mississippi Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD)y ; Mississippi Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

91

Nebraska Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

92

North Carolina Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Carolina Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

93

Michigan Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

94

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 Introduction On August 27, 1997, the EPA promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an

95

Electronegative gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent knowledge on electronegative gases essential for the effective control of the number densities of free electrons in electrically stressed gases is highlighted. This knowledge aided the discovery of new gas dielectrics and the tailoring of gas dielectric mixtures. The role of electron attachment in the choice of unitary gas dielectrics or electronegative components in dielectric gas mixtures, and the role of electron scattering at low energies in the choice of buffer gases for such mixtures is outlined.

Christophorou, L.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks.

Sherwood, D.J.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Kansas refinery starts up coke gasification unit  

SciTech Connect

Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc. has started up a gasification unit at its El Dorado, Kan., refinery. The unit gasifies delayed coke and other refinery waste products. This is the first refinery to install a coke-fueled gasification unit for power generation. Start-up of the $80-million gasification-based power plant was completed in mid-June. The gasifier produces syngas which, along with natural gas, fuels a combustion turbine. The turbine produces virtually 100% of the refinery`s electricity needs and enough heat to generate 40% of its steam requirements.

Rhodes, A.K.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

Refinery and Blender Net Inputs  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Crude OIl ... 14.54 15.14 15.26 15.08 14.51 15.30 15.70 14.93 14.47 15.30 15.54 14.97 15.01...

99

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 11 for thrid quarter FY 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 15 fourth quarter FY 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 23 for second quarter FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 19 for first quarter FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

U.S. Refinery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 354,918 353,802 345,413 343,062 345,025 342,763 1993-2013 Crude Oil 98,082 97,563 90,880 93,075 97,586 90,778 1981-2013 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 256,836 256,239 254,533 249,987 247,439 251,985 1993-2013 Pentanes Plus 947 867 828 805 708 856 1993-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 12,896 14,096 15,761 16,662 18,296 18,683 1993-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 281 321 261 242 205 171 1993-2013 Propane/Propylene 2,692 2,994 3,569 3,518 4,099 4,104 1993-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 7,627 8,451 9,511 10,757 11,921 12,147 1993-2013 Isobutane/Butylene 2,296 2,330 2,420 2,145 2,071 2,261 1993-2013 Other Hydrocarbons 19 43 49 33 26 21 2009-2013 Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) 116 99 100 82 71 78 2009-2013

104

U.S. Refinery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 346,915 338,782 331,615 339,907 336,327 341,211 1993-2012 Crude Oil 89,070 86,598 90,944 88,982 90,640 88,781 1981-2012 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 257,845 252,184 240,671 250,925 245,687 252,430 1993-2012 Pentanes Plus 949 997 1,006 971 895 884 1993-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,161 12,456 12,611 14,896 14,429 15,934 1993-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 31 185 118 220 223 214 1993-2012 Propane/Propylene 4,120 3,293 3,577 4,278 4,087 4,574 1993-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 6,320 6,482 6,478 7,818 7,794 8,774 1993-2012 Isobutane/Butylene 2,690 2,496 2,438 2,580 2,325 2,372 1993-2012 Other Hydrocarbons 29 20 41 42 2009-2012 Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) 47 24 58 112 2009-2012

105

U.S. Refinery Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 5,383,494 5,119,100 4,676,865 4,568,301 4,484,600 4,395,128 2005-2012 Liquefied Refinery Gases 238,904 230,431 227,470 240,454 225,992 230,413 2005-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 7,323 6,671 7,069 7,228 7,148 6,597 2005-2012 Ethane 5,145 4,608 5,229 5,200 5,105 4,835 2005-2012 Ethylene 2,178 2,063 1,840 2,028 2,043 1,762 2005-2012 Propane/Propylene 205,179 190,020 196,011 204,223 201,492 202,309 2005-2012 Propane 120,596 114,268 106,177 102,913 98,508 100,933 2005-2012 Propylene 84,583 75,752 89,834 101,310 102,984 101,376 2005-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,285 30,887 24,148 30,281 17,449 20,580 2005-2012 Normal Butane 25,715 33,092 25,825 32,094 19,263 22,965 2005-2012

106

Phased Array Approach To Retrieve Gases, Liquids, Or Solids From Subsurface And Subaqueous Geologic Or Man-Made Formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enhancing the remediation of contaminated soils and ground water, production of oil and gas, and production of any solid, gas, and/or liquid from subsurface geologic and man-made formations including the steps of estimating the geometric boundaries of the region containing the material to be recovered, drilling a recovery well(s) into subsurface in a strategic location to recover the material of interest, establishing multiple sources of acoustical power in an array about and spaced-apart from the surface or at various depths below the surface in a borehole(s) and/or well(s), directing a volume of acoustical excitation from the sources into the region containing the material to be recovered, the excitation in the form of either controllable sinusoidal, square, pulsed, or various combinations of these three waveforms, and controlling the phasing, frequency, power, duration, and direction of these waveforms from the sources to increase and control the intensity of acoustical excitation in the region of the material to be recovered to enhance. the recovery of said material from the recovery well(s). The invention will augment any technology affecting the removal of materials from the subsurface.

Rynne, Timothy M. (Long Beach, CA); Spadaro, John F. (Huntington Beach, CA); Iovenitti, Joe L. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Dering, John P. (Lakewood, CA); Hill, Donald G. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

107

Encon Motivation in European Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One essential element in a successful energy conservation or Encon program is effective motivation of employees and organizations to conserve energy. Encon motivation in our European refineries is a continuing effort that requires utilization of various techniques and approaches, dependent on the local environment and effectiveness of the Encon program. In this paper, we begin with the importance for stimulating personnel, note the essential ingredients required to motivate our people, and briefly review several techniques used for Encon motivation. Two examples of Encon motivation programs are presented before introducing the characteristics of a successful Encon motivation program. The paper concludes with a review of the needs and suggestions for maintaining a continuing program. Energy utilization efficiency in Esso Europe's refineries improved about 16% in the mid 70's, due primarily to Encon motivation. Experience has since demonstrated that additional improvements can be achieved through operational and maintenance practices.

Gambera, S.; Lockett, W., Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Table 12. Refinery Sales During 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd) New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 12. Refinery Sales During 2010

109

Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a summary of our collaborative 2005 project “Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries” at the Rio Oil and Gas Conference this September.

Holmgren, Jennifer; Arena, Blaise; Marinangelli, Richard; McCall, Michael; Marker, Terry; Petri, John; Czernik, Stefan; Elliott, Douglas C.; Shonnard, David

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Opportunities for Biorenewables in Petroleum Refineries  

SciTech Connect

A presentation by UOP based on collaborative work from FY05 using some results from PNNL for upgrading biomass pyrolysis oil to petroleum refinery feedstock

Holmgren, Jennifer; Marinangelli, Richard; Marker, Terry; McCall, Michael; Petri, John; Czernik, Stefan; Elliott, Douglas C.; Shonnard, David

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Areas of Corrosion in the Refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...J.D. Poindexter, Corrosion Inhibitors for Crude Oil Refineries, Corrosion: Fundamentals, Testing, and Protection, Vol 13A, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2003, p 887â??890...

112

Refinery Investments and Future Market Incentives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Presentation given at the Annual NPRA Meeting that discusses factors affecting refinery investments. Refiners have plunged from a seeming “golden age” investment ...

113

Refinery Capacity Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy) ... Tables: 1: Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of ...

114

A Louisiana Refinery Success Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Refining 155,000 barrels of crude oil daily, a Louisiana plant markets oil products to gas stations in at least 26 states, including Washington, D.C. The plant uses 8,538 steam traps with 1,200-, 600-, 250-, 75-, 40- and 15-psi nominal pressures. Standardized with inverted bucket steam traps, the Louisiana refinery’s maintenance and energy coordinator was content with the results. The Spirax Sarco Inc (SSI) team demonstrated SSI’s Energy Service Group (ESG) capabilities and successes to the refinery manager, operations manager and production manager. From 2004 through 2006, the team presented a series of ESG seminars at the refinery site. The numerous models demonstrated quantitative savings with 3- to 12-mo paybacks. For a complete SSI turnkey program, for example, the SSI team presented an ROI with less than six months payback. The ESG survey found that only 3,952 (46.3%) of the steam traps were operating correctly. The remaining steam traps experienced a variety of failures, including: 613 (7.2%) that failed open; 2,763 (32.4%) were cold; 1,012 (11.9%) that failed closed; 6 (0.0%) exhibited rapid cycling; and 192 (2.2%) were disconnected. The team also found performance and temperature issues with the HP sulfur reactors in the SRU units, largely due to the application of inverted bucket steam traps. Plus, as a result of excessive steam leaks, the sulfur reactors were creating a safety hazard. When these results were presented, management agreed that the sulfur reactors needed process improvement. The SSI team recommended replacing the inverted bucket steam traps with 1-1/2-in. strainers and 1-1/2-in. flanged float & thermostatic steam traps. They also suggested that the existing trap discharge piping should be removed and re-piped with globe-style bypass valves and gate-style isolation valves to reduce flow velocity. Once the SSI team began negotiations, it only took one survey for the Louisiana refinery to realize all the energy savings opportunities. In fact, the ESG survey uncovered more than $1.3 million in steam losses through failed steam traps and another $1 million in steam leak opportunities and production, process, safety and environmental improvements. Impressed with the survey results, the refinery approved the estimated $110,000 turnkey project, which offered a 5.3-month payback. Further negotiations netted the team annual steam trap surveys for the next three years, as well as an approved 2008 energy budget of $600,000. Additionally, the Louisiana refinery has indicated that upon successful completion of the ESG program, SSI’s annual energy budget will increase to $1,000,000."

Kacsur, D.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MTC. Marano, J.J. , 2003. Refinery Technology Profiles:Deep Desulfurization of Oil Refinery Streams: A Review. FuelSavings for Flying J Refinery. Oil & Gas Journal, December 2

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Table 2. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydrogen production capacity of hydrogen plants on refinery grounds. MMcfd = Million cubic feet per day. a ... (EIA), Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report."

117

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels in the graph. Source: Petroleum Supply Annual, Energypetroleum products, refineries are still a substantial sourceadded produced by petroleum refineries. Source: U.S. Census,

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Refinery receipts of crude oil by rail, truck, and barge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While refinery receipts of crude by truck, rail, and barge remain a small percentage of total receipts, EIA's recently released Refinery Capacity ...

119

Petroleum refineries vary by level of complexity - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A refinery is an industrial complex that manufactures petroleum products, such as gasoline, from crude oil and other feedstocks. Many different types of refineries ...

120

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspropyrgos Refinery Combined Cycle Cogeneration System.refineries operate combined cycles with higher efficiencies.in an Integrated Gasifier Combined Cycle (IGCC). In this

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIA-800 WEEKLY REFINERY AND FRACTIONATOR REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA-800, Weekly Refinery and Fractionator Report Page 3 Crude Oil (Code 050) Report all refinery input of domestic and foreign crude oil (including ...

122

PAD District 4 Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Idle refineries represent refineries where distillation units were completely idle but not permanently shutdown as of January 1 of the year.

123

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquid Fuels Market Module Liquid Fuels Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 145 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the LFMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The LFMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. petroleum refining

124

Regional Refinery Utilization Shows Gulf Coast Pressure  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: But there is some room for hope. Refineries generally begin maintenance in February or March, and finish in April. The East Coast was experiencing some lengthy refinery maintenance outages, as shown by the drop in utilization that remained low in most of March and April. In the meantime, the East Coast was drawing on extra supplies from the Gulf Coast and imports. The Midwest refineries seem to have been ramping up in April as they finished what maintenance was needed. But the Midwest no longer has the Blue Island refinery, so it also is pulling more product from the Gulf Coast. The high Gulf Coast prices this spring reflect extra "pull" on product from both the Midwest and the East Coast, and probably from California as well. Inputs into Gulf Coast refineries over the last 4 weeks

125

Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Take an integrated approach to refinery automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated approach to designing refinery automation systems is essential to guaranteeing systems compatibility and maximizing benefits. Several aspects of implementing integrated refinery automation should be considered early in the project. Many refineries have major parts of their business automated, starting from corporate planning at the higher level, down to DCS and field instrumentation. A typical refinery automation system architecture of the mid-eighties is shown. Automation systems help refineries improve their business through: Rationalization of man power; Increased throughputs; Reduced give-away; Reduced energy consumption; Better response to market demands and changes; Effective use of offsite areas through scheduling and automatic line-up systems; Reduced losses; and Decision support systems.

Wadi, I. (Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. (United Arab Emirates))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Documentation: The automated ORAD (Oil Refinery and Distribution Model) to RYMs (Refinery Yield Model) linked system  

SciTech Connect

The Refinery Evaluation Modeling System (REMS) is an analytic tool used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide insight into the domestic operations of United States refineries. REMS can be used to determine the potential impacts of changes in demands for petroleum products, crude and feedstock qualities, refinery processing capacities, foreign and domestic crude availabilities, transportation modes and costs, and government regulations. REMS is a set of linear programming models that solve for a partial equilibrium in the US refinery market by equating supply and demand while maximizing profits for US refiners. REMS consists of two models: the Refinery Yield Model (RYM), and the Oil Refinery and Distribution Model (ORAD). RYMs consists of nine separate regional models that represent the contiguous US refinery system. These nine regions are aggregates of the 13 Bureau of Mines (BOM) refinery districts. ORAD integrates the results from the individual RYMs into a transportation network which represents the US refinery market. ORAD uses the extreme point refinery representation from RYMs to solve for the optimal product prices in ORAD.

Sanders, R.P.; Kydes, A.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

French, R. J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

French, R. J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Wisconsin Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wisconsin Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

131

Ohio Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

132

Colorado Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

133

Colorado Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

134

Colorado Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity as ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

135

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery and Blender Net Production of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery and Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels per Day)

136

Guam Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

137

Rocky Mountains (PADD 4) Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units ; PAD District 4 Refinery Utilization and Capacity ...

138

Michigan Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

139

South Dakota Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Distillate Fuel Oil Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

140

South Dakota Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Propane and Propylene Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

142

Wastewater reuse and recycle in petroleum refineries  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study were to identify feasible reuse and recycle techniques that can be successful in reducing wastewater discharge and to estimate their associated costs. Wastewater reduction is a fundamental aspect of the US EPA's proposed regulations for the petroleum refining industry. EPA undertook this study to confirm the cost estimates used in the proposed guidelines, to identify specific technologies, and to accurately assess their costs. Fifteen refineries were chosen to represent the range of refinery characteristics including crude capacity, process employed, and wastewater generation. Significant wastewater reductions were found possible at 12 refineries studied.

Langer, B.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Former Soviet refineries face modernization, restructuring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A massive modernization and restructuring program is under way in the refining sector of Russia and other former Soviet republics. Economic reforms and resulting economic dislocation following the collapse of the Soviet Union has left refineries in the region grappling with a steep decline and changes in product demand. At the same time, rising oil prices and an aging, dilapidated infrastructure promise a massive shakeout. Even as many refineries in the former Soviet Union (FSU) face possible closure because they are running at a fraction of capacity, a host of revamps, expansions, and grass roots refineries are planned or under way. The paper discusses plans.

Not Available

1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

Texas facility treats, recycles refinery, petrochemical wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A US Gulf Coast environmental services company is treating refinery and petrochemical plant wastes to universal treatment standards (UTS). DuraTherm Inc.`s recycling center uses thermal desorption to treat a variety of refinery wastes and other hazardous materials. The plant is located in San Leon, Tex., near the major Houston/Texas City refining and petrochemical center. DuraTherm`s customers include major US refining companies, plus petrochemical, terminal, pipeline, transportation, and remediation companies. Examples of typical contaminant concentrations and treatment levels for refinery wastes are shown. The paper discusses thermal desorption, the process description and testing.

NONE

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

A Texas Refinery Success Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Common knowledge rules that maintenance is the key to long-lasting machinery performance. Yet steam traps are often left to their own devices, to fail or succeed alone. And without steam trap programs, plants are certain to experience a high failure rate. An oil refinery in Texas was continuously experiencing a high failure rate on its 4,790-steam trap system. Finally, the steam losses were judged to be too high, and plant management called on Spirax Sarco Inc. (SSI) to reduce costs. The SSI team noticed symptoms of subpar efficiency within the steam system. Steam traps were improperly installed, water hammer problems were evident and the condensate recovery system was damaged."

Kacsur, D.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Inbicon Biomass Refinery Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Platforms  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

for biogas production Inbicon Biomass Refinery Energy integrated solutions Wheat Straw 50 t/h (at 86 % dm) C5 molasses Power The Lignin and biogas are used in power

147

Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

it. When this expansion is complete this facility which is now one of the preeminent refineries on the Gulf Coast will become the largest in the United States and one of the...

148

Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

CO2 Reduction through Optimization of Steam Network in Petroleum Refineries: Evaluation of New Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam network of petroleum refinery is energy intensive, and consequently contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions. A simple model for the estimation of CO2 emissions associated with operation of steam network as encountered in refineries is introduced. In conjunction with a shortcut model this model has been used to calculate of the steam network of an existing refinery aiming at minimization total annualized cost with considering emissions. In this paper, the case study is steam network of southern Tehran refinery. Simulation of this case has been performed in STAR software that licensed by energy system laboratory at K.N. Toosi University of Technology. Mathematical linear programming method has been applied to optimization of steam network. In addition, the short cut model of CO2 production has been provided for evaluation of steam network with considering CO2 production taxes and other economic effects in total annualized cost. Meanwhile, in this research, new scenario has been defined and evaluated. Results shows new scenario have 45 % less TAOC rather than base scenario in optimal condition.

