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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

A new technology for producing synthetic liquid hydrocarbons from gaseous hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional technologies of synthetic liquid fuels (SLF) production from gaseous hydrocarbons by producing synthesis ... liquid hydrocarbons are examined. A high-efficiency SLF production technology that allows ...

D. L. Astanovskii; L. Z. Astanovskii; A. L. Lapidus

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Analyzing Biomass Conversion into Liquid Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variants of the Fischer–Tropsch producer-gas conversion into liquid hydrocarbons are analyzed under the ... is attained in the reactions occurring in the biomass gasification. When the raw material is wood ... th...

V. D. Meshcheryakov; V. A. Kirillov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Enhanced liquid hydrocarbon recovery process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for recovering liquid hydrocarbons. It comprises: injecting into a fractured subterranean formation a polymer enhanced foam comprising a polymer selected from a synthetic polymer or a biopolymer, a surfactant, an aqueous solvent and a gas, recovering liquid hydrocarbons from the formation.

Sydansk, R.D.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

4

Enhanced liquid hydrocarbon recovery process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for the recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a subterranean hydrocarbon-bearing formation. It comprises injecting natural gas into the formation via a well in fluid communication with the formation, the natural gas being at a temperature which is insufficient to significantly mobilize light density oil in the formation and at a pressure such that the natural gas is immiscible with the light density oil in the formation, the natural gas being injected in a volume sufficient to contact light density oil in the formation within a radius from the well of about 50 meters; shutting in the well for a period of time of about 1 to about 100 days which is sufficient to render the contacted light density oil mobile; and producing the light density oil which has been mobilized by solution of the natural gas from the well.

Haines, H.K.; Monger, T.G.; Kenyon, D.E.; Galvin, L.J.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discharge produces hydrocarbons from coal ... Studies of the reactions of coal in electric discharges by two chemists at the U.S. Bureau of Mines' Pittsburgh Coal Research Center may lead to improved ways of producing acetylene and other useful chemicals from coal. ... Other workers have produced high yields of acetylene from coal by extremely rapid pyrolysis using energy sources such as plasma jets, laser beams, arc-image reactors, and flash heaters. ...

1968-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Volatile liquid hydrocarbon characterization of underwater hydrocarbon vents and formation waters from offshore production operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile liquid hydrocarbon characterization of underwater hydrocarbon vents and formation waters from offshore production operations ... The environmental implications of offshore oil and gas activities ... The environmental implications of offshore oil and gas activities ...

Theodor C. Sauer

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Thermally Coupled Catalytic Reactor for Steam Reforming of Methane and Liquid Hydrocarbons: Experiment and Mathematical Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An energy-efficient catalytic reactor for producing synthesis gas from methane and liquid hydrocarbons is proposed that is ... on the coupling of an endothermic reaction (steam reforming of methane, hexane, or is...

V. A. Kirillov; N. A. Kuzin; A. V. Kulikov…

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the storage of natural gas and prior to the exercise of eminent domain by any person, firm, or corporation having such right under laws of the state of Louisiana, the commissioner, shall have found all of the following:

10

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

Cooling and solidification of heavy hydrocarbon liquid streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for cooling and solidifying a stream of heavy hydrocarbon material normally boiling above about 850.degree. F., such as vacuum bottoms material from a coal liquefaction process. The hydrocarbon stream is dropped into a liquid bath, preferably water, which contains a screw conveyor device and the stream is rapidly cooled, solidified and broken therein to form discrete elongated particles. The solid extrudates or prills are then dried separately to remove substantially all surface moisture, and passed to further usage.

Antieri, Salvatore J. (Trenton, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pyrolysis process for producing condensed stabilized hydrocarbons utilizing a beneficially reactive gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for recovery of values contained in solid carbonaceous material, the solid carbonaceous material is comminuted and then subjected to pyrolysis, in the presence of a carbon containing solid particulate source of heat and a beneficially reactive transport gas in a transport flash pyrolysis reactor, to form a pyrolysis product stream. The pyrolysis product stream contains a gaseous mixture and particulate solids. The solids are separated from the gaseous mixture to form a substantially solids-free gaseous stream which comprises volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals newly formed by pyrolysis. Preferably the solid particulate source of heat is formed by oxidizing part of the separated particulate solids. The beneficially reactive transport gas inhibits the reactivity of the char product and the carbon-containing solid particulate source of heat. Condensed stabilized hydrocarbons are obtained by quenching the gaseous mixture stream with a quench fluid which contains a capping agent for stabilizing and terminating newly formed volatilized hydrocarbon free radicals. The capping agent is partially depleted of hydrogen by the stabilization and termination reaction. Hydrocarbons of four or more carbon atoms in the gaseous mixture stream are condensed. A liquid stream containing the stabilized liquid product is then treated or separated into various fractions. A liquid containing the hydrogen depleted capping agent is hydrogenated to form a regenerated capping agent. At least a portion of the regenerated capping agent is recycled to the quench zone as the quench fluid. In another embodiment capping agent is produced by the process, separated from the liquid product mixture, and recycled.

Durai-Swamy, Kandaswamy (Culver City, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Indirect thermal liquefaction process for producing liquid fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

A progress report on an indirect liquefaction process to convert biomass type materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels by gasification followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis has been presented. A wide variety of feedstocks can be processed through the gasification system to a gas with a heating value of 500 + Btu/SCF. Some feedstocks are more attractive than others with regard to producing a high olefin content. This appears to be related to hydrocarbon content of the material. The H/sub 2//CO ratio can be manipulated over a wide range in the gasification system with steam addition. Some feedstocks require the aid of a water-gas shift catalyst while others appear to exhibit an auto-catalytic effect to achieve the conversion. H/sub 2/S content (beyond the gasification system wet scrubber) is negligible for the feedstocks surveyed. The water gas shift reaction appears to be enhanced with an increase in pyrolysis reactor temperature over the range of 1300 to 1700/sup 0/F. Reactor temperature in the Fischer-Tropsch step is a significant factor with regard to manipulating product composition analysis. The optimum temperature however will probably correspond to maximum conversion to liquid hydrocarbons in the C/sub 5/ - C/sub 17/ range. Continuing research includes integrated system performance assessment, alternative feedstock characterization (through gasification) and factor studies for gasification (e.g., catalyst usage, alternate heat transfer media, steam usage, recycle effects, residence time study) and liquefaction (e.g., improved catalysts, catalyst activity characterization).

Kuester, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids (HGL): Recent Market Trends and Issues  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the past five years, rapid growth in U.S. onshore natural gas and oil production has led to increased volumes of natural gas plant liquids (NGPL) and liquefied refinery gases (LRG). The increasing economic importance of these volumes, as a result of their significant growth in production, has revealed the need for better data accuracy and transparency to improve the quality of historical data and projections for supply, demand, and prices of these liquids, co-products, and competing products. To reduce confusion in terminology and improve its presentation of data, EIA has worked with industry and federal and state governments to clarify gas liquid terminology and has developed the term Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids, or HGL.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Method and apparatus for producing oxygenates from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical reactor for oxygenating hydrocarbons includes: (a) a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell, the plasma cell comprising a pair of electrodes having a dielectric material and void therebetween, the plasma cell comprising a hydrocarbon gas inlet feeding to the void; (b) a solid oxide electrochemical cell, the electrochemical cell comprising a solid oxide electrolyte positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, an oxygen containing gas inlet stream feeding to the porous cathode side of the electrochemical cell; (c) a first gas passageway feeding from the void to the anode side of the electrochemical cell; and (d) a gas outlet feeding from the anode side of the electrochemical cell to expel reaction products from the chemical reactor. A method of oxygenating hydrocarbons is also disclosed. 4 figs.

Kong, P.C.; Lessing, P.A.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

ccsd00001732, Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water with a melted NaCl is used as a test liquid. The liquid plasma is produced by the fundamental waveccsd­00001732, version 2 ­ 7 Nov 2004 Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by YAG laser the hazardous material called the environment material. Then, the plasma produced in liquid by the laser light

17

Structure and Depletion at Fluorocarbon and Hydrocarbon/Water Liquid/Liquid Interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of x-ray reflectivity studies of two oil/water (liquid/liquid) interfaces are inconsistent with recent predictions of the presence of a vaporlike depletion region at hydrophobic/aqueous interfaces. One of the oils, perfluorohexane, is a fluorocarbon whose superhydrophobic interface with water provides a stringent test for the presence of a depletion layer. The other oil, heptane, is a hydrocarbon and, therefore, is more relevant to the study of biomolecular hydrophobicity. These results are consistent with the subangstrom proximity of water to soft hydrophobic materials.

