National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for liquid porous interfaces

  1. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    dielectric semiconductor-liquid interfaces. J. Phys. Chem.rates across liquid-liquid interfaces. J. Phys. Chem.rates across liquid-liquid interfaces. 2. Relationships and

  2. Charge transfer kinetics at the solid–solid interface in porous electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Peng

    Interfacial charge transfer is widely assumed to obey the Butler–Volmer kinetics. For certain liquid–solid interfaces, the Marcus–Hush–Chidsey theory is more accurate and predictive, but it has not been applied to porous ...

  3. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    ion effects at the air/water interface. Chem. Rev. 106:1259-at the nitrobenzene-water interface electrified by a commonnature of ions at the liquid water surface. Annu. Rev. Phys.

  4. Burning Rate of Liquid Fuel on Carpet (Porous Media) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tingguang; Olenick, Stephen M; Klassen, Michael S; Roby, Richard J; Torero, Jose L

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of a liquid fuel burning on carpet has been involved in many incendiary and accidental fires. While the research on a liquid fuel fire on carpet is still limited, much work on porous media has been ...

  5. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Specific ion effects at the air/water interface. Chem. Rev.Diehl A. 2009. Ions at the air-water interface: An end to aequilibria of Eosin B at the air/water interface. Langmuir

  6. Local structure of Liquid-Vapour Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maia Godonoga; Alex Malins; Jens Eggers; C. Patrick Royall

    2011-02-15

    The structure of a simple liquid may be characterised in terms of ground state clusters of small numbers of atoms of that same liquid. Here we use this sensitive structural probe to consider the effect of a liquid-vapour interface upon the liquid structure. At higher temperatures (above around half the critical temperature) we find that the predominant effect of the interface is to reduce the local density, which significantly suppresses the local cluster populations. At lower temperatures, however, pronounced interfacial layering is found. This appears to be connected with significant orientational ordering of clusters based on 3- and 5-membered rings, with the rings aligning perpendicular and parallel to the interface respectively. At all temperatures, we find that the population of five-fold symmetric structures is suppressed, rather than enhanced, close to the interface.

  7. Colloidal Particles at Chiral Liquid Crystal Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne Claire Pawsey; Juho Lintuvuori

    2014-03-19

    Colloidal particles trapped at an interface between two fluids can form a wide range of different structures. Replacing one of the fluid with a liquid crystal increases the complexity of interactions and results in a greater range of possible structures. New behaviour emerges when colloidal particles interact with defects in the liquid crystal phases. Here we discuss the templating of colloids at a cholesteric isotropic interface.

  8. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    HH, Schiffrin DJ. 1989. Electrochemistry of liquid-liquidadvances in the electrochemistry of ion transfer processesDigital Simulation in Electrochemistry. Berlin Hiedelberg:

  9. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  10. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  11. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  12. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Pleasanton, CA); Fought, Eric R. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  13. A SHARP INTERFACE REDUCTION FOR MULTIPHASE TRANSPORT IN A POROUS FUEL CELL ELECTRODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    A SHARP INTERFACE REDUCTION FOR MULTIPHASE TRANSPORT IN A POROUS FUEL CELL ELECTRODE KEITH exchange membrane fuel cell is a highly porous material which acts to distribute reactant gases uniformly perturbation, fuel cell electrodes, free surface. AMS subject classifications. 35B40, 35K55, 76R99, 76S05 1

  14. NMR studies of carbon dioxide sequestration in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Rehan

    2015-06-09

    /liquid (air/water) interface for porous media consisting of glass bead and sand packs of different average particle size using quantitative MRI techniques....

  15. The equilibrium intrinsic crystal-liquid interface of colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessica Hernández-Guzmán; Eric R. Weeks

    2009-06-30

    We use confocal microscopy to study an equilibrated crystal-liquid interface in a colloidal suspension. Capillary waves roughen the surface, but locally the intrinsic interface is sharply defined. We use local measurements of the structure and dynamics to characterize the intrinsic interface, and different measurements find slightly different widths of this interface. In terms of the particle diameter $d$, this width is either $1.5d$ (based on structural information) or $2.4d$ (based on dynamics), both not much larger than the particle size. This work is the first direct experimental visualization of an equilibrated crystal-liquid interface.

  16. Photoinduced Excited State Electron Transfer at Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Jason K; Benjamin, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    of Coumarin- 314 at the Water/Air Interface. J. Phys. Chem.Solvation of Coumarin 314 at Water/Air Interfaces AontainingSolvation Dynamics at the Air/Water Interface with Time-

  17. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF CHANNEL POROUS LAYER INTERFACES IN PEM FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrhardt, Matthias

    MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF CHANNEL ­ POROUS LAYER INTERFACES IN PEM FUEL CELLS M. EHRHARDT, J, Germany ABSTRACT In proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, the transport of the fuel to the active diffusion layers. In order to improve existing mathematical and numerical models of PEM fuel cells, a deeper

  18. Nanofluidic transport governed by the liquid/vapour interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jongho

    Liquid/vapour interfaces govern the behaviour of a wide range of systems but remain poorly understood, leaving ample margin for the exploitation of intriguing functionalities for applications. Here, we systematically ...

  19. Fourier Transform Heterodyne Spectroscopy of Liquid Interfaces A thesis presented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    Fourier Transform Heterodyne Spectroscopy of Liquid Interfaces A thesis presented by Doo Soo Chung Abstract This thesis describes the application of a novel Fourier transform heterodyne spectroscopy of fluid interfaces 3 1.4 Organization of this thesis 5 2 Fourier Transform Heterodyne Spectroscopy 7 2

  20. Enzyme Activity and Biomolecule Templating at Liquid and Solid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey W. Blanch

    2004-12-01

    There are two main components of this research program. The first involves studies of the adsorption and catalytic activity of proteins at fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces; the second employs biological macromolecules as templates at the solid-liquid interface for controlled crystallization of inorganic materials, to provide materials with specific functionality.

  1. A Smooth Interface Method for Simulating Liquid Crystal Colloid Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Smooth Interface Method for Simulating Liquid Crystal Colloid Dispersions Ryoichi Yamamoto is presented for mesoscopic simulations of particle dispersions in liquid crystal solvents. It allows efficient mediated by the solvents. Demonstrations have been performed for the aggregation of colloid dispersions

  2. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G. (Gettysburg, PA); Clark, Roger F. (Frederick, MD); Kary, Tim (Union Bridge, MD)

    2010-07-20

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material that is parallel with the liquid surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on.times. ##EQU00001## where g is the gravitational constant, w is the horizontal width of the liquid, and f is the at least one frequency.

  3. Colloidal particles in liquid crystal films and at interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mykola Tasinkevych; Denis Andrienko

    2010-11-04

    This mini-review discusses the recent contribution of theoretical and computational physics as well as experimental efforts to the understanding of the behavior of colloidal particles in confined geometries and at liquid crystalline interfaces. Theoretical approaches used to study trapping, long- and short-range interactions, and assembly of solid particles and liquid inclusions are outlined. As an example, an interaction of a spherical colloidal particle with a nematic-isotropic interface and a pair interaction potential between two colloids at this interface are obtained by minimizing the Landau-de Gennes free energy functional using the finite-element method with adaptive meshes.

  4. Novel Fluctuations at a Constrained Liquid-Solid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chaudhuri; Debasish Chaudhuri; Surajit Sengupta

    2007-03-19

    We study the interface between a solid trapped within a bath of liquid by a suitably shaped non-uniform external potential. Such a potential may be constructed using lasers, external electric or magnetic fields or a surface template. We study a two dimensional case where a thin strip of solid, created in this way, is surrounded on either side by a bath of liquid with which it can easily exchange particles. Since height fluctuations of the interface cost energy, this interface is constrained to remain flat at all length scales. However, when such a solid is stressed by altering the depth of the potential; beyond a certain limit, it responds by relieving stress by novel interfacial fluctuations which involve addition or deletion of entire lattice layers of the crystal. This ``layering'' transition is a generic feature of the system regardless of the details of the interaction potential. We show how such interfacial fluctuations influence mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface. Tiny momentum impulses produce weak shock waves which travel through the interface and cause the spallation of crystal layers into the liquid. Kinetic and energetic constraints prevent spallation of partial layers from the crystal, a fact which may be of some practical use. We also study heat transport through the liquid-solid interface and obtain the resistances in liquid, solid and interfacial regions (Kapitza resistance) as the solid undergoes such layering transitions. Heat conduction, which shows strong signatures of the structural transformations, can be understood using a free volume calculation.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Charge-Transfer Reactions at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Katherine Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Study S N 2 Reaction at the Water–Chloroform Interface 2.1En- 6 Electronic Absorption Line Shapes at Interface 6.1at the liquid/liquid interface. The red ×s denote the

  6. Nanoparticles at liquid interfaces: Rotational dynamics and angular locking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razavi, Sepideh; Kretzschmar, Ilona; Koplik, Joel; Colosqui, Carlos E.

    2014-01-07

    Nanoparticles with different surface morphologies that straddle the interface between two immiscible liquids are studied via molecular dynamics simulations. The methodology employed allows us to compute the interfacial free energy at different angular orientations of the nanoparticle. Due to their atomistic nature, the studied nanoparticles present both microscale and macroscale geometrical features and cannot be accurately modeled as a perfectly smooth body (e.g., spheres and cylinders). Under certain physical conditions, microscale features can produce free energy barriers that are much larger than the thermal energy of the surrounding media. The presence of these energy barriers can effectively “lock” the particle at specific angular orientations with respect to the liquid-liquid interface. This work provides new insights on the rotational dynamics of Brownian particles at liquid interfaces and suggests possible strategies to exploit the effects of microscale features with given geometric characteristics.

  7. Multiple Liquid Bridges with Non-Smooth Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fel, Leonid; Ratner, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a coexistence of two axisymmetric liquid bridges LB_i and LB_m of two immiscible liquids i and m which are immersed in a third liquid (or gas) e and trapped between two smooth solid bodies with axisymmetric surfaces S_1,S_2 and free contact lines. Evolution of liquid bridges allows two different configurations of LB_i and LB_m with multiple (five or three) interfaces of non-smooth shape. We formulate a variational problem with volume constraints and present its governing equations supplemented by boundary conditions. We find a universal relationship between curvature of the interfaces and discuss the Young relation at the singular curve where all liquids meet together.

  8. Liquid/Liquid Interface Polymerized Porphyrin Membranes Displaying Size-Selective Molecular and Ionic Permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liquid/Liquid Interface Polymerized Porphyrin Membranes Displaying Size-Selective Molecular of ca. 3.5 Å. Molecular transport can be modulated by axially ligating pore- blocking moieties of studies of photophysical and photochemical processes, including solar-cell-related processes. In many

  9. Structure and Depletion at Fluoro- and Hydro-carbon/Water Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaoru Kashimoto; Jaesung Yoon; Binyang Hou; Chiu-hao Chen; Binhua Lin; Makoto Aratono; Takanori Takiue; Mark L. Schlossman

    2008-07-18

    The results of x-ray reflectivity studies of two oil/water (liquid/liquid) interfaces are inconsistent with recent predictions of the presence of a vapor-like depletion region at hydrophobic/aqueous interfaces. One of the oils, perfluorohexane, is a fluorocarbon whose super-hydrophobic interface with water provides a stringent test for the presence of a depletion layer. The other oil, heptane, is a hydrocarbon and, therefore, is more relevant to the study of biomolecular hydrophobicity. These results are consistent with the sub-angstrom proximity of water to soft hydrophobic materials.

  10. Formation of bubbly horizon in liquid-saturated porous medium by surface temperature oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldobin, Denis S

    2015-01-01

    We study non-isothermal diffusion transport of a weakly-soluble substance in a liquid-saturated porous medium being in contact with the reservoir of this substance. The surface temperature of the porous medium half-space oscillates in time, which results in a decaying solubility wave propagating deep into the porous medium. In such a system, the zones of saturated solution and non-dissolved phase coexist with the zones of undersaturated solution. The effect is firstly considered for the case of annual oscillation of the surface temperature of water-saturated ground being in contact with atmosphere. We reveal the phenomenon of formation of a near-surface bubbly horizon due to the temperature oscillation. An analytical theory of the phenomenon is developed. Further, the treatment is extended to the case of higher frequency oscillations and case of weakly-soluble solids and liquids.

  11. Formation of bubbly horizon in liquid-saturated porous medium by surface temperature oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis S. Goldobin; Pavel V. Krauzin

    2015-10-08

    We study non-isothermal diffusion transport of a weakly-soluble substance in a liquid-saturated porous medium being in contact with the reservoir of this substance. The surface temperature of the porous medium half-space oscillates in time, which results in a decaying solubility wave propagating deep into the porous medium. In such a system, the zones of saturated solution and non-dissolved phase coexist with the zones of undersaturated solution. The effect is firstly considered for the case of annual oscillation of the surface temperature of water-saturated ground being in contact with atmosphere. We reveal the phenomenon of formation of a near-surface bubbly horizon due to the temperature oscillation. An analytical theory of the phenomenon is developed. Further, the treatment is extended to the case of higher frequency oscillations and case of weakly-soluble solids and liquids.

  12. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  13. On the boundary layer structure near a highly permeable porous interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalwadi, Mohit P; Waters, Sarah L; Oliver, James M

    2015-01-01

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to study the canonical problem of steady laminar flow through a narrow two-dimensional channel blocked by a tight-fitting finite-length highly permeable porous obstacle. We investigate the behaviour of the local flow close to the interface between the single-phase and porous regions (governed by the incompressible Navier--Stokes and Darcy flow equations, respectively). We solve for the local flow in the limits of low and high Reynolds number, facilitating an understanding of the nature of the transition from Poiseuille to plug to Poiseuille flow in each of these limits. Significant analytic progress is made in the high-Reynolds-number limit, as we are able to explore in detail the rich boundary layer structure that occurs. We derive general results for the interfacial stress and for the conditions that couple the flow in the regions away from the interface. We consider the three-dimensional generalization to unsteady laminar flow through and around a tight-f...

  14. Dependence of solid-liquid interface free energy on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, S R; Mendelev, M I

    2014-09-01

    The Turnbull relation is widely believed to enable prediction of solid–liquid interface (SLI) free energies from measurements of the latent heat and the solid density. Ewing proposed an additional contribution to the SLI free energy to account for variations in liquid structure near the interface. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate whether SLI free energy depends on liquid structure. Analysis of the MD simulation data for 11 fcc metals demonstrated that the Turnbull relation is only a rough approximation for highly ordered liquids, whereas much better agreement is observed with Ewing’s theory. A modification to Ewing’s relation is proposed in this study that was found to provide excellent agreement with MD simulation data.

  15. Methods and systems for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G. (Gettysburg, PA); Clark, Roger F. (Frederick, MD)

    2011-10-04

    Methods and systems are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface, including providing a vessel configured to contain an at least partially melted material; detecting radiation reflected from a surface of a liquid portion of the at least partially melted material; providing sound energy to the surface; measuring a disturbance on the surface; calculating at least one frequency associated with the disturbance; and determining a thickness of the liquid portion based on the at least one frequency, wherein the thickness is calculated based on L=(2m-1)v.sub.s/4f, where f is the frequency where the disturbance has an amplitude maximum, v.sub.s is the speed of sound in the material, and m is a positive integer (1, 2, 3, . . . ).

  16. Experimental Study of Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Liquid Piston Compressor/Expander Using Porous Media Inserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    or a compressor for compressed natural gas (CNG). Highlights · Porous medias role to improve compres- sor is the predominant contribution to im- provements Keywords: Liquid piston, porous media, gas compression / expansion combined with natural gas in a gas turbine to boost9 combustion e ciency. As a storage device, its e -10

  17. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C. (Fairfield, OH); Taylor, Larry T. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  18. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  19. Thermoelectric energy recovery at ionic-liquid/electrode interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bonetti; Sawako Nakamae; Bo Tao Huang; Thomas J. Salez; Cecile Wiertel-Gasquet; Michel Roger

    2015-06-22

    A Thermally Chargeable Capacitor containing a binary solution of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMIMTFSI) in acetonitrile is electrically charged by applying a tempera- ture gradient to two ideally polarisable electrodes. The corresponding thermoelectric coefficient is -1.7 mV/K for platinum foil electrodes and -0.3 mV/K for nanoporous carbon electrodes. Stored electrical energy is extracted by discharging the capacitor through a resistor. The measured capacitance of the electrode/ionic- liquid interface is 5 micro $\\mu$F for each platinum electrode while it becomes four orders of magnitude larger $\\approx 36$ mF for a single nanoporous carbon electrode. Reproducibility of the effect through repeated charging-discharging cycles under a steady-state temperature gradient demonstrates the robustness of the electrical charging pro- cess at the liquid/electrode interface. The acceleration of the charging by convective flows is also observed. This offers the possibility to convert waste-heat into electric energy without exchanging electrons between ions and electrodes, in contrast to what occurs in most thermogalvanic cells.

  20. Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halidesolution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ion Partitioning at the liquid...

  1. Comparison of the Adsorption of Linear Alkanesulfonate and Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonate Surfactants at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    at Liquid Interfaces M. R. Watry and G. L. Richmond* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of Oregon, Eugene/water interfaces. The linear alkane- and alkylbenzenesulfonates studied are, respectively, dodecanesulfonate of the number density of surfactant molecules at the interface. The change in aromatic ring orientation

  2. WETTING, SPREADING AND REACTIONS AT LIQUID/SOLID INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    on Glass- Metal Interface Reactions and Adherence," J. Am.oxide on the metal at the interface directly: Fe + H0 - +rigid phase at the interface at temperature introduce

  3. Freezing of 4 He and its liquid-solid interface from density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caupin, Frédéric

    Freezing of 4 He and its liquid-solid interface from density functional theory F. Ancilotto,1 M of the method that accurately describes the solid phase and the freezing transition of liquid 4 He at zero phenomenon of crystallization waves, i.e., melting-freezing waves which can easily propagate on the liquid

  4. Control and ultrasonic actuation of a gas-liquid interface in a microfluidic chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Xu; Daniel Attinger

    2009-12-15

    This article describes the design and manufacturing of a microfluidic chip, allowing for the actuation of a gas-liquid interface and of the neighboring fluid. A first way to control the interface motion is to apply a pressure difference across it. In this case, the efficiency of three different micro-geometries at anchoring the interface is compared. Also, the critical pressures needed to move the interface are measured and compared to theoretical result. A second way to control the interface motion is by ultrasonic excitation. When the excitation is weak, the interface exhibits traveling waves, which follow a dispersion equation. At stronger ultrasonic levels, standing waves appear on the interface, with frequencies that are half integer multiple of the excitation frequency. An associated microstreaming flow field observed in the vicinity of the interface is characterized. The meniscus and associated streaming flow have the potential to transport particles and mix reagents.

  5. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-10-14

    Life creates some of its most robust, extreme surface materials not from solids but from liquids: a purely liquid interface, stabilized by underlying nanotexture, makes carnivorous plant leaves ultraslippery, the eye optically perfect and dirt-resistant, our knees lubricated and pressure-tolerant, and insect feet reversibly adhesive and shape-adaptive. Novel liquid surfaces based on this idea have recently been shown to display unprecedented omniphobic, self-healing, anti-ice, antifouling, optical, and adaptive properties. In this Perspective, we present a framework and a path forward for developing and designing such liquid surfaces into sophisticated, versatile multifunctional materials. Drawing on concepts from solid materials design andmore »fluid dynamics, we outline how the continuous dynamics, responsiveness, and multiscale patternability of a liquid surface layer can be harnessed to create a wide range of unique, active interfacial functions-able to operate in harsh, changing environments-not achievable with static solids. We discuss how, in partnership with the underlying substrate, the liquid surface can be programmed to adaptively and reversibly reconfigure from a defect-free, molecularly smooth, transparent interface through a range of finely tuned liquid topographies in response to environmental stimuli. In conclusion, with nearly unlimited design possibilities and unmatched interfacial properties, liquid materials-as long-term stable interfaces yet in their fully liquid state-may potentially transform surface design everywhere from medicine to architecture to energy infrastructure.« less

  6. The molecular structure of the interface between water and a hydrophobic substrate is liquid-vapor like

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam P. Willard; David Chandler

    2014-07-16

    With molecular simulation for water and a tunable hydrophobic substrate, we apply the instantaneous interface construction [A. P. Willard and D. Chandler, J. Phys. Chem. B, 114, 1954 (2010)] to examine the similarity between a water-vapor interface and a water-hydrophobic surface interface. The intrinsic interface refers to molecular structure in terms of distances from the instantaneous interface. We show that attractive interactions between a hydrophobic surface and water affect capillary wave fluctuations of the instantaneous liquid interface, but these attractive interactions have essentially no effect on the intrinsic interface. Further, the intrinsic interface of liquid water and a hydrophobic substrate differs little from that of water and its vapor.The same is not true, we show, for an interface between water and a hydrophilic substrate. In that case, strong directional substrate-water interactions disrupt the liquid-vapor-like interfacial hydrogen bonding network.

  7. Effects of liquid pore water on acoustic wave propagation in snow as a Biot-type porous material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidler, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    A method to estimate phase velocity and attenuation of acoustic waves in the presence of liquid water in a snowpack is presented. The method is based on Biot's theory of wave propagation in porous materials. Empirical relations and a priori information is used to characterize snow as a porous material as a function of porosity. Plane wave theory and an equivalent pore fluid are used to solve Biot's differential equations and to asses the impact of the air and water in the pore space. The liquid water in the pore space of a snow pack reduces the velocity of the first compressional wave by roughly 300 m/s for every 0.1 increase in liquid water saturation. Also the attenuation of the compressional waves is increased with increasing liquid water content. Two end member models for compaction are evaluated to asses the importance of an independent density measurement for an estimate of liquid pore water saturation in snow with acoustic waves. The two end members correspond to no compaction at all and to a melting s...

  8. An Open Port Sampling Interface for Liquid Introduction Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2015-08-25

    RATIONALE: A simple method to introduce unprocessed samples into a solvent for rapid characterization by liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry has been lacking. The continuous flow, self-cleaning open port sampling interface introduced here fills this void. METHODS: The open port sampling interface used a vertically aligned, co-axial tube arrangement enabling solvent delivery to the sampling end of the device through the tubing annulus and solvent aspiration down the center tube and into the mass spectrometer ionization source via the commercial APCI emitter probe. The solvent delivery rate to the interface was set to exceed the aspiration rate creatingmore »a continuous sampling interface along with a constant, self-cleaning spillover of solvent from the top of the probe. RESULTS: Using the open port sampling interface with positive ion mode APCI and a hybrid quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer, rapid, direct sampling and analysis possibilities are exemplified with plastics, ballpoint and felt tip ink pens, skin, and vegetable oils. These results demonstrated that the open port sampling interface could be used as a simple, versatile and self-cleaning system to rapidly introduce multiple types of unprocessed, sometimes highly concentrated and complex, samples into a solvent flow stream for subsequent ionization and analysis by mass spectrometry. The basic setup presented here could be incorporated with any self-aspirating liquid introduction ionization source (e.g., ESI, APCI, APPI, ICP, etc.) or any type of atmospheric pressure sampling ready mass spectrometer system. CONCLUSIONS: The open port sampling interface provides a means to introduce and quickly analyze unprocessed solid or liquid samples with liquid introduction atmospheric pressure ionization source without fear of sampling interface or ionization source contamination.« less

  9. A Smooth Interface Method for Simulating Liquid Crystal Colloid Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryoichi Yamamoto; Yasuya Nakayama; Kang Kim

    2003-10-30

    A new method is presented for mesoscopic simulations of particle dispersions in liquid crystal solvents. It allows efficient first-principle simulations of the dispersions involving many particles with many-body interactions mediated by the solvents. Demonstrations have been performed for the aggregation of colloid dispersions in two-dimensional nematic and smectic-C* solvents neglecting hydrodynamic effects, which will be taken into account in the near future.

  10. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  11. Theory of acoustic scattering by supported ridges at a solid-liquid interface A. Khelif,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    linear and nonlinear solutions to the acoustic wave equation is presented in some details in Sec. II/liquid interface. We treat the problem of scattering of an incident acoustic plane wave by a single ridge and two.25. y, 62.60. v, 68.08. p I. INTRODUCTION The problem of the interaction between acoustic waves

  12. ARTICLE IN PRESS Modeling hydrogen sulfide emissions across the gas liquid interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    ARTICLE IN PRESS Modeling hydrogen sulfide emissions across the gas­ liquid interface-film theory Hydrogen sulfide Process-based model Lagoon flux Mass transfer a b s t r a c t Hydrogen sulfide (H waste treatment lagoons are widely used to store and treat hog excreta at commercial hog farms. Hydrogen

  13. The effect of the potential on the surface plasmon resonance at a metal-liquid interface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lioubimov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    of an electric potential applied to a gold film on the surface plasmon resonance phenomenon at the metal-liquid interface was studied. The oscillating shifts of the resonance angle and a gradual average drift were observed with a voltage cycling at different...

  14. A sharp interface method for compressible liquid-vapor flow with phase transition and surface tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fechter, Stefan; Rohde, Christian; Zeiler, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The numerical approximation of non-isothermal liquid-vapor flow within the compressible regime is a difficult task because complex physical effects at the phase interfaces can govern the global flow behavior. We present a sharp interface approach which treats the interface as a shock-wave like discontinuity. Any mixing of fluid phases is avoided by using the flow solver in the bulk regions only, and a ghost-fluid approach close to the interface. The coupling states for the numerical solution in the bulk regions are determined by the solution of local multi-phase Riemann problems across the interface. The Riemann solution accounts for the relevant physics by enforcing appropriate jump conditions at the phase boundary. A wide variety of interface effects can be handled in a thermodynamically consistent way. This includes surface tension or mass/energy transfer by phase transition. Moreover, the local normal speed of the interface, which is needed to calculate the time evolution of the interface, is given by the...

  15. Bijel - a novel composite material from colloids on liquid-liquid interfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herzig, Eva M

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials generally consist of different components which individually exhibit an entirely different material behaviour than within the composite. Here, two immiscible liquids are stabilised with solid particles ...

  16. Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas J. Tobias; Abraham C. Stern; Marcel D. Baer; Yan Levin; Christopher J. Mundy

    2013-06-28

    Chemistry occurring at or near the surfaces of aqueous droplets and thin films in the atmosphere influences air quality and climate. Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly useful for gaining atomic-scale insight into the structure and reactivity of aqueous interfaces in the atmosphere. Here we review simulation studies of atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces, with an emphasis on ions that play important roles in the chemistry of atmospheric aerosols. In addition to surveying results from simulation studies, we discuss challenges to the refinement and experimental validation of the methodology for simulating ion adsorption to the air-water interface, and recent advances in elucidating the driving forces for adsorption. We also review the recent development of a dielectric continuum theory that is capable of reproducing simulation and experimental data on ion behavior at aqueous interfaces.

  17. Ionic liquid ion source emitter arrays fabricated on bulk porous substrates for spacecraft propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, Daniel George

    2011-01-01

    Ionic Liquid Ion Sources (ILIS) are a subset of electrospray capable of producing bipolar beams of pure ions from ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are room temperature molten salts, characterized by negligible vapor pressures, ...