Manesh, M. H. K; Khodaie, H.; Amidpour, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Refinery analytical techniques optimize unit performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refinery process engineers need to consider benefits of laboratory analytical techniques when evaluating unit performance. Refinery heavy-oil laboratory analytical techniques use both old and new technologies. Knowing how to use available laboratory analytical techniques within their limitations are critical to obtain correct refinery optimization decisions. Better refinery stream distillation and contaminant data ultimately improves the accuracy of various refinery decision-making tools. These laboratory analytical techniques are covered: high-temperature simulated distillation (HTSD); true boiling point (TBP) distillation--ASTM D2892; vacuum distillation--ASTM D5236; continuous-flash vaporizers; wiped-film evaporators; inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES); Conradson--ASTM D189/Microcarbon residue--ASTM D4530; and asphaltene IP-143, ASTM D3279, ASTM D4124. Analysis of atmospheric crude, vacuum crude and delayed coker units highlight these laboratory techniques to identify potential yield and product quality benefits. Physical distillation or wiped-film evaporation in conjunction with HTSD, ICP-AES, microcarbon residue and asphaltened data will better characterize a feedstock as well as determine the source of contaminants. Economics are refinery specific, therefore, these examples focus on applying laboratory techniques as opposed to discussing specifics of unit improvement. These are discussed qualitatively.

Golden, S.W. [Process Consulting Services Inc., Grapevine, TX (United States); Craft, S. [Chempro, Inc., LaPorte, TX (United States); Villalanti, D.C. [Triton Analytics Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Complexity index indicates refinery capability, value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refinery size usually is measured in terms of distillation capacity. Relative size, however, can be measured using refinery complexity--a concept developed by W.L. Nelson in the 1960s. Nelson developed the complexity index to quantify the relative cost of components that make up a refinery. It is a pure cost index that provides a relative measure of the construction costs of a particular refinery based on its crude and upgrading capacity. The Nelson index compares the costs of various upgrading units--such as a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit or a catalytic reformer--to the cost of a crude distillation unit. Computation of the index is an attempt to quantify the relative cost of a refinery based on the added cost of various upgrading units and the relative upgrading capacity. A review of complexity calculations, and an explanation of how indices have changed, provide a simple means of determining the complexity of single refineries or refining regions. The impact of complexity on product slate is also examined in this paper.

Johnston, D. [Daniel Johnston and Co. Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

High voltage research (breakdown strengths of gaseous and liquid insulators) and environmental effects of dielectric gases. Semiannual report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics covered include basic studies of gaseous dielectrics, direct current breakdown strengths of gases/mixtures, environmental effects studies and decomposition analyses, impulse studies, breakdown strengths of binary mixtures with concentric cylinder geometry, and a discussion of the experimental apparatus. (GHT)

Christophorou, L.G.; James, D.R.; Pai, R.Y.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

OMB No. 1905-0165 Version No.:xxxx.xx FORM EIA-820 ANNUAL REFINERY ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the comparable capacity numbers reported on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report," filed for January 2014. ... ANNUAL REFINERY REPORT.

154

Final Report - Development of New Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) Technology to Recover High Valued Products from Chemical Plant and Refinery Waste Systems  

SciTech Connect

Project Objective was to extend pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology into previously under-exploited applications such as polyolefin production vent gas recovery and H2 recovery from refinery waste gases containing significant amounts of heavy hydrocarbons, aromatics, or H2S.

Keith Ludwig

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Kyrgyzstan starts up its first refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan started up its first oil refinery in October 1996. The 10,000 b/d plant is designed to produce gasoline, diesel, and mazut (heavy fuel oil) from local Kyrgyz crude. Before construction of the Jalalabad refinery, all finished petroleum products were imported from neighboring countries. Kyrgyzstan`s demand for finished products is about 40,000 b/d. The new refinery was designed and constructed by Petrofac of Tyler, Texas, on behalf of Kyrgoil Corp., Calgary. Kyrgoil is a partner with the Kyrgyz state oil company, Kyrgyzsneft, in a venture called Kyrzgyz Petroleum Co. (KPC). KPC has undertaken restoration and continued development of the oil fields in Kyrgyzstan`s Fergana basin, in addition to the refinery project. The company also has marketing rights for finished products within Kyrgyzstan. The refinery comprises: a hydroskimming (atmospheric distillation) section, diesel steam stripping, gasoline blending, and utilities and off-sites, including steam generation, power generation, tank farm, truck and rail tank-car loading and unloading facilities, crude inlet pipeline, high-voltage power line, substation, air compression, laboratory, and maintenance facilities.

McLeod, G. [Petrofac LLC, Tyler, TX (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Refinery District Gross Inputs to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Refinery District Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 1,739 ...

157

Texas City Refinery Update: The Price of Safety Complacency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas City Refinery Update: The Price of Safety Complacency DOEEH-0699 2006-01 January 2006 ES&H Safety Bulletin 2005-09 (July 2005) discussed the Texas City Refinery accident in...

158

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Improved oil refinery operations and cheaper crude oil to help reduce gasoline prices U.S. gasoline prices are expected to fall as more oil refineries come back on line and crude...

159

How refinery fuel indexes have varied  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refinery fuels costs have endured a steady incline since 1993, except for a period in 1993. As shown in the accompanying table, these increases in cost have occurred for residual fuel oil costs in three of the five PADD districts. The cost for natural gas for refinery usage also dropped steadily during the 3-year study. These conclusions are based on costs of an average refinery fuel consisting of 1 bbl each of PADD Districts 1--5 and an average US cost of 4.4 MMscf natural gas (a 1 bbl equivalent on a BTU content basis). Raw residual fuel oil and natural gas prices come from publications put out by the US Department of Labor.

Farrar, G.

1997-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

160

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Visbreaking Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

162

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

163

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Fluid Coking Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

164

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2009 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

January fuel demand with availability of the refinery process units for distillate and gasoline production net of outages.

165

Virgin Islands Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

166

Midwest (PADD 2) Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

167

Puerto Rico Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Idle refineries ...

168

Refineries are also indirectly exposed to forced processing rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refineries receive crude oil from two sources: waterborne deliveries by ship and domestic production from California crude oil producing fields.

169

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

receipt of crude oil at idled refineries require considerable modification before they can be used to receive products. Moreover, ...

170

Michigan Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro.. Kerosene/Jet Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Michigan Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

171

Colorado Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Other/Residual Fuel Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Other/Residual Fuel Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

172

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery Technology Profiles: Gasification and SupportingGasification.to be carried out. 18.5 Gasification Gasification provides

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Puerto Rico Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Thermal Cracking/Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

174

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

175

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking, Gas Oil Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Catalytic Hydrocracking, Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

176

Refining District Oklahoma-Kansas-Missouri Refinery and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refining District Oklahoma-Kansas-Missouri Refinery and Blender Net Input of Fuel Ethanol (Thousand Barrels per Day)

177

New Jersey Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Jersey Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

178

Arkansas Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arkansas Refinery Catalytic Reforming/High Pressure Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

179

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Heavy Gas Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

180

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

182

West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Coast (PADD 5) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

183

Puerto Rico Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Puerto Rico Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

184

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

185

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

186

U.S. Refinery Operating Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Operating Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

187

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Calendar Day)

188

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

189

U.S. Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity as ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Marketable Petroleum Coke Production Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

190

Structural, energy and environmental aspects in Iranian oil refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum refineries extract and upgrade the valuable components of crude oil to produce a variety of marketable petroleum products. However Iranian refineries are old and their efficiency and structure do not satisfy demand of the country in which their ... Keywords: Iran, demand, energy, refinery

Sourena Sattari; Akram Avami

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Exxon reduces production at U. S. refineries  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Exxon Co. U.S.A. has trimmed output of its U.S. refineries by a combined 15% because of depressed margins on products markets. The company made the announcement last week as it began increasing crude runs at its 396,000 b/cd refinery at Baytown, Tex., on the Houston Ship Channel. Exxon trimmed Baytown crude runs late last month to manage feedstock inventories after a barge was rammed and sunk in the ship channel, briefly halting traffic. Most feedstock is delivered to the Baytown plant by water.

Not Available

1993-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1972, the U.S. refining industry has made much progress in reducing energy consumption. Lately, falling energy prices have de-emphasized the need to appropriate new capital for additional energy conservation projects. One area neglected in most refineries is the need to monitor and manage the daily use of energy. Setting up an energy auditing system will tell management how well each unit in the refinery is being operated and can be used as a valuable tool in reducing energy costs. An example of an energy monitorirg and management system is discussed and illustrated with examples.

Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Refinery Investments and Future Market Incentives  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presentation given at the Annual NPRA Meeting that discusses factors affecting refinery investments. Refiners have plunged from a seeming "golden age" investment environment to a world with excess capacity, flat to declining demand, and weak margins. What is happening to refining investments in this turbulent and uncertain situation?

Information Center

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New environmentally-driven regulations for motor gasoline volatility will significantly alter refinery light ends supply/demand balancing. This, in turn, will impact refinery economics. This paper presumes that one outcome will be excess refinery normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper identifies the fundamental driving forces which are changing refinery butane economics, examines how these forces influence refinery production, and evaluates the potential for using normal butanes as peaking utility gas turbine fuel, especially on the US East Coast.

Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases. ” Washington, DC:Input and Output at Refineries, 1995 - 2004. Sacramento, CA:www.energy.ca.gov/oil/refinery_output/index.html California

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

U.S. Refinery Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 320,455 348,984 346,918 365,525 358,673 335,185 2005-2013 Crude Oil 445,937 474,296 474,991 497,241 489,887 468,825 2005-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids 11,914 11,407 12,393 13,031 13,377 15,397 2005-2013 Pentanes Plus 4,688 4,040 4,439 4,667 5,044 5,273 2005-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 7,226 7,367 7,954 8,364 8,333 10,124 2005-2013 Normal Butane 2,038 1,829 1,935 1,885 1,987 3,707 2005-2013 Isobutane 5,188 5,538 6,019 6,479 6,346 6,417 2005-2013 Other Liquids -137,396 -136,719 -140,466 -144,747 -144,591 -149,037 2005-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 7,511 8,089 7,844 8,541 8,568 8,086 2005-2013 Hydrogen 5,792 6,200 6,050 6,477 6,520 6,226 2009-2013

198

Petroleum Refinery Catalytic Reforming -- Cutting High Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon reforming involves a variety of chemical reactions at high temperatures and pressures in the presence of suitable catalysts. The conversion of naptha to high octane aromatics requires high energy to initiate and sustain the reaction at temperatures of 850-950oF. Hydrogen - rich off - gases are fired in combinations of process furnaces. Heat is transferred to hydrocarbon fluids by radiation, principally. Feed or return stream temperatures determine the need for convection sections. It is essential that the operation and maintenance of these furnaces be optimized to minimize production costs. This paper describes the performance testing and evaluation of a set of ten refinery furnaces used to thermally drive several reforming reactors and to regenerate catalysts. Firing rates provide an input of 216.2 x 106 Btu/hr. to the furnaces, at $1.90 per 106 Btu. The units are fitted with multiple natural draft burners. There is insufficient turbulence and swirl in the burners. Operators manually set up the burners with excessive airflows for normal, full-load firing. These furnaces represent production limits. Products of combustion exhaust at high thermal levels - the range is from 985-1700oF. The mixed gases flow through a "waste heat" boiler, or they bypass the boiler and enter a single stack. Steam generation at 150 psig averages 38,200 lb/hr. Heat is wasted via the bypass at a rate of 41.1x106 Btu /hr. at 1240oF. When airflows are reduced (to 15% excess air) the loss will be 18.7x106 Btu/hr. at 1180oF. Installation of a second, parallel waste heat boiler will result in a saving of l3.4x106 Btu/hr. Energy savings at this furnace complex will be equivalent to $628,700 per year. Investment costs were estimated to be less than $250,000 for the proposed heat trap addition.

Viar, W. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 6,567,929 6,641,293 6,527,069 6,735,067 6,815,590 6,794,407 1981-2012 Liquefied Refinery Gases 238,904 230,431 227,470 240,454 225,992 230,413 1981-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 7,323 6,671 7,069 7,228 7,148 6,597 1981-2012 Ethane 5,145 4,608 5,229 5,200 5,105 4,835 1993-2012 Ethylene 2,178 2,063 1,840 2,028 2,043 1,762 1993-2012 Propane/Propylene 205,179 190,020 196,011 204,223 201,492 202,309 1981-2012 Propane 120,596 114,268 106,177 102,913 98,508 100,933 1995-2012 Propylene 84,583 75,752 89,834 101,310 102,984 101,376 1993-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,285 30,887 24,148 30,281 17,449 20,580 1981-2012 Normal Butane 25,715 33,092 25,825 32,094 19,263 22,965 1993-2012

200

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 559,639 599,643 591,916 616,905 613,451 578,101 1981-2013 Liquefied Refinery Gases 24,599 26,928 25,443 26,819 25,951 19,023 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 464 426 407 441 487 379 1981-2013 Ethane 317 277 283 312 332 232 1993-2013 Ethylene 147 149 124 129 155 147 1993-2013 Propane/Propylene 16,840 17,792 16,966 17,839 18,063 17,254 1981-2013 Propane 8,051 8,949 8,756 9,002 9,153 8,816 1995-2013 Propylene 8,789 8,843 8,210 8,837 8,910 8,438 1993-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 7,270 8,876 8,122 8,676 7,664 1,738 1981-2013 Normal Butane 7,447 9,044 8,314 8,832 8,067 1,743 1993-2013 Butylene -177 -168 -192 -156 -403 -5 1993-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha For Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils For Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

202

Suppressant: Inert Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Influencing the Reported Extinguishing Concentrations of Inert Gases.. ... for the Protection of Machinery Spaces and Gas Turbine Enclosures in ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Quantum Coulomb Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures on Quantum Coulomb gases delivered at the CIME summer school on Quantum Many Body Systems 2010

Jan Philip Solovej

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Investigation of sulfur-tolerant catalysts for selective synthesis of hydrocarbon liquids from coal-derived gases. Quarterly technical progress report, March 19-June 18, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15% Fe-3% K/sub 2/O on SiO/sub 2/ catalyst, a 15% Co-3% K/sub 2/O on SiO catalyst and a 15% CoB/SiO/sub 2/ catalyst were prepared. H/sub 2/ and CO chemisorption uptakes were measured for the catalysts prepared to date. It was noted that calcining the iron catalysts in air before reduction in flowing H/sub 2/ aided in increasing metal dispersion. Liquid and wax traps for use in the reactor system were completed as were plans for chromatographic product analysis.

Bartholomew, C H

1980-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Mott-Insulator to Liquid Transition and Population Trapping in Ultracold Fermi Gases by Non-Equilibrium Modulation of the Optical Lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultracold gas of interacting fermionic atoms in a three dimensional optical lattice is considered, where the lattice potential strength is periodically modulated. This non-equilibrium system is nonperturbatively described by means of a Keldysh-Floquet-Green's function approach employing a generalized dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). Strong repulsive interactions between different atoms lead to a Mott-Insulator state for the equilibrium system, but the additional external driving yields a non-equilibrium density of Floquet-states and a transition to a liquid or conducting state.

Regine Frank

2011-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

Marker, T.L.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

PAD District / Refinery Location Total Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Operable Date of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 11. New, Shutdown and Reactivated Refineries During 2012 a b REACTIVATED PAD District I 185,000 366,700 Monroe Energy LLC Trainer, PA 185,000 366,700 09/12 c SHUTDOWN PAD District I 80,000 47,000 ChevronUSA Inc Perth Amboy, NJ 80,000 47,000 03/08 07/12 PAD District III 16,800 19,500 Western Refining Southwest Inc Bloomfield, NM 16,800 19,500 12/09 11/12 PAD District VI 500,000 1,086,000 Hovensa LLC Kingshill, VI 500,000 1,086,000 02/12 02/12 a b bbl/cd=Barrels per calendar day. bbl/sd=Barrels per stream day. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report" and Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report." c Formerly owned by ConocoPhillips Company.

208

Separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of polar gases from nonpolar gases may be effected by passing a mixture of nonpolar gases over the face of a multicomponent membrane at separation conditions. The multicomponent membrane which is used to effect the separation will comprise a mixture of a glycol plasticizer having a molecular weight of from about 200 to about 600 and an organic polymer cast on a porous support. The porous support is pretreated prior to casting of the mixture thereon by contact with a polyhydric alcohol whereby the pores of the support are altered, thus adding to the increased permeability of the polar gas.

Kulprathipanja, S.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

209

GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening June 2, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for (Acting) Deputy Secretary Kupfer Today, Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey Kupfer delivered remarks at the launch of GreenHunter Energy's biodiesel refinery, which will be the nation's single largest biodiesel refinery, producing 105 million gallons of "white-water" B100 biodiesel per year. Thank you Gary. I'm pleased to join with Governor Perry, Congressmen Green and Lampson, and Mayor Garcia in celebrating this important occasion. Today, as we open the nation's largest biodiesel refinery, we reach another milestone in our effort to make America more energy secure. As you know, global energy demand is surging. We must act swiftly and aggressively to

210

Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Investigation of sulfur-tolerant catalysts for selective synthesis of hydrocarbon liquids from coal-derived gases. Annual technical progress report, September 19, 1979-September 18, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twelve supported iron and cobalt catalysts were prepared, including three boride-promoted catalysts, by a procedure developed previously in this laboratory. Each was characterized by H/sub 2/ and CO chemisorption measurements. Construction and testing of a high pressure laboratory microreactor system were completed. The system features a 0.65 cm tubular reactor, ice-temperature liquid traps, and a gas chromatograhic system for complete product analysis. Eight catalysts were tested at 90 kPa, 450 to 500/sup 0/K H/sub 2//CO = 2 to obtain product distribution, selectivity, and turnover number data. The results show that supports and promoters significantly affect specific activity and product selectivity of iron and cobalt in CO hydrogenation.

Bartholomew, C H

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

213

Summary of Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Summary of Market Assessment of Planned Refinery ... As required under Section 804 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 ...

214

U.S. refineries and blenders produced record amounts of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because of its chemical composition, crude oil run through a refinery typically yields roughly twice as much motor gasoline as distillate fuels.

215

Directory of Operable Petroleum Refineries on Tables 38 and 39  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Directory of Operable Petroleum Refineries on Tables 38 and 39 Refiner State(s)aRefiner State(s)a.....Age Refining Inc ...