Kaoru Kashimoto; Jaesung Yoon; Binyang Hou; Chiu-hao Chen; Binhua Lin; Makoto Aratono; Takanori Takiue; Mark L. Schlossman

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon liquids at high pressures and temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the organic/inorganic interface in the Earth's crust requires values of the thermodynamic properties of hydrocarbon species in crude oil, coal, and natural gas at elevated temperatures and pressures. Values of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation and the standard partial molal entropies and heat capacities of these organic species can be computed as a function of temperature at 1 bar using the equations of state adopted by Helgeson et al (1991). The pressure dependence of the thermodynamic properties can be calculated from a modified version of the Parameters From Group Contributions (PFGC) equation of state. To improve the accuracy of these predictions, critical evaluation of high-pressure density experiments reported in the literature was used in the present study to characterize b[sub j] as a function of pressure and temperature. The revised PFGC equation of state permits accurate calculation of the standard partial molal volumes of the major hydrocarbon species in the aliphatic, aromatic, and naphthenic fractions of crude oil, as well as fatty acids, phenols, and naphthenic acids at temperatures and pressures to 500 C and 5 kbar. Combining the revised PFGC equation of state and parameters with the standard partial molal properties of these species at one bar and those of aqueous species and minerals permits calculation of the apparent standard partial molal Gibbs Free energies of reaction, and thus equilibrium constants for a wide variety of chemical equilibria among organic liquids, solids, and gases, aqueous species, and minerals at temperatures and pressures characteristic of both diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic processes in the Earth's crust.

Aagaard, P. (Univ. of Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Geology); Oelkers, E.H. (Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. de Geochimie); Helgeson, H.C. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

UV Resonance Raman Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coal Liquid Distillates*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UV Resonance Raman Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coal Liquid Distillates samples, such as petroleum and coal, or for man-made samples, such as coal liquids, a major desire- nique for studying coal-liquid samples. 1-4 We demon- strated that the Raman spectra of polycyclic

Asher, Sanford A.

20

A study on the solubility of heavy hydrocarbons in liquid methane and methane containing mixtures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The solubilities of the hydrocarbons n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, n-octane, and n-nonane in liquid methane and of n-hexane in the mixed solvents of methane and ethane… (more)

Brew, T. C. L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Potential of producing various hydrocarbons from canola oil by catalytic treatment over Pt-ZSM-5  

SciTech Connect

Canola oil conversion was studied at atmospheric pressure over Pt-ZSM-5 catalyst (0.5 wt% Pt) in a fixed bed micro-reactor. The operating conditions were: temperature range of 400--500 C, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of 1.8 and 3.6 h{sup {minus}1} and steam/oil ratio of 4:1. The products were coke, gas, an organic liquid product (OLP) and residue. The gas and OLP consisted mainly of hydrocarbons. The objective of this study was to maximize the amount of gasoline range hydrocarbons in the OLP and the selectivity to isohydrocarbons in the gas. The gas yields varied between 22--65 wt% and were higher in the presence of steam compared to the operation without steam. Also, the gas fraction decreased with increase in space velocity. The olefin/paraffin ratio of C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbon gases varied between 0.31--0.79. The amount of isohydrocarbons relative to n-hydrocarbons were higher with Pt-ZSM-5 (1.6--4.8) compared to pure HZSM-5 catalyst (0.2--0.3). The OLP yields with Pt-ZSM-5 (20--55wt% of canola oil) were slightly lower compared to HZSM-5 (40--63wt% of canola oil) under similar conditions. The major components of OLP were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The main aromatic hydrocarbons were benzene, toluene, xylenes and trimethylbenzenes. Alkylated pentane and hexane were the main aliphatic hydrocarbons. In the presence of steam, Pt-ZSM-5 gave higher yields of liquid hydrocarbons within the gasoline boiling range than HZSM-5.

Katikaneni, S.P.R.; Adjaye, J.D.; Bakhshi, N.N. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

UNDERSTANDING OF CATALYST DEACTIVATION CAUSED BY SULFUR POISONING AND CARBON DEPOSITION IN STEAM REFORMING OF LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUELS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The present work was conducted to develop a better understanding on the catalyst deactivation in steam reforming of sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon fuels for hydrogen production.… (more)

Xie, Chao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

2013 Survey of Non-Starch Ethanol and Renewable Hydrocarbon Biofuels Producers  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the status of the industry for non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels as of the end of calendar year 2013, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the first of what is anticipated to be an annual survey of U.S. non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels producers. This report presents the results of this initial survey and describes the survey methodology. Subsequent surveys will report on the progress over time of the development of these facilities and companies.

Schwab, A.; Geiger, J.; Lewis, J.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

25

Determination of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in seafood by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection  

SciTech Connect

Modification of a previously published method for determination of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produces very clean seafood extracts in less than half the time. After alkaline digestion of the seafood, PAHs were partitioned into 1,2,3-trichlorotrifluoroethane. The resulting extract was cleaned up by solid-phase extraction on alumina, silica, and C{sub 18} adsorbents and then analyzed by gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography with programmable fluorescence detection. Average recoveries of 12 PAHs [acenaphthene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)-fluoranthene, benzo(k)-fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, benzo(ghi)perylene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene] from 5 different matrixes (mussels, oysters, clams, crabmeat, and salmon)spiked at low parts-per-billion levels ranged from 76 to 94%. Estimated limits of quantitation ranged from 0.01 to 0.6 ppb PAHs in extracts that were free of matrix interferences. Results of analyses of a mussels standard reference material obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology were in good agreement with the certified values. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Perfetti, G.A.; Nyman, P.J.; Fisher, S.; Joe, F.L. Jr.; Diachenko, G.W. [Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

DETERMINATION OF SOLID-LIQUID EQUILIBRIA DATA FOR MIXTURES OF HEAVY HYDROCARBONS IN A LIGHT SOLVENT  

SciTech Connect

A methodology was developed using an FT-IR spectroscopic technique to obtain solid-liquid equilibria (SLE) data for mixtures of heavy hydrocarbons in significantly lighter hydrocarbon diluents. SLE was examined in multiple Model Oils that were assembled to simulate waxes. The various Model oils were comprised of C-30 to C-44 hydrocarbons in decane. The FT-IR technique was used to identify the wax precipitation temperature (WPT). The DSC technique was also used in the identification of the onset of the two-phase equilibrium in this work. An additional Model oil made up of C-20 to C-30 hydrocarbons in decane was studied using the DSC experiment. The weight percent solid below the WPT was calculated using the FT-IR experimental results. The WPT and the weight percent solid below the WPT were predicted using an activity coefficient based thermodynamic model. The FT-IR spectroscopy method is found to successfully provide SLE data and also has several advantages over other laboratory-based methods.

F.V. Hanson; J.V. Fletcher; Karthik R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Gas-liquid-liquid equilibria in mixtures of water, light gases, and hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Phase equilibrium in mixtures of water + light gases and water + heavy hydrocarbons has been investigated with the development of new local composition theory, new equations of state, and new experimental data. The preferential segregation and orientation of molecules due to different energies of molecular interaction has been simulated with square well molecules. Extensive simulation has been made for pure square well fluids and mixtures to find the local composition at wide ranges of states. A theory of local composition has been developed and an equation of state has been obtained for square well fluids. The new local composition theory has been embedded in several equations of state. The pressure of water is decoupled into a polar pressure and non-polar pressure according to the molecular model of water of Jorgensen et al. The polar pressure of water is combined with the BACK equation for the general description of polar fluids and their mixtures. Being derived from the steam table, the Augmented BACK equation is particularly suited for mixtures of water + non-polar substances such as the hydrocarbons. The hydrophobic character of the hydrocarbons had made their mixtures with water a special challenge. A new group contribution equation of state is developed to describe phase equilibrium and volumetric behavior of fluids while requiring only to know the molecular structure of the components. 15 refs., 1 fig.

Chao, K.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Producing liquid fuels from coal: prospects and policy issues  

SciTech Connect

The increase in world oil prices since 2003 has prompted renewed interest in producing and using liquid fuels from unconventional resources, such as biomass, oil shale, and coal. This book focuses on issues and options associated with establishing a commercial coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry within the United States. It describes the technical status, costs, and performance of methods that are available for producing liquids from coal; the key energy and environmental policy issues associated with CTL development; the impediments to early commercial experience; and the efficacy of alternative federal incentives in promoting early commercial experience. Because coal is not the only near-term option for meeting liquid-fuel needs, this book also briefly reviews the benefits and limitations of other approaches, including the development of oil shale resources, the further development of biomass resources, and increasing dependence on imported petroleum. A companion document provides a detailed description of incentive packages that the federal government could offer to encourage private-sector investors to pursue early CTL production experience while reducing the probability of bad outcomes and limiting the costs that might be required to motivate those investors. (See Rand Technical Report TR586, Camm, Bartis, and Bushman, 2008.) 114 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs., 3 apps.