  18. Computational study of ion distributions at the air/liquid methanol interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiuquan; Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2011-06-16

    Molecular dynamic simulations with polarizable potentials were performed to systematically investigate the distribution of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, and SrCl2 at the air/liquid methanol interface. The density profiles indicated that there is no substantial enhancement of anions at the interface for the NaX systems in contrast to what was observed at the air/aqueous interface. The surfactant-like shape of the larger more polarizable halide anions is compensated by the surfactant nature of methanol itself. As a result, methanol hydroxy groups strongly interacted with one side of polarizable anions, in which their induced dipole points, and methanol methyl groups were more likely to be found near the positive pole of anion induced dipoles. Furthermore, salts were found to disrupt the surface structure of methanol, reducing the observed enhancement of methyl groups at the outer edge of the air/liquid methanol interface. With the additional of salts to methanol, the computed surface potentials increased, which is in contrast to what is observed in corresponding aqueous systems, where the surface potential decreases with the addition of salts. Both of these trends have been indirectly observed with experiments. This was found to be due to the propensity of anions for the air/water interface that is not present at the air/liquid methanol interface. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  19. Interface for the rapid analysis of liquid samples by accelerator mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Thomas, Avi; Daley, Paul F; Salazar Quintero, Gary A; Bench, Graham

    2014-02-04

    An interface for the analysis of liquid sample having carbon content by an accelerator mass spectrometer including a wire, defects on the wire, a system for moving the wire, a droplet maker for producing droplets of the liquid sample and placing the droplets of the liquid sample on the wire in the defects, a system that converts the carbon content of the droplets of the liquid sample to carbon dioxide gas in a helium stream, and a gas-accepting ion source connected to the accelerator mass spectrometer that receives the carbon dioxide gas of the sample in a helium stream and introduces the carbon dioxide gas of the sample into the accelerator mass spectrometer.

  20. Anchoring effects at the isotropic-nematic interface in liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. C. Vink

    2007-06-18

    The isotropic-to-nematic transition in liquid crystals is studied in d=3 spatial dimensions. A simulation method is proposed to measure the angle dependent interfacial tension g(theta), with theta the anchoring angle of the nematic phase at the interface. In addition, an alternative liquid crystal model is introduced, defined on a lattice. The advantage of the lattice model is that accurate simulations of anchoring effects become possible. For the lattice model, g(theta) depends sensitively on the nearest-neighbor pair interaction, and both stable and metastable anchoring angles can be detected. We also measure g(theta) for an off-lattice fluid of soft rods. For soft rods, only one stable anchoring angle is found, corresponding to homogeneous alignment of the nematic director in the plane of the interface. This finding is in agreement with most theoretical predictions obtained for hard rods.

  1. Topological defects in electric double layers of ionic liquids at carbon interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Feng, Guang; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-06-07

    The structure and properties of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids is of interest in a wide range of areas including energy storage, catalysis, lubrication, and many more. Theories describing the electrical double layer for ionic liquids have been proposed, however a full molecular level description of the double layer is lacking. To date, studies have been predominantly focused on ion distributions normal to the surface, however the 3D nature of the electrical double layer in ionic liquids requires a full picture of the double layer structure not only normal to the surface, but also in plane. Here wemore »utilize 3D force mapping to probe the in plane structure of an ionic liquid at a graphite interface and report the direct observation of the structure and properties of topological defects. The observation of ion layering at structural defects such as step-edges, reinforced by molecular dynamics simulations, defines the spatial resolution of the method. Observation of defects allows for the establishment of the universality of ionic liquid behavior vs. separation from the carbon surface and to map internal defect structure. In conclusion, these studies offer a universal pathway for probing the internal structure of topological defects in soft condensed matter on the nanometer level in three dimensions.« less

  2. Charge transfer effects of ions at the liquid water/vapor interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.

    2014-05-14

    Charge transfer (CT), the movement of small amounts of electron density between non-bonded pairs, has been suggested as a driving force for a variety of physical processes. Herein, we examine the effect of CT on ion adsorption to the water liquid-vapor interface. Using a CT force field for molecular dynamics, we construct a potential of mean force (PMF) for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cl{sup ?}, and I{sup ?}. The PMFs were produced with respect to an average interface and an instantaneous interface. An analysis of the PMF relative to the instantaneous surface reveals that the area in which the anions experience a free energy minimum is quite narrow, and the cations feel a steeply repulsive free energy near the interface. CT is seen to have only minor effects on the overall free energy profiles. However, the long-ranged effects of ions are highlighted by the CT model. Due to CT, the water molecules at the surface become charged, even when the ion is over 15 Å away from the surface.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Liquid-Solid and Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Metals and Alloys, Grant DE-FG02-06ER46321

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Stuart

    2012-09-27

    The research supported by ER46321 was designed to understand in microscopic detail the structures of the interfaces between liquid metals and alloys and solid media. The system chosen for study, because of detailed knowledge of the structure of the corresponding liquid alloy-vapor interface, was the interface between a Si crystal and a dilute alloy of Pb in Ga. Experimental study of the Si:PbGa interface was anticipated to be very difficult; it requires preparation of an interface between a liquid metal and a solid surface that is flat to better than a nanometer on the scale length of the x-ray coherence, alignment of the x-ray beam and the surface in the sub-micro radian regime, and the use of high energy x-rays to penetrate the window and reach the interface without disastrous loss of intensity. The experimental design was subject to compromises forced by the limit to the highest x-ray energy available at the ChemMatCARS beam-line, namely 30 keV, which reduced the scattered signal relative to what can be obtained with higher x-ray energy. Although considerable progress was achieved during the support period and its no-cost extension, the difficulties encountered prevented completion of the studies and the data collected are incomplete. These data hint at the existence of unexpected structural features of the interface, in particular that Pb dimers play an important role in the interfacial structure. These data provide a different picture of the interface from the pentagonal structure inferred to be present in the interface between pure Pb and Si 001 (Nature 408, 839 (2000)), but much like the Ga dimers in the interface between liquid Ga and the 100 face of diamond (Nature 390, 379 (1997), J. Chem. Phys. 123, 104703 (2005)). However, during the latter part of the support period significant progress was made in the theoretical description of the liquid metal-crystal interface. In particular, stimulated by the results of an experimental study of the interface between liquid Hg and the reconstructed (0001) face of sapphire, we developed an extension of the self-consistent quantum Monte Carlo scheme previously used to study the structure of the liquid metal-vapor interface. The calculated density distribution is in very good agreement with that inferred from the experimental data. We conclude, contrary to the original interpretation offered by Tamam et al (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, I, 1041-1045), thast to account for the difference in structure between the liquid Hg-vapor and liquid Hg-reconstructed (0001) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces it is not necessary to assume there is charge transfer from the Hg to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Rather, the available experimental data are adequately reproduced when the van der Waals interaction of the Al and O atoms with Hg atoms and the exclusion of the electron density from the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via repulsion of the electrons from the closed shells of the ions in the solid are accounted for. We believe this interpretation will be applicable to a wide range of liquid metal-crystal interfaces.

  4. Trapping energy of a spherical particle on a curved liquid interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Léandri; Alois Würger

    2014-01-29

    We derive the trapping energy of a colloidal particle at a liquid interface with contact angle h and principal curvatures c1 and c2. The boundary conditions at the particle surface are significantly simplified by introducing the shift e of its vertical position. We discuss the undulating contact line and the curvatureinduced lateral forces for a single particle and a pair of nearby particles. The single-particle trapping energy is found to decrease with the square of both the total curvature c1 + c2 and the anisotropy c1 ? c2. In the case of non-uniform curvatures, the resulting lateral force pushes particles toward more strongly curved regions.

  5. Early-time interface instabilities in high intensity aero-breakup of liquid drop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, X Y

    2014-01-01

    The early-time interface instabilities in high intensity (high Weber number and high Reynolds number) aero-breakup of a liquid drop are investigated by numerical simulations. A combined analysis based on simulation results and linear-instability theory show that both RT (Rayleigh-Taylor) and KH (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instabilities contributes the dominant disturbances originate from about the half way from the stagnation point to the equator. This is verified further with a specially modified simulation, which decreases the effect of KH instability while keeps other flow properties unchanged.

  6. On the movement of a liquid front in an unsaturated, fractured porous medium, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J.J.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to present approximate analytical solutions of the fracture flow which gives the position of the liquid fracture front as a function of time. These solutions demonstrate that the liquid movement in the fracture can be classified into distinctive time periods, or flow regimes. It is also shown that when plotted versus time using a log-log scale, the liquid fracture front position asymptotically approaches a series of line segments. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run utilizing input data applicable to the densely welded, fractured tuff found at Yucca Mountain in order to confirm these observations. 19 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Smouldering Combustion of Organic Liquids in Porous Media for Remediating NAPL-contaminated Soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pironi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated the potential of smouldering combustion to be employed as a remediation approach for soil contaminated by non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Small-scale (~15 cm), proof-of-concept experiments ...

  8. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF POROUS MEDIA TO GAS-WETTING FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND INJECTIVITY IN GAS-LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2003-12-01

    Wettability alteration to intermediate gas-wetting in porous media by treatment with FC-759, a fluoropolymer polymer, has been studied experimentally. Berea sandstone was used as the main rock sample in our work and its wettability before and after chemical treatment was studied at various temperatures from 25 to 93 C. We also studied recovery performance for both gas/oil and oil/water systems for Berea sandstone before and after wettability alteration by chemical treatment. Our experimental study shows that chemical treatment with FC-759 can result in: (1) wettability alteration from strong liquid-wetting to stable intermediate gas-wetting at room temperature and at elevated temperatures; (2) neutral wetting for gas, oil, and water phases in two-phase flow; (3) significant increase in oil mobility for gas/oil system; and (4) improved recovery behavior for both gas/oil and oil/water systems. This work reveals a potential for field application for improved gas-well deliverability and well injectivity by altering the rock wettability around wellbore in gas condensate reservoirs from strong liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting.

  9. Shape and effective spring constant of liquid interfaces probed at the nanometer scale: finite size effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Baubigny, Julien Dupré; Fabié, Laure; Delmas, Mathieu; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Legros, Marc; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the shape and mechanical properties of liquid interfaces down to nanometer scale by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with in situ micromanipulation techniques. In both cases, the interface is probed with a cylindrical nanofiber with radius R of the order of 25-100 nm. The effective spring constant of the nanomeniscus oscillated around its equilibrium position is determined by static and frequency-modulation (FM) AFM modes. In the case of an unbounded meniscus, we find that the effective spring constant k is proportional to the surface tension {\\gamma} of the liquid through k = (0.51 +- 0.06) {\\gamma}, regardless of the excitation frequency from quasistatic up to 450 kHz. A model based on the equilibrium shape of the meniscus reproduces well the experimental data. Electron microscopy allowed to visualize the meniscus profile around the fiber with a lateral resolution of the order of 10 nm and confirmed its catenary shape. The influence of a lateral co...

  10. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  11. Modeling and analysis of the movement of fluid-fluid interfaces in porous media coupled with turbulent free flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    allows the coupling of a laminar single-phase free flow and a two-phase porous-medium flow under non be necessary Coupling Situation coupling exists for laminar free flow (Mostaf et al. 2011) boundary layer DuMux in use for Darcy flow and laminar Stokes flow no RANS solver in DuMux or DUNE PDELab Open

  12. Structure of gas-liquid interface and hydrophobic interface for urea aqueous solution: a computer simulation study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Meng

    2009-05-15

    of water structure by the urea solute on the hydrophobic interface in terms of the orientation and number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule....

  13. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  14. Processing of alumina-niobium interfaces via liquid-film-assistedjoining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Gronsky, Ronald; Glaeser,Andreas M.

    2005-02-15

    Alumina-niobium interfaces were fabricated at 1400 C via solid-state diffusion brazing of a 127-{micro}m-thick niobium foil between alumina blocks. Prior to brazing, some of the alumina mating surfaces, both polished and unpolished, were evaporation-coated with copper films {approx}1.4 {micro}m, {approx}3.0 {micro}m, and {approx}5.5 {micro}m thick to induce liquid-film-assisted joining at the brazing temperature. The effects of copper film thickness and surface roughness on fracture characteristics and ceramic-metal interfacial microstructure were investigated by room-temperature four-point bend tests, optical microscopy, profilometry, and atomic force microscopy. The average strength of bonds between niobium and polished alumina substrates increased with the introduction of copper film interlayers, and the scatter in strength tended to decrease, with an optimum combination of strength and Weibull modulus arising for a copper film thickness of 3.0 {micro}m. The strength characteristics of niobium bonded to unpolished alumina substrates were also improved by liquid-film-assisted joining, but were unaffected by the thickness of the copper interlayers.

  15. Solid-liquid interface free energies of pure bcc metals and B2 phases

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wilson, S. R.; Gunawardana, K. G. S. H.; Mendelev, M. I.

    2015-04-07

    The solid-liquid interface (SLI) free energy was determined from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for several body centered cubic (bcc) metals and B2 metallic compounds (space group: Pm3?m ; prototype: CsCl). In order to include a bcc metal with a low melting temperature in our study, a semi-empirical potential was developed for Na. Two additional synthetic “Na” potentials were also developed to explore the effect of liquid structure and latent heat on the SLI free energy. The obtained MD data were compared with the empirical Turnbull, Laird, and Ewing relations. All three relations are found to predict the general trend observedmore »in the MD data for bcc metals obtained within the present study. However, only the Laird and Ewing relations are able to predict the trend obtained within the sequence of “Na” potentials. The Laird relation provides the best prediction for our MD data and other MD data for bcc metals taken from the literature. Overall, the Laird relation also agrees well with our B2 data but requires a proportionality constant that is substantially different from the bcc case. It also fails to explain a considerable difference between the SLI free energies of some B2 phases which have nearly the same melting temperature. In contrast, this difference is satisfactorily described by the Ewing relation. Thus, the Ewing relation obtained from the bcc dataset also provides a reasonable description of the B2 data.« less

  16. Solid - Liquid Phase Transition in a Gibbs Monolayer of Melissic Acid at the n-Hexane - Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksey M. Tikhonov

    2015-12-02

    A sharp phase transition from a crystalline state with the area per molecule A = (17 +/- 1) Angstrom^2 to a liquid state with A = (23 +/- 1) Angstrom^2 at the n-hexane - water interface in a Gibbs monolayer of melissic acid has been revealed in data of X-ray reflectometry with the use of synchrotron radiation.

  17. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  18. Gas Bubbles and Gas Pancakes at Liquid/Solid Interface: A Continuum Theory Incorporated with Molecular Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaoxia Li; Xuehua Zhang; Lijuan Zhang; Xiaocheng Zeng; Jun Hu; Haiping Fang

    2007-10-27

    The states of gas accumulated at the liquid-solid interface are analyzed based on the continuum theory where the Hamaker constant is used to describe the long-range interaction at the microscopic scale. The Hamaker constant is always negative, whereas the gas spreading coefficient can be either sign. Despite the complexity of gas, including that the density profile may not be uniform due to absorption on both solid and liquid surfaces, we predict three possible gas states at the liquid-solid interface, i.e. complete wetting, partial wetting and pseudopartial wetting. These possible gas states correspond respectively to a gas pancake (or film) surrounded by a wet solid, a gas bubble with a finite contact angle, and a gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas pancake. Typical thickness of the gas pancakes is at the nanoscale within the force range of the long-range interaction, whereas the radius of the gas bubbles can be large. The state of gas bubble(s) coexisting with a gas film is predicted theoretically for the first time. Our theoretical results can contribute to the development of a unified picture of gas nucleation at the liquid-solid interface.

  19. Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 5 2000 56 63 Colloidal crystals as templates for porous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 5 2000 56 63 Colloidal crystals as templates-packed colloidal crystals are promising precursors for novel materials, but only after appropriate methods by replicating the structure of colloidal crystals into durable solid matrices. Such materials with structured

  20. Adsorption Trajectories and Free-Energy Separatrices for Colloidal Particles in Contact with a Liquid-Liquid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. de Graaf; M. Dijkstra; R. van Roij

    2010-02-18

    We apply the recently developed triangular tessellation technique as presented in [J. de Graaf et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 051405 (2009)] to calculate the free energy associated with the adsorption of anisotropic colloidal particles at a flat interface. From the free-energy landscape, we analyze the adsorption process, using a simplified version of Langevin dynamics. The present result is a first step to understand the time-dependent behavior of colloids near interfaces. This study shows a wide range of adsorption trajectories, where the emphasis lies on a strong dependence of the dynamics on the orientation of the colloid at initial contact with the interface. We believe that the observed orientational dependence in our simple model can be recovered in suitable experimental systems.

  1. The Hydrated Proton at the Water Liquid/Vapor Interface Matt K. Petersen, Srinivasan S. Iyengar, Tyler J. F. Day, and Gregory A. Voth*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    The Hydrated Proton at the Water Liquid/Vapor Interface Matt K. Petersen, Srinivasan S. Iyengar ReceiVed: July 23, 2004; In Final Form: August 22, 2004 The hydrated proton was studied at the water the migration of the excess proton to and about the interface through the fluctuating bond topology described

  2. Forces between a Rigid Probe Particle and a Liquid Interface: Comparison between Experiment and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    of the surface forces acting between solid-water and oil-water interfaces is critical in order to control of Chemistry, Particulate Fluids Processing Centre, The University of Melbourne, VIC, 3010 Australia Received The measurement of surface forces has, for many years, been the focus of much interest in the field of colloid

  3. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Axnanda, Stephanus [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Crumlin, Ethan J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mao, Baohua [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (Republic of China); Rani, Sana [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chang, Rui [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (Republic of China); Karlsson, Patrik G. [VG Scienta,Uppsala (Sweden); Edwards, Mårten O. M. [VG Scienta,Uppsala (Sweden); Lundqvist, Måns [VG Scienta,Uppsala (Sweden); Moberg, Robert [VG Scienta,Uppsala (Sweden); Ross, Phil [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hussain, Zahid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Zhi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (Republic of China); Shanghai Tech Univ., Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²? and Pt?? interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.

  4. Anomalous Capacitance Maximum of the Glassy Carbon-Ionic Liquid Interface through Dilution with Organic Solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    with Organic Solvents David J. Bozym, Betul Uralcan, David T. Limmer, Michael A. Pope, Nicholas J. Szamreta liquid with miscible organic solvents on the differential capacitance of the glassy carbon,2-dichloroethane, a low- dielectric constant solvent, yield the largest gains in capacitance near the open circuit

  5. In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface – Subproject to Co-PI Eric E. Roden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric E. Roden

    2007-11-02

    Although the biogeochemical processes underlying in situ bioremediation technologies are increasingly well understood, field-scale heterogeneity (both physical and biogeochemical) remains a major obstacle to successful field-scale implementation. In particular, slow release of contamination from low-permeability regions (primarily by diffusive/dispersive mass transfer) can hinder the effectiveness of remediation. The research described in this report was conducted in conjunction with a project entitled “In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface”, which was funded through the Field Research element of the former NABIR Program (now the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Dr. Timothy Scheibe (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) was the overall PI/PD for the project, which included Scott Brooks (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and Eric Roden (formerly at The University of Alabama, now at the University of Wisconsin) as separately-funded co-PIs. The overall goal of the project was to evaluate strategies that target bioremediation at interfaces between high- and low-permeability regions of an aquifer in order to minimize the rate of contaminant transfer into high-permeability/high fluid flow zones. The research was conducted at the Area 2 site of the Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Area 2 is a shallow pathway for migration of contaminated groundwater to seeps in the upper reach of Bear Creek at ORNL, mainly through a ca. 1 m thick layer of gravel located 4-5 m below the ground surface. Hydrological tracer studies indicate that the gravel layer receives input of uranium from both upstream sources and from diffusive mass transfer out of highly contaminated fill and saprolite materials above and below the gravel layer. We sought to test the hypothesis that injection of electron donor into this layer would induce formation of a redox barrier in the less conductive materials above and below the gravel, resulting in decreased mass transfer of uranium out these materials and attendant declines in groundwater U(VI) concentration. Details regarding the planning, execution, and results of the in situ biostimulation experiment will be provided in separate peer-reviewed publications by the project PIs and colleagues. This report summarizes research activities conducted at The University of Alabama (2002-2005) and the University of Wisconsin (2005-2007) in support of the field experiment, which included (1) chemical and microbiological characterization of sediment cores from Area 2; (2) sediment slurry experiments with Area 2 materials which evaluated the biogeochemical response to ethanol amendment and the potential for U(VI) reduction; (3) analysis of the response of groundwater microbial communities to in situ biostimulation. In addition, biogeochemical reaction models of microbial metabolism in ethanol-stimulated sediments, developed based on sediment slurry experiments, are described.

  6. TESTING VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID-AIR INTERFACE CORROSION IN SIMULATED ENVIRONMENTS OF HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELLED TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.

    2013-05-30

    Electrochemical coupon testing were performed on 6 Hanford tank solution simulants and corresponding condensate simulants to evaluate the susceptibility of vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. Additionally, partial-immersion coupon testing were performed on the 6 tank solution simulants to compliment the accelerated electrochemical testing. Overall, the testing suggests that the SY-102 high nitrate solution is the most aggressive of the six solution simulants evaluated. Alternatively, the most passive solution, based on both electrochemical testing and coupon testing, was AY-102 solution. The presence of ammonium nitrate in the simulants at the lowest concentration tested (0.001 M) had no significant effect. At higher concentrations (0.5 M), ammonium nitrate appears to deter localized corrosion, suggesting a beneficial effect of the presence of the ammonium ion. The results of this research suggest that there is a threshold concentration of ammonium ions leading to inhibition of corrosion, thereby suggesting the need for further experimentation to identify the threshold.

  7. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF POROUS MEDIA TO GAS-WETTING FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY AND INJECTIVITY IN GAS-LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2002-10-21

    The authors have performed a number of imbibition tests with the treated and untreated cores in nC{sub 10}, nC{sub 14}, and nC{sub 16} and a natural gas condensate liquid. Imbibition tests for nC{sub 14} and nC{sub 16} were also carried out at elevated temperatures of 100 C and 140 C. An experimental polymer synthesized for the purpose of this project was used in core treatment. Imbibition results are very promising and imply liquid condensate mobility enhancement in the treated core. They also performed flow tests to quantify the increase in well deliverability and to simulate flow under realistic field conditions. In the past we have performed extensive testing of wettability alteration in intermediate gas wetting for polymer FC759 at temperatures of 24 C and 90 C. The results were promising for the purpose of gas well deliverability improvement in gas condensate wells. We used FC759 to lower the surface energy of various rocks. The model fluids nC{sub 10}, and nC{sub 14} were used to represent condensate liquid, and air was used as the gas phase. A new (L-16349) polymer, which has been recently synthesized for the purpose of the project, was used in the work to be presented here. L-16349 is a water-soluble fluorochemical polymer, with low order, neutral PH and very low volatile organic compound (VOC < 9.1 g/l). It is light yellow in appearance and density in 25% solution is 1.1 g/cc. Polymer L-16349 is very safe from environmental considerations and it is economical for our purpose. In this work, in addition to nC{sub 10}, and nC{sub 14}, we used two other liquids nC{sub 16}, and a liquid condensate in order to study the effect of wettability alteration with a broader range of fluids.

  8. Heat transfer between stratified immiscible liquid layers driven by gas bubbling across the interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The modeling of molten core debris in the CORCON and VANESA computer codes as overlying, immiscible liquid layers is discussed as it relates to the transfer of heat and mass between the layers. This initial structure is identified and possible configurations are discussed. The stratified, gas-sparged configuration that is presently employed in CORCON and VANESA is examined and the existing literature for interlayer heat transfer is assessed. An experiment which was designed to measure interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is described. The results are presented and compared to previously existing models. A dimensionless correlation for stratified, interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is developed. This relationship is recommended for inclusion in CORCON-MOD2 for heat transfer between stratified, molten liquid layers. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; et al

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquidmore »and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²? and Pt?? interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.« less

  10. Wall-fluid and liquid-gas interfaces of model colloid-polymer mixtures by simulation and theory Andrea Fortini,* Marjolein Dijkstra, and Matthias Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Matthias

    of a model suspension of hard sphere colloids with diameter c and nonadsorbing ideal polymer coils stabilized colloids and nonadsorb- ing polymers are widely studied complex fluids 1­3 . Pro- vided the sizeWall-fluid and liquid-gas interfaces of model colloid-polymer mixtures by simulation and theory

  11. NMR study of the molecular dynamics of ethanol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol liquids confined to nanopores of porous silica glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, L.; Jonas, J.

    1996-05-29

    A dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the polar fluids ethanol (EtOH) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) confined to porous silica sol-gel glasses is reported. The {sup 13}C NMR spin-lattice relaxation times, T{sub 1}, were measured in glasses with pore radii ranging from 18.9 to 54.8 A, over a temperature range from -13.6 to 30.5{degree}C. The data were analyzed in terms of the two-state, fast exchange model, and surface layer relaxation times, T{sub 1s}, were calculated. On the basis of surface enhancement factors, T{sub 1b}/T{sub 1s}, where T{sub 1b} is the relaxation time of the bulk liquid, it was concluded that the more acidic TFE has a weaker hydrogen bond interaction with silica, due to the fact that the alcohols serve as hydrogen bond acceptors. The experiment shows that EtOH and TFE have nearly identical surface layer viscosities, originating from the differences in hydrogen bonding with the silica surface. Confinement was found to have little effect on the internal rotation of terminal CF{sub 3} or CH{sub 3} groups. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Study of Hydrophobic and Ionizable Hydrophilic Copolymers at Polymer/Solid and Polymer/Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perahia, Dvora

    2011-11-01

    Joint experimental-computational efforts were set to characterize the interfacial effects on the structure and dynamics of polymers consisting of highly rigid hydrophilic-ionizable and hydrophobic sub-units within one polymeric chain casted into thin films of several molecular dimensions. Focusing on the ultra thin film region we separate out the interfacial effects from bulk characteristics. Specifically, the study sought to: identify the parameters that control the formation of a stable polymer-solid interface. The study consists of two components, experimental investigations and computational efforts. The experimental component was designed to derive empirical trends that can be used to correlate the set of coupled polymer molecular parameters with the interfacial characteristics of these polymers, and their response to presence of solvents. The computational study was designed to provide molecular insight into the ensemble averages provided by the experimental efforts on multiple length scales from molecular dimensions, to the nanometer lengths to a macroscopic understanding of solvent interactions with structured polymers. With the ultimate goal of correlating molecular parameters to structure, dynamics and properties of ionic polymers, the first stage of the research began with the study of two systems, one which allowed tailoring the flexibility of the backbone without the presence of ionic groups, but with a potential to sulfonate groups at a later stage, and a polymer whose backbone is rigid and the density of the ionic group can be varied. The combined experimental and computational studies significantly extended the understanding of polymers at interfaces from model systems to polydispersed copolymers with blocks of varying nature and complexity. This new insight directly affects the design of polymers for sustainable energy applications from batteries and fuel cells to solar energy.

  13. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. II. Confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-07-14

    In this work, a new classical density functional theory is developed for group-contribution equations of state (EOS). Details of implementation are demonstrated for the recently-developed SAFT-? WCA EOS and selective applications are studied for confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces. The acronym WCA (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen) refers to the characterization of the reference part of the third-order thermodynamic perturbation theory applied in formulating the EOS. SAFT-? refers to the particular form of “statistical associating fluid theory” that is applied to the fused-sphere, heteronuclear, united-atom molecular models of interest. For the monomer term, the modified fundamental measure theory is extended to WCA-spheres. A new chain functional is also introduced for fused and soft heteronuclear chains. The attractive interactions are taken into account by considering the structure of the fluid, thus elevating the theory beyond the mean field approximation. The fluctuations of energy are also included via a non-local third-order perturbation theory. The theory includes resolution of the density profiles of individual groups such as CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} and satisfies stoichiometric constraints for the density profiles. New molecular simulations are conducted to demonstrate the accuracy of each Helmholtz free energy contribution in reproducing the microstructure of inhomogeneous systems at the united-atom level of coarse graining. At each stage, comparisons are made to assess where the present theory stands relative to the current state of the art for studying inhomogeneous fluids. Overall, it is shown that the characteristic features of real molecular fluids are captured both qualitatively and quantitatively. For example, the average pore density deviates ?2% from simulation data for attractive pentadecane in a 2-nm slit pore. Another example is the surface tension of ethane/heptane mixture, which deviates ?1% from simulation data while the theory reproduces the excess accumulation of ethane at the interface.