216

Environmentally advanced refinery nears start-up in Germany  

SciTech Connect

Mitteldeutsche Erdoel-Raffinerie GmbH (Mider), is building a 170,000 b/d, grassroots refinery in Leuna, Germany. The refinery is scheduled to start up in third quarter of this year. At the heart of the new refinery is a new technology called progressive distillation. Other major units include: vacuum distillation, catalytic reforming, alkylation, visbreaking, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), and hydrodesulfurization (HDS). In addition, an existing partial oxidation (POX)/methanol production unit will be integrated with the new refinery. The paper describes the plant and its major processes.

Rhodes, A.K.

1997-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiencesmanagement programs. This Energy Guide describes researchpetroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 935: ...

219

EIA Energy Kids - Carson Refinery - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydrogen. Recent Statistics ... and then distributed to gas stations all over Los Angeles and Southern ... you are probably filling up with gas from the Carson refinery.

220

U.S. Refinery Operable Capacity is Updated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: March 28, 2012 Notice: Reported refinery operable capacity data shown in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) for the week-ended March 23, 2012, has ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Kerosene/Jet Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro.. Kerosene/Jet Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries ...

222

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0641(2010)/1 Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2010 through June 2010 March 2010 Energy Information Administration

223

Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals. Quarterly technical status report, January 1--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Work on this project will be performed according to two tasks: Task 1, Industrial Chemistry and Applied Kinetics of Light Hydrocarbon Gas Conversion to Metal Carbides H{sub 2} and CO. We are building a laboratory-scale electric are discharge reactor, in which to assess the technical feasibility of producing Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3}, H{sub 2}, and CO from methane and MgO. We will also do experimental runs with CaO as well as mixtures of CaO and MgO and measure conversions of methane, CaO and/or MgO, and yields of Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3}, and/or CaC{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO to identify the operating conditions of interest for implementing these reactions on a commercial scale. Reaction conditions and parameters will be chosen based on the previous work at MIT with CaO and CH, and on results of thermodynamic and thermochemical kinetics calculations. Task 2: Mechanistic Foundations-For Convertings Light Hydrocarbon Gases to Metal Carbides-H{sub 2} and CO. We will evaluate the technical feasibility of carrying out methane reactions with CaO and MgO by thermal (e.g. 1500--2000{degrees}C) rather than under plasma conditions by performing experiments with the use of electrical screen heaters, heated tubular reactors, or other suitable apparatus. Extents and global rates of methane conversion, and yields as well as global production rates of CaC{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3}, H{sub 2} and CO will be measured upon subjecting mixtures of methane and CaO and/or MgO to high temperatures and controlled residence times. We will conduct hypothesis-testing of possible mechanistic pathways with selected experiments and perform reaction modeling to better understand the underlying chemical and physical processes that could influence process scale-up possibilities.

Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental assessment of the HYGAS process. Volume III. Interim report on HYGAS environmental characterization: manual of methods for characterization of HYGAS pilot plant solids, liquids, and gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has commissioned the HYGAS environmental assessment program to characterize various solid, liquid, and gaseous streams in the HYGAS pilot plant. The purpose of this manual is to describe the various analytical techniques that have been used to analyze pilot plant streams for environmental species. Many of the techniques have been recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency or otherwise have been published in ASTM Standards, Standard Methods, and assorted vendor equipment manuals. Complete references have been provided in the text. Analytical techniques for the determination of the following are included: ammonia-nitrogen; biochemical oxygen demand; chemical oxygen demand; chlorides; total cyanide; grease and oil; total organic carbon; phenol; total, suspended, and dissolved solids; sulfide; total sulfur; thiocyanate; total oxygen demand; hydrocyanic acid in gas; hydrogen sulfide in gas; gaseous hydrocarbons; organic compounds in HYGAS light oil and aqueous samples; proximate analysis of coal; ultimate analysis of coal; calorific value; screen analysis; bulk density; and trace elements in coal (arsenic, antimony, selenium, tellurium, barium, beryllium chromium, copper, iron, lithium, manganese, nickel, tin, vanadium, zinc, boron, cadmium, lead, thallium, chlorine, cobalt, fluorine, mercury, and molybdenum). (DMC)

Karst, R.H.; Passaniti, J.L.; Metcalf, T.C.; Salazar, E.V.; Pau, J.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in a study to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids is reported.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

When was the last refinery built in the United States? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When was the last refinery built in the United States? There were a total of 143 operable petroleum refineries in the United States as of January 1, 2013.

227

Investigation of sulfur-tolerant catalysts for selective synthesis of hydrocarbon liquids from coal-derived gases. Annual technical progress report, September 19, 1980-September 18, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the past contract year, considerable progress was made in characterization and activity/selectivity testing of iron and cobalt catalysts. Preparation of boride promoted cobalt and iron catalysts was refined and nearly completed. H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption and oxygen titration measurements were performed on a number of supported and unsupported catalysts, especially several boride promoted cobalt and iron catalysts. Activity/selectivity tests of 3 and 15% Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and Co/SiO/sub 2/ and of 6 borided cobalt and iron catalysts were completed. The product distributions for iron and cobalt boride catalysts are unusual and interesting. Boron promoted iron is more active and stable than iron/silica; cobalt boride has an unusually high selectivity for alcohols. Tests to determine effects of H/sub 2/S poisoning on activity/selectivity properties of 15% Co/SiO/sub 2/ indicate that a significant loss of activity occurs over a period of 24 to 28 h in the presence of 10 to 20 ppM H/sub 2/S. Product selectivity to liquids increased through a maximum during the gradual addition of sulfur. Reactant CO and H/sub 2/S interact partially to form COS which is less toxic than H/sub 2/S. H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption data were obtained for 3, 6 and 9% Co/ZSM-5 catalysts prepared and reactor tested by PETC. The unusual and interesting results suggest that metal-support interactions may have an important influence on reactant adsorption properties.

Bartholomew, C.H.

1981-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Poland petroleum refinery sludge lagoon demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Area have been working together to develop mutually beneficial, cost-effective environmental remediation technologies such as the demonstration of bioremediation techniques for the clean up of acidic petroleum sludge impacted soils at an oil refinery in southern Poland. After an expedited site characterization, treatability study, and a risk assessment study, a remediation strategy was devised. The waste material was composed primarily of high molecular weight paraffinic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A biopile design which employed a combination of passive and active aeration in conjunction with nutrient and surfactant application as used to increase the biodegradation of the contaminants of concern.

Altman, D.J.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Upgrade Your Refinery for Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Upgrading existing refineries for efficient energy utilization imposes strict restraints upon design engineers. Present and future production requirements must be defined. Reliable operating data must be obtained from historical records and test runs to accurately define actual performance of each piece of equipment. A complete simulation model of the facility is developed and tested. Future operations are evaluated using the model to define heat and material balance requirements for all projected operations. Energy conservation projects are evaluated with the model to define energy savings over the life of each project. A discounted cash flow analysis is formulated and an optimum set of projects yielding maximum rates of return are selected for implementation.

Johnnie, D. H., Jr.; Klooster, H. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Natural Gas Plant Liquids and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

231

Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals. Quarterly technical status report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Previous work at MIT indicates that essentially stoichiometric, rather than catalytic, reactions with alkaline earth metal oxides offer technical and economic promise as an innovative approach to upgrading natural gas to premium products such as liquid hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. In this approach, methane would be reacted with relatively low cost and recyclable alkaline earth metal oxides, such as CaO and MgO, at high temperatures (>1500{degrees}C) to achieve very high (i.e. approaching 100%) gas conversions to H{sub 2}, CO and the corresponding alkaline earth metal carbides. These carbides exist stably in solid form at dry ambient conditions and show promise for energy storage and long distance transport. The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop new scientific and engineering knowledge bases for further assessment of the approach by performing laboratory-scale experiments and thermodynamic and thermochemical kinetics calculations. Work on this project will be performed according to two tasks. Under Task 1 (Industrial Chemistry), a laboratory-scale electric arc discharge plasma reactor is being constructed and will be used to assess the technical feasibility of producing Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3} from MgO and methane, and to identify the operating conditions of interest for the commercial production of Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3} and/or CaC{sub 2} from MgO and/or CaO and methane. Under Task 2 (Mechanistic Foundations), preliminary thermodynamic calculations were performed for the Ca-C-H-O and Mg-C-H-O systems using the Chemkin program. A scoping run with CaO in an electrical screen heater reactor under reduced methane pressure was also conducted. No appreciable quantity of acetylene was detected upon hydrolysis of the solid residue. This can be attributed to the very small quantity of methane at the very low pressure coupled with inadequate contacting of whatever methane was present with the CaO powder.

Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Physical Properties of Liquid Precursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a carrier gas through the liquid held in ... of decomposition products, dissolved gases, and other ... measure thermal stability, a gas chromatograph/mass ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

234

Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages Summary of Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages Market Assessment of Upcoming Planned Refinery Outages, December 2008 - March 2009 reviews planned U.S. refinery outages from December 2008 though March 2009 in order to identify any regions where outages might create enough supply pressure to impact prices significantly. As required under Section 804 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-140), this report reviews the supply implications of planned refinery outages for December 2008 through March 2009, which covers the winter period when demand for distillate fuels (diesel and heating oil) is high. As a result, emphasis in this report is on distillate rather than gasoline. Refinery outages are the result of planned maintenance and unplanned outages. Maintenance is usually scheduled during the times when demand is lowest - in the first quarter and again in the fall. Unplanned outages, which occur for many reasons including mechanical failures, fires, and flooding, can occur at any time.

235

Refining District Minnesota-Wisconsin-North Dakota-South Dakota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refining District Minnesota-Wisconsin-North Dakota-South Dakota Gas Plant Production of Natural Gas Liquids and Liquid Refinery Gases (Thousand Barrels)

236

Master development plan for the Cartagena Refinery. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study, conducted by the M.W. Kellogg Company, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of ECOPETROL, Colombia`s national oil company. The objective of the study was to investigate technical, economic, and environmental issues that challenge the Cartagena Refinery. The study also recommends the most attractive options for the refinery to improve profitability. The document is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) Market Survey; (3) Refinery Configuration; (4) Economic Evaluation; (5) Other Technical/Strategic Considerations; (6) Appendix.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Application of Pinch Technology in Refinery Retrofits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the application of pinch technology in the identification of the most attractive retrofit prospects in typical refineries. In the first part of the paper, methodology is described to identify attractive inter-unit heat integration opportunities as well as attractive process-utility system integration (co-generation). An example of an atmospheric pipestill-alkylation unit integration evaluation is given using both composite stream and Grand composite stream methods. In the second part of the paper, the application of pinch technology in a typical intra-unit heat integration problem is given. It is explained how inefficiencies in an APS crude preheat train are identified, and a typical small retrofit project is described.

Thomas, W. R.; Siegell, J. H.; Sideropoulos, T.; Robertson, J. L.; Papoulias, S. A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Thermal Conductivity of Liquids and Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... JCED Supporting Information: Propane.(ASCII)(pdf)(Postscript). JCED Supporting Information: Butane.(ASCII)(pdf)(Postscript). ...

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking Motiva Enterprises Refinery Expansion Groundbreaking December 10, 2007 - 4:44pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you, Bill. It's good to see Congressman Poe, Rob Routs, Mr. Al-Khayyal and Mayor Prince here. Thank you all for inviting me to be part of this occasion. In 1901 Texas wildcatters struck oil near here at a place called Spindletop, setting off the Texas Oil Boom. Like the California Gold Rush some 50 years before, the Texas Oil Boom helped to build America. People moved across the country in search of prosperity. To achieve it, they needed to develop new technologies and build new infrastructure like the original parts of the Port Arthur refinery, which opened here in 1903. As America's need for energy expanded as our demand for oil and gas

240

Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining Capacity Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining Capacity May 18, 2006 - 10:43am Addthis Highlights President Bush's Four-Point Plan to Combat High Energy Prices PORT ARTHUR, TX - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today renewed the call for expanded oil refining capacity in the United States and discussed additional steps the Department of Energy (DOE) is taking to prepare for the upcoming hurricane season. Secretary Bodman made the statements after touring the Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas. "We need a more robust energy sector; and one way to do that is to strengthen and expand our domestic oil refining capacity. We're hopeful that Motiva will continue to work to expand their capacity to 600,000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual : Download Data (XLS File) U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 74.0 ...

242

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery and Blender Net Production of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Refinery and Blender Net Production of Normal Butane (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8

243

,"U.S. Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"7242013 11:46:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" "Sourcekey","MCRS1US2","MCRAPUS2" "Date","U.S. Sulfur...

244

Coal Use in Petroleum Refineries -- Opportunities and Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a brief review of the technologies and key issues involved in considering the use of coal as a replacement, supplemental, or additional fuel in petroleum refineries.

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

245

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Refinery Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Refinery Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Adrian Geagla

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by Tank Cars (Rail) (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8

247

U.S. Petroleum Coke Consumed at Refineries (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Petroleum Coke Consumed at Refineries (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: ...

248

U.S. Petroleum Coke Stocks at Refineries (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Petroleum Coke Stocks at Refineries (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 10,747: 11,072: 11,444: ...

249

Flexible hydrogen plant utilizing multiple refinery hydrocarbon streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous processes are available to produce hydrogen, however, steam reforming is still the dominant and currently preferred process because it can economically process a variety of refinery feedstocks into hydrogen. This paper discusses the Air Products 88 MMSCFD hydrogen plant built by KTI, adjacent to Shell`s Martinez refinery, which utilizes up to eight separate refinery hydrocarbon streams as feed and fuel for the production of hydrogen in the steam reforming unit. The integration of refinery hydrocarbon purge streams, normally sent to fuel, allows greater flexibility in refinery operations and increases the overall refinery fuel efficiencies. The hydrogen plant also incorporates a number of process control design features to enhance reliability, such as two out of three voting systems, in-line sparing, and reduced bed PSA operation. The final section of the paper describes the environmental features of the plant required for operation in the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD). Air Products and KTI designed BACT features into the hydrogen plant to minimize emissions from the facility.

Kramer, K.A.; Patel, N.M. [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Sekhri, S. [Kinetics Technology International Corp., San Dimas, CA (United States); Brown, M.G. [Shell Oil Products Co., Martinez, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Engineering firm has designed refinery of the future  

SciTech Connect

Four years ago, JGC Corp. organized a project team called ``Refinery Engineering for the Future in the Twenty-First Century,`` or REF-21. The purpose of the team was to forecast the environment facing the refining industry in Japan, long-range energy supply and demand, population and economic growth, traffic system trends, and technology and science progress through the middle of the twenty-first century. The REF-21 team also was charged with developing a conceptual design for the future refinery. The team proposed four types of configurations for the so-called new-generation refineries. These schemes included some new technologies that it deemed commercializable by 2000. JGC evaluated these new-generation refinery schemes in terms of overall yields, energy efficiencies, emissions, and economics, as compared with existing refineries. JGC also has developed an amenity design program (ADP), and is applying it to a refinery in Japan to produce a new-concept operation center. Through amenity design, JGC intends to improve the operating environment for employees in order to enhance overall productivity.

Inomata, Makoto; Sato, Kyohei; Yamada, Yu; Sasaki, Hajime [JGC Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

1997-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cycling with air and other nonhydrocarbon gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injecting lean gas into condensate reservoirs is a practice currently used to increase recovery. The process reduces condensation and increases liquid recovery by revaporization. However, delaying natural gas sales for long periods of time is economically unattractive. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of nonhydrocarbon gases (i.e., air, N/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/) for improving recovery from retrograde condensate reservoirs. A compositional model that uses the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS) was developed to evaluate condensate reservoir performance. A 15-component hydrocarbon system and extensive experimental data were used in the study. The simulator was tuned to match the available experimental data. The model shows that nonhydrocarbon gases can vaporize hydrocarbon liquids effectively, with CO/sub 2/ the most effective nonhydrocarbon for vaporizing heavy fractions.

Striefel, M.A.; Ahmed, T.H.; Cady, G.V.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

High voltage research (breakdown strengths of gaseous and liquid insulators) and environmental effects of dielectric gases. Semiannual report, April 1, 1979-September 30, 1979. [Health and Safety Research Div. , ORNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of gas mixtures are suggested for industrial-scale testing. Electron attachment rates were measured and unfolded to give attachment cross section functions for CCl/sub 3/F, CCl/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and CClF/sub 3/ each in N/sub 2/, and for CCl/sub 3/F in Ar. Electron attachment rates were measured also for n-C/sub 6/F/sub 14/ in both Ar and N/sub 2/. The effects of molecular structure on energy, cross section, and lifetime of negative ion states of organic molecules were considered. A study was made of the potential role of electron detachment in breakdown. The role of dipolar scattering of electrons in inhibiting breakdown was investigated. The nature of synergisms among constituents of a gas dielectric mixture is discussed. Examples are cited from recent breakdown measurements. Breakdown measurements in plane-plane geometry were made for CF/sub 4/, 1,1,1-CH/sub 3/CF/sub 3/, and CHF/sub 3/. Similar measurements were conducted with binary mixtures containing one of (c-C/sub 4/F/sub 8/, SF/sub 6/) and one of (CF/sub 4/, CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/, 1,1,1-CH/sub 3/CF/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/). Of special interest in these results were observed synergisms and the effect of dipole moment on the breakdown strengths. The initial fragmentation of 1,1,2-C/sub 2/Cl/sub 3/F/sub 3/ under electron impact was studied. Final decomposition products of sparked SF/sub 6//2-C/sub 4/F/sub 6/ mixtures were identified and quantified. The breakdown products of SF/sub 6/ were studied. Impulse measurements concentrated on c-C/sub 4/F/sub 8//SF/sub 6/ mixtures. Values of V/sub 50/, V/sub NO/, and V/sub 10x/ were obtained and evaluated. In the practical conditions of cylindrical geometry with and without surface roughness, many multicomponent mixtures of the gases SF/sub 6/, c-C/sub 4/F/sub 8/, 2-C/sub 4/F/sub 8/, N/sub 2/, and 1,1,1-CH/sub 3/CF/sub 3/ were tested, at both 1 and 4.4 atmospheres. The electric fields were calculated. In the study of liquid dielectrics n-hexane and perfluoro-n-hexane were tested. 35 figures, 20 tables.