James T. Bartis; Frank Camm; David S. Ortiz

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessment of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon inputs using PAHs as tracers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce liquid hydrocarbons and water. -- Coal-to-liquids (CTLs) are derived either by pyrolysis of coal authors accept that conventional oil resources are at an advanced stage of depletion and that liquid fuels is a heterogeneous mix of hydrocarbons that remain in liquid phase when extracted to the surface. -- Condensate

30

Stabilization of liquid hydrocarbon fuel combustion by using a programmable microwave discharge in a subsonic airflow  

SciTech Connect

Under conditions of a programmable discharge (a surface microwave discharge combined with a dc discharge), plasma-enhanced combustion of alcohol injected into a subsonic (M = 0.3-0.9) airflow in the drop (spray) phase is stabilized. It is shown that the appearance of the discharge, its current-voltage characteristic, the emission spectrum, the total emission intensity, the heat flux, the electron density, the hydroxyl emission intensity, and the time dependences of the discharge current and especially discharge voltage change substantially during the transition from the airflow discharge to stabilized combustion of the liquid hydrocarbon fuel. After combustion stabilization, more than 80% of liquid alcohol can burn out, depending on the input power, and the flame temperature reaches {approx}2000 K.

Kopyl, P. V.; Surkont, O. S.; Shibkov, V. M.; Shibkova, L. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Infinite dilution activity coefficient and vapour liquid equilibrium measurements for dimethylsulphide and tetrahydrothiophene with hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activity coefficients at infinite dilution (??) of dimethylsulphide (DMS) in four hydrocarbon solvents were measured using the dilutor technique at temperatures between 288 K and 303 K. The four hydrocarbons were hexane, 1-hexene, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and 2,4,4-trimethyl-1-pentene. The dilutor technique is based on the stripping of the highly diluted solute, i.e. DMS, by a constant flow of inert gas. The gas composition was analysed by gas chromatography and the rate of solute removal was calculated from the area of the peaks. In addition, a static total pressure apparatus was used to measure the vapour–liquid equilibrium of the binary systems of propane + DMS and propane + tetrahydrothiophene at 293 K and 313 K. In the static total pressure method, the analysis of the constituent phases is avoided. The systems’ components were injected to the equilibrium cell in known amounts. The composition of the liquid and vapour phase was calculated from the measured temperature and total pressure. The parameters for the Wilson activity coefficient model were regressed. When possible, a comparison between our experimental results and data found in the literature was performed.

Piia Haimi; Petri Uusi-Kyyny; Juha-Pekka Pokki; Ville Alopaeus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

REFORMING OF LIQUID HYDROCARBONS IN A NOVEL HYDROGEN-SELECTIVE MEMBRANE-BASED FUEL PROCESSOR  

SciTech Connect

We propose to develop an inorganic metal-metal composite membrane to study reforming of liquid hydrocarbons and methanol by equilibrium shift in membrane-reactor configuration, viewed as fuel processor. Based on our current understanding and experience in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane, we propose to further develop this membrane to a Pd and Pd-Ag alloy membrane on microporous stainless steel support to provide structural reliability from distortion due to thermal cycling. Because of the metal-metal composite structure, we believe that the associated end-seal problem in the Pd-ceramic composite membrane in tubular configuration would not be an issue at all. We plan to test this membrane as membrane-reactor-separator for reforming liquid hydrocarbons and methanol for simultaneous production and separation of high-purity hydrogen for PEM fuel cell applications. To improve the robustness of the membrane film and deep penetration into the pores, we have used osmotic pressure field in the electroless plating process. Using this novel method, we deposited thin Pd-film on the inside of microporous stainless steel tube and the deposited film appears to robust and defect free. Work is in progress to evaluate the hydrogen perm-selectivity of the Pd-stainless steel membrane.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing vapors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Values are recovered from a hydrocarbon-containing vapor by contacting the vapor with quench liquid consisting essentially of hydrocarbons to form a condensate and a vapor residue, the condensate and quench fluid forming a combined liquid stream. The combined liquid stream is mixed with a viscosity-lowering liquid to form a mixed liquid having a viscosity lower than the viscosity of the combined liquid stream to permit easy handling of the combined liquid stream. The quench liquid is a cooled portion of the mixed liquid. Viscosity-lowering liquid is separated from a portion of the mixed liquid and cycled to form additional mixed liquid.

Mirza, Zia I. (La Verne, CA); Knell, Everett W. (Los Alamitos, CA); Winter, Bruce L. (Danville, CA)

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Shear exfoliation in liquids : a promising way to produce graphene.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My initial project was to install and test a new spectrometer for the solid state physics group. However, due to a delay in the construction of the new photoluminescence laboratory this project had to be abandoned. Graphene is a one atom thick 2D material that presents remarkable physical properties whose applications are very promising. However, the current means of production present several limitations. They are costly in terms of energy consumption and yields are ridiculously low. Thus, to progress from the laboratory to industrial production it will be necessary to find a method to produce large quantities of defect graphene. In April 2014, a paper \\cite{graphene_shear} came out in \\emph{Nature Material} demonstrating that shear exfoliation in liquids would be a scalable way to produce defect-free grahene. The aim of my project was to test this new method by trying to reproduce some of the results published in this article. It involved the setting up of the experiment, the production of samples and fin...

Mougeot, Maxime

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Application of electrochemical technology for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from produced water using lead dioxide and boron-doped diamond electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although diverse methods exist for treating polluted water, the most promising and innovating technology is the electrochemical remediation process. This paper presents the anodic oxidation of real produced water (PW), generated by the petroleum exploration of the Petrobras plant-Tunisia. Experiments were conducted at different current densities (30, 50 and 100 mA cm?2) using the lead dioxide supported on tantalum (Ta/PbO2) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes in an electrolytic batch cell. The electrolytic process was monitored by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon [TPH] in order to know the feasibility of electrochemical treatment. The characterization and quantification of petroleum wastewater components were performed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The COD removal was approximately 85% and 96% using PbO2 and BDD reached after 11 and 7 h, respectively. Compared with PbO2, the BDD anode showed a better performance to remove petroleum hydrocarbons compounds from produced water. It provided a higher oxidation rate and it consumed lower energy. However, the energy consumption and process time make useless anodic oxidation for the complete elimination of pollutants from PW. Cytotoxicity has shown that electrochemical oxidation using BDD could be efficiently used to reduce more than 90% of hydrocarbons compounds. All results suggest that electrochemical oxidation could be an effective approach to treat highly concentrated organic pollutants present in the industrial petrochemical wastewater and significantly reduce the cost and time of treatment.

Boutheina Gargouri; Olfa Dridi Gargouri; Bochra Gargouri; Souhel Kallel Trabelsi; Ridha Abdelhedi; Mohamed Bouaziz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide from liquid hydrocarbons with activated alumina and other adsorbents  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of Liquid hydrocarbon streams with carbonyl sulfide (COS) is not desirable; particularly in propylene. COS may poison the down stream polymerization catalyst. Thus, it is usually required to reduce the COS concentration to an extremely low level, e.g. 1 ppm or less, for polymer grade propylene. Many technologies generally available for sulfur removal, such as scrubbing and distillation are not applicable to the removal of COS from propylene. The former is not suitable for a low level removal. With the boiling point of COS (-50{sup 0}C) very close to that of propylene (-48{sup 0}C) it is difficult to achieve a very efficient separation with distillation. Adsorption technology provides a very energy efficient process in addition to its ability of the low level removal. Adsorbents selected in this study include activated carbon, molecular sieves, zinc oxide and activated alumina. The results show that activated alumina is far superior in both adsorption capacity and rate. An adsorption mechanism with activated alumina is proposed. It is believed that adsorption of COS takes place simultaneously with the hydrolysis of COS on the alumina surface. Adsorption isotherms of COS up to 100 ppm and the effect of moisture content are also addressed in this study.