  14. Identification of Explosives from Porous Materials: Applications Using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J. Miller; G. Elias; N.C. Schmitt; C. Rae

    2010-06-01

    High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography techniques are well documented and widely used for the detection of trace explosives from organic solvents. These techniques were modified to specifically identify and quantify explosives extracted from various materials taken from people who had recently handled explosives. Documented techniques were modified to specifically detect and quantify RDX, TNT, and PETN from denim, colored flannel, vinyl, and canvas extracted in methanol using no sample cleanup prior to analysis. The methanol extracts were injected directly into several different column types and analyzed by HPLC-UV and/or GC-ECD. This paper describes general screening methods that were used to determine the presence of explosives in unknown samples and techniques that have been optimized for quantification of each explosive from the substrate extracts.

  15. Ionic Liquid-Enhanced Solid State Electrolyte Interface (SEI) for Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Chen, Honghao; Meduri, Praveen; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-05-16

    Li-S battery is a complicated system with many challenges existing before its final market penetration. While most of the reported work for Li-S batteries is focused on the cathode design, we demonstrate in this work that the anode consumption accelerated by corrosive polysulfide solution also critically determines the Li-S cell performance. To validate this hypothesis, ionic liquid (IL) N-methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Py14TFSI) has been employed to modify the properties of SEI layer formed on Li metal surface in Li-S batteries. It is found that the IL-enhanced passivation film on the lithium anode surface exhibits much different morphology and chemical compositions, effectively protecting lithium metal from continuous attack by soluble polysulfides. Therefore, both cell impedance and the irreversible consumption of polysulfides on lithium metal are reduced. As a result, the Coulombic efficiency and the cycling stability of Li-S batteries have been greatly improved. After 120 cycles, Li-S battery cycled in the electrolyte containing IL demonstrates a high capacity retention of 94.3% at 0.1 C rate. These results unveil another important failure mechanism for Li-S batteries and shin the light on the new approaches to improve Li-S battery performances.

  16. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  17. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-08-19

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  18. Surface Speciation at Solid/Liquid Interfaces: A Vibrational Sum-Frequency Study of Acetate Adsorption at the Fluorite/Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    recorded in frequency regions corresponding to vibrational modes of the adsorbate and water. Quantitative concentration of surface defects making the interpretation of the results in terms of an intact crystallineH), which generates a strong electric field (ranging up to 107 V,cm-1 4) at the interface. Except

  19. Review of enhanced vapor diffusion in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; Ho, C.K.

    1998-08-01

    Vapor diffusion in porous media in the presence of its own liquid has often been treated similar to gas diffusion. The gas diffusion rate in porous media is much lower than in free space due to the presence of the porous medium and any liquid present. However, enhanced vapor diffusion has also been postulated such that the diffusion rate may approach free-space values. Existing data and models for enhanced vapor diffusion, including those in TOUGH2, are reviewed in this paper.

  20. Hyperbolic Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Giomi

    2012-09-25

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature.

  1. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-05-16

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures ({alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  2. Effects of interfaces on dynamics in micro-fluidic devices: slip-boundaries' impact on rotation characteristics of polar liquid film motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Qiang Liu; Su-Rong Jiang; Tamar A. Yinnon; Xiang-Mu Kong; Ying-Jun Li

    2014-04-21

    Slip-boundary effects on the polar liquid film motor (PLFM) -- a novel micro-fluidic device with important implications for advancing knowledge on liquid micro-film's structure, dynamics, modeling and technology -- are studied. We develop a mathematical model, under slip boundary conditions, describing electro-hydro-dynamical rotations in the PLFMs induced either by direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) fields. Our main results are: (i) rotation characteristics depend on the ratio $k=l_{s}/D$ ($l_{s}$ denotes the slip length, resulting from the interface's impact on the structure of the liquid and $D$ denotes the film's diameter). (ii) As $k$ ($k>-1/2$) increases: (a) PLFMs subsequently exhibit rotation characteristics under "negative-", "no-", "partial-" and "perfect-" slip boundary conditions; (b) the maximum value of the linear velocity of the steady rotating liquid film increases and its location approaches the film's border; (c) the decay of the angular velocities' dependency on the distance from the center of the film slows down, resulting in a macroscopic flow near the boundary. (iii) In addition to $k$, the rotation characteristics of the AC PLFM depend on the magnitudes, the frequencies, and the phase difference of the AC fields. (iv) Our analytical derived rotation speed distributions are consistent with the existing experimental ones.

  3. Liquid foams of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

  4. A combined droplet train and ambient pressure photoemission spectrometer for the investigation of liquid/vapor interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, David E.

    2008-01-01

    ambient conditions the vapor pressure of water or aqueousrange (e.g. , the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at itsUHV conditions due to the vapor pressure of the liquids, but

  5. Molecular Mechanism of the Adsorption Process of an Iodide Anion into Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Water-Methanol Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2012-12-07

    To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ion adsorption to the interface of mixtures, we systematically carried out a free energy calculations study involving the transport of an iodide anion across the interface of a water-methanol mixture. Many body affects are taken into account to describe the interactions among the species. The surface propensities of I- at interfaces of pure water and methanol are well understood. In contrast, detailed knowledge of the molecular level adsorption process of I- at aqueous mixture interfaces has not been reported. In this paper, we explore how this phenomenon will be affected for mixed solvents with varying compositions of water and methanol. Our potential of mean force study as function of varying compositions indicated that I- adsorption free energies decrease from pure water to pure methanol but not linearly with the concentration of methanol. We analyze the computed density profiles and hydration numbers as a function of concentrations and ion positions with respect to the interface to further explain the observed phenomenon. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  6. The crystal–liquid interface of a body?centered?cubic?forming substance: Computer simulations of the r ? 6 potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Brian Bostian; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1989-09-01

    to the interfacial plane, of the single particle density (averaged over the directions perpendicular to z) and the diffusion constant are measured. Although the 10–90 widths of the density peak?height profiles differ significantly among the three interfaces (6, 9...

  7. Thermal Science & Engineering Vol.7 No 1 (1999) A Study on Thermal Resistance over a Solid-Liquid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1999-01-01

    conductivity = potential function = contact angle = length parameter of Lennard-Jones potential F = standard dynamics method. A vapor region was sandwiched between liquid layers, which were in contact with two solid walls. While independently controlling temperatures at ends of walls by the phantom method, the energy

  8. Porous material and process development for electrospray propulsion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arestie, Steven Mark

    2014-01-01

    Ion electrospray propulsion devices rely on the transportation of ionic liquid propellant to emission regions where ions are extracted at high velocities. One such method involves the use of porous substrates to passively ...

  9. Curvature Effect on the Capacitance of Electric Double Layers at Ionic Liquid/Onion-Like Carbon Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Guang; Jiang, Deen; Cummings, Peter T

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that onion-like carbons (OLCs) offer high energy density and charging/discharging rates when used as the electrodes in supercapacitors. To understand the physical origin of this phenomenon, molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a room-temperature ionic liquid near idealized spherical OLCs with radii ranging from 0.356 to 1.223 nm. We find that the surface charge density increases almost linearly with the potential applied on electric double layers (EDLs) near OLCs. This leads to a nearly flat shape of the differential capacitance versus the potential, unlike the bell or camel shape observed on planar electrodes. Moreover, our simulations reveal that the capacitance of EDLs on OLCs increases with the curvature or as the OLC size decreases, in agreement with experimental observations. The curvature effect is explained by dominance of charge overscreening over a wide potential range and increased ion density per unit area of electrode surface as the OLC becomes smaller.

  10. Method of fabrication of supported liquid membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David R.; Hong, Lei; Myers, Christina R.

    2015-11-17

    Method for the fabrication of a supported liquid membrane having a dense layer in contact with a porous layer, and a membrane liquid layer within the interconnected pores of the porous layer. The dense layer is comprised of a solidified material having an average pore size less than or equal to about 0.1 nanometer, while the porous layer is comprised of a plurality of interconnected pores and has an average pore size greater than 10 nanometers. The supported liquid membrane is fabricated through the preparation of a casting solution of a membrane liquid and a volatile solvent. A pressure difference is established across the dense layer and porous layer, the casting solution is applied to the porous layer, and the low viscosity casting solution is drawn toward the dense layer. The volatile solvent is evaporated and the membrane liquid precipitates, generating a membrane liquid layer in close proximity to the dense layer.

  11. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  12. HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Walter E.; Stender, Kerith K.

    2012-08-29

    This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

  13. Observation of the Anomalously Slow (Power-Law) Relaxation of the System of Interacting Liquid Nanoclusters in the Disordered Confinement of a Random Porous Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Borman; A. A. Belogorlov; V. N. Tronin

    2015-05-20

    The time evolution of the system of water in the Libersorb 23 (L23) disordered nanoporous medium after the complete filling at excess pressure and the subsequent removal of excess pressure has been studied. It has been found that three stages can be identified in the relaxation of the L23-water system under study. At the first stage, a portion of water at the removal of excess pressure rapidly flows out in the pressure reduction time, i.e., following a decrease in the pressure. It has been shown that, at temperatures below the dispersion transition temperature $T pressure. At the second stage of relaxation, the degree of filling ${\\theta}$ varies slowly according to a power law ${\\theta} \\sim t^{-\\alpha}$ with the exponent ${\\alpha} 10^5$ s, the formed metastable state decays, which is manifested in the transition to a power-law dependence ${\\theta}(t)$ with a larger exponent. The extrusion-time distribution function of pores has been calculated along with the time dependence of the degree of filling, which qualitatively describes the observed anomalously slow relaxation and crossover of the transition to the stage of decay with a power-law dependence ${\\theta}(t)$ with a larger exponent. It has been shown that the relaxation and decay of the metastable state of the confined nonwetting liquid at ${\\theta}>{\\theta_c}$ are attributed to the appearance of local configurations of liquid clusters in confinement and their interaction inside the infinite percolation cluster of filled pores.

  14. Tailored Porous Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  15. Three-dimensional wave propagation through single crystal solidliquid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Three-dimensional wave propagation through single crystal solid­liquid interfaces Yichi Lua solid­ liquid interfaces during single crystal growth. A previously developed two-dimensional ray across solid­liquid interfaces in cylindrical bodies where the receiver is located at an arbitrary

  16. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    corrosion, solar energy conversion and water splittingimplications for solar energy conversion (74), phase

  17. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    and in bulk water, and the free energy profiles at twodegree in bulk water), the free energy curves are wellcorrosion, solar energy conversion and water splitting

  18. Reaction Dynamics at Liquid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    A. 2001. Calculating free energies using average force. J.D, Benjamin I. 2009. Free energy of transfer of hydrated ion1990. Reorganization free energy for electron transfers at

  19. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  20. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2003-12-23

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  1. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Zykova, Irina D. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Lubtsev, Rem I. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  2. Ventilation of porous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neeper, D.A.

    1994-02-22

    Methods are presented for distributing gases throughout the interstices of porous materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of porous materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction. 10 figures.

  3. Ventilation of porous media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neeper, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Methods for distributing gases throughout the interstices of porous materials and removing volatile substances from the interstices of porous materials. Continuous oscillation of pressures and flows results in increased penetration of the interstices by flowing gases and increased transport of gaseous components out of the interstices. The invention is particularly useful in soil vapor extraction.

  4. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  5. The pore wall structure of porous semi-crystalline anatase TiO2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dr Man-Ho [National Institute of Standards and Technol/University of Maryland, College Park; Doh, Dr. Jeong-Mann [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Han, Seong Chul [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Chae, Keun Hwa [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Yu, Byung-Yong [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Hong, Kyung Tea [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Jackson, Andrew [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The structure of porous TiO2 prepared by electrochemical anodization in a fluoride-containing ethylene glycol electrolyte solution was quantitatively studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS). The cylindrical pores along the coaxial direction were somewhat irregular in shape, were widely distributed in diameter, and seemed to have a broadly pseudo-hexagonal arrangement. The scattering from the pore wall showed a negative deviation from Porod scattering, indicating that the interface between TiO2 and the pore was not sharp. A density gradient of around 40 60 A at the pore wall (i.e. the interface between the pore and the TiO2 matrix) was estimated using both constant and semi-sigmoidal interface models. This gradient may be due to the presence of fluorine and carbon partially absorbed by the pore wall from the fluoride-containing electrolyte or to sorbed water molecules on the wall. The neutron contrast-matching point between the TiO2 matrix and the pores filled with liquid H2O/D2O mixtures was 51/49%(v/v) H2O/D2O, yielding an estimated mass density of 3.32 g cm3. The specific surface area of the sample derived from the (U)SANS data was around 939 1003 m2 cm3 (283 302 m2 g1).

  6. The pore wall structure of porous semi-crystalline anatase TiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dr Man-Ho [National Institute of Standards and Technol/University of Maryland, College Park; Doh, Dr. Jeong-Mann [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Han, Seong Chul [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Chae, Keun Hwa [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Yu, Byung-Yong [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Hong, Kyung Tea [Harbin Institute of Technology & Korea Institute of Science and Technology; Jackson, Andrew [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The structure of porous TiO2 prepared by electrochemical anodization in a fluoride-containing ethylene glycol electrolyte solution was quantitatively studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS). The cylindrical pores along the coaxial direction were somewhat irregular shape, were broadly distributed in diameter, and seemed to have a broadly pseudo-hexagonal arrangement. The scattering from the pore wall showed a negative deviation from Porod scattering, indicating the interface between TiO2 and the pore was not sharp. A density gradient of around 40 ~ 60 at the pore wall (i.e. interface between the pore and the TiO2 matrix) was estimated using both constant and semi-sigmoidal interface models. This may be due to the presence of fluorine and carbon partially absorbed by the pore wall from the fluoride-containing electrolyte and sorbed water molecules on the wall. The neutron contrast-matching point between the TiO2 matrix and the pores filled with liquid H2O/D2O mixtures was 51/49 vol/vol H2O/D2O, yielding an estimated mass density of 3.32 g/cm3. The specific surface area of the sample derived from the (U)SANS data, S/V, was around 939 ~ 1003 m2/cm3 (283~ 302m2/g).

  7. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-07

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  8. Metal filled porous carbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Adam F. (Los Angeles, CA); Vajo, John J. (West Hills, CA); Cumberland, Robert W. (Malibu, CA); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Salguero, Tina T. (Encino, CA)

    2011-03-22

    A porous carbon scaffold with a surface and pores, the porous carbon scaffold containing a primary metal and a secondary metal, where the primary metal is a metal that does not wet the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold but wets the surface of the secondary metal, and the secondary metal is interspersed between the surface of the pores of the carbon scaffold and the primary metal.

  9. CHAPTER ____ THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE: TURBULENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Transport processes at gas-liquid interfaces are of importance in a number of areas, such as for equipment be generated by heat losses that give rise to natural convective motions on the liquid side. In the second winds, the turbulence is not only due to shear, but also due to natural convection on the liquid side

  10. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  11. Lateral Mobility of Amphiphiles Adsorbed at the Air/Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Eric David

    2009-01-01

    Liquid/Vapor Interface of Water. J. Phys. Chem. 1996 , 100,Pratt, L. R. Molecular Dynamics of the Water Liquid/VaporInterface of Water. J. Phys. Chem. 1987 , 91, 4873–4878 21.

  12. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  13. Materials and interfaces for catalysis, separation, storage, and environmental applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    the next generation of catalysts, separation processes, gas and liquid storage technologiesMaterials and interfaces for catalysis, separation, storage, and environmental applications Advanced materials and interfaces (including surfaces, thin films, and membranes) are a key to developing

  14. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  15. Thermochemical Interface

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermochemical Interface PNNL-SA-109025 DATE MARCH 24, 2015 TECHNOLOGY AREA REVIEW: ALGAE DAN ANDERSON DOUG ELLIOTT, ANDY SCHMIDT, KARL ALBRECHT, JON MAGNUSON PACIFIC NORTHWEST...

  16. Method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Dow, Jerome P.

    2004-03-23

    A method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures. The method employs any porous material preferably in granular form and having small pores and a large specific surface area, that is hydrophobic so that liquid water does not readily wet its surface. In this method, organics, especially organic solvents that mix with and are more volatile than water, are separated from aqueous solution by preferentially evaporating across the liquid/solid boundary formed at the surfaces of the hydrophobic porous materials. Also, organic solvents that are immiscible with water, preferentially wet the surfaces of the hydrophobic material and are drawn within the porous materials by capillary action.

  17. Excitations of superfluid 4 He in porous media: Aerogel and Vycor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    Excitations of superfluid 4 He in porous media: Aerogel and Vycor O. Plantevin and B. Fa structure factor S(Q, ) and the elementary excitations of liquid 4 He immersed in aerogel and Vycor. In both and superfluid density, S(T), of liquid 4 He in aerogel and Vycor have been made over the past 30 years.1

  18. Heat pipe effect in porous medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, M.

    1992-12-01

    In this thesis a parametric study of the thermal and hydrologic characteristics of the fractured porous tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada was conducted. The effects of different fracture and matrix properties including permeability, thermal conductivity, specific heat, porosity, and tortuosity on heat pipe performance in the vicinity of the waste package were observed. Computer simulations were carried out using TOUGH code on a Cray YMP-2 supercomputer. None of the fracture parameters affected the heat pipe performance except the mobility of the liquid in the fracture. Matrix permeability and thermal conductivity were found to have significant effect on the heat pipe performance. The effect of mass injection was studied for liquid water and air injected at the fracture boundary. A high rate of mass injection was required to produce any effect on the heat pipe. The fracture-matrix equilibrium is influenced by the matrix permeability and the matrix thermal conductivity.

  19. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Jun (Richland, WA); Kim, Anthony Y. (Kennewick, WA); Virden, Jud W. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors.

  20. Ceramic porous material and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, J.; Kim, A.Y.; Virden, J.W.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is a mesoporous ceramic membrane having substantially uniform pore size. Additionally, the invention includes aqueous and non-aqueous processing routes to making the mesoporous ceramic membranes. According to one aspect of the present invention, inserting a substrate into a reaction chamber at pressure results in reaction products collecting on the substrate and forming a membrane thereon. According to another aspect of the present invention, a second aqueous solution that is sufficiently immiscible in the aqueous solution provides an interface between the two solutions whereon the mesoporous membrane is formed. According to a further aspect of the present invention, a porous substrate is placed at the interface between the two solutions permitting formation of a membrane on the surface or within the pores of the porous substrate. According to yet another aspect of the present invention, mesoporous ceramic materials are formed using a non-aqueous solvent and water-sensitive precursors. 21 figs.

  1. Porous electrode preparation method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.

    1983-10-18

    A porous sintered plaque is provided with a bimodal porosity that is especially well suited for use as an electrode within a molten carbonate fuel cell. The coarse porosity is sufficient for admitting gases into contact with the reaction surfaces while the fine porosity is wetted with and retains molten electrolyte on the reaction sites. The electrode structure is prepared by providing a very fine powder of such as nickel oxide and blending the powder with a suitable decomposable binder to form a solid mass. The mass is comminuted into agglomerate size particles substantially larger than the fine oxide particles and formed into a cohesive compact for subsequent sintering. Sintering is carried out at sufficient conditions to bind the agglomerates together into a porous structure having both coarse and fine porosity. Where lithiated nickel oxide cathodes are prepared, the sintering conditions can be moderate enough to retain substantial quantities of lithium within the electrode for adequate conductivity. 2 figs.

  2. Porous electrode preparation method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arons, Richard M. (Wheaton, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1983-01-01

    A porous sintered plaque is provided with a bimodal porosity that is especially well suited for use as an electrode within a molten carbonate fuel cell. The coarse porosity is sufficient for admitting gases into contact with the reaction surfaces while the fine porosity is wetted with and retains molten electrolyte on the reaction sites. The electrode structure is prepared by providing a very fine powder of such as nickel oxide and blending the powder with a suitable decomposable binder to form a solid mass. The mass is comminuted into agglomerate size particles substantially larger than the fine oxide particles and formed into a cohesive compact for subsequent sintering. Sintering is carried out at sufficient conditions to bind the agglomerates together into a porous structure having both coarse and fine porosity. Where lithiated nickel oxide cathodes are prepared, the sintering conditions can be moderate enough to retain substantial quantities of lithium within the electrode for adequate conductivity.

  3. Porous polymer media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Highly crosslinked monolithic porous polymer materials for chromatographic applications. By using solvent compositions that provide not only for polymerization of acrylate monomers in such a fashion that a porous polymer network is formed prior to phase separation but also for exchanging the polymerization solvent for a running buffer using electroosmotic flow, the need for high pressure purging is eliminated. The polymer materials have been shown to be an effective capillary electrochromatographic separations medium at lower field strengths than conventional polymer media. Further, because of their highly crosslinked nature these polymer materials are structurally stable in a wide range of organic and aqueous solvents and over a pH range of 2-12.

  4. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  5. Graphene Enhances Li Storage Capacity of Porous Single-crystalline Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Han, W.

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrated that graphene significantly enhances the reversible capacity of porous silicon nanowires used as the anode in Li-ion batteries. We prepared our experimental nanomaterials, viz., graphene and porous single-crystalline silicon nanowires, respectively, using a liquid-phase graphite exfoliation method and an electroless HF/AgNO{sub 3} etching process. The Si porous nanowire/graphene electrode realized a charge capacity of 2470 mAh g{sup -1} that is much higher than the 1256 mAh g{sup -1} of porous Si nanowire/C-black electrode and 6.6 times the theoretical capacity of commercial graphite. This relatively high capacity could originate from the favorable charge-transportation characteristics of the combination of graphene with the porous Si 1D nanostructure.

  6. FLOW-THROUGH POROUS ELECTRODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trainham, III, James Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Wilhelm. HBoundary conditions of a flow reactor. 1i Chemicala Packed-Bed Electrochemical Flow Reactor." Journal ofRichard, and Brian Gracon. "Flow-Through Porous Electrodes."

  7. Fabrication of porous silicon membranes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue, Wing Kong

    1988-01-01

    . Porous silicon layer is formed by the local dissolution which is initiated by the surface layer and is promoted by the hindrance layers composed of the silicic acid. Local etching or local dissolution is the cause of forming porous structure... of pores were 25 to 45 A with a mean value of 38 A. Microstructure of porous silicon studied by Besle et al. showed two distinct 17 patterns: the structure pattern of porous silicon film on heavily doped silicon and that on slightly doped silicon [26...

  8. FLOW-THROUGH POROUS ELECTRODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trainham, III, James Arthur

    2011-01-01

    configurations for flow redox battery applications: (i) theporous electrodes A flow-redox battery using flow-by poroustrue in battery applications, Flow..through porous

  9. Mechanical Design of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Ellis, R. Kaita, H. Kugel, G. Paluzzi, M. Viola and R. Nygren

    2009-02-19

    The Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) on NSTX will be the first test of a fully-toroidal liquid lithium divertor in a high-power magnetic confinement device. It will replace part of the lower outboard divertor between a specified inside and outside radius, and ultimately provide a lithium surface exposed to the plasma with enough depth to absorb a significant particle flux. There are numerous technical challenges involved in the design. The lithium layer must be as thin as possible, and maintained at a temperature between 200 and 400 degrees Celsius to minimize lithium evaporation. This requirement leads to the use of a thick copper substrate, with a thin stainless steel layer bonded to the plasma-facing surface. A porous molybdenum layer is then plasma-sprayed onto the stainless steel, to provide a coating that facilitates full wetting of the surface by the liquid lithium. Other challenges include the design of a robust, vacuumcompatible heating and cooling system for the LLD. Replacement graphite tiles that provided the proper interface between the existing outer divertor and the LLD also had to be designed, as well as accommodation for special LLD diagnostics. This paper describes the mechanical design of the LLD, and presents analyses showing the performance limits of the LLD.

  10. Rigid porous filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Dennis, Richard A. (Morgantown, WV)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter including a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulates from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulates. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area-to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  11. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  12. Process for making film-bonded fuel cell interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Terry, Peter L. (Chatham, NJ)

    1990-07-03

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  13. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

    1997-06-10

    Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

  14. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

  15. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media and Its Effects on the Performance of a PEM Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xuhai

    2010-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the two-phase flow properties of porous media used in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The liquid and gas phase relative permeability of porous media used in PEM fuel cells was measured...

  16. NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chenson K.

    2010-01-01

    Surface Plasmons at a Metal-Dielectric Interface . . . .Plasmons at Metal-Dielectric Interfaces . . . . A. GeneralNONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen (Ph.D.

  17. Evaporation-driven Transport and Precipitation of NaCl in Porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    First Results Outlook Slide 2/49 #12;Overview Motivation Theory Model Concept First Results Outlook, M., 2007 Motivation Slide 5/49 #12;Motivation Soil salinization problem across the world Motivation Motivation Slide 7/49 #12;Interface Processes solid fluid gas porous medium free flow mass exchange energy

  18. A Semi-Empirical Model for Porous Media Heat Exchanger Design Richard A. Wirtz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirtz, Richard A.

    A Semi-Empirical Model for Porous Media Heat Exchanger Design Richard A. Wirtz1 Mechanical-dimensional temperature Introduction Compact heat exchangers invariably incorporate heat transfer augmentation technology matrix at the fluid-solid interface of a compact heat exchanger will also enhance performance

  19. www.rsc.org/analyst The airliquid interface of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYST FULLPAPER THE www.rsc.org/analyst The air­liquid interface of benzene, toluene, m as an Advance Article on the web 10th April 2003 The air­liquid interface and the liquid-phase of benzene-zero hyperpolarizabilities of benzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. The orientation of the aromatic rings of these compounds

  20. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  1. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Joshua David

    2012-07-24

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing a monolith.

  2. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

    2013-12-10

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

  3. Porous light-emitting compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Bauer, Eve (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Alexander H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-04-17

    Light-emitting devices are prepared by coating a porous substrate using a polymer-assisted deposition process. Solutions of metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for metal precursor were coated onto porous substrates. The coated substrates were heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere. The result was a substrate with a conformal coating that did not substantially block the pores of the substrate.

  4. Fluid Dynamic Aspects of the Porous Wetted Wall Protection Scheme for Inertial Fusion Energy Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, S.; Abdelall, F.; Juric, D.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Yoda, M.; Sadowski, D. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

    2003-05-15

    A numerical and experimental investigation has been conducted to analyze the fluid dynamic aspects of the porous wetted wall protection scheme for inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor first walls. A level contour reconstruction method has been used to track the three-dimensional evolution of the liquid film surface on porous downward-facing walls with different initial film thickness, liquid injection velocity through the porous wall, surface disturbance amplitude, configuration and mode number, liquid properties, and surface inclination angle. Generalized charts for the computed droplet detachment time, detached droplet equivalent diameter, and minimum film thickness during the transient for various design parameters and coolant properties are presented.In order to validate the numerical results over a wide range of parameters, an experimental test facility has been designed and constructed to simulate the hydrodynamics of downward-facing porous wetted walls. Nondimensionalization of the model shows that water can be adequately used as a simulant to validate the numerical results. Preliminary experimental results show good agreement with model predictions. The results of this investigation should allow designers of conceptual IFE reactors to identify appropriate 'windows' for successful operation of the porous wetted wall protection concept for different coolants.