Christophorou, L.G.; James, D.R.; Pai, R.Y.; Mathis, R.A.; Sauers, I.; Frees, L.; Pace, M.O.; Bouldin, D.W.; Chan, C.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

PAD District / Refinery Location Total Atmospheric Distillation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Last of Last Operation Date Shutdown Table 13. Refineries Permanently Shutdown By PAD District Between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 2013 PAD District I 542,450 GNC Energy Corp Greensboro, NC 3,000 0 a Primary Energy Corp Richmond, VA 6,100 0 a Saint Mary's Refining Co Saint Mary's, WV 4,000 4,480 02/93 03/93 Cibro Refining Albany, NY 41,850 27,000 07/93 09/93 Calumet Lubricants Co LP Rouseville, PA 12,800 26,820 03/00 06/00 Young Refining Corp. Douglasville, GA 5,400 0 07/04 07/04 Sunoco Inc Westville, NJ 145,000 263,000 11/09 02/10 Western Refining Yorktown Inc Yorktown, VA 66,300 182,600 09/10 12/11 Sunoco Inc Marcus Hook, PA 178,000 278,000 12/11 12/11 ChevronUSA Inc Perth Amboy, NJ 80,000 47,000 03/08 07/12 PAD District II 460,315 Coastal Refining & Mktg El Dorado, KS 0 20,000 b Intercoastal Energy Svcs

254

Environmental Regulation and Productivity: Evidence from Oil Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: We examine the effect of air quality regulation on the productivity of some of the most heavily regulated manufacturing plants in the United States, the oil refineries of the Los Angeles (South Coast) Air Basin. We use direct measures of local air pollution regulation in this region to estimate their effects on abatement investment. Refineries not subject to these local environmental regulations are used as a comparison group. We study the period of increased regulation between 1979 and 1992. On average, each regulation cost $3M per plant on compliance dates and a further $5M per plant on dates of increased stringency. We also construct measures of total factor productivity using plant level data which allow us to observe physical quantities of inputs and outputs for the entire population of refineries. Despite the high costs associated with the local regulations, productivity in the Los Angeles Air Basin refineries rose sharply during the 1987-92 period, a period of decreased refinery productivity in other regions. We conclude that measures of the cost of environmental regulation may be significantly overstated. The gross costs may be far greater than the net cost, as abatement may be productive.

Eli Berman; Linda T. M. Bui

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

(Interaction of slow electrons with high-pressure gases (quasi-liquids): synthesis of our knowledge on slow electron-molecule interactions. Progress report for year ending May 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Research on electron interactions with molecules at high pressure is reported. This includes electron collisions with chlorofluoroethanes; temperature dependence of electron attachment to halocarbons; electron energy distribution functions in argon; the role of electron attachment in the breakdown strength of gaseous dielectrics; a new high temperature swarm experiment; electron scattering from molecules of environmental interest; negative ions of polyatomic molecules; electron motion in high pressure polar gases (NH/sub 3/); fast gases for radiation detectors; and electron affinities of atoms and molecules. (GHT)

Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cryogenic method for measuring nuclides and fission gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic method is provided for determining airborne gases and particulates from which gamma rays are emitted. A special dewar counting vessel is filled with the contents of the sampling flask which is immersed in liquid nitrogen. A vertically placed sodium-iodide or germanium-lithium gamma-ray detector is used. The device and method are of particular use in measuring and identifying the radioactive noble gases including emissions from coal-fired power plants, as well as fission gases released or escaping from nuclear power plants.

Perdue, P.T.; Haywood, F.F.

1980-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

257

2013 Short Course Analytical Techniques: Quality Control, Process Control, and Refinery Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical Techniques: Quality Control, Process Control, and Refinery Optimization held at the 104th AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 2013 Short Course Analytical Techniques: Quality Control, Process Control, and Refinery Optimization Analytical Techn

258

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Rare Metals Refinery Inc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rare Metals Refinery Rare Metals Refinery Inc - NY 38 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Rare Metals Refinery, Inc. (NY.38 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Canadian Radium and Uranium Corporation NY.38-1 Location: 69 Kisko Avenue , Mt. Kisko , New York NY.38-1 NY.38-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.38-4 Site Operations: Manufactured and distributed radium and polonium products. NY.38-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Site was a commercial operation not under the jurisdiction of DOE predecessor agencies NY.38-2 NY.38-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radium, Plutonium NY.38-5 Radiological Survey(s): Yes NY.38-1 NY.38-5 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

259

Alternative multimedia regulatory programs for next-generation refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 25-year-old command-and-control environmental regulatory structure in the US has resulted in significant environmental improvements. Recently, however, its limitations (e.g., rigid application regardless of site-specific conditions, disregard of cross-media and multimedia impacts, limited incentives for new technology development and use) have become increasingly apparent. New regulatory approaches that recognize current and anticipated economic constraints, new knowledge of environmental processes and impacts, and the benefits of new technologies are needed. Such approaches could be especially important for the US petroleum refining industry. This industry operates under thin profit margins, releases chemicals that can produce adverse health and environmental impacts, and must meet the technological challenges of producing more highly refined fuels from poorer quality feedstocks. Under a grant from the Environmental Technology Initiative (ETI), Argonne National Laboratory and its subcontractor, Analytical Services, Inc. developed two alternative environmental regulatory programs for next-generation petroleum refineries. (In this report, next-generation refineries refers to the refineries of today as they operate in the next 20 or more years rather than to fully reengineered future refineries.) The objective of the ETI refinery project was to develop future-oriented regulatory programs for next-generation refineries that will expand the use of innovative technologies, encourage pollution prevention, demonstrate environmental responsibility, and maintain refinery economic performance. Rather than suggesting targeted, short-term modifications to existing media-specific command-and-control regulations, the ETI project suggests the use of new approaches that are broader and more flexible. It recognizes that giving refineries flexibility in meeting environmental protection goals can stimulate new technology development and use. Unlike most US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reinvention efforts, which seek results in 12 to 18 months, this ETI effort assumes a time frame of 20 years or more. It also assumes that existing laws and regulations can be changed. An iterative and interactive process was used by the project team to develop the alternative approaches. Information and stakeholder input were integrated to provide for constant revision and improvement. First, guidelines and principles were established to bound the study and set parameters for developing the approaches. Next, existing and projected environmental laws and regulations affecting petroleum refineries were examined to identify areas needing change. Then, to understand future challenges and opportunities, the projected refinery operating environment was described in terms of feedstock, product, technology, and economics. Finally several goals and indicators for assessing and comparing the alternatives were identified. On the basis of this background information, more than 60 options that could efficiently and effectively protect human health and the environment were identified. These options ranged from fundamental changes in program philosophy to procedural improvements. After the options were evaluated against the goals and indicators, many of them were integrated into two separate thematic paradigms: a risk-based paradigm and a goal-based paradigm. Elements common to both approaches include the following: (1) Establish the baseline--In establishing the baseline, the refinery and the regulator jointly identify residuals for which release limits must be established; (2) Set residual release limits--The refinery and the regulator jointly specify release limits on a facility-wide rather than a source-specific basis. A facility-wide permit documents the release limits; and (3) Assure compliance--Incentives provide the basis for assuring compliance, and flexibility in the compliance method is encouraged. Penalties apply if releases exceed the limits, and reporting requirements are streamlined relative to current practices.

Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Arguerro, R.; Emerson, D.

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Executive summary. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. The volume contains the Executive Summary.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 section 313 list  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this volume, detailed procedures recommended for the measurement of selected petroleum refinery emissions in ambient air are presented.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Monitoring near refineries for airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list  

SciTech Connect

This study provides an ambient air concentration perspective to the engineering estimates of petroleum refinery emissions required under SARA Title III Section 313. It presents and discusses ambient air concentrations of 25 selected target chemicals measured at and near the perimeter (fenceline) of three refineries. Measurements were made over three consecutive 24-hour sampling periods at each refinery. The extent to which the concentrations of the target chemicals were due to fugitive emissions from the refineries is estimated.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume identifies publications and databases that address ambient air concentrations measured near petroleum refineries for the selected target chemicals.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Lyondell, Citgo join for heavy oil upgrade project at Houston refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lyondell-Citgo Refining Co. Ltd. is beginning an $800-million upgrade and expansion of its Houston refinery. The project will enable the refinery. The project will enable the refinery to produce clean fuels while processing about 80% heavy, high-sulfur Venezuelan crude oil. The paper describes the Houston refinery, the expansion project, the technologies to be used, operational changes, environmental impacts, and construction.

Rhodes, A.K.

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

265

Distillate yields at U.S. refineries are rising - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refinery processing gain results from some refining processes, such as fluid catalytic cracking and hydrocracking, where volumes can increase when ...

266

Fuzzy possibilistic modeling and sensitivity analysis for optimal fuel gas scheduling in refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In refinery, fuel gas which is continuously generated during the production process is one of the most important energy sources. Optimal scheduling of fuel gas system helps the refinery to achieve energy cost reduction and cleaner production. However, ... Keywords: Fuel gas, Fuzzy possibilistic programming, Marginal value analysis, Refinery, Scheduling, Sensitivity analysis

J. D. Zhang; G. Rong

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Low-Value Waste Gases as an Energy Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste gases with potentially useful fuel value are generated at any number of points in refineries, chemical plants and other industrial and commercial sites. The higher quality streams have been utilized successfully in fuel systems for years. Lower quality streams, often difficult to capture and sometimes limited in quantity, have often not been utilized for their fuel value. Increasing environmental and economic concerns have led to greater interest in utilizing these marginal fuel value waste gas streams as auxiliary fuels. The combustion and heat transfer characteristics of these fuels are different from normal fuels and these differences must be considered when determining if they can be fired successfully in existing furnaces or when designing new furnaces to use them. In addition, because of the difficulties in burning them and the chemical compounds that may be included in them, the potential pollutant emissions from these waste streams is also a significant consideration.

Waibel, R. T.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Name Saudi Aramco Mobile Refinery Company (SAMREF) Address P.O. Box 30078 Place Yanbu, Saudi Arabia Sector Oil and Gas Product Crude Oil Refining Phone number (966) (4) 396-4443 Website http://www.samref.com.sa/ Coordinates 24.0866932°, 38.0585527° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.0866932,"lon":38.0585527,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned in the refineries. This paper discusses the key aspects that should be considered in evaluating the feasibility of motorization projects. Based on the literature review and a refinery survey conducted by the authors, the key factors include the critical level of the related equipment, the potential energy savings and capital cost, the steam and power balance in the related area, and the reliability in the refinery's power supply. Based on the authors' experience, the utilities' energy efficiency incentive programs in California also influence the decision-making process for turbine motorization projects. Therefore, this paper includes a description of the utilities' guidelines for fuel substitution projects. In particular, the utilities' three-prong requirements on net source-BTU energy savings, cost effectiveness, and avoidance of adverse impacts to the environment are discussed. Two real life case studies are presented to demonstrate how the above criteria should be applied for determining if a motorization opportunity is economically viable. A discussion on suggested features is also included for prescreening turbine motorization project candidates for better energy and environment economics such as venting of exhaust steam from a back pressure turbine and oversized design of the existing turbine and pump.

Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Refinery Outages: Description and Potential Impact on Petroleum Product Prices  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a July 13, 2006 request from Chairman Jeff Bingaman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requested that EIA conduct a study of the impact that refinery shutdowns have had on the price of oil and gasoline.

Joanne Shore

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

U.S. LPG's Consumed at Refineries (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. LPG's Consumed at Refineries (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 8,966: 8,021: 9,466: 11,962 ...

272

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 4.3: 4.3: 4.3: ...

273

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 4.4: 4.6: 4.5: 4.3: 4.1: 4.2: 4.4: 4.3: ...

274

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Market survey on products from the Tema Oil Refinery carried out as part of the feasibility study on the Tema Oil Refinery expansion project. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The Tema Oil Refinery (TOR), which was commissioned in 1963, is a simple hydroskimming plant which processes crude oil into LPG, gasoline, kerosene, gasoil, and fuel oil. It is the only petroleum refinery in Ghana. Over the years some of the equipment in the refinery has deteriorated or become obsolete necessitating major rehabilitation. A feasibility study is investigating the modernization and expansion of the refinery to meet projected market demands until the year 2005. The report presents the results of a market survey done on products from TOR.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: August 13, 2: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on AddThis.com... Fact #482: August 13, 2007

277

PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA PART 2. SUBMISSION ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: PART 4. TOTAL U.S. CRUDE OIL IMPORTS BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN (Thousand Barrels) ...

278

DRAFT - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: 242: Propane/Propylene. 246: Unfinished Oils. 812: Fuel Ethanol. 141: Finished ...

279

OMB No. 1905-0165 Expiration Date: 1/31/2013 Version No.:2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: 242 Propane/Propylene 246 Unfinished Oils 812 Fuel Ethanol 141 Finished Motor ...

280

OMB No. 1905-0165 Expiration Date: 1/31/2013 Version No.:2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)* 242 Propane/Propylene 246 Propylene (nonfuel use) 624 Fuel Ethanol 141 Finished ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA PART 2. SUBMISSION ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL) and Liquefied Refinery Gases (LRG)*: Reformulated, Blended with Fuel Ethanol PADD 4 PADD 5 U.S. Conventional, Blended ...

282

Efficieny handling effluent gases through chemical scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

This paper is presented as an information source for efficiencies of chemical scrubbing. In it, we will discuss the specific problems of scrubbing silane, disilane, diborane, phosphine, hydrogen selenide and arsine. We will explain the scrubber dynamics, gases and flow rates used along with liquid mediums. The equipment and procedures used for testing, as well as the determination of the results, will be discussed. We intend to give examples of possible reactions and documentation of our efficiencies. Installation and maintenance will be touched, as well as our experiments into accidental catastrophic releases. From all of this we will derive conclusions as to the best possible means of wet chemical scrubbing.

Herman, T.; Soden, S.

1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

U.S. Fuel Consumed at Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels, Except Where Noted) Barrels, Except Where Noted) Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1986-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,663 2,930 2,866 2,404 1,291 1,521 1986-2012 Distillate Fuel Oil 420 472 339 440 483 539 1986-2012 Residual Fuel Oil 1,844 1,390 1,249 980 759 540 1986-2012 Still Gas 247,106 237,161 220,191 219,890 217,716 220,094 1986-2012 Petroleum Coke 88,015 81,811 82,516 82,971 84,053 85,190 1986-2012 Marketable Petroleum Coke

285

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLLUTANTS FROM PETROLEUM REFINERIES IN C ALIFORNIA (FROM C ALIFORNIA PETROLEUM REFINERIES ( G / GALLON -122 T ABLE 32. E NERGY USE BY REFINERIES IN C ALIFORNIA AND

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period: Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period: Annual (as of January 1) Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Total 765,593 758,619 710,413 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Crude Oil 180,830 179,471 180,846 -- -- -- 1985-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 34,772 32,498 33,842 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Propane/Propylene 10,294 8,711 8,513 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,478 23,787 25,329 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Other Liquids 95,540 96,973 96,157 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Oxygenates 1,336 1,028 1,005 -- -- -- 1994-2013

287

A primer on greenhouse gases  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a reference summarizing current understanding of basic information for information greenhouse gases. Each of the gases included is recognized to be important to the future state of global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Included as greenhouse gases are thoses of direct radiative importance to climate, thoses that act as radiative precursors, and those of importance as intermediate constitutents because of their chemical activities. Knowns, unknowns and uncertainties for each gas are described. This document focuses on information relevant to understanding the role of energy and atmospheric chemical and radiative processes in the determination of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases.

Wuebbles, D.J.; Edmonds, J.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Crude oil distillation and the definition of refinery capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

289

Coking is a refinery process that produces 19% of finished ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

290

refinery - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

291

Refinery utilization rates react to economics in 2011 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

292

Petroleum refineries vary by level of complexity - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

293

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Flue gases and fuel gases: combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, incineration and other and gasification technologies for heat and power . . . . . . . . 2-3 2.4 Waste incineration and waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 3.3 Formation of sulphur compounds during combustion and gasification . . 3-5 3.4 Emission

Zevenhoven, Ron

294

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

Unknown

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Alternative future environmental regulatory approaches for petroleum refineries.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, many industrial, regulatory, and community leaders have expressed concern that the current environmental regulatory structure disregards multimedia environmental impacts, provides few incentives to develop and use new technologies, and fails to consider site-specific conditions. For the US petroleum refining industry, faced with the need to produce higher-quality fuels from poorer-quality feedstocks, such criticisms are expected to increase. This article offers two alternative environmental regulatory approaches for existing petroleum refineries to use in the future. These alternative approaches are multimedia in scope, provide for new technology development and use, and allow flexibility in the means for meeting environmental goals. They have been reviewed and critiqued by various stakeholders, including industry representatives, regulators, and local and national community and environmental organizations. The integration of stakeholder comments and findings of ongoing national and international regulatory reinvention efforts in the development of these approaches positions them for potential use by other industries in addition to petroleum refineries.

Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Moses, D. O.; Emerson, D.; Arguerro, R.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Analytical Services, Inc.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

New process effectively recovers oil from refinery waste streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new process uses chemically assisted, thermal flashing to break difficult emulsions and recover oil for reprocessing. The process is best suited for refinery waste management and slop oil systems, where it can process streams with high oil content to recover high-quality oil. Recent testing of a full-scale, commercial prototype unit on slop oil emulsions at a major Gulf Coast refinery resulted in: 97.9% recovery of oil with 99.3--99.6% purity; 99.5% recovery of water with 99+% purity; and a centrifuge cake containing 49-60% solids, 23--30 oil, and 17--22% water. The paper discusses background of the process, then gives a process description as well as results of field studies and cost.