Liu, P.K.T. (Alcoa Separations Technology Div., Aluminum Co. of America, Warrendale, PA (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Single-reactor process for producing liquid-phase organic compounds from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for preparing liquid fuel and chemical intermediates from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons. The method includes the steps of reacting in a single reactor an aqueous solution of a biomass-derived, water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon reactant, in the presence of a catalyst comprising a metal selected from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au, at a temperature, and a pressure, and for a time sufficient to yield a self-separating, three-phase product stream comprising a vapor phase, an organic phase containing linear and/or cyclic mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons, and an aqueous phase.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Simonetti, Dante A. (Middleton, WI); Kunkes, Edward L. (Madison, WI)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nuclear tanker producing liquid fuels from air and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging technologies in CO? air capture, high temperature electrolysis, microchannel catalytic conversion, and Generation IV reactor plant systems have the potential to create a shipboard liquid fuel production system ...

Galle-Bishop, John Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

ccsd-00001732,version2-7Nov2004 Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ccsd-00001732,version2-7Nov2004 Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by YAG laser Jun called the environment material. Then, the plasma produced in liquid by the laser light is studied and the plasma development is observed by a streak camera. The ultra pure water or the ultra pure water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

40

Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods...

Furrow, Brendan Eugene

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Selectivity Enhancement for Petroleum Hydrocarbons Using a Smectic Liquid Crystalline Stationary Phase in Supercritical Fluid Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Lee* Department of Chemistry, Brigham Young University...Bartle. Analytical Chemistry of Polycyclic Aromatic...Physical and Biological Chemistry. M. Cooke, A.J...hydrocarbon isomers in coal tars and combustion products. Environ......

H-C.K. Chang; K.E. Markides; J.S. Bradshaw; M.L. Lee

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Biodegradation of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons in Soil Contaminated by Oily Wastes Produced During Onshore Drilling Operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The petroleum industry generates high amount of oily wastes during drilling, storage and refining operations. Onshore drilling operations produce oil based wastes, typically 100–150m-3 well. The drilling cuttings...

Qaude-Henri Chaîneau; Jean-Louis Morel; Jean Oudot

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effect of potassium halide salts on mutual solubility of water + aromatic hydrocarbons liquid–liquid interface studied with surface and interfacial tensions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface tension (?, mN/m) of benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene (EB) aromatic hydrocarbons (AHCs, low density liquids, LDL) and interfacial tension (IFT, mN/m) both with water and aqueous 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 mol kg? 1 KF, KCl, KBr, KI (high density liquids, HDL) separately at 303.15 K are reported. Contributions of –CH3 and –CH2CH3 of toluene and EB to hydrophobic interactions are calculated from ?toluene–?benzene and ?EB–?benzene, respectively. \\{IFTs\\} of water + AHCs liquid–liquid interfaces (LLI) are as toluene (34.71) > EB (32.35) > benzene (32.32 mN m? 1), with a ~ 32.32 mN m? 1 decrease from 71.40 mN m? 1 of water. \\{AHCs\\} with hyperconjugation (HC) and positive inductive effects (+ ve IE) with toluene and EB LLI have reduced IFT by 39.08, 2.39, ? 1.56 mN m? 1, respectively. The effects of ?-conjugation, –H, –CH3 and –CH2CH3 on surface tension are calculated as ?-conjugation = ?(IFTair–liquid ? IFTAPHS–benzene), –CH3 = ?(IFTAPHS–toluene ? IFTAPHS–benzene). The effects of halide salts on hypercongugation –H(–CH3)/3, –CH2CH3 are obtained from ?(IFTAPHS–EB ? IFTAPHS–benzene).

Man Singh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Kimberly established that biomass pyrolysis oil could be steam-reformed to generate hydrogen using non pyrolysis oil could be almost stoichiometrically converted to hydrogen. However, process performance

45

Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Fresh Milk by Hollow Fiber Liquid-Phase Microextraction–Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Fresh Milk by...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fresh...more volatile and heat sensitive. The...Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds...the incomplete combustion of carbon-containing...respectively. Data were collected......

Mohd Marsin Sanagi; Saw Hong Loh; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim; Mohamed Noor Hasan; Hassan Y. Aboul Enein

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

High-energy-density solid and liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Final report, July 1987-December 1988  

SciTech Connect

The development of new high-energy hydrocarbon fuels for use in air-breathing missiles has been the objective of a number of investigations which have received support during the past decade through programs sponsored by the Air Force Systems Command and/or the Naval Air Systems Command. The key characteristics which must be met by potential cruise missile fuels have been described by Burdette and coworkers. A primary requirement in this regard is that candidate fuels must possess high net volumetric heat of combustion (preferably greater than 160,000 BTU/gallon). In order to meet the primary requirement of high net volumetric heat of combustion, hydrocarbon systems have been sought which maximize the ratio of carbon-atom to hydrogen-atom content have been sought that maximize the ratio n/m.(JES)

Marchand, A.P.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The effect of chemical dispersants on the solution of volatile liquid hydrocarbons from spilled crude oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Arabian Light oil VLHs into the water column; temperature set at 5 C or 25 C 34 Examples of the varying amounts of VLHs introduced into the water column from three different crude oils; temperature set at 25aC and fan speed 50 35 Incorporation of VLHs..., 1972). Evaporation alone can remove 30 ? 50 g of the 10 hydrocarbons in a typical crude oil, whereas Bunker C fuel oil will only lose 10 '/ of its components in a time span of several days. Simulated laboratory experiments demonstrated that light...

McDonald, Thomas Joseph

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Numerical modeling of the ignition of a liquid hydrocarbon layer by a radiant heat pulse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A gas-phase model of radiative ignition of a flammable liquid is developed, allowing for absorption of the radiant flux in the gas phase. Using motor fuels (gasoline and diesel fuel), as examples, we demonstra...

Yu. V. Agabekov; F. G. Yagafarov

49

Examining the Adsorption (Vapor?Liquid Equilibria) of Short-Chain Hydrocarbons in Low-Density Polyethylene with the SAFT-VR Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Examining the Adsorption (Vapor?Liquid Equilibria) of Short-Chain Hydrocarbons in Low-Density Polyethylene with the SAFT-VR Approach ... The versatility of the SAFT-VR approach in the prediction of fluid-phase equilibria of complex fluids is illustrated for systems of short and long hydrocarbons. ... 1999, 1, 2057), the phase behavior of pure long-chain n-alkane molecules was examined using the SAFT-VR approach; the intermolecular potential parameters were found to tend to a limiting value as the chain length of the n-alkane increases. ...

Clare McCabe; Amparo Galindo; M. Nieves García-Lisbona; George Jackson

2001-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus, and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, G.R.B.; Barraclough, B.L.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1981-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pulse radiolysis of liquid water using picosecond electron pulses produced by a table-top terawatt laser system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulse radiolysis of liquid water using picosecond electron pulses produced by a table-top terawatt into a supersonic helium gas jet are used to ionize liquid water. The decay of the hydrated electrons produced electron generator is shown, for the first time, to produce sufficient charge to conduct time resolved

Umstadter, Donald

54

Structural analysis of Catliq bio-oil produced by catalytic liquid conversion of biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The energy contained in biomass can be utilized either directly as in combustion or by converting the biomassStructural analysis of Catliq® bio-oil produced by catalytic liquid conversion of biomass Toor, S The potential offered by biomass for solving some of the world's energy problems is widely recognized

Toor, Saqib

55

Increasing liquid hydrocarbon recovery from natural gas: Evaluation of the vortex-tube device  

SciTech Connect

The vortex-tube device provides a useful addition to the range of equipment available to the gas industry. It has been shown that the use of vortex-tube equipment permits improved separation in comparison with a Joule-Thomson system, without entering into the cost and complexity of a true isentropic system such as a turbo-expander unit. The comparative advantage of the vortex tube depends upon the inlet conditions of the gas and the pressure drop that is available. An optimum pressure drop of 25--35% of the inlet gas pressure has been confirmed in practice. Although not yet tested on operating plant, it is expected that a loss of performance of vortex-tube units will occur for inlet liquid-to-gas ratios of greater than 20%. Units with up to 5% liquid at the inlet have been successfully operated showing that a single phase gas at the unit inlet is not essential. It is expected that future application of vortex tube units will be concentrated where performance improvements over Joule-Thomson units, at low capital cost, are required.