  5. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  6. Process for forming a porous silicon member in a crystalline silicon member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Raley, Norman F. (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  7. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Raley, Norman F. (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  8. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The transport of foam in porous media is complicated in that the number of lamellae present governs flow characteristics such as viscosity, relative permeability, fluid distribution, and interactions between fluids. Hence, foam is a non-Newtonian fluid. During transport, foam destruction and formation occur. The net result of the two processes determines the foam texture (i.e., bubble density). Some of the foam may be trapped during transport. According to the impacts of the aqueous and gas flow rates, foam flow generally has two regimes – weak and strong foam. There is also a minimum pressure gradient to initiate foam flow and a critical capillary for foam to be sustained. Similar to other fluids, the transport of foam is described by Darcy’s law with the exception that the foam viscosity is variable. Three major approaches to modeling foam transport in porous media are the empirical, semi-empirical, and mechanistic methods. Mechanistic approaches can be complete in principal but may be difficult to obtain reliable parameters, whereas empirical and semi-empirical approaches can be limited by the detail used to describe foam rheology and mobility. Mechanistic approaches include the bubble population-balance model, the network/percolation theory, the catastrophe theory, and the filtration theory. Among these methods, all were developed for modeling polyhedral foam with the exception that the method based on the filtration theory was for the ball foam (microfoam).

  9. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, Edward F. (P.O. Box 900, Isle of Palms, SC 29451)

    1992-01-01

    A method for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF.sub.4 and HNO.sub.3 and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200.degree. C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

  10. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-18

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

  11. Structure, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Chemically Heterogeneous Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palafox Hernandez, Jesus Pablo

    2011-08-31

    the closest packing orientations [(111) FCC and (110) BCC] developed prefreezing (complete wetting). A detailed atomic-level characterization of the structure, energetics and transport properties of the planar Cu/Pb solid-liquid interface in equilibrium...

  12. Method of preparing thin porous sheets of ceramic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swarr, Thomas E. (South Windsor, CT); Nickols, Richard C. (East Hartford, CT); Krasij, Myron (Avon, CT)

    1987-03-24

    A method of forming thin porous sheets of ceramic material for use as electrodes or other components in a molten carbonate fuel cell is disclosed. The method involves spray drying a slurry of fine ceramic particles in liquid carrier to produce generally spherical agglomerates of high porosity and a rough surface texture. The ceramic particles may include the electrode catalyst and the agglomerates can be calcined to improve mechanical strength. After slurrying with suitable volatile material and binder tape casting is used to form sheets that are sufficiently strong for further processing and handling in the assembly of a high temperature fuel cell.

  13. Method of preparing thin porous sheets of ceramic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swarr, T.E.; Nickols, R.C.; Krasij, M.

    1984-05-23

    A method of forming thin porous sheets of ceramic material for use as electrodes or other components in a molten carbonate fuel cell is disclosed. The method involves spray drying a slurry of fine ceramic particles in liquid carrier to produce generally spherical agglomerates of high porosity and a rough surface texture. The ceramic particles may include the electrode catalyst and the agglomerates can be calcined to improve mechanical strength. After slurrying with suitable volatile material and binder tape casting is used to form sheets that are sufficiently strong for further processing and handling in the assembly of a high temperature fuel cell.

  14. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  15. Laboratory setup and results of experiments on two-dimensional multiphase flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, J.F. (ed.) (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Graham, D.N. (ed.); Schiegg, H.O. (SIMULTEC Ltd., Meilen/Zurich (Switzerland))

    1990-10-01

    In the event of an accidental release into earth's subsurface of an immiscible organic liquid, such as a petroleum hydrocarbon or chlorinated organic solvent, the spatial and temporal distribution of the organic liquid is of great interest when considering efforts to prevent groundwater contamination or restore contaminated groundwater. An accurate prediction of immiscible organic liquid migration requires the incorporation of relevant physical principles in models of multiphase flow in porous media; these physical principles must be determined from physical experiments. This report presents a series of such experiments performed during the 1970s at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland. The experiments were designed to study the transient, two-dimensional displacement of three immiscible fluids in a porous medium. This experimental study appears to be the most detailed published to date. The data obtained from these experiments are suitable for the validation and test calibration of multiphase flow codes. 73 refs., 140 figs.

  16. Water Dynamics at Rough Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Rosenstihl; Kerstin Kämpf; Felix Klameth; Matthias Sattig; Michael Vogel

    2014-07-21

    We use molecular dynamics computer simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to investigate the dynamics of water at interfaces of molecular roughness and low mobility. We find that, when approaching such interfaces, the structural relaxation of water, i.e., the $\\alpha$ process, slows down even when specific attractive interactions are absent. This prominent effect is accompanied by a smooth transition from Vogel to Arrhenius temperature dependence and by a growing importance of jump events. Consistently, at protein surfaces, deviations from Arrhenius behavior are weak when free water does not exist. Furthermore, in nanoporous silica, a dynamic crossover of liquid water occurs when a fraction of solid water forms near 225 K and, hence, the liquid dynamics changes from bulk-like to interface-dominated. At sufficiently low temperatures, water exhibits a quasi-universal $\\beta$ process, which is characterized by an activation energy of $E_a\\!=\\!0.5$ eV and involves anisotropic reorientation about large angles. As a consequence of its large amplitude, the faster $\\beta$ process destroys essentially all orientational correlation, rendering observation of a possible slower $\\alpha$ process difficult in standard experiments. Nevertheless, we find indications for the existence of structural relaxation down to a glass transition of interfacial water near 185 K. Hydrated proteins show a highly restricted backbone motion with an amplitude, which decreases upon cooling and vanishes at comparable temperatures, providing evidence for a high relevance of water rearrangements in the hydration shell for secondary protein relaxations.

  17. Interface deformations affect the orientation transition of magnetic ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary B. Davies; Timm Krüger; Peter V. Coveney; Jens Harting; Fernando Bresme

    2014-10-28

    Manufacturing new soft materials with specific optical, mechanical and magnetic properties is a significant challenge. Assembling and manipulating colloidal particles at fluid interfaces is a promising way to make such materials. We use lattice-Boltzmann simulations to investigate the response of magnetic ellipsoidal particles adsorbed at liquid-liquid interfaces to external magnetic fields. We provide further evidence for the first-order orientation phase transition predicted by Bresme and Faraudo [Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 19 (2007), 375110]. We show that capillary interface deformations around the ellipsoidal particle significantly affect the tilt-angle of the particle for a given dipole-field strength, altering the properties of the orientation transition. We propose scaling laws governing this transition, and suggest how to use these deformations to facilitate particle assembly at fluid-fluid interfaces.

  18. Web Browser Interface (WBUI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6...

  19. Web Service Interface (API)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6...

  20. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feigenbaum, Haim (Ramat Ilan, IL); Pudick, Sheldon (Sayreville, NJ); Wang, Chiu L. (Edison, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  1. Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Carbon Tetrachloride-Water and 1,2-Dichloroethane-Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    Tetrachloride-Water and 1,2-Dichloroethane-Water Interfaces Dave S. Walker, Fred G. Moore, and Geraldine L-liquid interfaces. The VSF spectral response from interfacial water at the CCl4-H2O interface contains spectral features similar to the resonant VSF response of the vapor-water interface and alkane-water interfaces

  2. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  3. Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    rrr ×= BJF rrr ×= BJF rrr ×= BJF rrr ×= J r V r+- g r B r J r #12;· Magnetic Propulsion Liquid Metal Forces" · Gravity-Momentum Drive (GMD) · GMD with Swirl Flow · Electromagnetically Restrained · Magnetic Propulsion Plasma-Liquid Interface · Fluids with low vapor pressure at high temperature (e.g. Sn

  4. Solid-Liquid Interfacial Premelting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian Bostian

    2013-02-28

    liquid-liquid miscibility gap, negligible solubility of Pb in the Al solid phase, and a large melting point separa- tion (600 K for Pb and 933 K for Al). We have previously reported results from MD simulations on this system at 625 K, a temperature just... undergoes a roughening transition about 100 K below the melting point of Al. Simulation details.—In our simulations of the Al-Pb solid-liquid interface, we employ a classical many-body potential developed by Landa et al. [42] to model the inter- atomic...

  5. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1992-10-13

    A method is described for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF[sub 4] and HNO[sub 3] and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200 C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

  6. Porous-electrode preparation method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arons, R.M.; Dusek, J.T.

    1981-09-17

    A porous sintered plaque is provided with a bimodal porosity that is especially well suited for use as an electrode within a molten carbonate fuel cell. The coarse porosity is sufficient for admitting gases into contact with the reaction surfaces while the fine porosity is wetted with and retains molten electrolyte on the reaction sites. The electrode structure is prepared by providing a very fine powder such as nickel oxide and blending the powder with a suitable decomposable binder to form a solid mass. The mass is comminuted into agglomerate size particles substantially larger than the fine oxide particles and formed into a cohesive compact for subsequent sintering. Sintering is carried out at sufficient conditions to bind the agglomerates together into a porous structure having both coarse and fine porosity. Where lithiated nickel oxide cathodes are prepared, the sintering conditions can be moderate enough to retain substantial quantities of lithium within the electrode for adequate conductivity.

  7. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

  8. Activation of porous MOF materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2014-04-01

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  9. Understanding how organic solvent polarity affects water structure and bonding at halocarbonwater interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    ­water interfaces Cathryn L. McFearin, Geraldine L. Richmond Department of Chemistry and Materials Science molecules at the mixed halocarbon­water interface. Mixtures of non-polar CCl4 with more polar solvents CHCl3­liquid interfaces; Water at hydrophobic surfaces; Hydrogen bonding; Vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy 1

  10. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  11. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  12. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munch, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    2002, “Novel Hydroxyapatite Ceramics with an InterconnectiveTricalcium Phosphate Ceramics,” Biomaterials, 19, pp. 2147-2004, “Development of Porous Ceramics with Well-Controlled

  13. Adsorption of soft particles at fluid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Style; Lucio Isa; Eric R. Dufresne

    2015-07-14

    Soft particles can be better emulsifiers than hard particles because they stretch at fluid interfaces. This deformation can increase adsorption energies by orders of magnitude relative to rigid particles. The deformation of a particle at an interface is governed by a competition of bulk elasticity and surface tension. When particles are partially wet by the two liquids, deformation is localized within a material-dependent distance $L$ from the contact line. At the contact line, the particle morphology is given by a balance of surface tensions. When the particle radius $R \\ll L$, the particle adopts a lenticular shape identical to that of an adsorbed fluid droplet. Particle deformations can be elastic or plastic, depending on the relative values of the Young modulus, $E$, and yield stress, $\\sigma_p$. When surface tensions favour complete spreading of the particles at the interface, plastic deformation can lead to unusual fried-egg morphologies. When deformable particles have surface properties that are very similar to one liquid phase, adsorption can be extremely sensitive to small changes of their affinity for the other liquid phase. These findings have implications for the adsorption of microgel particles at fluid interfaces and the performance of stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsions.

  14. Porous and porous-nonporous composites for battery electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herscovici, C.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a zinc-bromide electrochemical cell. It comprises: a cathode element comprising a pressure-molded porous composite comprising electrically conductive particulate carbon selected from the group consisting of carbon black, graphite and mixtures thereof having a particle size distribution of 0 to 45 {mu}m and a thermoplastic resin, the carbon and the resin being in a weight ratio from about 1:5 to 1:1; the composite characterized by 80--95% porosity by volume and a pore size diameter distribution from about 5 microns to about 200 microns.

  15. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Microfluidic...

  16. ZnO/porous-Si and TiO{sub 2}/porous-Si nanocomposite nanopillars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dong, E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Yan, Yong; Schaaf, Peter [Chair Materials for Electronics, Institute of Materials Engineering and Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano, TU Ilmenau, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Sharp, Thomas [Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology Ltd., Yatton, Bristol BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Schönherr, Sven; Ronning, Carsten [Institute for Solid State Physics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Ji, Ran [SUSS MicroTec Lithography GmbH, Schleissheimer Str. 90, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    Porous Si nanopillar arrays are used as templates for atomic layer deposition of ZnO and TiO{sub 2}, and thus, ZnO/porous-Si and TiO{sub 2}/porous-Si nanocomposite nanopillars are fabricated. The diffusion of the precursor molecules into the inside of the porous structure occurs via Knudsen diffusion and is strongly limited by the small pore size. The luminescence of the ZnO/porous-Si nanocomposite nanopillars is also investigated, and the optical emission can be changed and even quenched after a strong plasma treatment. Such nanocomposite nanopillars are interesting for photocatalysis and sensors.

  17. NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chenson K.

    2010-01-01

    N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear Optics (W. A. Benjamin, 1977) p.Research Division NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K.ED LBL-12084 NONLINEAR OPTICS AT INTERFACES Chenson K. Chen

  18. Selecting and Applying Interfacings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-01

    provides some ?give? to garment pieces. Woven interfacing in the appropriate weight and cut on the bias can be used on knits to prevent stretching. Interfacings containing wool can be shaped and molded with steam. Nonwoven interfacings are usually made... cutting out the garment.) Surface problems, such as bubbling, show up when the interfacing and garment fabric have incompat- ible shrinkage. Select a method of preshrinking that avoids distorting the fabric or fusing compound. Common methods...

  19. Quantum interfaces Karl Svozil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svozil, Karl

    Quantum interfaces Karl Svozil Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology they consider to be objects. The cartesian cut or, in modern terminology, the interface mediating this exchange the necessary conceptual means. An attempt is made to formalize the interface, in particular the quantum

  20. Generalization of the van der Waals equation for anisotropic fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myroslav Holovko; Volodymyr Shmotolokha

    2015-09-01

    The generalized van der Waals equation of state for anisotropic liquids in porous media consists of two terms.One of them is based on the equation of state for hard spherocylinders in random porous media obtained from the scaled particle theory.The second term is expressed in terms of the mean value of attractive intermolecular interactions.The obtained equation is used for the investigation of the gas-liquid-nematic phase behavior of a molecular system depending on the anisotropy of molecule shapes, anisotropy of attractive intermolecular interactions, and porosity of a porous medium.It is shown that the anisotropic phase is formed by the anisotropy of attractive intermolecular interactions and by the anisotropy of molecular shapes.The anisotropy of molecular shapes shifts the phase diagram to lower densities and higher temperatures.The anisotropy of attractive interactions widens significantly the coexistence region between the isotropic and anisotropic phases and shifts it to the region of lower densities and higher temperatures.It is shown that, for sufficiently long spherocylinders, the liquid-gas transition is localized completely within the nematic region.For all the considered cases, the decrease of the porosity shifts the phase diagram to the region of lower densities and lower temperatures.

  1. Equilibrium composition between liquid and clathrate reservoirs on Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I; Sotin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of lakes and a few seas of liquid hydrocarbons have been observed by the Cassini spacecraft to cover the polar regions of Titan. A significant fraction of these lakes or seas could possibly be interconnected with subsurface liquid reservoirs of alkanes. In this paper, we investigate the interplay that would happen between a reservoir of liquid hydrocarbons located in Titan's subsurface and a hypothetical clathrate reservoir that progressively forms if the liquid mixture diffuses throughout a preexisting porous icy layer. To do so, we use a statistical-thermodynamic model in order to compute the composition of the clathrate reservoir that forms as a result of the progressive entrapping of the liquid mixture. This study shows that clathrate formation strongly fractionates the molecules between the liquid and the solid phases. Depending on whether the structure I or structure II clathrate forms, the present model predicts that the liquid reservoirs would be mainly composed of either propane or ethane, r...

  2. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  3. X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, Helmut (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research) [Max Planck Institute for Metals Research

    2007-05-02

    Solid-liquid interfaces play an important role in many areas of current and future technologies, and in our biosphere. They play a key role in the development of nanofluidics and nanotribology, which sensitively depend on our knowledge of the microscopic structures and phenomena at the solid-liquid interface. The detailed understanding of how a fluid meets a wall is also a theoretical challenge. In particular, the phenomena at repulsive walls are of interest, since they affect many different phenomena, such as water-repellent surfaces or the role of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. Recent x-ray reflectivity studies of various solid-liquid interfaces have disclosed rather intriguiing phenomena, which will be discussed in this lecture: premelting of ice in contact with silica; liquid Pb in contact with Si; water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. These experiments, carried out with high-energy x-ray microbeams, reveal detailed insight into the liquid density profile closest to the wall. A detailed insight into atomistic phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is also a prerequisite in the microscopic control of electrochemical reactions at interfaces. Recent x-ray studies show the enormous future potential of such non-destructive analytical tools for the in situ observation of (electro-)chemical surface reactions. This lecture will review recent x-ray experiments on solid-liquid interfaces.

  4. Simulation of a Heat Transfer in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juergen Geiser

    2012-05-11

    We are motivated to model a heat transfer to a multiple layer regime and their optimization for heat energy resources. Such a problem can be modeled by a porous media with different phases (liquid and solid). The idea arose of a geothermal energy reservoir which can be used by cities, e.g. Berlin. While hot ground areas are covered to most high populated cites, the energy resources are important and a shift to use such resources are enormous. We design a model of the heat transport via the flow of water through the heterogeneous layer of the underlying earth sediments. We discuss a multiple layer model, based on mobile and immobile zones. Such numerical simulations help to economize on expensive physical experiments and obtain control mechanisms for the delicate heating process.

  5. Diffusion between evolving interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janne Juntunen; Juha Merikoski

    2010-11-19

    Diffusion in an evolving environment is studied by continuos-time Monte Carlo simulations. Diffusion is modelled by continuos-time random walkers on a lattice, in a dynamic environment provided by bubbles between two one-dimensional interfaces driven symmetrically towards each other. For one-dimensional random walkers constrained by the interfaces, the bubble size distribution domi- nates diffusion. For two-dimensional random walkers, it is also controlled by the topography and dynamics of the interfaces. The results of the one-dimensional case are recovered in the limit where the interfaces are strongly driven. Even with simple hard-core repulsion between the interfaces and the particles, diffusion is found to depend strongly on the details of the dynamical rules of particles close to the interfaces. Article reference: Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 22, 465402 (2010).

  6. Multiphase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1995-02-01

    The major goal of this research project was to improve the understanding of the gas-oil two-phase flow in fractured porous media. In addition, miscible displacement was studied to evaluate its promise for enhanced recovery.

  7. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  8. Charge Transfer Reactions in Porous Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell-Koch, Katie Rose

    2008-08-15

    Porous materials, such as sol-gels and zeolites, contain nanometer-scale spaces in which molecules are confined, leading to significant changes in their chemical dynamics. In this dissertation, the effects of confinement on chemical behavior...

  9. Brain-Computer Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Khushbu

    2009-01-01

    I \\ November 16, 2008). CNN. ’Brain’ in a dish ?ies ?ightREFERENCES Adams, Ray. Brain Computer Interfaces: Psychologyaccessed Biever, Celeste. Brain cells in a dish ?y ?ghter

  10. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  11. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  12. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  13. Excitation of fountain and entrainment instabilities at the interface between two viscous fluids using a beam of laser light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza Chraibi; Julien Petit; Régis Wunenburger; Jean-Pierre Delville

    2013-07-24

    We report on two instabilities called viscous fountain and viscous entrainment triggered at the interface between two liquids by the action of bulk flows driven by a laser beam. These streaming flows are due to light scattering losses in turbid liquids, and can be directed either toward or forward the interface. We experimentally and numerically investigate these interface instabilities and show that the height and curvature of the interface deformation at the threshold and the jet radius after interface destabilization mainly depend on the waist of the laser beam. Analogies and differences between these two instabilities are characterized.

  14. Derivation of effective macroscopic Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard equations for periodic immiscible flows in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Schmuck; Marc Pradas; Gregorios A. Pavliotis; Serafim Kalliadasis

    2013-10-19

    Using thermodynamic and variational principles we examine a basic phase field model for a mixture of two incompressible fluids in strongly perforated domains. With the help of the multiple scale method with drift and our recently introduced splitting strategy for Ginzburg-Landau/Cahn-Hilliard-type equations [Schmuck et al., Proc. R. Soc. A 468:3705-3724, 2012.], we rigorously derive an effective macroscopic phase field formulation under the assumption of periodic flow and a sufficiently large P\\'eclet number. As for classical convection-diffusion problems, we obtain systematically diffusion-dispersion relations (including Taylor-Aris-dispersion). Our results also provide a convenient analytical and computational framework to macroscopically track interfaces in porous media. In view of the well-known versatility of phase field models, our study proposes a promising model for many engineering and scientific applications such as multiphase flows in porous media, microfluidics, and fuel cells.

  15. Computational Studies of [Bmim][PF6]/n-Alcohol Interfaces with Many-Body Potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tsun-Mei; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-09-04

    In this paper, we present the results from molecular-dynamics simulations of the equilibrium properties of liquid/liquid interfaces of room temperature ionic liquid [bmim][PF6] and simple alcohols (i.e., methanol, 1-butanol, and 1-hexanol) at room temperature. Polarizable potential models are employed to describe the interactions among species. Results from our simulations show stable interfaces between the ionic liquid and n-alcohols, and we found that the interfacial widths decrease from methanol to 1-butanol systems, and then increase for 1-hexanol interfaces. Angular distribution analysis reveals that the interface induces a strong orientational order of [bmim] and n-alcohol molecules near the interface, with [bmim] extending its butyl group into the alcohol phase while the alcohol has the OH group pointing into the ion liquid region, which is consistent with the recent sum-frequency-generation experiments. We found the interface to have a significant influence on the dynamics of ionic liquids and n-alcohols. The orientational autocorrelation functions illustrate that [bmim] rotate more freely near the interface than in the bulk, while the rotation of n-alcohol is hindered at the interface. Additionally, the time scale associated with the diffusion along the interfacial direction is found to be faster for [bmim] but slowed down for n-alcohols approaching the interface. We also calculate the dipole moment of n-alcohols as a function of the distance normal to the interface. We found that, even though methanol and 1-butanol have different dipole moments in bulk phase, they reach a similar value at the interface. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  16. X-ray reflectivity studies of liquid metal and alloy surfaces M. J. Regan* and P. S. Pershan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershan, Peter S.

    /vapor interface, averaged later- ally over several atomic diameters, of a liquid metal is atomi- cally stratified consideration of the metal as a charged, in- teracting two-component liquid: a fluid of classical ions

  17. Detachment Energies of Spheroidal Particles from Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary B. Davies; Timm Krüger; Peter V. Coveney; Jens Harting

    2014-10-28

    The energy required to detach a single particle from a fluid-fluid interface is an important parameter for designing certain soft materials, for example, emulsions stabilised by colloidal particles, colloidosomes designed for targeted drug delivery, and bio-sensors composed of magnetic particles adsorbed at interfaces. For a fixed particle volume, prolate and oblate spheroids attach more strongly to interfaces because they have larger particle-interface areas. Calculating the detachment energy of spheroids necessitates the difficult measurement of particle-liquid surface tensions, in contrast with spheres, where the contact angle suffices. We develop a simplified detachment energy model for spheroids which depends only on the particle aspect ratio and the height of the particle centre of mass above the fluid-fluid interface. We use lattice Boltzmann simulations to validate the model and provide quantitative evidence that the approach can be applied to simulate particle-stabilized emulsions, and highlight the experimental implications of this validation.

  18. Growing interfaces uncover universal fluctuations behind scale invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazumasa A. Takeuchi; Masaki Sano; Tomohiro Sasamoto; Herbert Spohn

    2011-08-10

    Stochastic motion of a point -- known as Brownian motion -- has many successful applications in science, thanks to its scale invariance and consequent universal features such as Gaussian fluctuations. In contrast, the stochastic motion of a line, though it is also scale-invariant and arises in nature as various types of interface growth, is far less understood. The two major missing ingredients are: an experiment that allows a quantitative comparison with theory and an analytic solution of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) equation, a prototypical equation for describing growing interfaces. Here we solve both problems, showing unprecedented universality beyond the scaling laws. We investigate growing interfaces of liquid-crystal turbulence and find not only universal scaling, but universal distributions of interface positions. They obey the largest-eigenvalue distributions of random matrices and depend on whether the interface is curved or flat, albeit universal in each case. Our exact solution of the KPZ equation provides theoretical explanations.

  19. Quadrature conductivity: A quantitative indicator of bacterial abundance in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi Zhang; Andre Revil; Yoshiko Fujita; Junko Munakata-Marr; George Redden

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT The abundance and growth stages of bacteria in subsurface porous media affect the concentrations and distributions of charged species within the solid-solution interfaces. Therefore, spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements can be used to monitor changes in bacterial biomass and growth stage. Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the SIP response of bacteria present in a porous material. Bacterial cell surfaces possess an electric double layer and therefore become polarized in an electric field. We performed SIP measurements over the frequency range of 0.1–1 kHz on cell suspensions alone and cell suspensions mixed with sand at four pore water conductivities. We used Zymomonas mobilis at four different cell densities (in- cluding the background). The quadrature conductivity spectra exhibited two peaks, one around 0.05–0.10 Hz and the other around 1–10 Hz. Because SIP measurements on bacterial suspensions are typically made at frequencies greater than 1 Hz, these peaks have not been previously reported. In the bac-terial suspensions in growth medium, the quadrature conduc-tivity at peak I was linearly proportional to the density of the bacteria. For the case of the suspensions mixed with sands, we observed that peak II presented a smaller increase in the quadrature conductivity with the cell density. A comparison of the experiments with and without sand grains illustrated the effect of the porous medium on the overall quadrature con- ductivity response (decrease in the amplitude and shift of the peaks to the lower frequencies). Our results indicate that for a given porous medium, time-lapse SIP has potential for mon- itoring changes in bacterial abundance within porous media.

  20. SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-15

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

  1. Effect of gravitation on dynamic response of tanks containing two liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Yu

    1994-08-01

    The exact solution to the dynamic response of circular cylindrical tanks containing two liquids, considering the gravitational (g) effect at the interface of the two liquids, is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The solution is expressed as the superposition of the so-called impulsive and convective solutions. The results are compared with those obtained by neglecting the gravitional effect at the interface to elucidate the g effect and with those of the tanks containing only one liquid to elucidate the effect of the interaction between two liquids. The response functions examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, base shear, base moments, sloshing motions at surface and at the interface of two liquids and the associated sloshing frequencies. It is found that there are two natural frequencies associated with each sloshing mode in contrast to only one frequency associated with each sloshing mode if the g effect at the interface is neglected; also, the convective pressure has a jump at the interface of two liquids, whereas the impulsive pressure is continuous at the interface. Further, it is shown that in a tank containing two liquids the maximum sloshing wave height may increase significantly, and the fundamental frequency of the sloshing motion is lower than that of an identical tanks filled with only one liquid. Additionally, the well-known mechanical model for tanks containing one liquid is generalized for tanks containing two liquids.

  2. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Gap...

  3. Emergent Phenomena at Complex Oxide Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Pu

    2011-01-01

    across the polar interfaces of ferroelectric het-films . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Interface control of bulkdi?erent interfaces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  4. Huge broadening of the crystal-fluid interface for sedimenting colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allahyarov, Elshad

    2011-01-01

    For sedimenting colloidal hard spheres, the propagation and broadening of the crystal-fluid interface is studied by Brownian dynamics computer simulations of an initially homogeneous sample. Two different types of interface broadenings are observed: the first occurs during growth and is correlated with the interface velocity, the second is concomitant with the splitting of the crystal-fluid interface into the crystal-amorphous and amorphous-liquid interfaces. The latter width is strongly peaked as a function of the gravitational driving strength with a huge amplitude relative to its equilibrium counterpart.