Rhodes, A.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Pemex to acquire interest in Shell Texas refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that Petroleos Mexicanos and Shell Oil Co. have signed a memorandum of understanding to form a joint refining venture involving Shell's 225,000 b/d Deer Park, Tex., refinery. Under the agreement, Mexico's state owned oil company is to purchase a 50% interest in the refinery, and Shell is to sell Pemex unleaded gasoline on a long term basis. Under the venture, Shell and Pemex plan to add undisclosed conversion and upgrading units tailored to process heavy Mexican crude. The revamp will allow Pemex to place more than 100,000 b/d of Mayan heavy crude on the U.S. market. Mayan accounts for 70% of Mexico's crude oil exports. In turn, Shell will sell Pemex as much as 45,000 b/d of unleaded gasoline to help meet Mexico's rapidly growing demand.

Not Available

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Improved correlations for retrograde gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three correlations for retrograde gases have been developed. First, a correlation was developed that relates the composition of a retrograde gas-condensate mixture at any depletion stage to the composition at its dew point pressure. This correlation is as accurate as previous correlations, and in addition, to the composition, it includes the trends for molecular weight of heptanes plus fraction (A4WC7+), specific gravity of heptanes plus fraction (SGC7+), gas produced (GP) and fraction of liquid (FL). Second, a correlation to describe the molar distribution Of C7+ of a gas-condensate mixture as a function of carbon number (CN), the C6 mole fraction and the properties Of C7+ has been developed. For comparison, the Ahmed, et aL, and Whitson methods were evaluated using a data base of 52 extended (from C]5+ and up) retrograde gascondensate samples. The evaluation of the Ahmed, et al. and Whitson methods showed that both methods are better than the new method. The Ahmed, et aL method does a better overall job than the Vvlhitson method. Comparing the relative error, Ahmed, et al. method had an error of 20.6 percent, and Whitson's method had an error of 25.1 percent. Third, a new and improved retrograde dew point pressure correlation has been developed. The new dew point correlation is an improvement of the Kennedy-Nemeth dew point correlation. Contrary to the Kennedy-Nemeth correlation, temperature is not included in the new correlation. The new dew point correlation is based on composition and the C7+ properties, molecular weight and specific gravity of the heptanes plus fraction.

Crogh, Arne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program established a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., can report to the EIA, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

Information Center

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Martinez Refinery Completes Plant-Wide Energy Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes how the Equilon Enterprises oil refinery in Martinez, California undertook a plant-wide energy assessment that focused on three key areas: waste minimization, process debottlenecking, and operations optimization. The assessment yielded recommendations, which, if implemented, can save more than 6,000,000 MMBtu per year and an estimated $52,000,000 per year, plus improve process control and reduce waste.

Not Available

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid.

Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Shikoku Industry and Technology Promotion Center, 2-5 Marunouchi, Takamatsu, Kagawa 760-0033 (Japan)

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

Apparatus for the plasma destruction of hazardous gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma cell for destroying hazardous gases. An electric-discharge cell having an electrically conducting electrode onto which an alternating high-voltage waveform is impressed and a dielectric barrier adjacent thereto, together forming a high-voltage electrode, generates self-terminating discharges throughout a volume formed between this electrode and a grounded conducting liquid electrode. The gas to be transformed is passed through this volume. The liquid may be flowed, generating thereby a renewable surface. Moreover, since hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids may be formed from destruction of various chlorofluorocarbons in the presence of water, a conducting liquid may be selected which will neutralize these corrosive compounds. The gases exiting the discharge region may be further scrubbed if additional purification is required.

Kang, Michael (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gases on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Basics Federal Requirements Guidance & Reporting Inventories & Performance Mitigation Planning Resources Contacts Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Industrial Facilities Sustainable Federal Fleets

305

Petroleum & Other Liquids - Pub - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The review uncovered definitional inconsistencies in the use of terms such as NGL, natural gas plant liquids (NGPL), and liquefied petroleum gases ...

306

RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

Batzer, T.H.

1962-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

307

Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems)

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

Petroleum complex of Russia. Reconstruction of petroleum refineries: Means for accomplishing the task  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the refining industry in Russia with respect to production and economic factors. The modernization and reconstruction of the refineries is also discussed.

Rykunova, T.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

New desorption process treats refinery K and F wastes in demo trial  

SciTech Connect

A new desorption process for treating refinery wastes has been proven in pilot demonstrations at Amoco Oil Co.'s Texas City, Tex., refinery. The process -- Waste-Tech Services Inc.'s desorption and recovery unit (DRU) -- treats petroleum-contaminated refinery wastes and recovers oil and water suitable for recycling to the refinery. The DRU meets Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) recycle exemptions and produces solids that satisfy US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). This paper discusses RCRA wastes, the process, the demonstration unit, operating conditions, and analyses of semivolatiles, volatiles, leachable metals, and recovered oil and water.

Rasmussen, G.P. (Waste-Tech Services Inc., Golden, CO (United States))

1994-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

Economic forces push down selling prices of U.S. refineries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent data on US refinery sales reveal that selling prices have continued to decline in the 1990s. Reasons for this decrease include increased plant investments to meet regulatory requirements, excess refining capacity, increased imports of refined products, and reduced margins. While these expenditures enable a refinery to continue operating, they do not make the refinery more profitable or valuable. Other factors contributing to reduced selling prices of US refineries are: declining local crude production; unstable crude costs; increased energy conservation; growing competition from alternative fuels.

NONE

1996-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Revival of Onahama Smelter & Refinery from the Disaster by the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, The Revival of Onahama Smelter & Refinery from the ... Study of Modified Semi-Coke on the Advanced Treatment of Coking Wastewater's Oil.

312

Aspects of Holly Corporation's Acquisition of Sunoco Inc.'s Tulsa, Oklahoma Refinery  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration has produced a review of aspects of the Holly's acquisition of Sunoco's 85,000-barrels-per-day Tulsa refinery

Neal Davis

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

313

Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 9:59am Addthis Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Basics: Read an overview of greenhouse gases. Federal Requirements: Look up requirements for agency greenhouse gas management as outlined in Federal initiatives and executive orders. Guidance and Reporting: Find guidance documents and resources for greenhouse gas accounting and reporting. GHG Inventories and Performance: See detailed comprehensive GHG inventories by Federal agency and progress toward achieving Scope 1 and 2 GHG and Scope 3 GHG reduction targets. Mitigation Planning: Learn how Federal agencies can cost-effectively meet their GHG reduction goals.

314

Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g., year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) standards. This report is the 12th quarterly progress report in the series covering January 1, 1997 to March 31, 1997.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Clean air amendments put big burden on refinery planners  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will not only require the production of reformulated gasoline but also have significant impact on other refinery-related construction. This must be considered when developing sound planning strategy. The three titles of the Clean Air Act Amendments that will have the greatest effect on refining are: Title I: Nonattainment; Title III: Air toxics; Title V: Permitting. To understand the ramifications of these amendments, it is necessary to review the interactions of new requirements with the permitting and construction schedule shown.

Scherr, R.C.; Smalley, G.A. Jr.; Norman, M.E. (ENSR Consulting and Engineering, Houston, TX (US))

1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

PADD 5 Refinery Net Input - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period-Unit: Download ... 51: 54: 50: 57: 59: 2005-2013: Pentanes Plus: 23: 21: 17: 13: 17: 18: 2005-2013: Liquefied Petroleum Gases: 40: 30: 37: 37: 40: 41 ...

319

U.S. Refinery Net Input - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

413: 420: 2005-2013: Pentanes Plus: 166: 168: 156: 130: 148: 151: 2005-2013: Liquefied Petroleum Gases: 300: 281: 241: 238: 265: 270: 2005-2013: Normal Butane: 132 ...

320

Implementing an Energy Management Strategy for a Houston Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intense competition and environmental regulation of industries utilizing combustion equipment have motivated many owners and operators to seek ways to reduce costs, improve performance, and minimize emissions. Energy management programs are being implemented throughout industry to improve equipment operating efficiencies, profitability, extend equipment life, prevent forced shutdowns, generate substantial fuel savings, track valuable information, and enhance compliance margins. A well designed and maintained energy management program translates to PROFIT added directly to the BOTTOM LINE. Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) recently implemented and energy management program at the Lyondell-Citgo Refinery in Houston, Texas. The basis of the program is the 80/20 rule where 80% of the total potential savings are derived from optimizing the energy utilization from 20% of the combustion equipment. In this case, 11 out of 55 heaters were targeted for inclusion in the program. The fuel savings potential alone exceeded $1,250,000. In addition to the fuel savings, there were reduced costs from improved operation, as well as reduction in maintenance requirements and forced shutdowns. The remainder of this paper discusses the technical approach, the benefits, and the results of the program implemented at the Lyondell-Citgo Refinery.

Wood, S. C.; Agrawal, R. K.; Canon, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the partial oxidation process. Studies were conducted in the Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) to pyrolyze naphtha with untreated as well as potassium-impregnated spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium over a temperature range of 1,400 to 1,600 F. The results from these studies are presented and discussed here. Studies were also performed in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) in an effort to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments conducted in the TRTU. The results from these studies are also presented here. A Cold Flow Simulator (CFS) was designed and built to investigate the flow problems experienced in the TRTU.

O`Donnell, J.; Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.

1996-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Climate VISION: Greenhouse Gases Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GHG Information GHG Information Greenhouse Gases, Global Climate Change, and Energy Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001 [1605(a)] This report, required by Section 1605(a) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, provides estimates of U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, as well as information on the methods used to develop the estimates. The estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors, not on measured or metered emissions monitoring. Available Energy Footprints Industry NAICS* All Manufacturing Alumina & Aluminum 3313 Cement 327310 Chemicals 325 Fabricated Metals 332 Food and Beverages 311, 312 Forest Products 321, 322 Foundries 3315 Glass & Glass Products, Fiber Glass 3272, 3296 Iron & Steel Mills 331111 Machinery & Equipment 333, 334, 335, 336

323

Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop, an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PICS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1994 were in the areas of: subcontract preparation and negotiation; and linear programming modeling.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Control of pollutants in flue gases and fuel gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mercury typically forms the sulfide (HgS) #12;4 because of the prevalence of sulfides in volcanic gases Aq + 2e-- ´ Hg0 Atmos Equation 1 Ionic mercury can form from the oxidation of elemental mercury Coal is known to contain mercury as a result of testing done upon the flue gas emitted from power plant

Laughlin, Robert B.

325

REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two direct coal liquids were evaluated by linear programming analysis to determine their value as petroleum refinery feedstock. The first liquid, DL1, was produced from bitiuminous coal using the Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc.(HTI) two-stage hydrogenation process in Proof of Concept Run No.1, POC-1. The second liquid, DL2,was produced from sub-bituminous coal using a three-stage HTI process in Proof of Concept Run No. 2, POC-2; the third stage being a severe hydrogenation process. A linear programming (LP) model was developed which simulates a generic 150,000 barrel per day refinery in the Midwest U.S. Data from upgrading tests conducted on the coal liquids and related petroleum fractions in the pilot plant testing phase of the Refining and End Use Study was inputed into the model. The coal liquids were compared against a generic petroleum crude feedstock. under two scenarios. In the first scenario, it was assumed that the refinery capacity and product slate/volumes were fixed. The coal liquids would be used to replace a portion of the generic crude. The LP results showed that the DL1 material had essentially the same value as the generic crude. Due to its higher quality, the DL2 material had a value of approximately 0.60 $/barrel higher than the petroleum crude. In the second scenario, it was assumed that a market opportunity exists to increase production by one-third. This requires a refinery expansion. The feedstock for this scenario could be either 100% petroleum crude or a combination of petroleum crude and the direct coal liquids. Linear programming analysis showed that the capital cost of the refinery expansion was significantly less when coal liquids are utilized. In addition, the pilot plant testing showed that both of the direct coal liquids demonstrated superior catalytic cracking and naphtha reforming yields. Depending on the coal liquid flow rate, the value of the DL1 material was 2.5-4.0 $/barrel greater than the base petroleum crude, while the DL2 material was 3.0-4.0 /barrel higher than the crude. Co-processing the coal liquids with lower quality, less expensive petroleum crudes that have higher sulfur, resid and metals contents was also examined. The coal liquids have higher values under this scenario, but the values are dependent on the prices of the alternative crudes.

NONE

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July-- September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

,"U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",11,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capprod_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

328

,"U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capwork_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

329

,"U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries",32,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capchg_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

330

,"U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries",28,"Annual",2013,"6/30/1982" ,"Release Date:","6/21/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","6/20/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_capshell_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

331

Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages March Â… June 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09)/1 09)/1 Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages March - June 2009 March 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

332

Optimization of Steam Network in Tehran Oil Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dominated energy crisis in the world dictates to reduce energy consumption and identify energy saving opportunities in large and complex industries especially in oil refining industry. In this paper, Tehran oil refinery is considered as a proper case study and its steam network is analyzed. At the first step, using STAR software, the steam network is simulated and then optimized, which determines the optimum conditions. In this regard, energy saving potential was identified and total operating costs (TOC) in two states of fixed fuel fraction and changeable fuel fraction was calculated. In addition, different scenarios were proposed like using HRSG instead of two boilers. The results showed that amount of total operating cost has been reduced, as the result the best scenario regarding TOC is selected.

Khodaie, H.; Nasr, M. R. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical and Refining Sectors Advisory Committee as streams with a temperature below 400 degrees F. Their waste energy streams were also characterized as to state, flow rate, heat content, source and temperature. These criteria were then used to identify potential candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle, and fuel cell technologies. This paper characterizes each of these technologies, technical specifications, limitations, potential costs/ payback and commercialization status as was discussed in the Technology Forum held in Houston, TX in May 2012 (TXIOF 2012).

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Air Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells â–  Hydrogen Energy â–  Biogas Upgrading Technology 12 June 2012 Charlie.Anderson@airliquide.com 2 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Renewable H 2 to Fuel Cell, Integrated Concept Purified Biogas 3 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Renewable H 2 to Fuel Cell, Non-Integrated Concept Landfill WWTP digester Biogas membrane Pipeline quality methane CH4 Pipeline Hydrogen Production To Fuel Cell Vehicles Stationary Fuel Cells With H2 purification Stationary Fuel Cells Direct Conversion Directed Biomethane 4 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry, health and the environment Biogas Sources in the US â–  Landfill gas dominates (~4,000 Nm3/h typical)

335

Trace gases could double climate warming  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric concentrations of several trace gases capable of changing the climate are increasing. Researchers are concerned about the trace gases despite their miniscule concentrations because they are such efficient absorbers of far-infrared radiation. The trace gases that concern climatologists are methane, nitrous oxide, and the chlorofluorocarbons or CFC's. The increase in atmospheric concentrations of these gases are discussed and atmospheric models predicting their greenhouse effect are described.

Kerr, R.A.

1983-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

Sustainability: Economics, Lifecycle Analysis, Green House Gases ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report on Linking Transformational Materials and Processing for Energy and ... LIFECYCLE ANALYSIS, GREEN HOUSE GASES, AND CLIMATE CHANGE ...

337

House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act House Passage of H.R. 5254 - The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act June 8, 2006 - 2:17pm Addthis Statement from Secretary Bodman WASHINGTON, DC - The following is a statement from the Secretary Samuel W. Bodman of the Department of Energy on the passage of House Resolution 5254, The Refinery Permit Process Schedule Act: "I commend the House of Representatives for their passage of this important piece of legislation. Expanding our nation's refining capacity is an important part of President Bush's four-point plan to confront high gasoline prices and is a key component to strengthening our nation's energy security. By increasing our nation's domestic refining capacity we can help grow our nation's economy and reduce our reliance on foreign sources

338

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2011 through June 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Assessment of Refinery Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for March 2011 through June 2011 APRIL 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages / March 2011 - June 2011 ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Market Assessment of Planned Refinery Outages /

339

Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply 9302 Appendix D Short-Term Analysis of Refinery Costs and Supply As a result of the new regulations issued by the U.S. Estimating Components of the Distillate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for ultra-low- Blend Pool sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) the U.S. refining industry faces two major challenges: to meet the more stringent specifi- The initial step of the analysis was to analyze the poten- cations for diesel product, and to keep up with demand tial economics of producing ULSD for each refinery. by producing more diesel product from feedstocks of Using input and output data submitted to the Energy lower quality. Some refineries in the United States and Information Administration (E1A) by refiners, the cur-

340

Refinery Furnaces Retrofit with Gas Turbines Achieve Both Energy Savings and Emission Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating gas turbines with refinery furnaces can be a cost effective means of reducing NOx emissions while also generating electricity at an attractive heat rate. Design considerations and system costs are presented.

Giacobbe, F.; Iaquaniello, G.; Minet, R. G.; Pietrogrande, P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S1","MDGSXUS1","MRESXUS1","MPRSXUS1" "Date","U.S. Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Reformulated Motor...

342

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production of Normal Butane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production of Normal Butane (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993-884: 268: 4,851: 6,387: 6,489 ...

343

Valero: Houston Refinery Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Develop an Energy Optimization and Management System  

SciTech Connect

This Industrial Technologies Program case study describes an energy assessment team's recommendations for saving $5 million in energy, water, and other costs at an oil refinery in Houston, Texas.

Not Available

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

U.S. Refinery Hydrogen Production Capacity as of January 1 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Hydrogen Production Capacity as of January 1 (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

345

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; ...

346

U.S. Refinery Normal Butane/Butylene Shell Storage Capacity as ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Normal Butane/Butylene Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

347

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Grade Butane Stocks at Bulk Terminals (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 1,077: 999: 1,362: ...

348

Models and algorithms for a multilevel control system of primary oil refinery installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms and mathematical models for the technological process of primary oil refinery operating in the uncertain conditions are developed; the solution of the optimal control problem in the form of stochastic programming with probabilistic characteristics ...