Hajdik, B. [CBS Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Steinle, J. [BEB Erdoel and Erdgas GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Lorey, M. [Filtan Analgenbau GmbH, Langenselbold (Germany); Thomas, K. [Falk and Thomas Engineering GmbH, Wettenberg (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Removal of trace olefins from aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for treating a hydrocarbon process stream by converting trace quantities of olefinic impurities to nonolefinic hydrocarbons. The process comprises contacting the process stream, which contains trace olefins in an amount of from about 50 to about 2000 as measured by Bromine Index and at least 80% by weight of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons having from 6 to 20 carbon atoms per molecule, at reaction conditions which ensure liquid phase operation with a solid catalyst composite comprising a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and a refractory inorganic oxide. A catalytic olefin-consuming alkylation reaction then produces an essentially olefinfree product stream with approximately the same quantity and distribution of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons as contained in the process stream.

Sachtler, J.W.A.; Barger, P.T.

1989-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

Contribution of power and desalination plants to the levels of volatile liquid hydrocarbons in the nearby coastal areas of Kuwait  

SciTech Connect

The levels and distribution of volatile liquid hydrocarbons (VLHs) were determined in Kuwait`s coastal areas in the vicinity of outlets of power and desalination plants. About 230 samples were collected from the selected sampling locations over the 4 seasons. The VLHs in the samples were analyzed using Grob`s closed-loop stripping technique and GC with FID and confirmed by GC/MS. The results showed that significant levels of VLHs were present. The levels ranged from 307 to 6,500 ng/L and from 2,880 to 7,811 ng/L in Kuwait Bay and Sulaibekhat Bay, respectively. The annual average for VLHs near Al-Zor power plant ranged from 465 to 4,665 ng/L. Benzenoids formed the bulk (about 80%) of the VLHs present. Comparison with the levels in the outlets indicated that Doha West power plant contributed much higher levels of VLHs to the coastal areas than Al-Zor plant.

Saeed, T.; Khordagui, H.; Al-Hashash, H. [Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait). Environmental Sciences Dept.] [Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait). Environmental Sciences Dept.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Conversion of hydrocarbons for fuel-cell applications. Part I. Autothermal reforming of sulfur-free and sulfur-containing hydrocarbon liquids. Part II. Steam reforming of n-hexane on pellet and monolithic catalyst beds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Experimental autothermal reforming (ATR) results obtained in the previous phase of this work with sulfur-free pure hydrocarbon liquids are summarized. Catalyst types and configuration used were the same as in earlier tests with No. 2 fuel oil to facilitate comparisons. Fuel oil has been found to form carbon in ATR at conditions much milder than those predicted by equilibrium. Reactive differences between paraffins and aromatics in ATR, and thus the formation of different carbon precursors, have been shown to be responsible for the observed carbon formation characteristics (fuel-specific). From tests with both light and heavy paraffins and aromatics, it is concluded that high boiling point hydrocarbons and polynuclear aromatics enhance the propensity for carbon formation in ATR. Effects of olefin (propylene) addition on the ATR performance of benzene are described. In ATR tests with mixtures of paraffins and aromatics (n-tetradecane and benzene) synergistic effects on conversion characteristics were identified. Comparisons of the No. 2 fuel oil data with the experimental results from this work with pure (and mixed) sulfur-free hydrocarbons indicate that the sulfur content of the fuel may be the limiting factor for efficient ATR operation. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in conventional reformers is heat transfer limited. Steam reforming tasks performed have included performance comparisons between conventional pellet beds and honeycomb monolith catalysts. Metal-supported monoliths offer higher structural stability than ceramic supports, and have a higher thermal conductivity. Data from two metal monoliths of different catalyst (nickel) loading were compared to pellets under the same operating conditions.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Voecks, G.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Process for using alkyl substituted C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons as preferential physical solvents for selective processing of hydrocarbon gas streams  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for the removal of hydrocarbon gas liquids, comprising hydrocarbons heavier than methane, from a hydrocarbon gas stream. The improvement consists of selectively extracting the hydrocarbon gas liquids from the hydrocarbon gas stream with a preferential physical solvent which provides selective capability for recovery according to the selected degree of (a) ethane in amounts ranging from 2-98%, (b) propane in amounts ranging from 2-99%, (c) butane in amounts ranging from 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% which comprises: A. selectively extracting and stripping the hydrocarbon gas stream with the physical solvent to produce a residue hydrocarbon gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components, the preferential physical solvent being: (1) rich in C/sub 8/-C/sub 10/ aromatic compounds having methyl, ethyl, or propyl aliphatic groups and (2) selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream such that: (a) the relative volatility of methane over ethane is at least 5.0 and the hydrocarbon loading capacity, defined as solubility of ethane in solvent, is at least 0.25 standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, or (b) the preferential factor determined by the multiplication of relative volatility of methane over ethane by the solubility of ethane in solvent, in standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, of at least 1.25; and B. distilling the rich solvent to produce the hydrocarbon gas liquids and the physical solvent.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap there between. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition. 6 figs.

Kong, P.C.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap therebetween. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effect of in-cylinder liquid fuel films on engine-out unburned hydrocarbon emissions for SI engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly all of the hydrocarbon emissions from a modern gasoline-fueled vehicle occur when the engine is first started. One important contributing factor to this is the fact that, during this time, temperatures throughout ...

Costanzo, Vincent S. (Vincent Stanley), 1979-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Fresh Milk by Hollow Fiber Liquid-Phase Microextraction–Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......my 1 Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science...Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, National Research...products of the incomplete combustion of carbon-containing material, such as coal, oil or municipal waste...aromatic hydrocarbons: Chemistry and analysis. (2000......

Mohd Marsin Sanagi; Saw Hong Loh; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim; Mohamed Noor Hasan; Hassan Y. Aboul Enein

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Treatment of produced water by simultaneous removal of heavy metals and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a photoelectrochemical cell.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Early produced water treatment technologies were developed before carbon dioxide emissions and hazardous waste discharge were recognised as operational priority. These technologies are deficient in… (more)

Igunnu, Ebenezer Temitope

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

In utero Exposure of Mice to Dibenzo[a,l]Pyrene Produces Lymphoma in the Offspring: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) 3-methylcholanthrene...from incomplete combustion of many organic...diesel. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR...nonspecific binding. Data were collected...water, were heat denatured and...Modeling survival data: extending the...to polycyclic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic...

Zhen Yu; Christiane V. Loehr; Kay A. Fischer; Mandy A. Louderback; Sharon K. Krueger; Roderick H. Dashwood; Nancy I. Kerkvliet; Clifford B. Pereira; Jamie E. Jennings-Gee; Stephanie T. Dance; Mark Steven Miller; George S. Bailey; and David E. Williams

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

A new LPCVD technique of producing borophosphosilicate glass films by injection of miscible liquid precursors  

SciTech Connect

This study introduces a new, simple, and viable LPCVD technique based on the injection of miscible liquid precursors. The preparation of BPSG films from liquid mixtures of TEOS, TMB, and TMP is used here as a prime example for implementing this concept. The relationship between starting solution composition and resulting film composition is investigated to provide guidelines for achieving desired stoichiometries. Variations in growth rate and composition are examined to assess the relative effects of deposition temperature, total pressure, solution composition, and injection rate. At the high boron and phosphorus levels (greater than or equal to4 weight percent), the reaction chemistry associated with the use of TMP is seen to produce severe depletion effects. At optimum deposition conditions, select properties of BPSG films are investigated. The results indicate high compositional uniformity within the film, a dielectric constant value in close agreement with that of thermally grown, SiO/sub 2/, conformal step coverage even in the case of severe aspect ratios, and desirable flow profiles at temperatures and phosphorus concentrations significantly lower than those being currently achieved with phosphosilicate glass films.

Levy, R.A.; Gallagher, P.K.; Schrey, F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Liquid--liquid equilibria by use of UNIFAC for gasohol extraction systems  

SciTech Connect

A synthetic naphtha cut composed of a mixture of paraffinic, aromatic, and naphthenic hydrocarbons has been studied as a solvent to directly produce gasohol. The equilibria in these highly nonideal liquid mixtures has been estimated by the UNIFAC group contribution method. The process would appear to be simple and direct to produce gasohol by liquid--liquid extraction with this naphtha and could compete with existing azeotropic distillation processes.

Furzer, I.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Place Volumes and Liquid Recovery for Volatile Oil and Gas Condensate Reservoirs. (December 2000) Juan Manual Jaramillo Arias, B. S. , Universidad de America; B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Colombia Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Maria A. Barrufet... Reservoir Performance 2. 2 Equation of State Review. . 2. 3 Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR EOS). 2. 4 Vapor Liquid Equilibria. . 2. 5 Volume Translation. 2. 6 Pseudoization or Lumping. 2. 7 Heavy Fraction Characterization. . 2. 8 Compositional...

Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

Greenbaum, E.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang, Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. Tb each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of {open_quotes}present{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}absent{close_quotes} were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refiner&y work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9,95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5,95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). 53 refs., 7 tabs.

Poole, C.; Dreyer, N.A.; Satterfield, M.H. [Epidemiology Resources Inc., Newton Lower Falls, MA (United States); Levin, L. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

Kubo, Junichi [Nippon Oil Co. Ltd. (Japan)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Carbon neutral hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...depends on a source of primary energy to drive the required chemical...synthetic hydrocarbons are an energy carrier produced from a primary energy source such as wind, nuclear...Gustavsson et al. 2007), using a conversion value of $1.00=0.72...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Influence of Sulfur on the Carbon Deposition in Liquid Hydrocarbon Steam Reforming over CeO2-Al2O3 supported Ni and Rh Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to elucidate the influence of sulfur on the carbon deposition in steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbons over CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported Ni and Rh catalysts at 800 C. The characteristics of the carbon deposits on the used catalysts after the reactions without and with sulfur were investigated by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Though abundant carbon deposits can accumulate on the pure CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support due to fuel thermal cracking, the addition of Ni or Rh metal greatly reduced the carbon deposition in the sulfur-free reaction. The presence of sulfur increased the carbon deposition on both catalysts, which has a much more significant impact for the Ni catalyst. Carbon XANES study on the used catalysts revealed that graphitic carbon was dominant in the presence of sulfur, while oxidized carbon species (quinone-like carbon, carboxyl and carbonate) prevailed without sulfur. Meanwhile, the formation of carboxyl and carbonate more dramatically dropped on the Ni catalyst than that on the Rh catalyst. Our results strongly suggest that (I) the presence of sulfur can suppress carbon gasification and promote the formation of graphitic carbon on reforming catalysts due mainly to its poisoning effect on metals, and (II) Rh catalyst possesses stronger capability to maintain carbon gasification activity than Ni catalyst in the presence of sulfur.

C Xie; Y Chen; Y Li; X Wang; C Song

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nearest-neighbor distributions of free radicals produced within charged-particle tracks in liquid water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 20-MeV alpha particles compared to maximum double strand break distance INTRODUCTION All forms of ionizing radiation eventually produce charged particles which are responsible for depositing all of the energy to the medium being irradiated. We... quantify this energy deposition in terms of absorbed dose. The definition of absorbed dose is the energy absorbed per unit mass from any kind of ionizing radiation in any type of matter (2). It has long been recognized that different types of radiation...

Smith, Miles Clay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

Tabak, S.A. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States). Central Research Lab.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Process for using preferential physical solvents for selective processing of hydrocarbon gas streams  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for the removal of hydrocarbon gas liquids, comprising hydrocarbons heavier than methane, from a hydrocarbon gas stream, wherein a need exists for recovering to any selected degree and at extremely high recoveries a selected hydrocarbon component and heavier hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons are within the group consisting of ethane, propane, butane, and pentane without the need simultaneously to recover hydrocarbons lighter than the selected hydrocarbon component from the hydrocarbon gas stream, The improvement of selectively extracting the hydrocarbon gas liquids from the hydrocarbon gas stream with a preferential physical solvent is described here. The method provides selective capability for recovery according to the selected degree of (a) ethane in amounts ranging from 2-98%, (b) propane in amounts ranging from 2-99%, (c) butane in amounts ranging from 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100%.

Mehra, Y.R.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Catalytic multi-stage process for hydroconversion and refining hydrocarbon feeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-stage catalytic hydrogenation and hydroconversion process for heavy hydrocarbon feed materials such as coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and plastic waste materials. In the process, the feedstock is reacted in a first-stage, back-mixed catalytic reactor with a highly dispersed iron-based catalyst having a powder, gel or liquid form. The reactor effluent is pressure-reduced, vapors and light distillate fractions are removed overhead, and the heavier liquid fraction is fed to a second stage back-mixed catalytic reactor. The first and second stage catalytic reactors are operated at 700-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure and 20-80 lb./hr per ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The vapor and light distillates liquid fractions removed from both the first and second stage reactor effluent streams are combined and passed to an in-line, fixed-bed catalytic hydrotreater for heteroatom removal and for producing high quality naphtha and mid-distillate or a full-range distillate product. The remaining separator bottoms liquid fractions are distilled at successive atmospheric and vacuum pressures, low and intermediate-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products are withdrawn, and heavier distillate fractions are recycled and further upgraded to provide additional low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products. This catalytic multistage hydrogenation process provides improved flexibility for hydroprocessing the various carbonaceous feedstocks and adjusting to desired product structures and for improved economy of operations.

Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA); Lee, Lap-Keung (Cranbury, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Composition of liquids from coals of different rank  

SciTech Connect

Eight coal liquids prepared from six coals of widely differing rank were compared with respect to their suitability as potential feedstocks for production of refined fuels. The compositions of the liquids were determined by methods adapted from those developed for characterization of petroleum crudes. The coal liquids were prepared and upgraded by hydrogenation in a batch autoclave. The reaction conditions employed were selected to minimize hydrocarbon ring-opening reactions and, at the same time, to produce most of the hydrocarbon liquids potentially available from the coals. The degree of hydrogenation of the raw coal liquids was varied as required to decrease the nitrogen content to about the same level and to provide a predominantly hydrocarbon liquid for analysis. Distilled fractions of the upgraded coal liquids boiling up to 540/sup 0/C were characterized by a combination of separation and analytical techniques including adsorption chromatography; gel permeation chromatography; separations of acids, bases, and asphaltenes; and high- and low-resolution mass spectrometry. In general, the results show that liquids of comparable suitability as feedstocks for production of refined fuels can be produced from coals of different rank.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Thomson, J.S.; Woodward, P.W.; Vogh, J.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Production of hydrocarbons from hydrates. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical and safe method of producing hydrocarbons (or natural gas) from in situ hydrocarbon-containing hydrates is given. Once started, the method will be self-driven and will continue producing hydrocarbons over an extended period of time (i.e., many days).

McGuire, P.L.

1981-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Process for reforming naphthene and paraffin-containing hydrocarbons in the naphtha boiling range and isomerizing C sub 5 -C sub 6 normal paraffin feedstock to produce a high octane gasoline  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for reforming a naphthenic and paraffin-containing hydrocarbon feedstock to produce a reformate product having an increased octane rating by contacting the feedstock with a reforming catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at reforming conditions in a reforming zone, the reforming zone including a naphtha dehydrogenation zone and a paraffin dehydrocyclization zone wherein heated, pressurized hydrogen is added to the effluent stream from the naphtha dehydrogenation zone prior to charging the effluent stream to the paraffin dehydrocyclization zone to produce a first product stream comprising a gasoline range reformate product having an RON octane rating of at least about 90 and hydrogen wherein the reformate product is separated from the hydrogen in a reformate separation zone. It comprises: charging at least a portion of the heated, pressurized hydrogen with a C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} n-paraffin feedstock to an isomerization zone containing an isomerization catalyst at isomerization conditions to produce a second product stream containing an isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product and passing the second product stream to the reformate separation zone and recovering at least a major portion of the isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product with the reformate product.

Dalson, M.H.

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mass Transfer of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the individual components of four synthetic dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mixtures into the aqueous hydrocarbons (PAHs), were designed to serve as models for coal tars and creosotes. The reactor employed (PAHs) are often present in the environment as components of such dense non- aqueous phase liquids

Peters, Catherine A.

86

Process for steam reforming of hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A process is provided for the steam reforming of normally liquid hydrocarbons to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which does not promote the deposition of carbonacious materials upon catalytic surfaces. The catalyst consists of nickel promoted with the oxides of iron and manganese within a specific manganese to iron ratio, said metal and metal oxides being supported upon a refractory support. The support is preferably aluminum oxide in its alpha phase having a surface area of more than 0.5 m2/gm but no more than 10 m2/gm. The metallic constituents are impregnated onto said refractory low surface area support as salts and are calcined at sufficiently high temperature to convert the salts to the oxide but at a sufficiently low temperature that they do not chemically react with the support.

Broughton, D.R.; Russ, K.J.