  5. Methods of forming and using porous structures for energy efficient separation of light gases by capillary condensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calamur, Narasimhan (Lemont, IL); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Archuleta, Tom (Espanola, NM)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for separating one or more condensable compounds from a mixture of two or more gases of differing volatilities by capillary fractionation in a membrane-type apparatus, and a method of forming porous structures therefor. More particularly, the invention includes methods of forming and using an apparatus consisting, at least in part, of a porous structure having capillary-type passages extending between a plurality of small openings on the first side and larger openings on a second side of the structure, the passages being adapted to permit a condensed liquid to flow therethrough substantially by capillary forces, whereby vapors from the mixture are condensed, at least in part, and substantially in and adjacent to the openings on the first side, and are caused to flow in a condensed liquid state, substantially in the absence of vapor, from the openings on the first side to the openings on the second side.

  6. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  7. On the interface instability during rapid evaporation in microgravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juric, D.

    1997-05-01

    The rapid evaporation of a superheated liquid (vapor explosion) under microgravity conditions is studied by direct numerical simulation. The time-dependent Navier-Stokes and energy equations coupled to the interface dynamics are solved using a two-dimensional finite-difference/front-tracking method. Large interface deformations, topology change, latent heat, surface tension and unequal material properties between the liquid and vapor phases are included in the simulations. A comparison of numerical results to the exact solution of a one-dimensional test problem shows excellent agreement. For the two-dimensional rapid evaporation problem, the vapor volume growth rate and unstable interface dynamics are studied for increasing levels of initial liquid superheat. As the superheat is increased the liquid-vapor interface experiences increasingly unstable energetic growth. These results indicate that heat transfer plays a very important role in the instability mechanism leading to vapor explosions. It is suggested that the Mullins-Sekerka instability could play a role in the instability initiation mechanism.

  8. NMRI methods for characterizing fluid flow in porous media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xiaoli

    1997-01-01

    Many important processes such as petroleum production and catalytic chemical reactions involve the flow of fluids through porous media. The measurement of localized velocity can provide information about how fluid is transported in porous media...

  9. Virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media Subir for virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media is presented. The model involves solution of the advection­dispersion equation, which additionally considers virus

  10. Fabrication and characterization of porous shape memory alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penrod, Luke Edward

    2004-09-30

    This work details an investigation into the production of porous shape memory alloys (SMAs) via hot isostatic press (HIP) from prealloyed powders. HIPing is one of three main methods for producing porous SMAs, the other two are conventional...

  11. Evaporative capillary instability for flow in porous media under the influence of axial electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Awasthi, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshiitr.kumar@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun (India)

    2014-04-15

    We study the linear analysis of electrohydrodynamic capillary instability of the interface between two viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting fluids in a fully saturated porous medium, when the phases are enclosed between two horizontal cylindrical surfaces coaxial with the interface and, when there is mass and heat transfer across the interface. The fluids are subjected to a constant electric field in the axial direction. Here, we use an irrotational theory in which the motion and pressure are irrotational and the viscosity enters through the jump in the viscous normal stress in the normal stress balance at the interface. A quadratic dispersion relation that accounts for the growth of axisymmetric waves is obtained and stability criterion is given in terms of a critical value of wave number as well as electric field. It is observed that heat transfer has stabilizing effect on the stability of the considered system while medium porosity destabilizes the interface. The axial electric field has dual effect on the stability analysis.

  12. Viscoelasticity of stepped interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demkowicz, Michael J.

    Using molecular dynamics modeling, we show that interfaces in sputter deposited Cu-Nb superlattices exhibit time-dependent elasticity, i.e., viscoelasticity, under shear loading. In the high temperature and small strain ...

  13. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Munch, Etienne; Franco, Jaime; Deville, Sylvain; Hunger, Phillip; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2008-03-15

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional (3-D) geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  14. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Luping (Hoffman Estates, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yuan, Shengwen (Chicago, IL); Yang, Junbing (Westmont, IL)

    2011-12-13

    Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  15. Bounds on Transport Coefficients of Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J G

    2005-03-21

    An analytical formulation of conductivity bounds by Bergman and Milton is used in a different way to obtain rigorous bounds on the real transport coefficients (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and/or fluid permeability) of a fluid-saturated porous medium. These bounds do not depend explicitly on the porosity, but rather on two formation factors--one associated with the pore space and the other with the solid frame. Hashin-Shtrikman bounds for transport in random polycrystals of porous-material laminates will also be discussed.

  16. On Relational Interfaces Stavros Tripakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Relational Interfaces Stavros Tripakis Ben Lickly Thomas A. Henzinger Edward A. Lee Electrical permission. #12;On Relational Interfaces Stavros Tripakis UC Berkeley Ben Lickly UC Berkeley Thomas A, Henzinger et al, on interface theories for component- based design. Existing interface theories fail

  17. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics in porous media : battery degradation, and sorption and transport in porous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinson, Matthew Bede

    2015-01-01

    Porous media offer many interesting problems in physics and engineering due to the interaction of phase transitions, surface effects and transport. In this thesis I examine two such problems: the degradation of lithium-ion ...

  18. Zein Recovery Using Non-Porous Membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mairal, Anurag P. (Fremont, CA); Ng, Alvin (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2005-01-25

    A membrane process for treating zein solutions to increase the zein concentration in the solution. The process uses a non-porous membrane that preferentially permeates the solvent and rejects the zein. Optionally, the process can be operated as a diafiltration process to yield a concentrate of high zein purity.

  19. Tensile & shear strength of porous dust agglomerates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Seizinger; Roland Speith; Wilhelm Kley

    2013-08-23

    Context.Within the sequential accretion scenario of planet formation, planets are build up through a sequence sticking collisions. The outcome of collisions between porous dust aggregates is very important for the growth from very small dust particles to planetesimals. In this work we determine the necessary material properties of dust aggregates as a function the porosity. Aims: Continuum models such as SPH that are capable of simulating collisions of macroscopic dust aggregates require a set of material parameters. Some of them such as the tensile and shear strength are ?difficult to obtain from laboratory experiments. The aim of this work is to determine these parameters from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations. Methods: We simulate the behavior of porous dust aggregates using a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains that includes adhesion forces, rolling, twisting, and sliding. Using different methods of preparing the samples we study the strength behavior of our samples with varying porosity and coordination number of the material. Results: For the tensile strength, we can reproduce data from laboratory experiments very well. For the shear strength, there are no experimental data available. The results from our simulations differ significantly from previous theoretical models, which indicates that the latter might not be sufficient to describe porous dust aggregates. Conclusions: We have provided functional behavior of tensile and shear strength of porous dust aggregates as a function of the porosity that can be directly applied in continuum simulations of these objects in planet formation scenarios.

  20. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, Timothy W. (Tempe, AZ); Sathe, Sanjeev B. (Tempe, AZ); Peck, Robert E. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  1. Dynamics of osmosis in a porous medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Silvana S. S.; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.

    2014-11-12

    –395. (doi:10.1016/j.jcis.2010.12.006) 10. Revil A, Leroy P. 2004 Constitutive equations for ionic transport in porous shales. J. Geophys. Res. 109, B03208. (doi:10.1029/2003JB002755) 11. Leroy P, Revil A, Titov K. 2005 Characterization of transport...

  2. Stretchable, Porous, and Conductive Energy Liangbing Hu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    energy. We demonstrate the loading of pseudocapacitor materials into these conductive textiles that leads new design opportunities for wearable electronics and energy storage applications. KEYWORDS EnergyStretchable, Porous, and Conductive Energy Textiles Liangbing Hu, Mauro Pasta, Fabio La Mantia, Li

  3. Effective Thermoviscoelasticity of a Saturated Porous Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fields of mechanics because of many reasons: for example [4, 15], the enhanced recovery of gas, oil and geothermally heated water depends upon flow in porous strata; underwater acoustics involves propa- gation are distinguished in analysis, i.e., description of the thermomechanical system is fulfilled using microscale

  4. Carbon films produced from ionic liquid carbon precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Lee, Je Seung

    2013-11-05

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ionic liquid has the general formula (X.sup.+a).sub.x(Y.sup.-b).sub.y, wherein the variables a and b are, independently, non-zero integers, and the subscript variables x and y are, independently, non-zero integers, such that ax=by, and at least one of X.sup.+ and Y.sup.- possesses at least one carbon-nitrogen unsaturated bond. The invention is also directed to a composition comprising a porous carbon film possessing a nitrogen content of at least 10 atom %.

  5. Capillary Interactions on Fluid Interfaces: Opportunities for Directed Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nima Sharifi-Mood; Iris B. Liu; Kathleen J. Stebe

    2015-10-19

    A particle placed in soft matter distorts its host and creates an energy landscape. This can occur, for example, for particles in liquid crystals, for particles on lipid bilayers or for particles trapped at fluid interfaces. Such energies can be used to direct particles to assemble with remarkable degrees of control over orientation and structure. These notes explore that concept for capillary interactions, beginning with particle trapping at fluid interfaces, addressing pair interactions on planar interfaces and culminating with curvature capillary migration. Particular care is given to the solution of the associated boundary value problems to determine the energies of interaction. Experimental exploration of these interactions on planar and curved interfaces is described. Theory and experiment are compared. These interactions provide a rich toolkit for directed assembly of materials, and, owing to their close analogy to related systems, pave the way to new explorations in materials science.

  6. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governingmore »equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.« less

  7. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  8. Process for the production of liquid hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Bharat Lajjaram; Engel, Dirk Coenraad; Heydorn, Edward Clyde; Senden, Matthijis Maria Gerardus

    2006-06-27

    The present invention concerns a process for the preparation of liquid hydrocarbons which process comprises contacting synthesis gas with a slurry of solid catalyst particles and a liquid in a reactor vessel by introducing the synthesis gas at a low level into the slurry at conditions suitable for conversion of the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbons, the solid catalyst particles comprising a catalytic active metal selected from cobalt or iron on a porous refractory oxide carrier, preferably selected from silica, alumina, titania, zirconia or mixtures thereof, the catalyst being present in an amount between 10 and 40 vol. percent based on total slurry volume liquids and solids, and separating liquid material from the solid catalyst particles by using a filtration system comprising an asymmetric filtration medium (the selective side at the slurry side), in which filtration system the average pressure differential over the filtration medium is at least 0.1 bar, in which process the particle size distribution is such that at least a certain amount of the catalyst particles is smaller than the average pore size of the selective layer of the filtration medium. The invention also comprises an apparatus to carry out the process described above.

  9. Experimental Investigation of the Effective Foam Viscosity in Unsaturated Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Zhong, Lirong; White, Mark D.; Szecsody, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Foam has the potential to effectively carry and distribute either aqueous or gaseous amendments to the deep vadose zone for contaminant remediation. However, the transport of foam in porous media is complicated because flow characteristics such as the effective viscosity are affected not only by foam properties but also by the sediment properties and flow conditions. We determined the average effective foam viscosity via a series of laboratory experiments and found that the effective foam viscosity increased with the liquid fraction in foam, the injection rate, and sediment permeability. These impacts are quantified with an empirical expression, which is further demonstrated with data from literature. The results show that the liquid fraction in foam and sediment permeability are two primary factors affecting effective foam viscosity. These results suggest that, when foam is used in deep vadose zone remediation, foam flow will not suffer from gravitational drainage and can distribute amendments uniformly in heterogeneous sediments.

  10. Design and Characterization of Porous Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels for in vitro and in vivo Non-Viral DNA Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokatlian, Talar

    2012-01-01

    synthetic chitosan–gelatin porous structures. BiotechnologyIkada Y. Fabrication of porous gelatin scaffolds for tissueJacobs PJS, et al. Porous gelatin cryogels as cell delivery

  11. C. Recanati Interface Graphique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    ) { int largeur=800,hauteur=500; Test2 f = new Test2(); f.initAlea(12, largeur, hauteur); for (EnumerationC. Recanati Interface Graphique INFO2, 2013 Eléments de correction pour le TP n° 1 Exercice 1 int ROND = 1; public static final int CROIX = 2; #12;public static final int POLY = 3; public static

  12. Research Interests: Robotics, Haptics, Wearable Interfaces, Tactile Interfaces,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Interests: Robotics, Haptics, Wearable Interfaces, Tactile Interfaces, Virtual and Augmented Reality, Telepresence, Telexistence, Human-Robot; Tactile Telexistence, Augmented Haptic Human-Robot Interaction iFeel_IM! (Affective

  13. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushner, Mark Jay

    2014-07-10

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  14. Powering mm-Size Wireless Implants for Brain-Machine Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .machine interfaces [Lebedev06] . . . . . . . . . . . . .rectifier interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A half-

  15. Fractal flow patterns in hydrophobic microfluidic pore networks: experimental modeling of two-phase flow in porous electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Sinton, David; Djilali, Ned

    2009-01-01

    Experimental two-phase invasion percolation flow patterns were observed in hydrophobic micro-porous networks designed to model fuel cell specific porous media. In order to mimic the operational conditions encountered in the porous electrodes of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), micro-porous networks were fabricated with corresponding microchannel size distributions. The inlet channels were invaded homogeneously with flow rates corresponding to fuel cell current densities of 1.0 to 0.1 A/cm2 (Ca 10e-7-10e-8). A variety of fractal breakthrough patterns were observed and analyzed to quantify flooding density and geometrical diversity in terms of the total saturation, St, local saturations, s, and fractal dimension, D. It was found that St increases monotonically during the invasion process until the breakthrough point is reached, and s profiles indicate the dynamic distribution of the liquid phase during the process. Fractal analysis confirmed that the experiments fall within the flow regime of i...

  16. Stiffening solids with liquid inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Style; Rostislav Boltyanskiy; Benjamin Allen; Katharine E. Jensen; Henry P. Foote; John S. Wettlaufer; Eric R. Dufresne

    2014-07-24

    From bone and wood to concrete and carbon fibre, composites are ubiquitous natural and engineering materials. Eshelby's inclusion theory describes how macroscopic stress fields couple to isolated microscopic inclusions, allowing prediction of a composite's bulk mechanical properties from a knowledge of its microstructure. It has been extended to describe a wide variety of phenomena from solid fracture to cell adhesion. Here, we show experimentally and theoretically that Eshelby's theory breaks down for small liquid inclusions in a soft solid. In this limit, an isolated droplet's deformation is strongly size-dependent with the smallest droplets mimicking the behaviour of solid inclusions. Furthermore, in opposition to the predictions of conventional composite theory, we find that finite concentrations of small liquid inclusions enhance the stiffness of soft solids. A straight-forward extension of Eshelby's theory, accounting for the surface tension of the solid-liquid interface, explains our experimental observations. The counterintuitive effect of liquid-stiffening of solids is expected whenever droplet radii are smaller than an elastocapillary length, given by the ratio of the surface tension to Young's modulus of the solid matrix.

  17. A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Hong

    2012-01-01

    for Waste Heat Energy Harvesting and Thermal Conductanceand Mechanical Model of a Thermal Energy Harvesting Device”,to remove the excess thermal energy and prevent burning of

  18. WETTING, SPREADING AND REACTIONS AT LIQUID/SOLID INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Midland, Mich. , Sept. 30, 1967. GRAPHITE FURNACE P ,ALUMINA FURNACE CONTACT ANGLE = 10" atm. WEIGHT L05S OF Na/of 2 x 10 atm in two furnaces: "alumina furnace" witn a pOp

  19. A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Hong

    2012-01-01

    illustrated in figure 4.1. Two Peltier devices are stackedThe hot side of the top Peltier device is attached to aand prevent burning of the Peltier devices. The temperature

  20. A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Hong

    2012-01-01

    1.1 Thermal energy harvester Wireless sensor networks (WSN)mechanisms for energy harvesting in wireless sensors involvecollect sufficient energy to power wireless sensors. Thermal

  1. Investigations of amino acid-based surfactants at liquid interfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Dengliang

    2005-11-01

    packing and hydrogen bonding between bulk crystals and two-dimensional thin films for enantiomeric and racemic compounds. Chapter IV summarizes the investigations of hydrogen bonding in N-acyl amino acid monolayers by vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy...

  2. Pen-Based Interfaces for Intelligent Statics Tutoring Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Levi Scott

    2013-01-01

    Paper Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PenGraphical User Interface . . . . . . A Correct BoundaryThe User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  3. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  4. Are Patents on Interfaces Impeding Interoperability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuelson, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    whether disclosure of interface information to Samba willRules and Practices as to Interfaces In the early years ofdistributed source code and interface specifications without

  5. Resource Interfaces Arindam Chakrabarti1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henzinger, Thomas A.

    Resource Interfaces Arindam Chakrabarti1 , Luca de Alfaro2 , Thomas A. Henzinger1 , and Mari Abstract. We present a formalism for specifying component interfaces that expose component requirements? To solve these questions, we model interfaces with resource requirements as games with quantitative

  6. Gas impermeable glaze for sealing a porous ceramic surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Scott T.; Stone, Ronald G.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Trudell, Daniel E.; Thoma, Steven G.

    2004-04-06

    A process for fabricating a gas impermeable seal on a porous ceramic surface using a thin, glass-based, pinhole free glaze. The process can be used to fabricate gas impermeable end seals on porous alumina tubes used as filter media. The porous alumina tubes can have an inorganic microporous thin film separation membrane on the inner surface, which can be used for high temperature gas separation processes.

  7. Porous silicon membranes as ultrafiltration devices: a feasibility study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Xiangrong

    1993-01-01

    in the integrated circuits. According to research results, porous silicon layers are formed by local dissolution of silicon during anodization in hydrofluoric acid solution. Memming and Schwandt (1966) proposed the following model for the etching process... results in the formation of the etched pores. Beale (1984) investigated the microstructure of porous silicon using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The studies show that the structure of porous silicon is not perfectly cylindrical...

  8. Popeye Project: ROV interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scates, C.R.; Hickok, D.D.; Hernandez, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    The Popeye Project in the Gulf of Mexico helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deepwater subsea production systems. Some of the many successful ROV operations during installation and completion were {open_quotes}first-of-it`s-kind{close_quotes} activities-enabled by many technical advances. The use and reliance upon ROV systems for support of deepwater drilling and installation operations significantly increased in the past 10 years. Shell Offshore Inc.`s (SOI) confidence in this increased capability was an important factor in many of the design decisions which characterized the innovative system. Technology advancements, which depended on effective ROV intervention, were implemented with no significant difficulties. These advancements, in particular the flying leads and seabed position methods, are available to the industry for other deepwater subsea systems. In addition, several Popeye ROV interfaces have helped advance the subsea standardization initiative; e.g., hot stabs, torque-tool end effectors, and paint color.

  9. Fusion of conformal interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bachas; I. Brunner

    2008-03-04

    We study the fusion of conformal interfaces in the c=1 conformal field theory. We uncover an elegant structure reminiscent of that of black holes in supersymmetric theories. The role of the BPS black holes is played by topological interfaces, which (a) minimize the entropy function, (b) fix through an attractor mechanism one or both of the bulk radii, and (c) are (marginally) stable under splitting. One significant difference is that the conserved charges are logarithms of natural numbers, rather than vectors in a charge lattice, as for BPS states. Besides potential applications to condensed-matter physics and number theory, these results point to the existence of large solution-generating algebras in string theory.

  10. Virtual button interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  11. Virtual button interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jake S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  12. Standard interface file handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks Gutierrez, Marte 54 ENVIRONMENTAL...

  14. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02

    Elastic properties of fluid saturated porous media with aligned fractures can be studied using the ...... that are in hydraulic equilibrium with the fractures, the.

  15. Living Bacterial Sacrificial Porogens to Engineer Decellularized Porous Scaffolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Feng

    Decellularization and cellularization of organs have emerged as disruptive methods in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Porous hydrogel scaffolds have widespread applications in tissue engineering, regenerative ...

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 87, 012403 (2013) Layer with reduced viscosity at water-oil interfaces probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 87, 012403 (2013) Layer with reduced viscosity at water-oil interfaces probed-dimensional diffusion of isolated molecular tracers at the water­n-alkane interface was studied with fluorescence. INTRODUCTION Water is the most common liquid on Earth and con- stitutes a major part of living organisms

  17. Photochemical switching between colloidal photonic crystals at the nematic-air interface S. B. Chernyshuk,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Photochemical switching between colloidal photonic crystals at the nematic-air interface B. Lev,1 S August 2008 A direct observation of the photochemical switching between colloidal crystals with different liquid crystal form two-dimensional hexagonal colloidal crystal at the nematic-air interface

  18. Solvent-mediated interactions between nanoparticles at fluid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bresme; H. Lehle; M. Oettel

    2009-04-03

    We investigate the solvent mediated interactions between nanoparticles adsorbed at a liquid-vapor interface in comparison to the solvent mediated interactions in the bulk liquid and vapor phases of a Lennard-Jones solvent. Molecular dynamics simulation data for the latter are in good agreement with results from integral equations in the reference functional approximation and a simple geometric approximation. Simulation results for the solvent mediated interactions at the interface differ markedly from the interactions of the particles in the corresponding bulk phases. We find that at short interparticle distances the interactions are considerably more repulsive than those in either bulk phase. At long interparticle distances we find evidence for a long-ranged attraction. We discuss these observations in terms of interfacial interactions, namely, the three-phase line tension that would operate at short distances, and capillary wave interactions for longer interparticle distances.

  19. Vrije Universiteit Brussel Technology Transfer Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    Vrije Universiteit Brussel Technology Transfer Interface -connecting science and society- [for Prof. Hugo Thienpont More Information Technology Transfer Interface (TTI) Vrije Universiteit Brussel.interface@vub.ac.be - www.vubtechtransfer.be Vrije Universiteit Brussel Technology Transfer Interface -connecting science

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Luis W.

    1956-01-01

    t No. W - 7 4 0 5 -eng-48 ,LIQUID HYDROGEN EUSBLE CHA,MBEEZSand 3erkeley to iind if liquid hydrogen could be used as thethat supezheated 'liquid hydrogen could be made to boil

  1. Primary Atomization of a Liquid Jet in Crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rana, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, we present a visualization of the primary atomization of a turbulent liquid jet injected into a turbulent gaseous crossflow. It is based on a detailed numerical simulation of the primary atomization region of the jet using a finite volume, balanced force, incompressible LES/DNS flow solver coupled to a Refined Level Set Grid (RLSG) solver to track the phase interface position. The visualization highlights the two distinct breakup modes of the jet: the column breakup mode of the main liquid column and the ligament breakup mode on the sides of the jet and highlights the complex evolution of the phase interface geometry.

  2. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application...

  3. Strange Metals from Quantum Geometric Fluctuations of Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Huang She; A. R. Bishop; Alexander V. Balatsky

    2015-09-03

    Our current understanding of strongly correlated electron systems is based on a homogeneous framework. Here we take a step going beyond this paradigm by incorporating inhomogeneity from the beginning. Specifying to systems near the Mott metal-insulator transition, we propose a real space picture of itinerant electrons functioning in the fluctuating geometries bounded by interfaces between metallic and insulating regions. In 2+1-dimensions, the interfaces are closed bosonic strings, and we have a system of strings coupled to itinerant electrons. When the interface tension vanishes, the geometric fluctuations become critical, which gives rise to non-Fermi liquid behavior for the itinerant electrons. The fermion self-energy scales as the square root of frequency, and the dc resistivity is linear in temperature. Furthermore, the quantum geometric fluctuations mediate Cooper pairing among the itinerant electrons, indicating the instrinsic instability of electronic systems near the Mott transition, in contrast to predictions based on a homogeneous framework.

  4. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Waste tank sludge rheology within a hot spot or during draining. Homogeneous flow versus flow through a porous medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauske, H.K. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Cash, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The conditions under which ferrocyanide waste sludge flows as a homogeneous non-Newtonian two-phase (solid precipitate-liquid) mixture rather than as a liquid through a porous medium (of stationary precipitate) are examined theoretically, based on the notion that the preferred rheological behavior of the sludge is the one which imposes the least resistance to the sludge flow. The homogeneous two-phase mixture is modeled as a power-law fluid and simple criteria are derived that show that the homogeneous power-law sludge-flow is a much more likely flow situation than the porous medium model of sludge flow. The implication of this finding is that the formation of a hot spot or the drainage of sludge from a waste tank are not likely to result in the uncovering (drying) and subsequent potential overheating of the reactive-solid component of the sludge.

  5. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirsten Larson Genson

    2005-12-27

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  6. Web Browser Interface (WBUI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProject AssessmentWe theBrowser Interface (WBUI)

  7. Electrode With Porous Three-Dimensional Support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Dauchier, Jean-Michel (Martignas, FR); Simonneau, Olivier (Dourdan, FR)

    1999-07-27

    Electrode including a paste containing particles of electrochemically active material and a conductive support consisting of a three-dimensional porous material comprising strands delimiting contiguous pores communicating via passages, characterized in that the average width L in .mu.m of said passages is related to the average diameter .O slashed. in .mu.m of said particles by the following equation, in which W and Y are dimensionless coefficients: wherein W=0.16 Y=1.69 X=202.4 .mu.m and Z=80 .mu.m

  8. A rigid porous filter and filtration method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  9. Porous Solids DOI: 10.1002/anie.200503950

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    solids have found technological applications as [*] N. N. Akl, X. Qi, J. Y. Kim, Prof. F. E. Osterloh in electrically conducting compo- sites,[14­17] as electrode materials for Li-battery applications,[18 mobile ions into porous structures.[8,9] We describe herein a novel approach to metallic porous solids

  10. Electronic Supplementary Material Scalable preparation of porous silicon nanoparticles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Nano Res. Electronic Supplementary Material Scalable preparation of porous silicon nanoparticles with reduced graphene oxide Figure S2 TEM image of porous silicon nanoparticles after carbon coating and graphene wrapping. #12;www.theNanoResearch.comwww.Springer.com/journal/12274 | Nano R

  11. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01

    as an electrode in field emission applications. In this project, the formation of a CoSi2, conducting layer on porous silicon by high dose ion implantation while preserving the pore structure and field emission properties of the underlying porous silicon...

  12. The Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    The Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Anna M and dispersion of nuclear contamination through a granitic medium having densely spaced fractures, Rochester, MI 48309-4485 1 #12; Nuclear Contamination in Fractured Porous Media 2 2 The Single Porosity

  13. Coated porous carbon cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Coated porous carbon cathodes for automotive lithium batteries are being developed with the goal of overcoming the problems with capacity fade and poor thermal management in conventional polymer-bonded cathodes. The active cathode material (lithium iron phosphate nanoparticles) is carbon-bonded to the porous carbon support material. Cathodes have been developed with high specific energy and power and with good cycling behavior.

  14. Development of an oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriode 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Don Deewayne

    1994-01-01

    the requirements for a gigatron cathode. In the present work, a porous sihcon-based approach is evaluated. The use of porous silicon reduces the size of a single emitter to the manometer scale, and a true two-dimensional array geometry can be approached. A wide...

  15. Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers Steve Schecter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schecter, Stephen

    Combustion fronts in porous media with two layers layer 1 layer 2 Steve Schecter North Carolina Subject: Propagation of a combustion front through a porous medium with two parallel layers having different properties. · Each layer admits a traveling combustion wave. · The layers are coupled by heat

  16. TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT To: APEX GROUP From: Anter El-Azab (anter@seas.ucla.edu) Re with Lithium will can not work and this concept should be terminated. For the case of vanadium alloy on this concept should be terminated. #12;TERMINATION OF THE POROUS WALL CONCEPT Best Regards, Anter #12;

  17. COMPARISON OF VARIOUS FORMULATIONS OF THREEPHASE FLOW IN POROUS MEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , oil, and gas) flow in porous media, including phase, global, and pseudo­global pressure three­phase (e.g., water, oil, and gas) flow in porous media. We show that, under a so­called total­global pressure and two saturations without any assumption. However, it turns out that the phase and pseudo

  18. Loading rate dependence of permeability evolution in porous aeolian sandstones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loading rate dependence of permeability evolution in porous aeolian sandstones Ira O. Ojala, Bryne on the permeability of porous sandstones by carrying out triaxial compression tests at four different temperatures effective stress and axial strain for the Locharbriggs sandstone. The Clashach sandstone exhibits a linear

  19. Liquid Effluents Program mission analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, S.S.

    1994-09-27

    Systems engineering is being used to identify work to cleanup the Hanford Site. The systems engineering process transforms an identified mission need into a set of performance parameters and a preferred system configuration. Mission analysis is the first step in the process. Mission analysis supports early decision-making by clearly defining the program objectives, and evaluating the feasibility and risks associated with achieving those objectives. The results of the mission analysis provide a consistent basis for subsequent systems engineering work. A mission analysis was performed earlier for the overall Hanford Site. This work was continued by a ``capstone`` team which developed a top-level functional analysis. Continuing in a top-down manner, systems engineering is now being applied at the program and project levels. A mission analysis was conducted for the Liquid Effluents Program. The results are described herein. This report identifies the initial conditions and acceptable final conditions, defines the programmatic and physical interfaces and sources of constraints, estimates the resources to carry out the mission, and establishes measures of success. The mission analysis reflects current program planning for the Liquid Effluents Program as described in Liquid Effluents FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan.