I. A. Guseinov; E. A. Melikov; N. A. Khanbutaeva; I. R. Efendiev

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

West Coast (PADD 5) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by Tank ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Coast (PADD 5) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by Tank Cars (Rail) (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

350

Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel carbon-conversion-fig-1.jpg Key Challenges: An important strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it to fuels and chemicals. Although researchers working toward that goal demonstrated in 1992 such a reaction in the lab, a key outstanding scientific challenge was explaining the details of how the reaction took place - its "mechanism." Why it Matters: An important potential strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it electrochemically to fuels and chemicals. Accomplishments: Computation to explain how carbon dioxide can be converted to small organic molecules with little energy input. The

351

Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection  

SciTech Connect

The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

John W. Berthold

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. , petroleum refineries, electricity-generating plants,will be about 0.65 g per 10^ Btu-refinery product. This is ain a modern Swedish refinery (Cooper and Emanuelsson, 1992).

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fischer-Tropsch Liquids from Greenhouse Gases: A Novel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All are ready-to-use feeds for SOFCs and syngas is a valuable precursor for the Fischer-Tropsch process. The concept uses inexpensive catalysts (a metal or its ...

354

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse Gases, Climate Change, and Energy Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States. Contact the 1605(b) Program ...

355

A Case Study of Steam System Evaluation in a Petroleum Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASI conducted a steam system evaluation study at a multinational petroleum Refinery located in the Eastern UK during June-July, 1999. At this refinery, Steam, Fuel and Electricity systems are inter-connected. Steam is generated from direct fuel fired boilers as well from Furnace and Kiln waste heat. Steam is also supplied from the CHP waste heat boilers. Steam generation averages 1,500,000 lbs/hr and does not change significantly between winter and summer since steam needs for process and power generation dominates way above comfort heating. To generate steam, the refinery spends about Ł28 million per year ($46 million). The system evaluation study identified 31 Energy & steam system cost savings measures (ECM) to save fuel, steam and condensate in the areas of: Steam generation, Steam distribution, Steam Utilization, Condensate recovery, and Combustion optimization in kilns. By implementing all the above 31 ECMs, the refinery is estimated to save $3.5 million annually. Based on our preliminary investment estimate the average payback would be within 2 years. The refinery also would reduce 5600 metric tons Carbon emission to environment. Some of the opportunities address the installation defects of the steam system components that would improve the system reliability and longevity.

Venkatesan, V. V.; Iordanova, N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

John D. Jones

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

,"U.S. Refinery Net Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" 3,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/2005" ,"Data 2","Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts",1,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1986" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:21:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Refinery Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRO_NUS_1","MCRRO_NUS_1","MNGRO_NUS_1","MPPRO_NUS_1","MLPRO_NUS_1","MBNRO_NUS_1","MBIRO_NUS_1","MOLRO_NUS_1","MOHRO_NUS_1","M_EPOOOH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MMTRO_NUS_1","MOORO_NUS_1","M_EPOOR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MFERO_NUS_1","M_EPOORD_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOORO_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MUORO_NUS_1","MNLRO_NUS_1","MKORO_NUS_1","MH1RO_NUS_1","MRURO_NUS_1","MBCRO_NUS_1","MO1RO_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MO3RO_NUS_1","MO4RO_NUS_1","MO5RO_NUS_1","MO6RO_NUS_1","MO7RO_NUS_1","MO9RO_NUS_1","MBARO_NUS_1"

358

,"U.S. Refinery Net Input"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" 2,"Annual",2012,"6/30/2005" ,"Data 2","Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts",1,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1986" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_inpt2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:21:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Refinery Net Input" "Sourcekey","MTTRO_NUS_1","MCRRO_NUS_1","MNGRO_NUS_1","MPPRO_NUS_1","MLPRO_NUS_1","MBNRO_NUS_1","MBIRO_NUS_1","MOLRO_NUS_1","MOHRO_NUS_1","M_EPOOOH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOXXFE_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MMTRO_NUS_1","MOORO_NUS_1","M_EPOOR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MFERO_NUS_1","M_EPOORD_YIY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPOOOXH_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MUORO_NUS_1","MNLRO_NUS_1","MKORO_NUS_1","MH1RO_NUS_1","MRURO_NUS_1","MBCRO_NUS_1","MO1RO_NUS_1","M_EPOBGRR_YIY_NUS_MBBL","MO3RO_NUS_1","MO4RO_NUS_1","MO5RO_NUS_1","MO6RO_NUS_1","MO7RO_NUS_1","MO9RO_NUS_1","MBARO_NUS_1"

359

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimating Emissions of Other Greenhouse Gases Presentation to the Department of Energy Republic of the Philippines September 17, 1997 Arthur Rypinski Energy ...

360

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Granular gases under extreme driving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study inelastic gases in two dimensions using event-driven molecular dynamics simulations. Our focus is the nature of the stationary state attained by rare injection of large amounts of energy to balance the dissipation due to collisions. We find that under such extreme driving, with the injection rate much smaller than the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a power-law high energy tail. The numerically measured exponent characterizing this tail is in excellent agreement with predictions of kinetic theory over a wide range of system parameters. We conclude that driving by rare but powerful energy injection leads to a well-mixed gas and constitutes an alternative mechanism for agitating granular matter. In this distinct nonequilibrium steady-state, energy cascades from large to small scales. Our simulations also show that when the injection rate is comparable with the collision rate, the velocity distribution has a stretched exponential tail.

W. Kang; J. Machta; E. Ben-Naim

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

APPARATUS FOR CATALYTICALLY COMBINING GASES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A convection type recombiner is described for catalytically recombining hydrogen and oxygen which have been radiolytically decomposed in an aqueous homogeneous nuclear reactor. The device is so designed that the energy of recombination is used to circulate the gas mixture over the catalyst. The device consists of a vertical cylinder having baffles at its lower enda above these coarse screens having platinum and alumina pellets cemented thereon, and an annular passage for the return of recombined, condensed water to the reactor moderator system. This devicea having no moving parts, provides a simple and efficient means of removing the danger of accumulated hot radioactive, explosive gases, and restoring them to the moderator system for reuse.

Busey, H.M.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

,"Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Sulfur Content, Weighted Average Refinery Crude Oil Input Qualities",16,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1985" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_crq_a_epc0_ycs_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

364

Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 1. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 1 of the study.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 3. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 3 of the study.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 2. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 2 of the study.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Potentials for fuel cells in refineries and chlor-alkali plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. the most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

Altseimer, J.H.; Roach, F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries Â… Past Changes and Future Potential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Increasing Distillate Production at U.S. Refineries - Past Changes and Future Potential U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis Department of Energy Office of Policy and International Affairs October 2010 Summary World consumption growth for middle distillate fuels (diesel fuel, heating oil, kerosene, and jet fuel) has exceeded the consumption growth for gasoline for some time, and the United States is no exception. Although the decrease in the ratio of total gasoline consumption to consumption for middle distillate fuels has been small in the United States, recent legislation requiring increased use of renewable fuels has resulted in forecasts that project a decline in consumption for petroleum-based gasoline from refineries, which would accelerate the decline in the

369

Short-Term Schedulability Analysis of Crude Oil Operations in Refinery With Oil Residency Time Constraint Using Petri Nets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A short-term schedule for oil refinery should arrange all the activities in every detail for the whole scheduling horizon, leading to a complex problem. There lacks efficient techniques and software tools for its solution applicable to industrial oil ... Keywords: Automated manufacturing system, Petri net (PN), hybrid Petri net, oil refinery, scheduling, short-term scheduling

NaiQi Wu; Feng Chu; Chengbin Chu; MengChu Zhou

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Modeling and Conflict Detection of Crude Oil Operations for Refinery Process Based on Controlled Colored Timed Petri Net  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, there has been a great interest in the modeling and analysis of process industry, and various models are proposed for different uses. It is meaningful to have a model to serve as an analytical aid tool in short-term scheduling for oil refinery ... Keywords: Hybrid systems, petri net, refinery process, system modeling

Naiqi Wu; Liping Bai; Chengbin Chu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

CTR/ANL, July 2010 1 Updated Estimation of Energy Efficiencies of U.S. Petroleum Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for emissions associated with hydrogen production. Hydrogen is generated in a refinery's catalytic reformer-process distillate material into commercial diesel and jet fuel. From this perspective catalytic reforming transfers refinery operations, most notably catalytic reforming. References Bredeson, L., Quiceno-Gonzalez, R., Riera

Argonne National Laboratory

372

Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Archive  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program established a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., can report to the EIA, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

Information Center

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

373

,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:28:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRX_NUS_1","MLPRX_NUS_1","METRX_NUS_1","MENRX_NUS_1","MEYRX_NUS_1","MPRRX_NUS_1","MPARX_NUS_1","MPLRX_NUS_1","MBNRX_NUS_1","MBURX_NUS_1","MBYRX_NUS_1","MBIRX_NUS_1","MIIRX_NUS_1","MIYRX_NUS_1","MGFRX_NUS_1","MGRRX_NUS_1","MG1RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG4RX_NUS_1","MG5RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG6RX_NUS_1","MGARX_NUS_1","MKJRX_NUS_1","M_EPJKC_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPJKM_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MKERX_NUS_1","MDIRX_NUS_1","MD0RX_NUS_1","MD1RX_NUS_1","MDGRX_NUS_1","MRERX_NUS_1","MRXRX_NUS_1","MRMRX_NUS_1","MRGRX_NUS_1","MPCRX_NUS_1","MPNRX_NUS_1","MPORX_NUS_1","MNSRX_NUS_1","MLURX_NUS_1","M_EPPLN_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPLP_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MWXRX_NUS_1","MCKRX_NUS_1","MCMRX_NUS_1","MCORX_NUS_1","MAPRX_NUS_1","MSGRX_NUS_1","MMSRX_NUS_1","MMFRX_NUS_1","MMNRX_NUS_1","MPGRX_NUS_1"

374

,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_refp2_dc_nus_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:28:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Net Production" "Sourcekey","MTTRX_NUS_1","MLPRX_NUS_1","METRX_NUS_1","MENRX_NUS_1","MEYRX_NUS_1","MPRRX_NUS_1","MPARX_NUS_1","MPLRX_NUS_1","MBNRX_NUS_1","MBURX_NUS_1","MBYRX_NUS_1","MBIRX_NUS_1","MIIRX_NUS_1","MIYRX_NUS_1","MGFRX_NUS_1","MGRRX_NUS_1","MG1RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0RO_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG4RX_NUS_1","MG5RX_NUS_1","M_EPM0CAL55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPM0CAG55_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MG6RX_NUS_1","MGARX_NUS_1","MKJRX_NUS_1","M_EPJKC_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPJKM_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MKERX_NUS_1","MDIRX_NUS_1","MD0RX_NUS_1","MD1RX_NUS_1","MDGRX_NUS_1","MRERX_NUS_1","MRXRX_NUS_1","MRMRX_NUS_1","MRGRX_NUS_1","MPCRX_NUS_1","MPNRX_NUS_1","MPORX_NUS_1","MNSRX_NUS_1","MLURX_NUS_1","M_EPPLN_YPY_NUS_MBBL","M_EPPLP_YPY_NUS_MBBL","MWXRX_NUS_1","MCKRX_NUS_1","MCMRX_NUS_1","MCORX_NUS_1","MAPRX_NUS_1","MSGRX_NUS_1","MMSRX_NUS_1","MMFRX_NUS_1","MMNRX_NUS_1","MPGRX_NUS_1"

375

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Allocation of energy use in petroleum refineries to petroleum products : implications for life-cycle energy use and emission inventory of petroleum transportation fuels.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies to evaluate the energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems have to address allocation of the energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products because refineries produce multiple products. The allocation is needed in evaluating energy and emission effects of individual transportation fuels. Allocation methods used so far for petroleum-based fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) are based primarily on mass, energy content, or market value shares of individual fuels from a given refinery. The aggregate approach at the refinery level is unable to account for the energy use and emission differences associated with producing individual fuels at the next sub-level: individual refining processes within a refinery. The approach ignores the fact that different refinery products go through different processes within a refinery. Allocation at the subprocess level (i.e., the refining process level) instead of at the aggregate process level (i.e., the refinery level) is advocated by the International Standard Organization. In this study, we seek a means of allocating total refinery energy use among various refinery products at the level of individual refinery processes. We present a petroleum refinery-process-based approach to allocating energy use in a petroleum refinery to petroleum refinery products according to mass, energy content, and market value share of final and intermediate petroleum products as they flow through refining processes within a refinery. The results from this study reveal that product-specific energy use based on the refinery process-level allocation differs considerably from that based on the refinery-level allocation. We calculated well-to-pump total energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for gasoline, diesel, LPG, and naphtha with the refinery process-based allocation approach. For gasoline, the efficiency estimated from the refinery-level allocation underestimates gasoline energy use, relative to the process-level based gasoline efficiency. For diesel fuel, the well-to-pump energy use for the process-level allocations with the mass- and energy-content-based weighting factors is smaller than that predicted with the refinery-level allocations. However, the process-level allocation with the market-value-based weighting factors has results very close to those obtained by using the refinery-level allocations. For LPG, the refinery-level allocation significantly overestimates LPG energy use. For naphtha, the refinery-level allocation overestimates naphtha energy use. The GHG emission patterns for each of the fuels are similar to those of energy use.We presented a refining-process-level-based method that can be used to allocate energy use of individual refining processes to refinery products. The process-level-based method captures process-dependent characteristics of fuel production within a petroleum refinery. The method starts with the mass and energy flow chart of a refinery, tracks energy use by individual refining processes, and distributes energy use of a given refining process to products from the process. In allocating energy use to refinery products, the allocation method could rely on product mass, product energy contents, or product market values as weighting factors. While the mass- and energy-content-based allocation methods provide an engineering perspective of energy allocation within a refinery, the market-value-ased allocation method provides an economic perspective. The results from this study show that energy allocations at the aggregate refinery level and at the refining process level could make a difference in evaluating the energy use and emissions associated with individual petroleum products. Furthermore, for the refining-process-level allocation method, use of mass -- energy content- or market value share-based weighting factors could lead to different results for diesel fuels, LPG, and naphtha. We suggest that, when possible, energy use allocations should be made at the lowest subprocess level

Wang, M.; Lee, H.; Molburg, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the first time. Bioelectrochemical treatability was evaluated relative to oxygen demand. MECs were-oiled refinery wastewater sample from one site (DOW1) produced the best results, with 2.1 ± 0.2 A/m2 (maximum current density), 79% chemical oxygen demand removal, and 82% headspace biological oxygen demand removal

378

U.S. Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gross Inputs to Refineries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 11,583: 11,485: 11,484: 11,969: 12,269: 12,422 ...

379

U.S. Refinery Net Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Net Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005-4,241-2,244: 2,431: 7,319: 7,538 ...

380

Web based multilayered distributed SCADA/HMI system in refinery application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes system synthesis and architecture of a multilayered distributed SCADA/HMI system. The system is used for monitoring and control of refinery terminals for truck loading and oil products pipeline shipping. Network-centered, distributed ... Keywords: Data server, Fieldbuses, OPC protocols, Real time systems, SCADA/HMI

Adnan Salihbegovic; Vlatko Marinkovi?; Zoran Cico; Elvedin Karavdi?; Nina Delic

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

THE NEW GASIFICATION PROJECT AT ENI SANNAZZARO REFINERY AND ITS INTEGRATION WITH A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the new regulation introduced in Europe in the last years, defining more stringent limits for the emissions to the atmosphere, the necessity to find an alternative use for the fuel oil has created a new challenge for the refineries. At the same time the need to improve the Italian power production has pushed Eni, the Italian energy company, to enter the electricity market.

Mwe Power Plant; Guido Collodi; Dario Camozzi; Snamprogetti Italy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Stocks at Refineries (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Stocks at Refineries (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 13,255: 14,640: 14,907: 15,583: 14,878 ...

383

Table 4b. U.S. Petroleum Refinery Balance (Million Barrels per Day ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refinery Distillation Utilization Factor ..... 0.86 0.90 0.90 0.89 0.83 0.89 0.91 0.87 0.83 0.88 0.90 0.87 0.89 0.88 0.87 - = no data available Table 4b. U.S ...

384

Table 39. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics Isobutane Lubricants Isomers Isopentane and Isohexane Asphalt and Road Oil Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen (MMcfd) Sulfur (short tons per day) Table 4. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2013 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) Isooctane a

385

Biomass Burning and the Production of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along ...

Levine J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Feasibility study on the modernization and expansion of the Tema Oil Refinery. Executive Summary. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tema Oil Refinery (TOR), which was commissioned in 1963, is a simple hydro-skimming plant which processes crude oil into LPG, gasoline, kerosene, gasoil, and fuel oil. It is the only petroleum refinery in Ghana. Over the years some of the equipment in the refinery has deteriorated or become obsolete necessitating major rehabilitation. A study of the refinery expansion project takes into consideration earlier studies and, equally important, recognizes the extensive work done by TOR in rehabilitating the refinery. The program, carried out in phases because of funding limitations, has addressed the critical repairs and replacements in the process units and utilities necessary to prolong the life of the refinery and assure reliability and safe operation. It undertook the task of investigating the feasibility of modernizing and expanding the refinery at Tema, Ghana to meet projected market demands until the year 2005. A process planning study was conducted to select the optimal process and utility configuration which would result in economic benefits to Ghana.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K. [Inst. for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

1997-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellog Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993 for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. The work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to characterize the coal liquids, develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids, and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PIMS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program, produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks, conduct engine emission tests, and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts during the reporting period, October through December 1996, were in the areas of Option 1 blending and Option 1 FCC production run.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

390

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

391

Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology Editorial CurtisWelcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology. Throughon greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between the two liquid phases, separation will result. This is the principle upon which separation by liquid-liquid extraction is based, and there are a number of important applications of this concept in industrial processes. This paper will review the basic concepts and applications as well as present future directions for the liquid-liquid extraction process.

Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Denitrification of combustion gases. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating waste combustion gas to remove the nitrogen oxygen gases therefrom is disclosed wherein the waste gas is first contacted with calcium oxide which absorbs and chemically reacts with the nitrogen oxide gases therein at a temperature from about 100/sup 0/ to 430/sup 0/C. The thus reacted calcium oxide (now calcium nitrate) is then heated at a temperature range between about 430/sup 0/ and 900/sup 0/C, resulting in regeneration of the calcium oxide and production of the decomposition gas composed of nitrogen and nitrogen oxide gas. The decomposition gases can be recycled to the calcium oxide contacting step to minimize the amount of nitrogen oxide gases in the final product gas.