1980-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

87

Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

89

Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Naphthenic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

An important type of naphthenic hydrocarbons is the monocyclic type, (k/sub 2/, 0, 0). In this instance the number of carbon atoms, n = k/sub 2/, and a formula, C/sub n/H/sub 2n/, can be written where H/C = 2. The value n can vary from 2 to infinity. In the case of n = 2, it is ethylene (I) (2-membered cyclic ring); n = 3, cyclopropane (II) (3-membered cyclic ring); n = 4, cyclobutane (III) (4-membered cyclic ring); etc. If the monocyclic naphthenic is planar, then the bond angle theta can be expressed as theta = (1 - 2/n)..pi.. where n is the number of carbon atoms. However, the tetrahedron angle of the carbon atom being phi = cos/sup -1/ (- 1/3).

Yen, T.F.; Kuo, J.F.; Chilingarian, G.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Molecular carbon isotopic evidence for the origin of geothermal hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in the flask's headspace. This procedure produced negligible amounts of contaminating hydrocarbons. The geothermal hydrocarbons were separated and combusted, and the carbon dioxide product purified and measured using ... of the pyrolysis and spark discharge experiments, b, Isotopic abundance of hydrocarbons from four geothermal localities as follows: D, Cerro Prieto, well M-5, sampled January 1979; ...

David J. Des Marais; Jason H. Donchin; Nancy L. Nehring; Alfred H. Truesdell

1981-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Southern Research Institute Project Number: FE0010231 Project Description Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, called syngas, into liquid hydrocarbons. It is a leading technology for converting syngas derived from gasification of coal and coal-biomass mixtures to hydrocarbons in coal to liquids (CTL) and coal-biomass to liquids (CBTL) processes. However, conventional FTS catalysts produce undesirable waxes (C21+) that need to be upgraded to liquids (C5-C20) by hydrotreating. This adds significantly to the cost of FTS. The objectives of this project are (i) to demonstrate potential for CBTL cost reduction by maximizing the production of C5-C20 hydrocarbon liquids using a selective FTS catalyst and (ii) to evaluate the impacts of the addition of biomass to coal on product characteristics, carbon foot print, and economics.

93

Sorptive extraction using polydimethylsiloxane/metal–organic framework coated stir bars coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, metal–organic frameworks (MOFs, Al-MIL-53-NH2) were synthesized via the hydrothermal method, and novel polydimethylsiloxane/metal–organic framework (PDMS/MOFs, PDMS/Al-MIL-53-NH2)-coated stir bars were prepared by the sol–gel technique. The preparation reproducibility of the PDMS/MOFs-coated stir bar was good, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 4.8% to 14.9% (n = 7) within one batch and from 6.2% to 16.9% (n = 6) among different batches. Based on this fact, a new method of PDMS/MOFs-coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and ultrasonic-assisted liquid desorption (UALD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) was developed for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental water samples. To obtain the best extraction performance for PAHs, several parameters affecting SBSE, such as extraction time, stirring rate, and extraction temperature, were investigated. Under optimal experimental conditions, wide linear ranges and good \\{RSDs\\} (n = 7) were obtained. With enrichment factors (EFs) of 16.1- to 88.9-fold (theoretical EF, 142-fold), the limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) of the developed method for the target \\{PAHs\\} were found to be in the range of 0.05–2.94 ng/L. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of \\{PAHs\\} in Yangtze River and East Lake water samples.

Cong Hu; Man He; Beibei Chen; Cheng Zhong; Bin Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Combustion of viscous hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for utilizing viscous hydrocarbons as combustible fuels comprising: (A) forming a hydrocarbosol using a surfactant package in a proportion of about 1:100 to about 1:20,000 by weight based on hydrocarbon, (1) the surfactant package comprising (a) at least one water-soluble surfactant, an effective amount of which surfactant promotes emulsification of a hydrocarbon with API gravity of about 20/sup 0//sup o/ API or less; and (b) at least one water-soluble bioemulsifier, being a microboally-derived substance which predominantly resides at hydrocarbon/water interfaces to substantially surround hydrocarbon droplets in hydrocarbon-in-water emulsions; (2) the hydrocarbosol (a) comprising a hydrocarbon characterized by an API gravity of about 20/sup 0//sup o/ API or less; (b) having a hydrocarbon:water ratio of about 70:30 by volume; and (B) burning the resultant hydrocarbosol.

Hayes, M.E.; Hrebenar, K.R.; Murphy, P.L.; Futch, L.E. Jr.; Deal, J.F. III

1986-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

95

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a method to make liquid chemicals, such as functional intermediates, solvents, and liquid fuels from biomass-derived cellulose. The method is cascading; the product stream from an upstream reaction can be used as the feedstock in the next downstream reaction. The method includes the steps of deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be converted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid so formed can be further reacted to yield a host of valuable products. For example, the pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes. Alternatively, the nonene may be isomerized to yield a mixture of branched olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of branched alkanes. The mixture of n-butenes formed from .gamma.-valerolactone can also be subjected to isomerization and oligomerization to yield olefins in the gasoline, jet and Diesel fuel ranges.

Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI); Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano (Madison, WI); West, Ryan M. (Madison, WI)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a method to make liquid chemicals. The method includes deconstructing cellulose to yield a product mixture comprising levulinic acid and formic acid, converting the levulinic acid to .gamma.-valerolactone, and converting the .gamma.-valerolactone to pentanoic acid. Alternatively, the .gamma.-valerolactone can be conveted to a mixture of n-butenes. The pentanoic acid can be decarboxylated yield 1-butene or ketonized to yield 5-nonanone. The 5-nonanone can be hydrodeoxygenated to yield nonane, or 5-nonanone can be reduced to yield 5-nonanol. The 5-nonanol can be dehydrated to yield nonene, which can be dimerized to yield a mixture of C.sub.9 and C.sub.18 olefins, which can be hydrogenated to yield a mixture of alkanes.

Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI; Ruiz, Juan Carlos Serrano [Madison, WI; West, Ryan M [Madison, WI

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Catalyst optimization in gas-to-liquid technology : an operations view / Israel Olalekan Jolaolu.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas to Liquids (GTL) technology is a general term used for a group of technologies that has the capability to create liquid hydrocarbon fuels from… (more)

Jolaolu, Israel Olalekan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Stability characteristics of some shale and coal liquids. Final report. [Thermal and storage stability  

SciTech Connect

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels derived from coal and from oil shale were made available for characterization and thermal and storage stability investigations. The coal-derived liquids identified as naphthas from No. 6 Illinois and Wyodak coals produced by the Exxon Donor Solvent process contained high concentrations of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds and were considered to be unrefined synthetic crudes. These materials were found to be relatively unstable in storage. The shale-derived fuels were refined to meet the requirements of military specification jet fuels JP-8 and JP-5 and marine diesel fuel (DFM). Virtually all the specification requirements were met and the fuels were found to be thermally and storage stable. During 32-week, 43/sup 0/C storage tests conducted on these liquids, periodic measurements were made of precipitate fuel-insolubles, fuel-soluble gum, dissolved oxygen content and peroxide number. The liquids were analyzed, in some instances, by infrared, NMR, and uv spectroscopy, before and after the 32-week storage test with little or no change being observed in the bulk liquid samples. Shale-derived liquid hydrocarbons have been refined to meet current specification requirements for hydrocarbon fuels, and it appears that coal-derived liquids can also be refined to meet requirements for performance and storage stability.

Bowden, J.N.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Combustion of viscous hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for utilizing viscous hydrocarbons as combustible pre-atomized fuels, comprising: (A) forming a hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion using an effective amount of a surfactant package comprising at least one water-soluble surfactant, the hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion (1) comprising a hydrocarbon characterized by API gravity of about 20/sup 0/ API or less, viscosity of about 1000 centipoise or greater at 212/sup 0/F., a paraffin content of about 50% by weight or less and, an aromatic content of about 15% by weight or greater, and (2) having a hydrocarbon water ratio from about 60:40 to about 90:10 by volume; and (B) burning the resultant hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion.

Hayes, M.E.; Hrebenar, K.R.; Murphy, P.L.; Futch, L.E. Jr.; Deal, J.F. III; Bolden, P.L. Jr.