  20. Monitoring Phase Behavior of Sub- and Supercritical CO2 Confined in Porous Fractal Silica with 85% Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnichenko, Yuri B; Mayama, Dr Hiroyuki; Cheng, Gang; Cheng, Gang; Blach, Tomasz P

    2010-01-01

    Phase behavior of CO{sub 2} confined in porous fractal silica with volume fraction of SiO{sub 2} {phi}{sub 5} = 0.15 was investigated using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) techniques. The range of fluid densities (0 < ({rho}{sub CO{sub 2}}){sub bulk} < 0.977 g/cm{sup 3}) and temperatures (T = 22 C, 35 and 60 C) corresponded to gaseous, liquid, near critical and supercritical conditions of the bulk fluid. The results revealed formation of a dense adsorbed phase in small pores with sizes D < 40 {angstrom} at all temperatures. At low pressure (P < 55 bar, ({rho}{sub CO{sub 2}}){sub bulk} < 0.2 g/cm{sup 3}) the average fluid density in pores may exceed the density of bulk fluid by a factor up to 6.5 at T = 22 C. This 'enrichment factor' gradually decreases with temperature, however significant fluid densification in small pores still exists at temperature T = 60 C, i.e., far above the liquid?gas critical temperature of bulk CO{sub 2} (T{sub c} = 31.1 C). Larger pores are only partially filled with liquid-like adsorbed layer which coexists with unadsorbed fluid in the pore core. With increasing pressure, all pores become uniformly filled with the fluid, showing no measurable enrichment or depletion of the porous matrix with CO{sub 2}.

  1. Computer simulation of the phase diagram for a fluid confined in a fractal and disordered porous material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. De Grandis; P. Gallo; M. Rovere

    2004-11-14

    We present a grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation study of the phase diagram of a Lennard-Jones fluid adsorbed in a fractal and highly porous aerogel. The gel environment is generated from an off-lattice diffusion limited cluster-cluster aggregation process. Simulations have been performed with the multicanonical ensemble sampling technique. The biased sampling function has been obtained by histogram reweighting calculations. Comparing the confined and the bulk system liquid-vapor coexistence curves we observe a decrease of both the critical temperature and density in qualitative agreement with experiments and other Monte Carlo studies on Lennard-Jones fluids confined in random matrices of spheres. At variance with these numerical studies we do not observe upon confinement a peak on the liquid side of the coexistence curve associated with a liquid-liquid phase coexistence. In our case only a shouldering of the coexistence curve appears upon confinement. This shoulder can be associated with high density fluctuations in the liquid phase. The coexisting vapor and liquid phases in our system show a high degree of spatial disorder and inhomogeneity.

  2. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  3. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  4. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  5. Preparation of silica aerogel using ionic liquids as solvents Sheng Dai,*a Y. H. Ju,ac H. J. Gao,b J. S. Lin,b S. J. Pennycookb and C. E. Barnesc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Preparation of silica aerogel using ionic liquids as solvents Sheng Dai,*a Y. H. Ju,ac H. J. Gaord December 1999 Ionic liquids have been used as effective solvents to synthesize aerogels; a long pores can be removed from the silica network through conventional solvent extraction. The porous

  6. [Investigation of ultrasonic wave interactions with fluid-saturated porous rocks]. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, L.

    1992-07-01

    During the last two years we have continued our investigation of ultrasonic wave propagation in fluid-filled porous materials. First, we studied the feasibility of using different surface modes to characterize both synthetic and natural rocks. We introduced a novel experimental technique based on the direct generation of surface waves by edge excitation. We used two low-frequency (100--500 kHz) shear transducers in pitch-catch mode to launch and receive the ultrasonic surface wave. The contact transducers were coupled to the opposite edges of the porous specimens with normal polarization relative to the surface. The same technique was successfully used to generate Rayleigh-type surface modes on the free surface of both dry and water-saturated specimens, as well as Stoneley-type interface modes on the fluid-loaded surfaces of immersed samples. Our main achievement in this area is the realization that, due to surface tension, practically closed-pore boundary conditions can prevail on the free surface of a water-saturated rock for completely open pores. As a result, the velocity of the true surface mode might be much lower than the Rayleigh velocity of the dry skeleton.

  7. (Investigation of ultrasonic wave interactions with fluid-saturated porous rocks)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, L.

    1992-01-01

    During the last two years we have continued our investigation of ultrasonic wave propagation in fluid-filled porous materials. First, we studied the feasibility of using different surface modes to characterize both synthetic and natural rocks. We introduced a novel experimental technique based on the direct generation of surface waves by edge excitation. We used two low-frequency (100--500 kHz) shear transducers in pitch-catch mode to launch and receive the ultrasonic surface wave. The contact transducers were coupled to the opposite edges of the porous specimens with normal polarization relative to the surface. The same technique was successfully used to generate Rayleigh-type surface modes on the free surface of both dry and water-saturated specimens, as well as Stoneley-type interface modes on the fluid-loaded surfaces of immersed samples. Our main achievement in this area is the realization that, due to surface tension, practically closed-pore boundary conditions can prevail on the free surface of a water-saturated rock for completely open pores. As a result, the velocity of the true surface mode might be much lower than the Rayleigh velocity of the dry skeleton.

  8. Wettability stabilizes fluid invasion into porous media via nonlocal, cooperative pore filling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Holtzman; Enrico Segre

    2015-09-15

    We study the impact of the wetting properties on the immiscible displacement of a viscous fluid in disordered porous media. We present a novel pore-scale model that captures wettability and dynamic effects, including the spatiotemporal nonlocality associated with interface readjustments. Our simulations show that increasing the wettability of the invading fluid (the contact angle) promotes cooperative pore filling that stabilizes the invasion, and that this effect is suppressed as the flow rate increases, due to viscous instabilities. We use scaling analysis to derive two dimensionless numbers that predict the mode of displacement. By elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we explain classical yet intriguing experimental observations. These insights could be used to improve technologies such as hydraulic fracturing, CO$_{2}$ geo-sequestration, and microfluidics.

  9. Wettability stabilizes fluid invasion into porous media via nonlocal, cooperative pore filling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtzman, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of the wetting properties on the immiscible displacement of a viscous fluid in disordered porous media. We present a novel pore-scale model that captures wettability and dynamic effects, including the spatiotemporal nonlocality associated with interface readjustments. Our simulations show that increasing the wettability of the invading fluid (the contact angle) promotes cooperative pore filling that stabilizes the invasion, and that this effect is suppressed as the flow rate increases, due to viscous instabilities. We use scaling analysis to derive two dimensionless numbers that predict the mode of displacement. By elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we explain classical yet intriguing experimental observations. These insights could be used to improve technologies such as hydraulic fracturing, CO$_{2}$ geo-sequestration, and microfluidics.

  10. Influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-01-01

    The influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in a porous medium is investigated through a linear stability analysis (LSA) as well as direct numerical simulations (DNS). The linear stability method implemented in this paper is based on an initial value approach, which helps to capture the onset of instability more accurately than the quasi-steady state analysis. In the absence of displacement, we show that viscosity contrast delays the onset of instability in buoyantly unstable miscible fluids. Further, it is observed that suitably choosing the viscosity contrast and injection velocity a gravitationally unstable miscible interface can be stabilized completely. Through LSA we draw a phase diagram, which shows three distinct stability regions in a parameter space spanned by the displacement velocity and the viscosity contrast. DNS are performed corresponding to parameters from each regime and the results obtained are in accordance with the linear stability results. Moreover, the conv...

  11. Multicomponent Gas Diffusion in Porous Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yeqing; Dutta, Abhijit; Mohanram, Aravind; Pietras, John D; Bazant, Martin Z

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent gas transport is investigated with unprecedented precision by AC impedance analysis of porous YSZ anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells. A fuel gas mixture of H2-H2O-N2 is fed to the anode, and impedance data are measured across the range of hydrogen partial pressure (10-100%) for open circuit conditions at three temperatures (800C, 850C and 900C) and for 300mA applied current at 800C. For the first time, analytical formulae for the diffusion resistance (Rb) of three standard models of multicomponent gas transport (Fick, Stefan-Maxwell, and Dusty Gas) are derived and tested against the impedance data. The tortuosity is the only fitting parameter since all the diffusion coefficients are known. Only the Dusty Gas model leads to a remarkable data collapse for over twenty experimental conditions, using a constant tortuosity consistent with permeability measurements and the Bruggeman relation. These results establish the accuracy of the Dusty Gas model for multicomponent gas diffusion in porous med...

  12. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, Karthik V.

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  13. The Common Communication Interface (CCI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Geoffray, Patrick [ORNL; Bosilca, George [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Squyres, Jeffrey M [ORNL; Minnich, Ronald [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2011-01-01

    There are many APIs for connecting and exchanging data between network peers. Each interface varies wildly based on metrics including performance, portability, and complexity. Specifically, many interfaces make design or implementation choices emphasizing some of the more desirable metrics (e.g., performance) while sacrificing others (e.g., portability). As a direct result, software developers building large, network-based applications are forced to choose a specific network API based on a complex, multi-dimensional set of criteria. Such trade-offs inevitably result in an interface that fails to deliver some desirable features. In this paper, we introduce a novel interface that both supports many features that have become standard (or otherwise generally expected) in other communication interfaces, and strives to export a small, yet powerful, interface. This new interface draws upon years of experience from network-oriented software development best practices to systems-level implementations. The goal is to create a relatively simple, high-level communication interface with low barriers to adoption while still providing important features such as scalability, resiliency, and performance. The result is the Common Communications Interface (CCI): an intuitive API that is portable, efficient, scalable, and robust to meet the needs of network-intensive applications common in HPC and cloud computing.

  14. Biological Interfaces | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    its associated biotic and abiotic environments. Understanding the exchange of energy, information, and materials across this dynamic interface at diverse spatial and temporal...

  15. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  16. Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Liquid hydrogen, liquid methane or liquefied natural gas could form an extremely flammable mixtureGuidance Document Cryogenic Liquids [This is a brief and general summary. Read the full MSDS for more details before handling.] Introduction: All cryogenic liquids are gases at normal temperature

  17. X-ray Microtomography Determination of Air?Water Interfacial Area?Water Saturation Relationships in Sandy Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Harrold, Katherine H.; Lieb-Lappen, Ross M. (Middlebury)

    2008-08-06

    In this work, total smooth air-water interfacial areas were measured for a series of nine natural and model sandy porous media as a function of water saturation using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Interfacial areas decreased linearly with water saturation, while the estimated maximum interfacial area compared favorably to the media geometric surface areas. Importantly, relative interfacial area (i.e., normalized by geometric surface area) versus water saturation plots for all media collapsed into a single linear cluster (r{sup 2} = 0.93), suggesting that geometric surface area is an important, and perhaps sufficient, descriptor of sandy media that governs total smooth interfacial area?water saturation relationships. Measured relationships were used to develop an empirical model for estimating interfacial area-water saturation relationships for sandy porous media. Model-based interfacial area estimates for independent media were generally slightly higher than interfacial areas measured using aqueous-phase interfacial tracer methods, which may indicate that microtomography captures regions of the air-water interface that are not accessible to aqueous-phase interfacial tracers. The empirical model presented here requires only average particle diameter and porosity as input parameters and can be used to readily estimate air-water interfacial area?water saturation relationships for sandy porous media.

  18. Journal of Crystal Growth 241 (2002) 4550 Boron doping of silicon layers grown by liquid phase epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Energy Systems, Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Acton, 0200, Australia cell approaches, such as the solar cells by liquid phase epitaxy over porous silicon (SCLIPS) process in the source wafer. This mismatch is explained by the gradual removal of boron from our system, most likely

  19. Automatic Extraction of Web Search Interfaces for Interface Schema Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Weiyi

    button, checkbox and selection list (i.e., a pull-down menu) that allow a user to enter searchAutomatic Extraction of Web Search Interfaces for Interface Schema Integration Hai He, Weiyi Meng@cacs.louisiana.edu ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of a technique for extracting information from the Web search

  20. Human-computer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  1. ForPeerReview Hybrid structures of porous silicon and conjugated polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asscher, Micha

    called "third generation solar cells [11]). A porous matrix, particularly a porous silicon (PS) matrixForPeerReview Hybrid structures of porous silicon and conjugated polymers for photovoltaic of Jerusalem, Physics Keywords: Porous silicon, conjugated polymers, photovoltaics Wiley-VCH physica status

  2. Ultrathin Polypeptide Multilayer Films for the Fabrication of Model Liquid/Liquid Electrochemical Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as ferri/ ferrocyanide, and are stable when immersed in organic solvents such as 1,2-dichloroethane (1 films in 1,2-DCE is used to reversibly oxidize the ferrocyanide ions in the film, and in situ PM-FTIRRAS measurements demonstrate that more than 95% of the ferrocyanide ions can be converted to ferricyanide without

  3. Effects of two-phase flow on the deflagration of porous energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margolis, S.B.; Williams, F.A.

    1994-05-01

    The combustion behavior of energetic materials (e.g., solid propellants) has long been of interest in the fields of propulsion and pyrotechnics. In many such applications, it is becoming increasingly clear that two-phase flow effects play an important role, especially since, during combustion, most homogeneous solid propellants develop thin multi-phase layers at their surfaces in which finite-rate exothermic reactions occur. In addition, there is a growing interest in the behavior of porous energetic solids, since even initially dense materials can develop significant void fractions if, at any time, they are exposed to abnormal thermal environments. The deflagration characteristics of such ``damaged`` materials may then differ significantly from those of the pristine material due, at least in part, to gas flow in the solid/gas preheat region. The presence of gas in the porous solid in turn results in a more pronounced two-phase effect in the multi-phase surface layer, such as in the liquid melt region of nitramine propellants, which thus tend to exhibit extensive bubbling in an exothermic foam layer. The present analysis is largely applicable to this latter class of propellants.

  4. AIDP -Apple Interface Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tollmar, Konrad

    AIDP - Apple Interface Design Project AIDP - Apple Interface Design Project m 92-95 m Joy Mountford m Design Centre, Advanced Technology Group m Apple's Industrial Design Group "Encourage ProjectThe Project m Bridge the gulf between the physical and virtual worlds - Apple m Design a new way

  5. Theory of Sound Propagation in Superfluid Solutions Filled Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sh. E. Kekutia; N. D. Chkhaidze

    2005-02-10

    A theory of the propagation of acoustic waves in a porous medium filled with superfluid solution is developed. The elastic coefficients in the system of equations are expressed in terms of physically measurable quantities. The equations obtained describe all volume modes that can propagate in a porous medium saturated with superfluid solution. Finally, derived equations are applied to the most important particular case when the normal fluid component is locked inside a highly porous media (aerogel) by viscous forces and the velocities of two longitudinal sound modes are calculated.

  6. Porous silicon ring resonator for compact, high sensitivity biosensing applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Gilberto A.; Hu, Shuren; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    A ring resonator is patterned on a porous silicon slab waveguide to produce a compact, high quality factor biosensor with a large internal surface area available for enhanced recognition of biological and chemical molecules. The porous nature of the ring resonator allows molecules to directly interact with the guided mode. Quality factors near 10,000 were measured for porous silicon ring resonators with a radius of 25 ?m. A bulk detection sensitivity of 380 nm/RIU was measured upon exposure to salt water solutions. Specific detection of nucleic acid molecules was demonstrated with a surface detection sensitivity of 4 pm/nM.

  7. Fabrication and testing of oxidized porous silicon field emitter strips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madduri, Vasanta Bhanu

    1992-01-01

    28 30 15. Reaction Cell for Anodization 32 16. 17. Cross-section of a Porous Silicon Field Emitting Strip Ctoss-section of the Anode Tester 34 36 LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) Figure 18. Testing Set-up for the Diode Arrays 19. I-V Curves... electrolyte in place of HF. In this process of oxide formation the oxide is formed at the bottom of the porous layer. The top PS layer can be recrystallized by high temperature annealing or laser processing. Light Emitting Porous Silicon Attempts to use...

  8. Rapid process for producing transparent, monolithic porous glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-14

    A process for making transparent porous glass monoliths from gels. The glass is produced much faster and in much larger sizes than present technology for making porous glass. The process reduces the cost of making large porous glass monoliths because: 1) the process does not require solvent exchange nor additives to the gel to increase the drying rates, 2) only moderate temperatures and pressures are used so relatively inexpensive equipment is needed, an 3) net-shape glass monoliths are possible using this process. The process depends on the use of temperature to control the partial pressure of the gel solvent in a closed vessel, resulting in controlled shrinking during drying.

  9. Method for forming porous platinum films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming a platinum film includes providing a substrate, sputtering a crystalline platinum oxide layer over at least a portion of the substrate, and reducing the crystalline platinum oxide layer to form the platinum film. A device includes a non-conductive substrate and a platinum layer having a density of between about 2 and 5 g/cm.sup.3 formed over at least a portion of the non-conductive substrate. The platinum films produced in accordance with the present invention provide porous films suitable for use as electrodes, yet require few processing steps. Thus, such films are less costly. Such films may be formed on both conductive and non-conductive substrates. While the invention has been illustrated with platinum, other metals, such as noble metals, that form a low density oxide when reactively sputtered may also be used.

  10. Porous Alumina Based Capacitive MEMS RH Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juhasz, L; Timar-Horvath, Veronika; Desmulliez, Marc; Dhariwal, Resh

    2008-01-01

    The aim of a joint research and development project at the BME and HWU is to produce a cheap, reliable, low-power and CMOS-MEMS process compatible capacitive type relative humidity (RH) sensor that can be incorporated into a state-of-the-art, wireless sensor network. In this paper we discuss the preparation of our new capacitive structure based on post-CMOS MEMS processes and the methods which were used to characterize the thin film porous alumina sensing layer. The average sensitivity is approx. 15 pF/RH% which is more than a magnitude higher than the values found in the literature. The sensor is equipped with integrated resistive heating, which can be used for maintenance to reduce drift, or for keeping the sensing layer at elevated temperature, as an alternative method for temperature-dependence cancellation.

  11. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  12. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  13. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  14. Liquid-metal-mediated homoepitaxial film growth of Ge at low temperature Fulin Xiong,a) Eric Ganz, A. G. Loeser, J. A. Golovchenko, and Frans Spaepen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Liquid-metal-mediated homoepitaxial film growth of Ge at low temperature Fulin Xiong,a) Eric Ganz for publication 10 October 1991) We demonstrate liquid-metal-mediated homoepitaxial crystal growth of Ge on Ge. The liquid-metal phase at the interface is a Au-Ge alloy formed by initial deposition of a thin Au layer

  15. Matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for elliptic problems with sharp-edged interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yongcheng

    Matched interface and boundary (MIB) method for elliptic problems with sharp-edged interfaces with sharp-edged interfaces, thin-layered interfaces and interfaces that intersect with geometric boundary. This work generalizes the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method previously designed for solving

  16. Composition suitable for decontaminating a porous surface contaminated with cesium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Michael D.; Finck, Martha R.; Mertz, Carol J.

    2010-06-15

    A method of decontaminating porous surfaces contaminated with water soluble radionuclides by contacting the contaminated porous surfaces with an ionic solution capable of solubilizing radionuclides present in the porous surfaces followed by contacting the solubilized radionuclides with a gel containing a radionuclide chelator to bind the radionuclides to the gel, and physically removing the gel from the porous surfaces. A dry mix is also disclosed of a cross-linked ionic polymer salt, a linear ionic polymer salt, a radionuclide chelator, and a gel formation controller present in the range of from 0% to about 40% by weight of the dry mix, wherein the ionic polymer salts are granular and the non cross-linked ionic polymer salt is present as a minor constituent.

  17. Porous hydroxyapatite-based obturation materials for dentistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    of Advanced Polymers & Optimized Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University Laboratory of Advanced Polymers & Optimized Materials, Department of Materials Science and EngineeringPorous hydroxyapatite-based obturation materials for dentistry Witold Brostowa) Laboratory

  18. Modelling Flow through Porous Media under Large Pressure Gradients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Shriram

    2013-11-01

    The most interesting and technologically important problems in the study of flow through porous media involve very high pressures and pressure gradients in the flow do- main such as enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide ...

  19. Gasification and combustion modeling for porous char particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Simcha Lev

    2012-01-01

    Gasification and combustion of porous char particles occurs in many industrial applications. Reactor-scale outputs of importance depend critically on processes that occur at the particle-scale. Because char particles often ...

  20. Acoustics in Porous Media. JUAN E. SANTOS - Department of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    robiel

    Blue regions represent water, yellow regions hydrocarbon and the void .... Time histories for a porous rock saturated by gas (top left), water (top right) and periodic gas-water (bottom). 0 ..... groundwater flow and contamination among others.

  1. Simulation of filtration for suspension transport in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yun Sung, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a novel method for analyzing the filtration of particles transported through a granular porous medium. The proposed analysis considers the deposition of particles ...

  2. Effective hydraulic conductivity of bounded, strongly heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    Effective hydraulic conductivity of bounded, strongly heterogeneous porous media Evangelos K of Arizona, Tucson Abstract. We develop analytical expressions for the effective hydraulic conductivity Ke boundaries. The log hydraulic conductivity Y forms a Gaussian, statistically homogeneous and anisotropic

  3. Commercial applications of nanostructures created with ordered porous alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Brendan Christopher, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    In the drive from microfabrication to nanofabrication, porous alumina templates may play a key role in technological evolution. Under the right processing conditions, ordered pores can grow in anodic aluminum oxide, which ...

  4. Uncertainty quantification using multiscale methods for porous media flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dostert, Paul Francis

    2009-05-15

    In this dissertation we discuss numerical methods used for uncertainty quantifi- cation applications to flow in porous media. We consider stochastic flow equations that contain both a spatial and random component which ...

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of capacitive charging and desalination by porous electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    The rapid and efficient exchange of ions between porous electrodes and aqueous solutions is important in many applications, such as electrical energy storage by supercapacitors, water desalination and purification by ...

  6. Overlimiting Current and Shock Electrodialysis in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Daosheng

    Most electrochemical processes, such as electrodialysis, are limited by diffusion, but in porous media, surface conduction and electroosmotic flow also contribute to ionic flux. In this article, we report experimental ...

  7. Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Crystals and Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James J.

    Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Crystals and Liquid Crystalline Polymers James J. Feng Department theories and mole- cular theories separately. In addition, a theory for liquid crystalline materials has, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada INTRODUCTION Liquid crystallinity refers to an intermediate state

  8. Porous coolant tube holder for fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT)

    1981-01-01

    A coolant tube holder for a stack of fuel cells is a gas porous sheet of fibrous material adapted to be sandwiched between a cell electrode and a nonporous, gas impervious flat plate which separates adjacent cells. The porous holder has channels in one surface with coolant tubes disposed therein for carrying coolant through the stack. The gas impervious plate is preferably bonded to the opposite surface of the holder, and the channel depth is the full thickness of the holder.

  9. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI); Hill, Jr., Charles G. (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  10. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    HPLC MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CIGARETTE SMOKE INTRODUCTION Even thoughHPLC - 1 High Performance Liquid Chromatography HPLC MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CIGARETTE SMOKE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;HPLC - 2 High Performance Liquid Chromatography

  11. Chemistry & Physics at Interfaces | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces SHARE Chemistry and Physics at Interfaces Chemical transformations and...

  12. Porous Elasticity: Lectures on the elasticity of porous materials as an application of the theory of mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray M.

    2014-01-22

    This work was originally planned as a textbook exploiting the structure of the Theory of Mixtures as the basis for the study of porous elasticity. The decision to write this book was made approximately thirty years ago! ...

  13. Ellipsoidal particles at fluid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Lehle; E. Noruzifar; M. Oettel

    2008-01-18

    For partially wetting, ellipsoidal colloids trapped at a fluid interface, their effective, interface--mediated interactions of capillary and fluctuation--induced type are analyzed. For contact angles different from 90$^o$, static interface deformations arise which lead to anisotropic capillary forces that are substantial already for micrometer--sized particles. The capillary problem is solved using an efficient perturbative treatment which allows a fast determination of the capillary interaction for all distances between and orientations of two particles. Besides static capillary forces, fluctuation--induced forces caused by thermally excited capillary waves arise at fluid interfaces. For the specific choice of a spatially fixed three--phase contact line, the asymptotic behavior of the fluctuation--induced force is determined analytically for both the close--distance and the long--distance regime and compared to numerical solutions.

  14. Surfactant-induced rigidity of interfaces: a unified approach to free and dip-coated films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorène Champougny; Benoit Scheid; Frédéric Restagno; Jan Vermant; Emmanuelle Rio

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of thin liquid films is known to be strongly affected by the presence of surfactants at the interfaces. The detailed mechanism by which the latter enhance film stability is still a matter of debate, in particular concerning the influence of surface elastic effects on the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the liquid/air interfaces. In the present work, "twin" hydrodynamic models neglecting surfactant transport to the interfaces are proposed to describe the coating of films onto a solid plate (Landau-Levich-Derjaguin configuration) as well as soap film pulling (Frankel configuration). Experimental data on the entrained film thickness in both configurations can be fitted very well using a single value of the surface elasticity, which is in good agreement with independent measurements by mean of surface expansion experiments in a Langmuir through. The analysis shows how and when the soap films or dip coating experiments may be used to precisely and sensitively measure the surface elasticity of surfactant solutions.

  15. Dobrushin Interfaces via Reflection Positivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senya Shlosman; Yvon Vignaud

    2007-04-13

    We study the interfaces separating different phases of 3D systems by means of the Reflection Positivity method. We treat discrete non-linear sigma-models, which exhibit power-law decay of correlations at low temperatures, and we prove the rigidity property of the interface. Our method is applicable to the Ising and Potts models, where it simplifies the derivation of some known results. The method also works for large-entropy systems of continuous spins.