Yang, R.T.

1980-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with South west research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with Process Industry Modeling System software. The objective of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major effort conducted during the fourth quarter of 1995 were in the areas of: IL catalytic cracking--microactivity tests were conducted on various wax blends; IL wax hydrocracking--a pilot plant run was conducted on a wax/petroleum blend; and DL2 characterization and fractionation.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

398

Collection and analysis of geothermal gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid, reliable procedures are described for the collection and analysis of geothermal gases at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Gases covered are H/sub 2/, He, Ar, O/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/S. The methods outlined are suitable for geothermal exploration. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Gritzo, L.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

400

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initialed a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October 1994--December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 14 631 332 -449 -31 12 606 14 690 Crude Oil 448 - - - - 317 -146 -38 8 573 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 379 0 9 10 -325 - - 0 19 12 41 Pentanes Plus...

405

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 14 665 293 -389 -59 -70 641 16 762 Crude Oil 515 - - - - 285 -153 -65 -1 584 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 311 0 18 4 -280 - - 1 16 13 23 Pentanes...

406

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Production is the sum of crude oil producion and natural gas plant liquids and liquefied refinery gases production. Crude oil production is an estimate based on data received from...

407

Much of the country’s refinery capacity is concentrated along ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

408

Capacity at existing U.S. refineries increases in 2013 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

409

Does EIA have data on U.S. oil refineries and their locations ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

410

Attributes of crude oil at U.S. refineries vary by region - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

411

Refinery receipts of crude oil by rail, truck, and barge continue ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

412

When was the last refinery built in the United States? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

413

Fermi gases in one dimension: From Bethe Ansatz to experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article reviews theoretical and experimental developments for one-dimensional Fermi gases. Specifically, the experimentally realized two-component delta-function interacting Fermi gas -- the Gaudin-Yang model -- and its generalisations to multi-component Fermi systems with larger spin symmetries. The exact results obtained for Bethe ansatz integrable models of this kind enable the study of the nature and microscopic origin of a wide range of quantum many-body phenomena driven by spin population imbalance, dynamical interactions and magnetic fields. This physics includes Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-like pairing, Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids, spin-charge separation, Fulde-Ferrel-Larkin-Ovchinnikov-like pair correlations, quantum criticality and scaling, polarons and the few-body physics of the trimer state (trions). The fascinating interplay between exactly solved models and experimental developments in one dimension promises to yield further insight into the exciting and fundamental physics of interacting Fermi systems.

Xi-Wen Guan; Murray T. Batchelor; Chaohong Lee

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

Numerical Simulation of an Industrial Cumulus Affected by Heat, Moisture, and CCN Released from an Oil Refinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large oil refineries emit heat, vapor, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), all of which can affect the formation of cloud and precipitation. This study quantities the relative contributions of the three factors on cloud development in calm wind ...

S. Guan; G. W. Reuter

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The safe use of low temperature liquefied gases 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(5-10%) but the others are odourless. Liquefied gases ­ oxygen, nitrogen, argon, helium and carbonCare with cryogenics The safe use of low temperature liquefied gases #12;Index 1. Introduction 1.1 Objective 1.2 Gases considered and typical uses 2. Properties of low temperature liquefied atmospheric gases

Martin, Ralph R.

416

Refinery byproduct emerges as a viable powerplant fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, the solid residue left after all valuable liquid and gaseous components have been extracted from crude oil, is the major byproduct from the petroleum refining industry. In the past few years, pet coke has become an attractive fuel for utility, independent power, and industrial cogeneration applications. Reasons: (1) trends in the petroleum refining industry and elsewhere have increases the supply, significantly decreasing the price; (2) recent technological advances permit the clean and efficient combustion of coke; and (3) coke has been classified as a waste fuel by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), which means independent power producers (IPPs) burning coke do not require a steam host. This article is an in-depth analysis of where coke comes from, what factors influence its supply and demand, and how to successfully utilize it as a powerplant fuel.

Rossi, R.A. (Combustion Power Co., Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP™) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver, Colorado. The refrigeration unit is designed to provide refrigeration for two process units at the refinery while utilizing waste heat as the energy source. The added refrigeration capacity benefits the refinery by recovering salable products, debottlenecking process units, avoiding additional electrical demand, and reducing the refinery Energy Intensity Index. In addition, the WHAARP unit lowers air pollutant emissions by reducing excess fuel gas that is combusted in the refinery flare. A comprehensive utility and process efficiency Master Plan developed for the Denver refinery by Planetec provided the necessary platform for implementing this distinctive project. The $2.3 million WHAARP system was paid for in part by a $760,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of their "Industry of the Future Program". Total combined benefits are projected to be approximately $1 million/year with a 1.6 year simple payback including the grant funding.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print Purchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print ALS users should follow Berkeley Lab policy, as described below, for the purchase, delivery, storage, and use of all gases at the ALS. See Shipping and Receiving for information on any non-gas deliveries. Contacts: Gas purchase or delivery: ALS Receiving, 510-486-4494 Gas use and storage: Experiment Coordination, 510-486-7222, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Gas Storage: Berkeley Lab Chemical Inventory All gas bottles and cylinders at the ALS must be identified with bar code and logged into the Berkeley Lab Chemical Inventory by ALS staff. The inventory will be updated periodically; for more information contact Experiment Coordination. Gases are stored either in the racks between buildings 6 and 7; toxic and corrosive gases are stored in Building 6, room 6C across the walkway from beamline 10.0.

419

Refinery IGCC plants are exceeding 90% capacity factor after 3 years  

SciTech Connect

Steep learning curves for commercial IGCC plants in Italy show annual capacity factors of 55-60% in the first year of service and improvement to over 90% after the third year. The article reviews the success of three IGCC projects in Italy - those of ISAB Energy, Sarlux Saras and Api Energy. EniPower is commissioning a 250 MW IGCC plant that will burn syngas produced by gasification of residues at an adjacent Eni Sannazzaro refinery in north central Italy. The article lists 14 commercially operating IGCC plants worldwide that together provide close to 3900 MW of generating capacity. These use a variety of feedstock-coals, petroleum coke and refinery residues and biomass. Experience with commercial scale plants in Europe demonstrates that IGCC plants can operate at capacity factors comparable to if not better than conventional coal plants. 2 figs., 1 photo.

Jaeger, H.

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Guideline Factors Provide a Better Measure of Refinery Energy Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Company, U.S.A. refineries reduced energy consumption by 25% between 1972 and 1978 compared with an 18% reduction for the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry over the same period. The Exxon approach to conserving energy in petroleum refining operations goes beyond energy conservation housekeeping measures and investments, and uses a comprehensive method to measure energy efficiency rather than energy consumption per barrel. It uses the Exxon Research and Engineering developed energy guideline factors, which are based on energy efficient designs and criteria, to (1) Evaluate the energy efficiency performance of refineries of different complexity in a consistent manner. (2) Compensate for changes in individual process unit throughputs and in unit operating intensity/severity. (3) Identify and quantify areas of energy inefficiency. (4) Regularly monitor and steward energy efficiency performance. Effective conservation also requires the analysis of energy performance and setting goals for future improvement. The paper explains how this can be done.

Libbers, D. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Restoration of Refinery Heaters Using the Technique of Prefabricated Ceramic Fiber Lined Panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery heater fuel requirements often represent 50% of a units operating cost. A one percent change in the efficiency of a heater firing 100 MBtu/hr amounts to more than $25,000 per year. Heater efficiency is influenced by casing hot spots, air leakage, corbel damage, flue gas obstruction and dirty tubes. Efficiency impact is greatest in the convection section since conventional repairs only permit accessing from the outside, thus only hot spots and some air leakage are repaired. Exxon USA's Baton Rouge refinery has adopted a restoration procedure, using the technique of ceramic fiber lined panels, which corrects all the problem areas and returns the heater to new condition. Restorations have been successfully completed on convection sections as well as total heaters. All restorations have been within a normal turnaround period. Efficiency increases greater than 3% have been realized, as well as improvements in the heater's operation.

Sento, H. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

423

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

Who lives near coke plants and oil refineries An exploration of the environmental inequity hypothesis  

SciTech Connect

Facility-specific information on pollution was obtained for 36 coke plants and 46 oil refineries in the US and matched with information on populations surrounding these 82 facilities. These data were analyzed to determine whether environmental inequities were present, whether they were more economic or racial in nature, and whether the racial composition of nearby communities has changed significantly since plants began operations. The Census tracts near coke plants have a disproportionate share of poor and nonwhite residents. Multivariate analyses suggest that existing inequities are primarily economic in nature. The findings for oil refineries are not strongly supportive of the environmental inequity hypothesis. Rank ordering of facilities by race, poverty, and pollution produces limited (although not consistent) evidence that the more risky facilities tend to be operating in communities with above-median proportions of nonwhite residents (near coke plants) and Hispanic residents (near oil refineries). Over time, the radical makeup of many communities near facilities has changed significantly, particularly in the case of coke plants sited in the early 1900s. Further risk-oriented studies of multiple manufacturing facilities in various industrial sectors of the economy are recommended.

Graham, J.D.; Beaulieu, N.D.; Sussman, D.; Sadowitz, M.; Li, Y.C. (Harvard Center for Risk Analysis, Boston, MA (United States))

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Use of Oil Refinery Wastes as a Dust Suppression Surfactant for Use in Mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, the suitability of a selection of petroleum refinery wastes as a dust suppressant were examined. Dust is a significant problem in surface and underground mining mainly because of its adverse effects on human health and machinery. Hence, dust control and suppression is a vital part of mine planning for mining engineers. Water is the oldest and the cheapest suppressant in dealing with the mine dusts. However, surfactant use has recently been used for a wider range of applications in the mining industry. In order to carry out laboratory experiments, a dust chamber was designed and manufactured. The chamber has an inlet for coal dust entrance and a nozzle for spraying water and the oil refinery wastes. Water and the surfactants were mixed at various ratios and then sprayed onto the coal dusts within the cell. Dust concentration was measured systematically to determine the effects of surfactant containing solution on the coal dust and the data obtained by the measurements were analyzed. The results showed that the oil refinery wastes could be used as a dust suppressant, which may create an economical utilization for the wastes concerned.

Dixon-Hardy, D.W.; Beyhan, S.; Ediz, I.G.; Erarslan, K. [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Potentials for Fuel Cells in Refineries and Chlor-Alkali Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. Costs of the total energy consumed (power plus steam) were calculated and compared with those for more conventional cogeneration systems. Questionnaires were sent to major plants in both industries to determine technical requirements and data required for the assessment of the market potential. The most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most cost competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell, both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

Altseimer, J. H.; Roach, F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Greenhouse gases and the metallurgical process industry  

SciTech Connect

The present lecture offers a brief review of the greenhouse effect, the sources of greenhouse gases, the potential effect of these gases on global warming, the response of the international community, and the probable cost of national compliance. The specific emissions of the metallurgical process industry, particularly those of the steel and aluminum sectors, are then examined. The potential applications of life-cycle assessments and of an input-output model in programs of emissions' abatement are investigated, and, finally, a few remarks on some implications for education are presented.

Lupis, C.H.P.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Composition of gases vented from a condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

Lyon, R.N.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Stationary light in cold atomic gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss stationary light created by a pair of counter-propagating control fields in Lambda-type atomic gases with electromagnetically induced transparency for the case of negligible Doppler broadening. In this case the secular approximation used in the discussion of stationary light in hot vapors is no longer valid. We discuss the quality of the effective light-trapping system and show that in contrast to previous claims it is finite even for vanishing ground-state dephasing. The dynamics of the photon loss is in general non exponential and can be faster or slower than in hot gases.

Gor Nikoghosyan; Michael Fleischhauer

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Petroleum & Other Liquids - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of ...

434

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen FLUE GASES and FUEL GASES 19.6.2001 2-1 Chapter 2 Flue gases and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is combusted in a hot fuel / bed material (mostly sand) / ash mixture which is fluidised by the combustion air.8 Principle of a fuel cell (picture OECD/IEA&ETSU, 1993) Future technologies will be based increasingly on the direct oxidation of fuel gases in fuel cells, which implies direct conversion of chemical potential

Zevenhoven, Ron

435

Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, December 19, 1994--March 26, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Refinery Net Production of Finished Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ... 576 -7...

437

Liquid fossil fuel technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented under the following headings: (1) extraction (technology assessment, oil research, gas research); (2) liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); (3) utilization (energy conservation); and (4) project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are also listed. Some of the highlights for this period are: the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center was converted into NIPER, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research on October 1, 1983; modelling of enthalpies, heat capacities and volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions began using a mass action model; a series of experiments were run on upgrading by hydrogenation SRC-II coal liquid at different degrees of severity and the products have been analyzed; heavy crude oil extracts were separated into fraction with high performance liquid chromatography by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the mass spectra and electron spin resonance were determin ed; and particulates from exhaust gases of diesel engines using fire fuel types are being collected and will be analyzed by chemical methods and results will be compared with those obtained by biological assay. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

DeLuchi, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases BOCLH Jump to: navigation, search Name BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH) Place Taipei, Taiwan Sector Solar Product BOCLH is a joint venture between the Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation and the BOC Group in the United Kingdom and produces high-purity gases used in solar component production. References BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH) is a company located in Taipei, Taiwan . References ↑ "BOC Lienhwa Industrial Gases (BOCLH)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=BOC_Lienhwa_Industrial_Gases_BOCLH&oldid=342956

440

Documentation for Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data Sources for High-GWP Gases from Aerosols..... 163 Table 4-5. Data Sources for High-GWP Gases from Solvent Applications ..... 164 Table 4-6. Data Sources for High ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Densities in the Liquid Hydrogen Chloride Solvent System Heather Brooks Shapiro and Donald R. Sadoway*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for electrodeposition of several reactive metals and silicon from liquefied halogenous gases at subambient temperatures requires more cooling power than simple dry ice slush baths but much less than standard liquid nitrogen

Sadoway, Donald Robert

442

Liquid-tin-jet laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet generation P. A. C. Jansson,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid nitrogen,8 and argon9 for 1 keV, micros- copy and reflectometry , and hard x rays copper solutions of liquefied inert gases such as xenon. Finally, the new range of target materials allows improved flexibility

443

Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

Turick, C.E.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

JILA Team Finds New Parallel Between Cold Gases and 'Hot' ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... theorists, have discovered another notable similarity between ultracold atomic gases and high-temperature superconductors, suggesting there may ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

Turick, Charles E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

MEASUREMENT OF RADIOIODINE IN PUREX STACK GASES  

SciTech Connect

The chemical behavior of iodine-131 in stack air from this site's Purex process is reported. The radioiodine in the stack gases apparently consists of variable proportions of molecular vapor and other forms of iodine, thus causing the efficiencies for most collection media to vary widely. Activated charcoal is a satisfactory collection medium although Process gases (ammonia and oxides of nitrogen) lower the efficiency of the charcoal from 99 to 88%. Ambient temperature and humidity had no effect on deposition and retention of iodine in long stainless steel sampling lines. Process conditions did have an effect and estimates of iodine released were 10 to 15% low due to this line loss. (auth)

Jacobsen, W.R.; Jolly, L. Jr.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROCARBON AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present period, the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) has been modified to improve its volumetric and equilibrium predictions. Specifically, the attractive term of the PGR equation was modified to enhance the flexibility of the model, and a new expression was developed for the temperature dependence of the attractive term in this segment-segment interaction model. The predictive capability of the modified PGR EOS for vapor pressure, and saturated liquid and vapor densities was evaluated for selected normal paraffins, normal alkenes, cyclo-paraffins, light aromatics, argon, carbon dioxide and water. The generalized EOS constants and substance-specific characteristic parameters in the modified PGR EOS were obtained from the pure component vapor pressures, and saturated liquid and vapor molar volumes. The calculated phase properties were compared to those of the Peng-Robinson (PR), the simplified-perturbed-hard-chain theory (SPHCT) and the original PGR equations. Generally, the performance of the proposed EOS was better than the PR, SPHCT and original PGR equations in predicting the pure fluid properties (%AAD of 1.3, 2.8 and 3.7 for vapor pressure, saturated liquid and vapor densities, respectively).

KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

Lyons, J.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

Lyons, J.E.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sulfur recovery in U.S. refineries is at an all-time high  

SciTech Connect

Environmental pressures are reducing allowable sulfur emissions and tightening fuel sulfur specifications on a global basis. Combined with an increasingly sour crude slate, this means that ever-greater quantities of sulfur are recovered each year. Sulfur is produced through three main routes: Frasch mining, recovery from pyrites, and recovery from crude oil and natural gas. Sulfur recovery from US refineries reached an all-time high in 1995: 13,753 metric tons/calendar day (mt/cd). Frasch mining has lost its place as the primary source of elemental sulfur. Current demand patterns for sulfur are expected to continue through the next decade. About half of world sulfur production will be used to produce phosphatic fertilizers. The other half will be used in some 30 chemically oriented industries. The data reported in this article were collected by the US Bureau of Mines/US Geological Survey, unless otherwise noted. The paper discusses sulfur from natural gas, sulfur from refineries, sulfur prices, imports and exports.

Swain, E.J. [Swain (Edward J.), Houston, TX (United States)

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Organic Rankine Cycle Systems for Waste Heat Recovery in Refineries and Chemical Process Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a low temperature Rankine cycle system using R-113 working fluid for recovery and conversion of process waste heat is described for typical applications in oil refineries and chemical plants. The system is designed to produce electric power from waste heat available in a temperature range from 180oF to 400oF. The design of a new ORC turbo generator uniquely adapted to applications of this type is presented. The unit has been designed for power outputs from 3/4 to 2 1/2 MW and turbine inlet temperatures from 170 to 260oF. The machine design has eliminated the need for shaft seals, shaft couplings and the usual lube oil console normally required for turbine-generator units. Results of prototype tests of a 1 MW unit are presented. A product package and recommended division of responsibilities between purchaser, A&E company and supplier is presented for installations in refineries and process plants. The product package covers the electrical power range from 3/4 to 5 MW and waste heat streams from 20 to 130 million BTU/hr.