  16. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  17. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  18. Poroelastic response of orthotropic fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-12-01

    An algorithm is presented for inverting either laboratory or field poroelastic data for all the drained constants of an anisotropic (specifically orthotropic) fractured poroelastic system. While fractures normally weaken the system by increasing the mechanical compliance, any liquids present in these fractures are expected to increase the stiffness somewhat, thus negating to some extent the mechanical weakening influence of the fractures themselves. The analysis presented quantifies these effects and shows that the key physical variable needed to account for the pore-fluid effects is a factor of (1 - B), where B is Skempton's second coe#14;fficient and satisfies 0 {<=} #20; B < 1. This scalar factor uniformly reduces the increase in compliance due to the presence of communicating fractures, thereby stiffening the fractured composite medium by a predictable amount. One further goal of the discussion is to determine how many of the poroelastic constants need to be known by other means in order to determine the rest from remote measurements, such as seismic wave propagation data in the field. Quantitative examples arising in the analysis show that, if the fracture aspect ratio a{sub f} ~ 0.1 and the pore fluid is liquid water, then for several cases considered Skempton's B ~ 0:9, so the stiffening effect of the pore-liquid reduces the change in compliance due to the fractures by a factor 1-B ~ 0.1, in these examples. The results do however depend on the actual moduli of the unfractured elastic material, as well as on the pore-liquid bulk modulus, so these quantitative predictions are just examples, and should not be treated as universal results. Attention is also given to two previously unremarked poroelastic identities, both being useful variants of Gassmann's equations for homogeneous -- but anisotropic -- poroelasticity. Relationships to Skempton's analysis of saturated soils are also noted. The paper concludes with a discussion of alternative methods of analyzing and quantifying fluid-substitution behavior in poroelastic systems, especially for those systems having heterogeneous constitution.

  19. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  20. Modeling Solid-Electrolyte-Electrode Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzwarth, Natalie

    Modeling Solid-Electrolyte- Electrode Interfaces N. D. Lepley and N. A. W. Holzwarth Wake Forest University Supported by NSF grant DMR-1105485 #12;Motivation · Solid electrolyte/electrode interfaces more chemically stable · Enable Li anodes, S cathodes · Interested in characterizing interface ­ What interface

  1. Metal pad instabilities in liquid metal batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    A mechanical analogy is used to analyze the interaction between the magnetic field, electric current and deformation of interfaces in liquid metal batteries. It is found that, during charging or discharging, a sufficiently large battery is prone to instabilities of two types. One is similar to the metal pad instability known for aluminum reduction cells. Another type is new. It is related to the destabilizing effect of the Lorentz force formed by the azimuthal magnetic field induced by the base current and the current perturbations caused by the local variations of the thickness of the electrolyte layer.

  2. Cracking in liquid petroleum gas Horton spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trivedi, D.K. Gupta, S.C.

    1997-07-01

    A gas processing plant on the western coast of India produces sweet gas after processing sour natural gas. Liquid petroleum gas (LPG) is recovered from the sweet gas. The LPG, containing a H{sub 2}S concentration of 10 ppm to 20 ppm, is stored in Horton spheres, each 17 m in diameter with a capacity of {minus}27 C to 55 C. Horton spheres for containing liquid petroleum gas (LPG) were fabricated on-site using prestressed plates of high-strength carbon steel (CS) SA 537 Class-1 with post-weld heat treatment. High-residual tensile stresses and hydrogen absorption from H{sub 2}S present in LPG could be the cause of cracking at weld and heat-affected zone interfaces at high hardness locations. Recommendations are given for inspection and use of lower-strength CS and improved welding procedures.

  3. Hybrid user interfaces : design guidelines and implementation examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Sehyun

    2006-01-01

    A hybrid user interface is a new type of computer user interface that achieves high usability by combining features of graphical user interfaces and command line interfaces. The main goal of a hybrid user interface is to ...

  4. Transient conjugate free convection from a vertical flat plate in a porous medium subjected to a sudden change in surface heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical study using the Karman-Pohlhausen method for describing the transient heat exchange between the boundary-layer free convection and a vertical flat plate embedded in a porous medium. The unsteady behavior is developed after the generation of an impulsive heat flux step at the right-hand side of the plate. Two cases are considered according to whether the plate has a finite thickness or no thickness. The time and space evolution of the interface temperature is evidenced.

  5. Surface and Interfacial Properties of Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Mixtures Released to the Subsurface at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nellis, Scott; Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Oostrom, Martinus; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2009-05-01

    Surface and interfacial tensions that arise at the interface between different phases are key parameters affecting Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (NAPL) movement and redistribution in the vadose zone after spill events. In this study, the impact of major additive components on surface and interfacial tensions for organic mixtures and wastewater was investigated. Organic mixture and wastewater compositions are based upon carbon tetrachloride (CT) mixtures released at the Hanford site, where CT was discharged simultaneously with dibutyl butyl phosphonate (DBBP), tributyl phosphate (TBP), dibutyl phosphate (DBP), and a machining lard oil (LO). A considerable amount of wastewater consisting primarily of nitrates and metal salts was also discharged. The tension values measured in this study revealed that the addition of these additive components caused a significant lowering of the interfacial tension with water or wastewater and the surface tension of the wastewater phase in equilibrium with the organic mixtures, compared to pure CT, but had minimal effect on the surface tension of the NAPL itself. These results lead to large differences in spreading coefficients for several mixtures, where the additives caused both a higher (more spreading) initial spreading coefficient and a lower (less spreading) equilibrium spreading coefficient. This indicates that if these mixtures migrate into uncontaminated areas, they will tend to spread quickly, but form a higher residual NAPL saturation after equilibrium, as compared to pure CT. Over time, CT likely volatilizes more rapidly than other components in the originally disposed mixtures and the lard oil and phosphates would become more concentrated in the remaining NAPL, resulting in a lower interfacial tension for the mixture. Spreading coefficients are expected to increase and perhaps change the equilibrated organic mixtures from nonspreading to spreading in water-wetting porous media. These results show that the behavior of organic chemical mixtures should be accounted for in numerical flow and transport models.

  6. Porous platinum-based catalysts for oxygen reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Jonah D; Snyder, Joshua D

    2014-11-25

    A porous metal that comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A fuel cell includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and an electrolyte arranged between the first and the second electrodes. At least one of the first and second electrodes is coated with a porous metal catalyst for oxygen reduction, and the porous metal catalyst comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A method of producing a porous metal according to an embodiment of the current invention includes producing an alloy consisting essentially of platinum and nickel according to the formula Pt.sub.xNi.sub.1-x, where x is at least 0.01 and less than 0.3; and dealloying the alloy in a substantially pH neutral solution to reduce an amount of nickel in the alloy to produce the porous metal.

  7. Syngas production from heavy liquid fuel reforming in inert porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastore, Andrea

    2010-11-16

    Figure 1.1: U.S. Primary Energy Flow by Source and Sector [1]. els have been investigated, such as biodiesel, methanol, ethanol, hydrogen, boron, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), Fischer-Tropsch fuel and solar fuels. One of these is hydrogen, the most... be noted that higher energy efficiency itself leads to a reduction in emissions. The absence of mechanical steps also leads to other advantages such as the minimum require- ment of rotating accessories pumps and motors demonstrating a low level of noise...

  8. An experimental measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of a porous solid-liquid system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, James Elliott

    1959-01-01

    . 6. The Relation of to SE for Values of K Calculated by the Heat Neter K SE Nethod 10 13 15 17 22 7. The Relation of the Thermal Conductivity of Fluid Saturated Sandstone to the Thermal Conductivity of the Saturating Fluid 8. The Variation... of pressures and temperatures and at flow and non-flow states (3)~(6), (7), The advent of widespread interest in increasing petroleum recovery from subterranean reservoirs by applying heat to an oil-bearing for- mation (8), (9), (10) has created a need...

  9. PinBus Interface Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  10. Multi-robot control interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walton, Miles C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  11. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  12. Flow adjustment and interior flow associated with a rectangular porous obstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey Tsaros

    The flow at the leading edge and in the interior of a rectangular porous obstruction is described through experiments and scaling. The porous obstruction consists of an emergent, rectangular array of cylinders in shallow ...

  13. Discrete particle transport in porous media : discrete observations of physical mechanisms influencing particle behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Joon Sik, 1973-

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of how discrete particles in the micron to submicron range behave in porous media is important to a number of environmental problems. Discrete particle behavior in the interior of a porous medium is complex ...

  14. An Investigation of In Situ Gelation of a Polyacrylamide/Chromium(III) System in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes, Antonio

    1992-04-01

    Crosslinked polymer systems are used in enhanced oil recovery treatments. To further understand the behavior of such systems in porous media, the flow of a chromium(H[)-polyacrylamide gel system has been studied in unconsolidated porous media...

  15. Study of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media with laser-polarized ¹²?Xe NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ruopeng, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of gas flow dynamics in porous and granular media by using laser-polarized ¹²?Xe . Two different physical processes, the gas transport in porous rock cores and ...

  16. Phenomenological study of Au and Pt nanowires grown in porous alumina scaffolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Yong Cheol, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Porous anodic aluminum oxide, commonly known as AAO, has been widely used as a scaffold to synthesize nanowires and nanotubes. The porous alumina structure can be obtained from a simple electrochemical oxidation process, ...

  17. A Study of Porous Transitions of Layer-By-Layer Thin Films and Patterning Multilayers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Chungyeon

    2013-05-24

    of this thesis focuses on patterning polyelectrolyte multilayers that are able to undergo transitions from continuous films to porous materials by using hydrogel stamps. The stamping process is able to locally etch and pattern the porous transition in the Lb...

  18. Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted of 3-Dimensionally Intermingled Rod-like Grains Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted of 3-Dimensionally...

  19. Factors controlling permeability of cataclastic deformation bands and faults in porous sandstone reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    Factors controlling permeability of cataclastic deformation bands and faults in porous sandstone March 2015 Available online 18 April 2015 Keywords: Cataclastic band Permeability Porous sandstone Fluid and their petrophysical properties is essential for realistic characterization of deformed sandstone reservoirs

  20. Porous siliconformation and etching process for use in silicon micromachining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guilinger, Terry R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kelly, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Jr., Samuel B. (Albuquerque, NM); Stevenson, Joel O. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Sylvia S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A reproducible process for uniformly etching silicon from a series of micromechanical structures used in electrical devices and the like includes providing a micromechanical structure having a silicon layer with defined areas for removal thereon and an electrochemical cell containing an aqueous hydrofluoric acid electrolyte. The micromechanical structure is submerged in the electrochemical cell and the defined areas of the silicon layer thereon are anodically biased by passing a current through the electrochemical cell for a time period sufficient to cause the defined areas of the silicon layer to become porous. The formation of the depth of the porous silicon is regulated by controlling the amount of current passing through the electrochemical cell. The micromechanical structure is then removed from the electrochemical cell and submerged in a hydroxide solution to remove the porous silicon. The process is subsequently repeated for each of the series of micromechanical structures to achieve a reproducibility better than 0.3%.

  1. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamicmore »phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.« less

  2. Dialysis on microchips using thin porous polymer membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Anup K. (San Francisco, CA); Kirby, Brian J. (San Francisco, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-04

    Laser-induced phase-separation polymerization of a porous acrylate polymer is used for in-situ fabrication of dialysis membranes inside glass microchannels. A shaped 355 nm laser beam is used to produce a porous polymer membrane with a thickness of about 15 .mu.m, which bonds to the glass microchannel and form a semi-permeable membrane. Differential permeation through a membrane formed with pentaerythritol triacrylate was observed and quantified by comparing the response of the membrane to fluorescein and fluorescently tagging 200 nm latex microspheres. Differential permeation was observed and quantified by comparing the response to rhodamine 560 and lactalbumin protein in a membrane formed with SPE-methylene bisacrylamide. The porous membranes illustrate the capability for the present technique to integrate sample cleanup into chip-based analysis systems.

  3. Method for dialysis on microchips using thin porous polymer membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Anup K. (San Francisco, CA); Kirby, Brian J. (San Francisco, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-05-19

    Laser-induced phase-separation polymerization of a porous acrylate polymer is used for in-situ fabrication of dialysis membranes inside glass microchannels. A shaped 355 nm laser beam is used to produce a porous polymer membrane with a thickness of about 15 .mu.m, which bonds to the glass microchannel and forms a semi-permeable membrane. Differential permeation through a membrane formed with pentaerythritol triacrylate was observed and quantified by comparing the response of the membrane to fluorescein and fluorescently tagging 200 nm latex microspheres. Differential permeation was observed and quantified by comparing the response to rhodamine 560 and lactalbumin protein in a membrane formed with SPE-methylene bisacrylamide. The porous membranes illustrate the capability for the present technique to integrate sample cleanup into chip-based analysis systems.

  4. Formation and properties of porous GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmuki, P.; Lockwood, D.J.; Fraser, J.W.; Graham, M.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1996-06-01

    Porous structures on n-type GaAs (100) can be grown electrochemically in chloride-containing solutions. Crystallographic etching of the sample is a precursor stage of the attack. Polarization curves reveal the existanece of a critical onset potential for por formation (PFP). PFP is strongly dependent on the doping level of the sample and presence of surface defects. Good agreement between PFP and breakdown voltage of the space charge layer is found. Surface analysis by EDX, AES, and XPS show that the porous structure consists mainly of GaAs and that anion uptake in the structure can only observed after attackhas been initiated. Photoluminescence measurements reveal (under certain conditions) visible light emission from the porous structure.

  5. Liquid Propane Injection Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liquid propane injection technology meets manufacturing/assembly guidelines, maintenance/repair strategy, and regulations, with same functionality, horsepower, and torque as gasoline counterpart.

  6. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  7. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  8. Manipulation of surface chemistry and nanostructure in porous silicon-based chemical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruminski, Anne Marie

    2009-01-01

    version 2006; Chemical Abstracts Service: Columbus, OH,Abstract Porous silicon nanostructures attract much interest for chemical and

  9. Method for preparation of thermally and mechanically stable metal/porous substrate composite membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Damle, Ashok S.

    2004-07-13

    A method is provided for the preparation of metal/porous substrate composite membranes by flowing a solution of metal to be plated over a first surface of a porous substrate and concurrently applying a pressure of gas on a second surface of the porous substrate, such that the porous substrate separates the solution of metal from the gas, and the use of the resulting membrane for the production of highly purified hydrogen gas.

  10. Design and manipulation of 1-D rugate photonic crystals of porous silicon for chemical sensing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Brian Henry

    2010-01-01

    by inclusion of a palladium hydrogen trap in the porousPalladium Composite Film for Optical Interferometric Sensing of Hydrogen.

  11. Epitaxial thin film growth of LiH using a liquid-Li atomic template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Ohsawa, Takeo; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2014-11-24

    We report on the synthesis of lithium hydride (LiH) epitaxial thin films through the hydrogenation of a Li melt, forming abrupt LiH/MgO interface. Experimental and first-principles molecular dynamics studies reveal a comprehensive microscopic picture of the crystallization processes, which sheds light on the fundamental atomistic growth processes that have remained unknown in the vapor-liquid-solid method. We found that the periodic structure that formed, because of the liquid-Li atoms at the film/MgO-substrate interface, serves as an atomic template for the epitaxial growth of LiH crystals. In contrast, films grown on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates indicated polycrystalline films with a LiAlO{sub 2} secondary phase. These results and the proposed growth process provide insights into the preparation of other alkaline metal hydride thin films on oxides. Further, our investigations open the way to explore fundamental physics and chemistry of metal hydrides including possible phenomena that emerge at the heterointerfaces of metal hydrides.

  12. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  13. Comparison of methods to quantify interface trap densities at dielectric/IIIV semiconductor interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stemmer, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    method to high-k/III-V interfaces has been discussedno D it ? CV curve for interfaces with III-V semiconductors,in D it at high-k/III-V interface is criti- cal for the

  14. Technique for converting non-conforming hexahedral-to-hexahedral interfaces into conforming interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L.; Shepherd, Jason F.; Ledoux, Frank; Shimada, Kenji; Merkley, Karl G.; Carbonera, Carlos

    2013-03-05

    A technique for conforming an interface between a first mesh and a second mesh is disclosed. A first interface surface in the first mesh and a second interface surface in the second mesh residing along the interface are identified. The first and second interface surfaces are initially non-conforming along the interface. Chords within the first and second interface surfaces that fall within a threshold separation distance of each other are paired. Sheets having chords that reside within the first or second interface surfaces are recursively inserted into or extracted from one or both of the first and second meshes until all remaining chords within the first interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the second interface surface and all remaining chords within the second interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the first interface surface.

  15. Noninvasive method for determining the liquid level and density inside of a container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Noninvasive method for determining the liquid level and density inside of a container having arbitrary dimension and shape. By generating a flexural acoustic wave in the container shell and measuring the phase difference of the detected flexural wave from that of the originally generated wave a small distance from the generated wave, while moving the generation and detection means through the liquid/vapor interface, this interface can be detected. Both the wave generation and wave detection may be achieved by transducers on the surface of the container. A change in the phase difference over the outer surface of the vessel signifies that a liquid/vapor interface has been crossed, while the magnitude of the phase difference can be related to fluid density immediately opposite the measurement position on the surface of the vessel.

  16. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Raj N. (Downers Grove, IL); Dusek, Joseph T. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1983-06-21

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H.sub.2 and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55-65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  17. Plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using porous nickel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oohara, W.; Maeda, T.; Higuchi, T.

    2011-09-15

    Hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H{sup +} and H{sup -} ions, are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a porous nickel plate. Positive ions in a hydrogen plasma generated by dc arc discharge are irradiated to the porous plate, and pair ions are produced from the back of the irradiation plane. It becomes clear that the production quantity of pair ions mainly depends on the irradiation current of positive ions and the irradiation energy affects the production efficiency of H{sup -} ions.

  18. Deposition of polyaniline film onto porous silicon layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhutik, V.P.; Martinez-Duart, J.M. [Univ. of Madrid, (Spain); Callegja, R.D.; Matveeva, E.M. [Polytechnical Univ. of Valencia, (Spain)

    1993-12-31

    Presently porous silicon (PS) layers are being considered a promising visible light emitting sources. Current research concentrates on the understanding of the nature of the light emission and the development of practical luminescent devices. The last goal is to find an appropriate solid contact to the rough surface of PS layers to ensure high electric conductivity and transparency. The aim of this work is to study the deposition of polyaniline (PANI) films onto porous silicon layers as an alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) as the electrode.

  19. Oxide-dispersion strengthening of porous powder metalurgy parts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthening of porous metal articles includes the incorporation of dispersoids of metallic oxides in elemental metal powder particles. Porous metal articles, such as filters, are fabricated using conventional techniques (extrusion, casting, isostatic pressing, etc.) of forming followed by sintering and heat treatments that induce recrystallization and grain growth within powder grains and across the sintered grain contact points. The result is so-called "oxide dispersion strengthening" which imparts, especially, large increases in creep (deformation under constant load) strength to the metal articles.

  20. Kolmogorov Dispersion for Turbulence in Porous Media: A Conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikas K. Chakrabarti

    2006-12-26

    We will utilise the self-avoiding walk (SAW) mapping of the vortex line conformations in turbulence to get the Kolmogorov scale dependence of energy dispersion from SAW statistics, and the knowledge of the disordered fractal geometries on the SAW statistics. These will give us the Kolmogorov energy dispersion exponent value for turbulence in porous media in terms of the size exponent for polymers in the same. We argue that the exponent value will be somewhat less than 5/3 for turbulence in porous media.

  1. Displacement of oil from porous material with carbonated water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, Jagjit Singh

    1967-01-01

    DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM POROUS MATERIAL WITH CARBONATED WATER A Thesis By JAGJIT S. YADAV Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1967 Ma/or Sub)act; Petroleum Engineering DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM POROUS MATERIAL WITH CARBONATED WATER A Thesis By JAGJIT ST YADAV Approved as to style and content by: ( ai an of Committee) cZ&-& 3~ ~" (Head of Department) (Member) (Member...

  2. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-25

    Disclosed is an illumination source comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interstices thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon. 1 fig.

  3. Porous silicon with embedded tritium as a stand-alone prime power source for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1998-06-16

    An illumination source is disclosed comprising a porous silicon having a source of electrons on the surface and/or interstices thereof having a total porosity in the range of from about 50 v/o to about 90 v/o. Also disclosed are a tritiated porous silicon and a photovoltaic device and an illumination source of tritiated porous silicon. 1 fig.

  4. Parameter Estimates for High-Level Nuclear Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    for the transport of a chain of radioactive waste products in certain fractured porous media. The formulation begins of radioactive waste prod- ucts in certain fractured porous media. The model is intended to be a reason- ablyParameter Estimates for High-Level Nuclear Transport in Fractured Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3

  5. Bending Creep Test to Measure the Viscosity of Porous Materials during Sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messing, Gary L.

    Bending Creep Test to Measure the Viscosity of Porous Materials during Sintering Sang-Ho Lee creep test is proposed for measuring the change in viscosity of a porous material during densification be measured. Experiments with porous Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 beams were used to illustrate the bending creep test

  6. Contractional deformation of porous sandstone: Insights from the Aztec Sandstone, SE Nevada, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    Contractional deformation of porous sandstone: Insights from the Aztec Sandstone, SE Nevada, USA Available online 19 March 2015 Keywords: Sevier thrusting Porous sandstone deformation Deformation bands Contractional deformation a b s t r a c t Contractional deformation of highly porous sandstones is poorly

  7. Innovative Porous Media Approach in Modeling Biofilm Applications, Human Eye and Nanofluid Based Heat Pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafahi, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    levels on the liquid and vapor pressure distributions Fig.the liquid density. Liquid and vapor pressure distributionsLiquid and vapor pressure distributions are obtained by

  8. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  9. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  10. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  11. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  12. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  13. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  14. Phase separation transition in liquids and polymers induced by electric field gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Marcus; Y. Tsori

    2009-01-14

    Spatially uniform electric fields have been used to induce instabilities in liquids and polymers, and to orient and deform ordered phases of block-copolymers. Here we discuss the demixing phase transition occurring in liquid mixtures when they are subject to spatially nonuniform fields. Above the critical value of potential, a phase-separation transition occurs, and two coexisting phases appear separated by a sharp interface. Analytical and numerical composition profiles are given, and the interface location as a function of charge or voltage is found. The possible influence of demixing on the stability of suspensions and on inter-colloid interaction is discussed.

  15. Potential structure of discharge plasma inside liquid directly measured by an electrostatic probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qiang; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro; CREST Matsuda, Naoki

    2013-06-17

    Potential structures of a discharge plasma inside a liquid are investigated by an electrostatic probe measurement. The time evolution of radial profiles of the floating potential for the plasma inside liquid reveals that the dominant negative charges in the plasma are the negative ion species such as OH{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} rather than electrons. In addition, a positive potential gradient exists at the plasma-liquid interface due to the presence of an electrical double layer which is caused by the separation of low-mass positive ion of H{sup +} and high-mass negative ions of OH{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} near the plasma-liquid interface.

  16. Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam, Bernard

    Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering Lennard Mooij #12;Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de graad van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3 Magnesium hydride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1

  17. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emrick, Todd S. (South Deerfield, MA); Russell, Thomas P. (Amherst, MA); Dinsmore, Anthony (Amherst, MA); Skaff, Habib (Amherst, MA); Lin, Yao (Amherst, MA)

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  18. SURFACES AND INTERFACES IN CERAMIC AND CERAMIC-METAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2013-01-01

    B. Characterization of Surfaces and Interfaces Physical andChemical Characterization of Interfaces by Electron OpticalStudies of Surfaces and Interfaces W. E. Spicer, Stanford

  19. Visualization and Analysis-Oriented Reconstruction of Material Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childs, Henry R.

    2011-01-01

    Discrete Multi-Material Interface Reconstruction for VolumeConstructing material interfaces from data sets with volume-M. Multi-material interface reconstruction on generalized

  20. Protection of porous carbon fuel particles from boudouard corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F.

    2015-05-26

    A system for producing energy that includes infusing porous carbon particles produced by pyrolysis of carbon-containing materials with an off-eutectic salt composition thus producing pore-free carbon particles, and reacting the carbon particles with oxygen in a fuel cell according to the reaction C+O.sub.2=CO.sub.2 to produce electrical energy.

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Conditional simulations of wateroil flow in heterogeneous porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    . The log-transformed intrinsic permeability, soil pore size distribution parameter, and van Genuchten of these processes in order to conduct risk assess- ment and design of cost-efficient remediation (e.g. Abriola 1989 is a complicated mixture of hydrocarbon fluids, brine, porous rock and fractures. The structure of the void space

  2. Bioremediation of Waste in a Porous Medium Changsheng Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chadam, John

    .g., water and carbon dioxide). Bioremediation was first systematically studied by Borden and BedientBioremediation of Waste in a Porous Medium Changsheng Chen Yahoo! Inc., Sunnyvale, CA 94089 and their co-workers [1, 2]. A discussion of the techological and practical aspects of bioremediation can

  3. Phasefield Modeling of Graphite Single Particles And Porous Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Abstract Graphite is the most commonly used anode material in lithiumion batteries because of excellent Phasefield Modeling of Graphite Single Particles And Porous Electrodes Singlelayer regular of the layered graphite material. We use the same model to fit both singleparticle experimental data

  4. A Java Reinforcement Learning Module for the Recursive Porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    A Java Reinforcement Learning Module for the Recursive Porous Agent Simulation Toolkit Facilitating Evaluation of free java-libraries for social- scientific agent based simulation, Tobias and Hoffman, 2004 in Repast Genetic Algorithm demo model OpenForecast demo model Java Object Oriented Neural Engine (JOONE

  5. The Approximation of Nuclear Contaminant Transport in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    of a chain of radioactive waste products and to present the results of some typical simulationsThe Approximation of Nuclear Contaminant Transport in Porous Media Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Chieh;ective and eÆcient numerical method for approximating the solution of equations that govern the transport

  6. AN ANALYSIS FOR A FORMULATION OF THE POROUS MEDIUM EQUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fadimba, Koffi B.

    a porous medium, with S the saturation of the invading fluid. In this model, one assumption (the wet phase and the dry phase) occupying entirely the pores of the medium, e.g. water and oil, so , we make the assumption that n = 0, (1..4) where n is the outward unit normal vector to the boundary

  7. Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    requirements of high-temperature components for future gas turbine engine technologies becomes realizable composites (CFCCs) in one of two ways. The more conventional approach involves the use of fiber coat- ings, obviating the need for a fiber coating (Fig. 1b). This approach can be viewed as an extension of the porous

  8. Method for the preparation of ferrous low carbon porous material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Curtis Jack

    2014-05-27

    A method for preparing a porous metal article using a powder metallurgy forming process is provided which eliminates the conventional steps associated with removing residual carbon. The method uses a feedstock that includes a ferrous metal powder and a polycarbonate binder. The polycarbonate binder can be removed by thermal decomposition after the metal article is formed without leaving a carbon residue.

  9. Acoustic wave propagation in two-phase heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Osypik; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

    2015-03-19

    The propagation of an acoustic wave through two-phase porous media with spatial variation in porosity is studied. The evolutionary wave equation is derived, and the propagation of an acoustic wave is numerically analyzed in application to marine sediments with various physical parameters.

  10. Infiltration in Porous Media with Dynamic Capillary Pressure: Travelling Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulshof, Joost

    Infiltration in Porous Media with Dynamic Capillary Pressure: Travelling Waves C. Cuesta # , C to gravity, results in a pseudo­parabolic Burgers type equation. We give a rigorous study of global of study in this paper. We confine ourselves to the particular case of unsaturated groundwater flow, where

  11. Infiltration through porous media W. Hwang and S. Redner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redner, Sidney

    2000; published 24 January 2001 We study the kinetics of infiltration in which contaminant particlesInfiltration through porous media W. Hwang and S. Redner Center for BioDynamics, Center for Polymer Studies, and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 Received 6 September

  12. Numerical assessment of 3-D macrodispersion in heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . [1] Hydrodynamic dispersion is a key controlling factor of solute transport in heterogeneous porous.20206. 1. Introduction [2] Hydrodynamic dispersion is a major component of solute transport; Freeze, 1975; Gelhar and Axness, 1983]. The logarithm of permeability Y xð Þ ¼ ln K xð Þð Þ follows

  13. Porous silicon based anode material formed using metal reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Masarapu, Charan; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Sujeet; Lopez, Herman A.

    2015-09-22

    A porous silicon based material comprising porous crystalline elemental silicon formed by reducing silicon dioxide with a reducing metal in a heating process followed by acid etching is used to construct negative electrode used in lithium ion batteries. Gradual temperature heating ramp(s) with optional temperature steps can be used to perform the heating process. The porous silicon formed has a high surface area from about 10 m.sup.2/g to about 200 m.sup.2/g and is substantially free of carbon. The negative electrode formed can have a discharge specific capacity of at least 1800 mAh/g at rate of C/3 discharged from 1.5V to 0.005V against lithium with in some embodiments loading levels ranging from about 1.4 mg/cm.sup.2 to about 3.5 mg/cm.sup.2. In some embodiments, the porous silicon can be coated with a carbon coating or blended with carbon nanofibers or other conductive carbon material.

  14. Author's personal copy Porous layered oxide/Nafion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    fuel cell applications Yeny Hudiono a , Sunho Choi b , Shu Shu a , William J. Koros a , Michael transport through membranes for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications. Ó 2008 Elsevier Inc. All September 2008 Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) Polyelectrolyte exchange membrane (PEM) Porous

  15. Microstructured Porous Silica Obtained via Colloidal Crystal Templates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Microstructured Porous Silica Obtained via Colloidal Crystal Templates O. D. Velev,* T. A. Jede, R modified colloidal crystals as templates for silica polymerization is reported. 3D close-packed crystals, representing a negative replica of the original colloidal crystal. The size of the pores can be controlled

  16. High-strength porous carbon and its multifunctional applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wojtowicz, Marek A; Rubenstein, Eric P; Serio, Michael A; Cosgrove, Joseph E

    2013-12-31

    High-strength porous carbon and a method of its manufacture are described for multifunctional applications, such as ballistic protection, structural components, ultracapacitor electrodes, gas storage, and radiation shielding. The carbon is produced from a polymer precursor via carbonization, and optionally by surface activation and post-treatment.

  17. Electric and Magnetic Walls on Dielectric Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2010-07-20

    Sufficient conditions of the existence of electric or magnetic walls on dielectric interfaces are given for a multizone uniform dielectric waveguiding system. If one of two adjacent dielectric zones supports a TEM field distribution while the other supports a TM (TE) field distribution, then the common dielectric interface behaves as an electric (magnetic) wall, that is, the electric (magnetic) field line is perpendicular to the interface while the magnetic (electric) field line is parallel to the interface.

  18. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  19. Web Interfaces 1 Python Scripts in Browsers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Web Interfaces 1 Python Scripts in Browsers the web server Apache processing forms with Python scripts Python code to write HTML 2 Web Interfaces for the Determinant dynamic interactive forms passing, 28 October 2013 Scientific Software (MCS 507 L-27) web interfaces 28 October 2013 1 / 42 #12;Web

  20. Sisl: Several Interfaces, Single Logic Thomas Ballz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Läufer, Konstantin

    Sisl: Several Interfaces, Single Logic Thomas Ballz Christopher Colby+ Peter Danielseny Lalita such as information and e-commerce services are becoming increasingly more flexible in the types of user interfaces they support. These interfaces incorporate automatic speech recognition and natural language understanding

  1. Do tangible interfaces enhance learning? Paul Marshall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do tangible interfaces enhance learning? Paul Marshall Department of Computing, Open University interfaces has focused primarily on the production of descriptive frameworks. While this work has been, it provides little guidance on the cognitive or social effects of using one type of interface or another

  2. Interfaces and simulations in SELALIB M. Mehrenberger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franchi, Jacques

    Interfaces and simulations in SELALIB M. Mehrenberger IRMA, Université de Strasbourg Garching, Selalib Day, November 2014 M. Mehrenberger (UDS) Interfaces and simulations in SELALIB Garching, November 2014 1 / 92 #12;Introduction Outline 0. Discussion on interfaces 1. Some examples of abstract

  3. NCGIA Initiative 13 "User Interfaces for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    NCGIA Initiative 13 "User Interfaces for Geographic Information Systems" Closing Report David M. Mark Abstract This report describes the results of NCGIA Research Initiative 13 "User Interfaces on User Interfaces for Geographic Information Systems was adopted by the NCGIA in December 1989

  4. Resolving the Impact of Biological Processes on DNAPL Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Time Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzog, Russel; Geesey, Gill G.; White, Timothy A.; Ho, Clifford K.; Straley, Christian; Bryar, Traci R.; Seymour, Joseph; Codd, Sarah L.; Oram, Libbie

    2003-06-01

    This research leads to a better understanding of how physical and biological properties of porous media influence water and dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) distribution under saturated and unsaturated conditions. Knowing how environmental properties affect DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface is essential for developing models of flow and transport that are needed for designing remediation and long-term stewardship strategies. This project investigates the capability and limitations of low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation decay-rate measurements for determining environmental properties affecting DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface. For in-situ subsurface environmental applications, lowfield proton NMR measurements are preferred to the conventional high-field techniques commonly used to obtain chemical shift data, because the low field measurements are much less degraded by the magnetic susceptibility variations between the rock grains and the pore fluid s that significantly interfere with the high-field NMR measurements. Our research scope includes determining whether DNAPLs exist in water-wet or solvent-wet environments, the pore-size distribution of the soils containing DNAPLs, and the impact of biological processes on their transport mechanisms in porous media. Knowledge of the in situ flow properties and pore distributions of organic contaminants are critical to understanding where and when these fluids will enter subsurface aquifers.

  5. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  6. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  7. Crossover from anomalous to normal diffusion in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. D. A. Aarao Reis; Dung di Caprio

    2015-06-16

    Random walks (RW) of particles adsorbed in the internal walls of porous deposits produced by ballistic-type growth models are studied. The particles start at the external surface of the deposits and enter their pores, in order to simulate an external flux of a species towards a porous solid. For short times, the walker concentration decays as a stretched exponential of the depth z, but a crossover to long time normal diffusion is observed in most samples. The anomalous concentration profile remains at long times in very porous solids if the walker steps are restricted to nearest neighbors and is accompanied with subdiffusion features. These findings are correlated with a decay of the explored area with z. The study of RW of tracer particles left at the internal part of the solid rules out an interpretation by diffusion equations with position-dependent coefficients. A model of RW in a tube of decreasing cross section explains those results by showing long crossovers from an effective subdiffusion regime to an asymptotic normal diffusion. The crossover position and density are analytically calculated for a tube with area decreasing exponentially with z and show good agreement with numerical data. The anomalous decay of the concentration profile is interpreted as a templating effect of the tube shape on the total number of diffusing particles at each depth, while the volumetric concentration in the actually explored porous region may not have significant decay. These results may explain the anomalous diffusion of metal atoms in porous deposits observed in recent works. They also confirm the difficulty in interpreting experimental or computational data on anomalous transport reported in recent works, particularly if only the concentration profiles are measured.

  8. Long-time evolution of sequestered CO$_2$ in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yossi

    2014-01-01

    CO$_2$ sequestration in subsurface reservoirs is important for limiting atmospheric CO$_2$ concentrations. However, a complete physical picture able to predict the structure developing within the porous medium is lacking. We investigate theoretically reactive transport in the long-time evolution of carbon in the brine-rock environment. As CO$_2$ is injected into a brine-rock environment, a carbonate-rich region is created amid brine. Within the carbonate-rich region minerals dissolve and migrate from regions of high concentration to low concentration, along with other dissolved carbonate species. This causes mineral precipitation at the interface between the two regions. We argue that precipitation in a small layer reduces diffusivity, and eventually causes mechanical trapping of the CO$_2$. Consequently, only a small fraction of the CO$_2$ is converted to solid mineral; the remainder either dissolves in water or is trapped in its original form. We also study the case of a pure CO$_2$ bubble surrounded by bri...

  9. Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Heat transfer in soft nanoscale interfaces: the influence of interface curvature Anders Lervik transient non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations, heat-transfer through nanometer-scale interfaces processes. We show that the modeling of heat transfer across a nanodroplet/fluid interface requires

  10. Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brigo, Damiano

    Risk Management under Liquidity Risk: Liquidity inclusive Risk Measures GARP Seminar, London, Nov://www.capco.com/capco-insights -- Joint work with Claudio Nordio Prof. D. Brigo (Imperial College and Capco) Risk Management under Management under Liquidity Risk GARP Seminar London 2 / 60 #12;Introduction Liquidity in Risk Measurement

  11. Plastic flow in solids with interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anurag Gupta; David Steigmann

    2011-11-25

    A non-equilibrium theory of isothermal and diffusionless evolution of incoherent interfaces within a plastically deforming solid is developed. The irreversible dynamics of the interface are driven by its normal motion, incoherency (slip and misorientation), and an intrinsic plastic flow; and purely by plastic deformation in the bulk away from the interface. Using the continuum theory for defect distribution (in bulk and over the interface) we formulate a general kinematical framework, derive relevant balance laws and jump conditions, and prescribe a thermodynamically consistent constitutive/kinetic structure for interface evolution.

  12. Plastic flow in solids with interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Anurag

    2011-01-01

    A non-equilibrium theory of isothermal and diffusionless evolution of incoherent interfaces within a plastically deforming solid is developed. The irreversible dynamics of the interface are driven by its normal motion, incoherency (slip and misorientation), and an intrinsic plastic flow; and purely by plastic deformation in the bulk away from the interface. Using the continuum theory for defect distribution (in bulk and over the interface) we formulate a general kinematical framework, derive relevant balance laws and jump conditions, and prescribe a thermodynamically consistent constitutive/kinetic structure for interface evolution.

  13. Direct liquid injection of liquid petroleum gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, D.J.; Phipps, J.R.

    1984-02-14

    A fuel injector and injection system for injecting liquified petroleum gas (LPG) into at least one air/fuel mixing chamber from a storage means that stores pressurized LPG in its liquid state. The fuel injector (including a body), adapted to receive pressurized LPG from the storage means and for selectively delivering the LPG to the air/fuel mixing chamber in its liquified state. The system including means for correcting the injector activation signal for pressure and density variations in the fuel.

  14. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  15. Liquid scintillator sampling calorimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudgeon, R. Greg

    1994-01-01

    This research was supported by the Department of Energy to investigate a new sampling calorimeter technology for the high intensity regions of the Superconducting Supercollider. The technology involved using liquid scintillator filled glass tubes...

  16. Fractons and Luttinger liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington da Cruz

    2000-10-05

    We consider the concept of fractons as particles or quasiparticles which obey a specific fractal statistics in connection with a one-dimensional Luttinger liquid theory. We obtain a dual statistics parameter ${\\tilde{\

  17. On supersymmetric interfaces for string theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuji Satoh

    2012-03-09

    We construct the world-sheet interface which preserves space-time supersymmetry in type II superstring theories in the Green-Schwarz formalism. This is an analog of the conformal interface in two-dimensional conformal field theory. We show that a class of the supersymmetric interfaces generates T-dualities of type II theories, and that these interfaces have a geometrical interpretation in the doubled target space. We compute the partition function with a pair of the supersymmetric interfaces inserted, from which we read off the spectrum of the modes coupled to the interfaces and the Casimir energy between them. We also derive the transformation rules under which a set of D-branes is transformed to another by the interface.

  18. Mesoscopic modeling of liquid water transport in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Chao Yang [PENNSTATE UNIV.

    2008-01-01

    A key performance limitation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC), manifested in terms of mass transport loss, originates from liquid water transport and resulting flooding phenomena in the constituent components. Liquid water leads to the coverage of the electrochemically active sites in the catalyst layer (CL) rendering reduced catalytic activity and blockage of the available pore space in the porous CL and fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) resulting in hindered oxygen transport to the active reaction sites. The cathode CL and the GDL therefore playa major role in the mass transport loss and hence in the water management of a PEFC. In this article, we present the development of a mesoscopic modeling formalism coupled with realistic microstructural delineation to study the profound influence of the pore structure and surface wettability on liquid water transport and interfacial dynamics in the PEFC catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer.

  19. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  20. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Vehicle Technologies...

  1. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  2. VOLUME 85, NUMBER 18 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 30 OCTOBER 2000 Phonons, Rotons, and Layer Modes of Liquid 4He in Aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    , and Layer Modes of Liquid 4He in Aerogel B. Fåk* and O. Plantevin Département de Recherche Fondamentale sur filled aerogel. Using complementary high-energy resolution and high statistical precision neutron scattering instruments, and two different 87% porous aerogel samples, we show that the three-dimensional (3D

  3. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

  4. Nonlinear Dynamics of Capacitive Charging and Desalination by Porous Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biesheuvel, P M

    2009-01-01

    The rapid and efficient exchange of ions between porous electrodes and aqueous solutions is important in many applications, such as electrical energy storage by super-capacitors, water desalination and purification by capacitive deionization (or desalination), and capacitive extraction of renewable energy from a salinity difference. Here, we present a unified mean-field theory for capacitive charging and desalination by ideally polarizable porous electrodes (without Faradaic reactions or specific adsorption of ions) in the limit of thin double layers (compared to typical pore dimensions). We illustrate the theory in the case of a dilute, symmetric, binary electrolyte using the Gouy-Chapman-Stern (GCS) model of the double layer, for which simple formulae are available for salt adsorption and capacitive charging of the diffuse part of the double layer. We solve the full GCS mean-field theory numerically for realistic parameters in capacitive deionization, and we derive reduced models for two limiting regimes wi...

  5. Modeling Methane Adsorption in Interpenetrating Porous Polymer Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, RL; Shahrak, MN; Swisher, JA; Simon, CM; Sculley, JP; Zhou, HC; Smit, B; Haranczyk, M

    2013-10-03

    Porous polymer networks (PPNs) are a class of porous materials of particular interest in a variety of energy-related applications because of their stability, high surface areas, and gas uptake capacities. Computationally derived structures for five recently synthesized PPN frameworks, PPN-2, -3, -4, -5, and -6, were generated for various topologies, optimized using semiempirical electronic structure methods, and evaluated using classical grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. We show that a key factor in modeling the methane uptake performance of these materials is whether, and how, these material frameworks interpenetrate and demonstrate a computational approach for predicting the presence, degree, and nature of interpenetration in PPNs that enables the reproduction of experimental adsorption data.

  6. Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT) [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  7. Methods for making a porous nuclear fuel element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L; Williams, Brian E; Benander, Robert E

    2014-12-30

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  8. Porous protective solid phase micro-extractor sheath

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D.; Randich, Erik

    2005-03-29

    A porous protective sheath for active extraction media used in solid phase microextraction (SPME). The sheath permits exposure of the media to the environment without the necessity of extending a fragile coated fiber from a protective tube or needle. Subsequently, the sheath can pierce and seal with GC-MS septums, allowing direct injection of samples into inlet ports of analytical equipment. Use of the porous protective sheath, within which the active extraction media is contained, mitigates the problems of: 1) fiber breakage while the fiber is extended during sampling, 2) active media coating loss caused by physical contact of the bare fiber with the sampling environment; and 3) coating slough-off during fiber extension and retraction operations caused by rubbing action between the fiber and protective needle or tube.

  9. The Uniaxial Tensile Response of Porous and Microcracked Ceramic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Stafford, Randall; Hemker, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial tensile stress-strain behavior of three porous ceramic materials was determined at ambient conditions. Test specimens in the form of thin beams were obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter honeycombs and tested using a microtesting system. A digital image correlation technique was used to obtain full-field 2D in-plane surface displacement maps during tensile loading, and in turn, the 2D strains obtained from displacement fields were used to determine the Secant modulus, Young s modulus and initial Poisson s ratio of the three porous ceramic materials. Successive unloading-reloading experiments were performed at different levels of stress to decouple the linear elastic, anelastic and inelastic response in these materials. It was found that the stress-strain response of these materials was non-linear and that the degree of nonlinearity is related to the initial microcrack density and evolution of damage in the material.

  10. Buoyancy driven dispersion in a layered porous rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farcas, Adrian; Woods, Andrew W.

    2015-02-12

    for example from a radioactive leak in a geological waste repository (Woods and Norris, 2010). One key challenge associated with modelling buoyancy driven flows in real rocks is the complex layering, on a range of length scales. In order to describe flows... ) Scaling, self-similarity and intermediate asymptotics. CUP, Cambridge. Bear, J. (1972) Dynamics of fluids in porous media. Elsevier. Bear, J., and Cheng A.H.-D (2010) Modeling groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Springer. Bijelic, J., Muggeridge A...

  11. ENCAPSULATION OF PALLADIUM IN POROUS WALL HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heung, L; George Wicks, G; Ray Schumacher, R

    2008-04-09

    A new encapsulation method was investigated in an attempt to develop an improved palladium packing material for hydrogen isotope separation. Porous wall hollow glass microspheres (PWHGMs) were produced by using a flame former, heat treating and acid leaching. The PWHGMs were then filled with palladium salt using a soak-and-dry process. The palladium salt was reduced at high temperature to leave palladium inside the microspheres.

  12. Flow of pH-responsive microcapsules in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gun, Wei Jin; Routh, Alexander F.

    2014-11-20

    blocked. 2 Keywords: Encapsulation; Enhanced oil recovery; Triggered release; Porous media 1.Introduction Micro-capsules are micron-sized particles. They comprise a shell, encapsulating an active ingredient, in the core. The shell acts as a barrier... ). Other examples include the encapsulation of astaxanthin, a food supplement, which showed minimal heat degradation compared to free astaxanthin(Tachaprutinun et al., 2009). Encapsulation is also important in the digital display industry, for example...

  13. Functional design criteria for the self-installing liquid observation well. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-12-04

    This document presents the functional design criteria for installing liquid observation wells (LOWs) into single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide or organic wastes. The LOWs will be designed to accommodate the deployment of gamma, neutron, and electromagnetic induction probes and to interface with the existing tank structure and environment.

  14. Functional design criteria for the self-installing liquid observation well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-06-16

    This document presents the functional design criteria for installing liquid observation wells (LOWs) into single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes. The LOWs will be designed to accommodate the deployment of gamma, neutron, and electromagnetic induction probes and to interface with the existing tank structure and environment.

  15. Functional design criteria for the self-installing liquid observation well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    This document presents the functional Design Criteria for installing liquid observation wells (LOWs) into single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide and organic wastes. The LOWs will be designed to accommodate the deployment of gamma, neutron, and electromagnetic induction probes and to interface with the existing tank structure and environment.

  16. High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

    2008-01-07

    An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

  17. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coffland, Douglas R. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  18. Elastic interface acoustic waves in twinned crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Destrade

    2013-04-30

    A new type of Interface Acoustic Waves (IAW) is presented, for single-crystal orthotropic twins bonded symmetrically along a plane containing only one common crystallographic axis. The effective boundary conditions show that the waves are linearly polarized at the interface, either transversally or longitudinally. Then the secular equation is obtained in full analytical form using new relationships for the displacement-traction quadrivector at the interface. For Gallium Arsenide and for Silicon, it is found that the IAWs with transverse (resp. longitudinal) polarization at the interface are of the Stoneley (resp. leaky) type.

  19. Superconductivity observed in platinum-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Pai-Chia, E-mail: paichia@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Research Program on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ku-Pin; Shiue, Jessie, E-mail: yshiue@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Research Program on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-26

    We report the discovery of superconductivity with an onset temperature of ?0.6?K in a platinum-silicon interface. The interface was formed by using a unique focused ion beam sputtering micro-deposition method in which the energies of most sputtered Pt atoms are ?2.5?eV. Structural and elemental analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal a???7?nm interface layer with abundant Pt, which is the layer likely responsible for the superconducting transport behavior. Similar transport behavior was also observed in a gold-silicon interface prepared by the same technique, indicating the possible generality of this phenomenon.

  20. Elastic Wave Behavior Across Linear Slip Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, M.

    Reflection and transmission coefficients for harmonic plane waves incident at arbitrary angles upon a plane linear slip interface are computed in terms of the.

  1. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Teng, H. Henry PI, The George Washington University PI, The George...

  2. NETL Research: Energy and Water Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water and Energy Interface Water and energy are inextricably linked. Because thermoelectric generation and fossil fuel extraction can impact water resources, it is critically...

  3. Pore-Scale Simulation Of Experimentally Realizable, Oscillatory Flow In Porous Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, John F.

    1999-01-01

    We report new simulations of oscillating flow in porous rock. Our goal is to better understand the frequency dependence of pore-scale fluid motion, which should ultimately

  4. Chemically modified and nanostructured porous silicon as a drug delivery material and device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anglin, Emily Jessica

    2007-01-01

    Sealed Source for Cancer Brachytherapy. Abstracts of Porousnovel approach to brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinomaSealed Source for Cancer Brachytherapy. Abstracts of Porous

  5. A Numerical Algorithm for Single Phase Fluid Flow in Elastic Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    algorithm. KEYWORDS: geomechanics, uid ow, elastic deformation, porous media 1 Introduction Mechanical, petroleum, and environmental engineering for several decades. While considering the impact of the rock

  6. High Performance Computing linear algorithms for two-phase flow in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    High Performance Computing linear algorithms for two-phase flow in porous media Robert Eymard High Performance Computing techniques. This implies to handle the difficult problem of solving

  7. Transport in Porous Media 50: 267305, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    recovery, exploitation of geothermal energy, storage of radioactive waste, soil pollution, etc. MostTransport in Porous Media 50: 267­305, 2003. © 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed

  8. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    SCMAG-798 Comments on Liquid Hydrogen Absorbers for MICEshown in Figure 1. Three liquid hydrogen absorbers are shownthe RF Cavities, the Liquid Hydrogen Absorbers, the Central

  9. Liquid Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Liquid Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen is most commonly transported and delivered as a liquid when high-volume transport is needed in the absence of pipelines....

  10. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung-Guen; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  11. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung -Geun; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this study, we describe an oxide/oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, inmore »one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7 eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.« less

  12. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Malashevich, Andrei [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Disa, Ankit S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Han, Myung-Guen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Hanghui [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Walker, Frederick J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ahn, Charles H. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States);

    2014-11-01

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  13. Open Worldsheets for Holographic Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Chiodaroli; Eric D'Hoker; Michael Gutperle

    2010-01-27

    Type IIB supergravity admits Janus and multi-Janus solutions with eight unbroken supersymmetries that are locally asymptotic to AdS_3 x S^3 x M_4 (where M_4 is either T^4 or K_3). These solutions are dual to two or more CFTs defined on half-planes which share a common line interface. Their geometry consists of an AdS_2 x S^2 x M_4 fibration over a simply connected Riemann surface Sigma with boundary. In the present paper, we show that regular exact solutions exist also for surfaces Sigma which are not simply connected. Specifically, we construct in detail solutions for which Sigma has the topology of an annulus. This construction is generalized to produce solutions for any surface Sigma with the topology of an open string worldsheet with g holes.

  14. Film boiling of R-11 on liquid metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An interesting problem is the effect of an immiscible liquid heating surface on the process of film boiling. Such surfaces raise questions concerning interface stability to disturbances, effects of gas bubbling, and vapor explosions in layered systems. The specific motivation for this study was to investigate film boiling from a liquid surface with application to cooling of molten reactor core debris by an overlying pool of reactor coolant. To investigate this phenomenon, and apparatus consisting of a nominal six-inch diameter steel vessel to hold the liquid metal and boiling fluid was constructed; coolant reservoirs, heaters, controllers, and allied instrumentation were attached. A transient energy balance was performed on the liquid metal pool by a submerged assembly of microthermocouples in the liquid metal and an array of thermocouples on the wall of the test vessel. The thermocouple data were used to determine the boiling heat flux as well as the boiling superheat. On an average basis, the deviation between the prediction of the Berenson model and the experimental data was less than one percent when Berenson was corrected for thermal radiation effects. Evidence from visualization tests of R-11 in film boiling over molten metal pools to superheats in excess of 600 K supports this conclusion. 13 refs.

  15. Phase-separation of miscible liquids in a centrifuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoav Tsori; Ludwik Leibler

    2007-12-18

    We show that a liquid mixture in the thermodynamically stable homogeneous phase can undergo a phase-separation transition when rotated at sufficiently high frequency $\\omega$. This phase-transition is different from the usual case where two liquids are immiscible or where the slow sedimentation process of one component (e.g. a polymer) is accelerated due to centrifugation. For a binary mixture, the main coupling is due to a term $\\propto \\Delta\\rho(\\omega r)^2$, where $\\Delta\\rho$ is the difference between the two liquid densities and $r$ the distance from the rotation axis. Below the critical temperature there is a critical rotation frequency $\\omega_c$, below which smooth density gradients occur. When $\\omega>\\omega_c$, we find a sharp interface between the low density liquid close to the center of the centrifuge and a high density liquid far from the center. These findings may be relevant to various separation processes and to the control of chemical reactions, in particular their kinetics.

  16. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 12 (2000) A209A214. Printed in the UK PII: S0953-8984(00)08414-9 Surface-induced order in liquid metals and binary alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershan, Peter S.

    2000-01-01

    of charged ion cores whose Coulomb interactions are screened by a conduction electron sea. At the liquid are stratified in layers parallel to the interface [1]. By contrast, a monotonic density profile is predicted

  17. Use of a porous membrane for gas bubble removal in microfluidic channels: physical mechanisms and design criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jie; Attinger, Daniel; 10.1007/s10404-010-0592-5

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate and explain a simple and efficient way to remove gas bubbles from liquid-filled microchannels, by integrating a hydrophobic porous membrane on top of the microchannel. A prototype chip is manufactured in hard, transparent polymer with the ability to completely filter gas plugs out of a segmented flow at rates up to 7.4 microliter/s per mm2 of membrane area. The device involves a bubble generation section and a gas removal section. In the bubble generation section, a T-junction is used to generate a train of gas plugs into a water stream. These gas plugs are then transported towards the gas removal section, where they slide along a hydrophobic membrane until complete removal. The system has been successfully modeled and four necessary operating criteria have been determined to achieve a complete separation of the gas from the liquid. The first criterion is that the bubble length needs to be larger than the channel diameter. The second criterion is that the gas plug should stay on the membrane fo...

  18. Gelled Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes: Achieving a 10,000 GPU Permeance for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture with Gelled Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-02-02

    IMPACCT Project: Alongside Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute, CU-Boulder is developing a membrane made of a gelled ionic liquid to capture CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants. The membranes are created by spraying the gelled ionic liquids in thin layers onto porous support structures using a specialized coating technique. The new membrane is highly efficient at pulling CO2 out of coal-derived flue gas exhaust while restricting the flow of other materials through it. The design involves few chemicals or moving parts and is more mechanically stable than current technologies. The team is now working to further optimize the gelled materials for CO2 separation and create a membrane layer that is less than 1 micrometer thick.

  19. Device for detecting the specific gravity of a liquid. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derouin, C.R.; Kerwin, W.J.; McCormick, J.B.; Bobbett, R.E.

    1980-11-18

    A device for detecting the specific gravity of a liquid and a device for detecting the state of charge of a liquid phase electrolyte battery are described. In one embodiment of the present invention, a change in the critical angle of total internal reflection is utilized to determine the index of refraction of the liquid to be measured. It is shown that the index of refraction of the liquid is a function of the specific gravity of the liquid. In applications for measuring the state of charge of a battery, the specific gravity is proportional to the state of charge of the battery. A change in intensity of rays intersecting an interface surface indicates the critical angle which is a direct indication of the specific gravity of the liquid and the state of charge of a battery. In another embodiment, a light beam is projected through a transparent medium and then through a portion of the liquid to be measured. A change in refraction due to a change in the index of refraction of the liquid produces a deflection of the beam which is measured by a detector. The magnitude of deflection of the beam is directly proportional to the specific gravity of the liquid and the state of charge of a battery.

  20. liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving Christopher D. Carroll ccarroll to the optimal consumption/saving problem under uncertainty have long known that there are quantitatively important in- teractions between liquidity constraints and precautionary saving behavior. This paper