Meacher, J. S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Transverse spin diffusion in strongly interacting Fermi gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute spin diffusion in a dilute Fermi gas at arbitrary temperature, polarization and strong interaction in the normal phase using kinetic theory. While the longitudinal spin diffusivity depends weakly on polarization and diverges for small temperatures, the transverse spin diffusivity D_\\perp has a strong polarization dependence and approaches a finite value for T->0 in the Fermi liquid phase. For a 3D unitary Fermi gas at infinite scattering length the diffusivities reach a minimum near the quantum limit of diffusion \\hbar/m in the quantum degenerate regime and are strongly suppressed by medium scattering, and we discuss the importance of the spin-rotation effect. In two dimensions, D_\\perp attains a minimum at strong coupling -1 < ln(kFa2D) < 1 and reaches D_\\perp~0.2...0.3\\hbar/m at large polarization. These values are consistent with recent measurements of two-dimensional ultracold atomic gases in the strong coupling regime.

Tilman Enss

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Process for removal of sulfur compounds from fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel gases such as those produced in the gasification of coal are stripped of sulfur compounds and particulate matter by contact with molten metal salt. The fuel gas and salt are intimately mixed by passage through a venturi or other constriction in which the fuel gas entrains the molten salt as dispersed droplets to a gas-liquid separator. The separated molten salt is divided into a major and a minor flow portion with the minor flow portion passing on to a regenerator in which it is contacted with steam and carbon dioxide as strip gas to remove sulfur compounds. The strip gas is further processed to recover sulfur. The depleted, minor flow portion of salt is passed again into contact with the fuel gas for further sulfur removal from the gas. The sulfur depleted, fuel gas then flows through a solid absorbent for removal of salt droplets. The minor flow portion of the molten salt is then recombined with the major flow portion for feed to the venturi.

Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA); Stegen, Gary E. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Traveling dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases  

SciTech Connect

Families of dark solitons exist in superfluid Fermi gases. The energy-velocity dispersion and number of depleted particles completely determine the dynamics of dark solitons on a slowly varying background density. For the unitary Fermi gas, we determine these relations from general scaling arguments and conservation of local particle number. We find solitons to oscillate sinusoidally at the trap frequency reduced by a factor of 1/{radical}(3). Numerical integration of the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation determines spatial profiles and soliton-dispersion relations across the BEC-BCS crossover, and proves consistent with the scaling relations at unitarity.

Liao Renyuan; Brand, Joachim [New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study and Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and Physics, Massey University, Private Bag 102904 NSMC, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Heat conduction in relativistic neutral gases revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetic theory of dilute gases to first order in the gradients yields linear relations between forces and fluxes. The heat flux for the relativistic gas has been shown to be related not only to the temperature gradient but also to the density gradient in the representation where number density, temperature and hydrodynamic velocity are the independent state variables. In this work we show the calculation of the corresponding transport coefficients from the full Boltzmann equation and compare the magnitude of the relativistic correction.

A. L. Garcia-Perciante; A. R. Mendez

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

458

Use of various acute, sublethal and early life-stage tests to evaluate the toxicity of refinery effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The toxicities of effluents from three Ontario, Canada, refineries were assessed with microbes, plants, invertebrates, and fish. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Microtox test, an assay based on electron transport activity in submitochondrial particles, and Daphnia magna (water flea); growth of Selenastrum capricornutum (alga); growth of Lemna minor (aquatic plant); germination of Lactuca sativa (nonaquatic plant); survival, growth, and maturation of Panagrellus redivivus (nematode); and genotoxicity in the SOS-Chromotest. Only the Microtox test and the submitochondrial particle test detected acute toxicity in the effluent samples. Reduced survival and sublethal responses were caused by some effluents, but not all effluents were toxic, and none caused a response in all of the tests applied. The results suggest that the effluent treatment systems used at Ontario refineries have largely eliminated acute toxicity to the organisms in their test battery. Although reduced survival and sublethal effects were detected in some of the effluents, the effects were minor. Some of the tests provided evidence, albeit weak, of variations in the responses of the test organisms to a temporal series of effluent samples. Not unexpectedly, there were also minor differences in the responses of the tests to effluents from the three refineries. The fathead minnow test seems to be a sensitive indicator of the sublethal toxicity of Ontario refinery effluents.

Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Dutka, B. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse Gases and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming Potentials (GWP) (From Appendix E of the instructions to Form EIA-1605) GREENHOUSE GAS NAME GREENHOUSE GAS CODE FORMULA GWP TAR1 AR42 (1) Carbon Dioxide CO2 CO2 1 1 (2) Methane CH4 CH4 23 25 (3) Nitrous Oxide N2O N2O 296 298 (4) Hydroflourocarbons HFC-23 (trifluoromethane) 15 CHF3 12000 14800 HFC-32 (difluoromethane) 16 CH2F2 550 675 HFC-41 (monofluoromethane) 43 CH3F 97 -3 HFC-125 (pentafluoroethane) 17 CHF2CF3 3400 3500 HFC-134 (1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane) 44 CHF2CHF2 1100 -3 HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) 18 CH2FCF3 1300 1430 HFC-143 (1,1,2-trifluorethane) 45 CHF2CH2F 330 -3 HFC-143a (1,1,1-trifluoroethane) 46 CF3CH3 4300 4470 HFC-152 (1,2-difluorethane) 47 CH2FCH2F

460

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquefies them. Cryogenic liquids are kept in the liquid state at very low temperatures. Cryogenic liquids are liquid nitrogen, liquid argon and liquid helium. The different cryogens become liquids under different. In addition, when they vaporize the liquids expand to enormous volumes. For example, liquid nitrogen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coast (PADD 1) Refinery Yield of Liquified Petroleum Gases (Percent)","Refining District East Coast Refinery Yield of Liquified Petroleum Gases (Percent)","Refining...

462

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen Previous Video (Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Shattering Pennies) Shattering Pennies Liquid Nitrogen Cooled...

463

Mechanism of photoreductive stripping of iron(III) in a liquid-liquid extraction system and its application for a hydrometallurgical process  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism of the photoreductive stripping of iron(III) in the liquid-liquid extraction process was investigated by employing (2-ethylhexyl)phosphonic acid mono(2-ethylhexyl) ester (EHPNA) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as extractants, n-dodecane and kerosene as diluents, and a xenon lamp as the light source. The photoreductive stripping of iron(III) progressed by photoirradiation following an initial induction period caused by dissolved oxygen in the extraction system. The iron(III)-extractant complex was photoexcited in the organic phase and photoreduced to the iron(II) complex by electron donation from the water at the aqueous/organic interface. A kinetic study of the photoreductive stripping of iron(III) revealed that the photochemical reduction of iron(III) was the rate-determining step. The removal of iron from a simulated zinc refinery residue solution by using liquid-liquid extraction combined with photochemical reduction of iron was also investigated, showing that the rare metals in the refinery residue, gallium and indium, were recovered effectively and leaving almost all iron(III) in the aqueous phase.

Nishihama, Syouhei; Hirai, Takayuki; Komasawa, Isao

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Method for controlling corrosion in thermal vapor injection gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the method for producing high pressure thermal vapor streams from combustion gases for injection into subterranean oil producing formations to stimulate the production of viscous minerals is described. The improvement involves controlling corrosion in such thermal vapor gases by injecting water near the flame in the combustion zone and injecting ammonia into a vapor producing vessel to contact the combustion gases exiting the combustion chamber.

Sperry, John S. (Houston, TX); Krajicek, Richard W. (Houston, TX)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Apparatus for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryer  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method are disclosed for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryers and return of heat to the dryer system. Fresh air is drawn through a plurality of tubes in heat exchange relation to heated exhaust gases and introduced into the drying system without intermingling of contaminated exhaust gases with the heated fresh air. The apparatus and method have particular utility in gas-fired commercial and industrial laundry dryers.

Winstel, F.H.

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

466

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2010 through January 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10)/2 10)/2 Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2010 through January 2011 November 2010 Energy Information Administration Office of Petroleum, Gas, and Biofuels Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. E nergy Information Adminis tration Market As s es s ment of P lanned R

467

Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2009 through January 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

09)/2 09)/2 Market Assessment of Refinery Outages Planned for October 2009 through January 2010 November 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views herein should not be construed as representing those of the Department or the Administration. Preface and Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the independent statistical and analytical

468

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On August 27, 1997, the EPA promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the U.S. would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

Information Center

1998-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

469

Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Topsoe`s Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process: An alternative technology for recovering refinery sulfur  

SciTech Connect

The Topsoe Wet gas Sulfuric Acid (WSA) process is a catalytic process which produces concentrated sulfuric acid from refinery streams containing sulfur compounds such as H{sub 2}S (Claus plant feed), Claus plant tail gas, SO{sub 2} (FCC off-gas, power plants), and spent sulfuric acid (alkylation acid). The WSA process recovers up to 99.97% of the sulfur value in the stream as concentrated sulfuric acid (93--98.5 wt%). No solid waste products or waste water is produced and no chemicals are consumed in the process. The simple process layout provides low capital cost and attractive operating economy. Twenty four commercial WSA plants have been licensed. The WSA process is explained in detail and comparisons with alternative sulfur management technology are presented. Environmental regulations applying to SO{sub x} abatement and sulfuric acid production plants are explained in the context of WSA plant operation.

Ward, J.W. [Haldor Topsoe, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Mechanics of liquid and gas, or mechanics of the inertless mass I. Ideal liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This monograph is a theoretical work. Its title shows that the theory states a novel view of the mechanical motion of liquids and gases to explain phenomena connected with mechanical motion of continuous medium. The second part of the monograph (II. Real liquids and gases) is placed in the same archive. It takes into account features of the real liquids and gases to give a practical direction for the theory. Both these parts are connected and have no practical meaning if separated. They were published in Russia in 2003 (after the death of the author) under the title "Mechanics of liquids and gas, or mechanics of the inertless mass (mechanics of media)" by the daughter of the author under her editing. This monograph is the last editing of the author's manuscript, which was made by the same editor in 2006. The editor plans to place two applied works of the author of the monograph in the same archive soon. The monograph contains information about both these manuscripts. The monograph is addressed to specialists in the field of theoretical and practical hydrodynamics and adjacent sciences.

I. Z. Shkurchenko

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

472

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

473

Formation and Incorporation Energies of Fission Gases He, Xe, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Formation and Incorporation Energies of Fission Gases He, Xe , ... nuclear fuels are bcc alloys of uranium that swell under fission conditions, ...

474

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Contact  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Mail: Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Energy Information Administration, EI-81 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave, SW Washington, DC 20585...

475

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1999 iii ... The 1.1-percent average annual growth in U.S. green-

476

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program -Data and...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Environment > Voluntary Reporting Program > Data and Reports Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Data and Reports The first reporting cycle under the revised...

477

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swapping Global Warming Gases for Methane in Gas Hydrate Layer ... would serve as energy sources as well as carbon dioxide storage sites in the ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

478

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.govmain Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation...

479

Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics graphics Graphics: Atmospheric Trace Gases in Whole-Air Samples The following links are for methane, nonmethane hydrocarbons, alkyl nitrates, and chlorinated carbon...

480

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid refinery gases" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bulletin 627 Bulletin 627 BUREAU o b MINES FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS By Michael G. Zabetakis DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

482

Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

483

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Liquid ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For 350 million years, fish have breathed liquid through gills. Mammals evolved lungs to breathe air. Rarely, circumstances can occur when a mammal needs to `turn back the clock' to breathe through a special liquid medium. This is particularly true if surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung is increased, as in acute lung injury. In this condition, surface tension increases because the pulmonary surfactant system is damaged, causing alveolar collapse, atelectasis, increased right-to-left shunt and hypoxaemia. 69 The aims of treatment are: (i) to offset increased forces causing lung collapse by applying mechanical ventilation with PEEP; (ii) to decrease alveolar surface tension with exogenous surfactant; (iii) to eliminate the air-liquid interface by filling the lung with a fluid in

U. Kaisers; K. P. Kelly; T. Busch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Quantum oscillations in ultracold Fermi gases : realizations with rotating gases or artificial gauge fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the angular momentum of a harmonically trapped, noninteracting Fermi gas subject to either rotation or to an artificial gauge field. The angular momentum of the gas is shown to display oscillations as a function of the particle number or chemical potential. This phenomenon is analogous to the de Haas - van Alphen oscillations of the magnetization in the solid-state context. However, key differences exist between the solid-state and ultracold atomic gases that we point out and analyze. We explore the dependence of the visibility of these oscillations on the physical parameters and propose two experimental protocols for their observation. Due to the very strong dependence of the amplitude of the oscillations on temperature, we propose their use as a sensitive thermometer for Fermi gases in the low temperature regime.

Charles Grenier; Corinna Kollath; Antoine Georges

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

486

Soot and SO[subscript 2] contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order ...

Molina, Luisa Tan

487

Capture and release of mixed acid gasses with binding organic liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reversible acid-gas binding organic liquid systems that permit separation and capture of one or more of several acid gases from a mixed gas stream, transport of the liquid, release of the acid gases from the ionic liquid and reuse of the liquid to bind more acid gas with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems. These systems utilize acid gas capture compounds made up of strong bases and weak acids that form salts when reacted with a selected acid gas, and which release these gases when a preselected triggering event occurs. The various new materials that make up this system can also be included in various other applications such as chemical sensors, chemical reactants, scrubbers, and separators that allow for the specific and separate removal of desired materials from a gas stream such as flue gas.

Heldebrant, David J. (Richland, WA); Yonker, Clement R. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

488

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 19. PAD District 4 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 393 - - - - 330 -111 -46 4 562 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 406 0 2 15 -333 - - 0 20 9 61 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 58 0 - - - -33 - - 0 6 9 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 348 - - 2 15 -299 - -

489

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 23. PAD District 5 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,197 - - - - 1,186 - -47 -4 2,340 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 69 0 14 4 - - - -60 83 20 43 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 32 0 - - - - - - -1 26 2 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 14 4 - - - -59

490

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 26 - - - - 864 11 23 -4 919 9 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 45 0 39 49 73 - - -4 20 8 182 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 8 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 1 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 37 - - 39 49 73 - - -4 20 7 175 Ethane/Ethylene ...........................................

491

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 September 2013 Table 20. PAD District 4 - Year-to-Date Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January-September 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 511 - - - - 289 -169 -49 4 579 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 316 0 13 11 -264 - - 2 16 15 44 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 0 - - 0 -38 - - 0 6 13 -7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ..............................

492

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2011 December 2011 Table 7. PAD District 1 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, December 2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 24 - - - - 854 -10 42 -28 935 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 42 0 27 67 119 - - -30 26 1 259 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 7 0 - - - - - - 0 - 0 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 35 - - 27 67 119 - - -30 26

493

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PAD District 2 - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, 2012 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Commodity Supply Disposition Field Production Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports (PADD of Entry) 1 Net Receipts 2 Adjust- ments 3 Stock Change 4 Refinery and Blender Net Inputs Exports Products Supplied 5 Crude Oil ............................................................. 1,114 - - - - 1,730 800 -85 62 3,442 55 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 446 -16 121 74 -25 - - -12 105 111 395 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 50 -16 - - 1 82 - - -4 31 101 -12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 396 - - 121 73 -107 - - -8 74 11 407

494

Reducing flare emissions from chemical plants and refineries through the application of fuzzy control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing legislative requirements on a global basis are driving the development of solutions to reduce emission. Flaring and venting of waste hydrocarbon gases is a known contributor to pollution and increasing pressure is being exerted onto operators ... Keywords: air assist, combustion, combustion efficiency, emissions, flare, fuzzy control, member ship function, steam injection, toxic gas

A. Alizadeh-Attar; H. R. Ghoohestani; I. Nasr Isfahani

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Reducing flare emissions from chemical plants and refineries through the application of fuzzy control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing legislative requirements on a global basis are driving the development of solutions to reduce emission. Flaring and venting of waste hydrocarbon gases is a known contributor to pollution and increasing pressure is being exerted onto operators ... Keywords: air assist, combustion, combustion efficiency, emissions, flare, fuzzy control, member ship function, steam injection, toxic gas

A. Alizadeh-Attar; H. R. Ghoohestani; I. Nasr Isfahani

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Greenhouse gases: What is their role in climate change  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes information relevant to understanding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It examines the nature of the greenhouse effect, the Earth's radiation budget, the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere, how these concentrations have been changing, natural processes which regulate these concentrations of greenhouse gases, residence times of these gases in the atmosphere, and the rate of release of gases affecting atmospheric composition by human activities. We address the issue of the greenhouse effect itself in the first section. In the second section we examine trends in atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases and emissions sources. In the third section, we examine the natural carbon cycle and its role in determining the atmospheric residence time of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In the fourth section, we examine the role atmospheric chemistry plays in the determining the concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive treatment of these issues. Exhaustive treatments can be found in other volumes, many of which are cited throughout this paper. Rather, this paper is intended to summarize some of the major findings, unknowns, and uncertainties associated with the current state of knowledge regarding the role of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 57 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Edmonds, J.A.; Chandler, W.U. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wuebbles, D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

498

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

499

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet) Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: greet.es.anl.gov/main Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model, GREET References: GREET Fleet Main Page[1] Logo: The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation Model (GREET Fleet)

500

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Greenhouse Gases Program of Greenhouse Gases Program Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program ***THE VOLUNTARY REPORTING OF GREENHOUSE GASES ("1605(b)") PROGRAM HAS BEEN SUSPENDED.*** This affects all survey respondents. Please visit the What's New page for full details. What Is the Voluntary Reporting Program? logo Established by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program encourages corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. The Program provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. More information on the program...