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Extractive stripping of inert-rich hydrocarbon gases with a preferential physical solvent  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for treating a natural gas stream containing methane, heavier hydrocarbons, and an inert gas, an improvement comprising: selectivity extracting natural gas liquids from the natural gas stream with a preferential physical solvent which provides selective capability for recovery according to the selected degree of: (a) ethane in amounts ranging from 2-98%, (b) propane in amounts ranging from 2-99%, (c) butanes in amounts ranging from 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100%, the improvement comprising the following steps: A. selecting the preferential physical solvent which is selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream such that: (1) relative volatility of methane over ethane is at least 5.0 and the hydrocarbon loading capacity, defined as solubility of ethane in the solvent, is at least 0.25 standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of the solvent, or (2) the preferential factor, determined by the multiplication of relative volatility of methane over ethane by the solubility of ethane in solvent, in standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, is at least 1.25; B. selectively extracting and stripping the natural gas stream with the physical solvent to produce an inert gas stream and a rich solvent stream containing methane and the hydrocarbons heavier than methane; and C. distilling the rich solvent stream to produce a stream vent to form a solution having a molar ratio of silicon alkoxide to water in the range of about 1 to about 10.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fish from the Arabian Gulf  

SciTech Connect

Emphasis has been placed upon the identification and qualification of compounds with potential adverse health effects on humans. Prominent among this group are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), several of which are known or suspected carcinogens. PAHs enter the marine environment from a variety of sources including petroleum pollution, industrial and domestic effluents, atmospheric particles, and biosynthesis by plants and microorganisms. Although one-third of the world's oil is produced around the Arabian Gulf, no detailed analysis have been conducted to determine PAHs in this region. Nevertheless, numerous investigations have shown the ability of marine organisms including fish to accumulation PAHs from solution or dispersion in seawater. When fish are harvested, a human health hazard may result. In the present communication, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to identify and measure sixteen PAHs priority pollutants issued by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in fourteen species of commercially significant fish from the NW Arabian Gulf.

DouAbdul, A.A.Z.; Abaychi, J.K.; Al-Edanee, T.E.; Ghani, A.A.; Al-Saad, H.T.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Process for hydrocracking carbonaceous material in liquid carrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid carbonaceous material is hydrocracked to provide aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons for use as gaseous and liquid fuels or chemical feed stock. Particulate carbonaceous material such as coal in slurry with recycled product oil is preheated in liquid state to a temperature of 600.degree.-1200.degree. F. in the presence of hydrogen gas. The product oil acts as a sorbing agent for the agglomerating bitumins to minimize caking within the process. In the hydrocracking reactor, the slurry of oil and carbonaceous particles is heated within a tubular passageway to vaporize the oil and form a gas-solid mixture which is further heated to a hydropyrolysis temperature in excess of 1200.degree. F. The gas-solid mixture is quenched by contact with additional oil to condense normally liquid hydrocarbons for separation from the gases. A fraction of the hydrocarbon liquid product is recycled for quenching and slurrying with the carbonaceous feed. Hydrogen is recovered from the gas for recycle and additional hydrogen is produced by gasification of residual char.

Duncan, Dennis A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Hydrocarbon Potential of Deep Water H. R. Warman In...the geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Earth's deeper water areas, an attempt...United Kingdom 1981 Hydrocarbon potential of deep water Warman H. R. Author...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hydrocarbon injection improves condensate recovery in U. S. S. R  

SciTech Connect

Treating producing zones with hydrocarbon mixtures can increase the flow capacity of wells in which the rate has decreased because of gas-condensate precipitation. When an appropriate mixture is injected in a predetermined amount (volume per meter of producing interval), production can be increased by 10-20%. After treatment, producing rates can be stabilized for a period of several months to 2 years. Wells producing from gas-condensate, depletion-drive reservoirs are considered to be the most suitable for stimulation. These wells can be characterized by: Initial liquid content in the formation (pentane plus high boiling fraction) exceeds 430-520 cu m/cu m of gas (77-93 bbl/MMcf). Formation pressure is in the range of 10-25% of initial pressure. Producing formation thickness is 15-80 m (49-262 ft). For better results in stimulating a well, one should consider the nature of rock characteristics of the reservoir. Preferred formations for stimulations are porous-type reservoirs with permeability not higher than 10{sup {minus}13} sq m (100 md) and not lower than 10{sup {minus}15} sq m (1 md).

Ter-Sarkisov, R. (All-Union Scientific Research, Inst. of Natural Gas, Moscow (SU)); Gritsenko, A. (NPO Soyuzgastechnology, Moscow (SU))

1991-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

106

Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

A generalized viscosity equation for pure heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for the correlation and prediction of the viscosity of pure heavy hydrocarbons listed in API Research Project 42. The 273 heavy hydrocarbons in the database include branched/unbranched paraffins and olefins together with a variety of complex nonfused/fused aromatic and naphthenic compounds. A generalized one-parameter viscosity-temperature equation, log ({mu} + 0.8) = 100(0.01T){sup b}, is proposed (overall AAD {lt} 7-10%) for all heavy hydrocarbons in the database. For each hydrocarbon, an optimum value of parameter b is provided. It is shown that parameter b varies linearly with the logarithm of molar mass as well as the inverse of boiling temperature (at 10 mmHg). This important observation leads to the development of a predictive method for the liquid-phase viscosity of pure heavy hydrocarbons.

Mehrotra, A.K. (Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (CA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Microplasma Ball Reactor for Liquid Hydrocarbon Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the main advantages of a transient arc discharge is the combination of relatively high power input and low plasma temperature. 2.1.2 Microplasmas An important new field in plasma research is the field of microplasmas. A microplasma is a plasma on a...

Slavens, Stephen M

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

Preparation of synthetic hydrocarbon lubricants  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for preparing synthetic lubricating materials which process comprises: (a) reacting (i) at least a portion of a reaction product of the liquid phase oligomerization of propylene, butylene or mixtures thereof containing a C/sub 6/ olefin component, (ii) a linear olefin reactant having an average carbon number ranging from about 10 to about 18 in the presence of a catalyst, (b) separating from the reaction mixture of (a) hydrocarbons which distill at a temperature above about 660/sup 0/ F. (316/sup 0/ C.), and (c) hydrogenating the reaction product of (b) by contact with hydrogen with or without a catalyst at a temperature ranging from about 25/sup 0/ C. to about 300/sup 0/ C.

Johnson, T.H.

1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells using hydrocarbon fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency conversion devices that use hydrogen or light hydrocarbon (HC) fuels in stationary applications to produce quiet and clean power. While successful, HC-fueled SOFCs face ...

Lee, Won Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Formation in Sludge Incineration by Fluidised Bed and Rotary Kiln Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are typical pollutants arising from incineration. They are produced in any incomplete combustion principally due to inhomogeneities in a combustion chamber. The effects ...

Giuseppe Mininni; Andrea Sbrilli; Ettore Guerriero…

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Examination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban stormwater system and bioaccumulation in Odonata.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic organic pollutants produced from combustion processes. Associated with urban runoff they have been detected worldwide in urban wetlands. PAH… (more)

Heintzman, Lucas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

Yarbro, Stephen Lee

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

Woolley, Robert D. (Hillsborough, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Novel process for depolymerization of coal to C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons. Final report, 1 September 1989--31 August 1993  

SciTech Connect

A principal objective of this work was to study the conversion of coal to C{sub 2} {minus} C{sub 4} hydrocarbons in a two-stage reactor system. Coal was converted to liquids at 440{degrees}C in a stirred batch autoclave using tetralin as the hydrogen donor solvent. The liquids produced were separated from the unreacted coal and ash by filtration. The liquids were then fed into a second stage fixed bed reactor containing sulfided Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2{minus}}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The liquids were hydrocracked on the dual functional catalyst giving high yields of C{sub 2} {minus} C{sub 4}. hydrocarbons. The pressure was 1800 psi and the temperatures were in the range of 425 to 500{degrees}C. The kinetic parameters of the conversion of coal liquids to gases were determined. The activation energy was determined.

Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, R.L.

1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

119

Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

Miller, Holly (Bethel Island, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethel Island, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 5 figs.

Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

1988-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 6 figs.

Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

Miller, Holly (Bethel Island, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethel Island, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

We have suggested that certain plants rich in hydrocarbon-like materials might be cultivated for renewable photosynthetic products. Two species were selected for experimental plantations: Euphorbia lathyris, an annual from seed and Euphorbia tirucalli, a perennial from cuttings, The yield from each species is over 10 barrels of oil/acre/year without genetic or agronomic improvement. In addition to plants, there are trees, such as species of Copaifera in Brazil and other tropical areas, which produce a diesel-like oil upon tapping. Each tree produces approximately 40 liters of hydrocarbon per year, and this material can be used directly by a diesel-powered car. Further efforts to develop plants as alternate energy sources are underway, as well as a continuing search for additional plant species throughout the world which have a similar capability.

Calvin, Melvin

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Optimizing hydrocarbon recoveries in nitrogen rejection units  

SciTech Connect

In order to address conceptual questions such as process selection and natural gas liquids plant integration, an understanding of the effects of several additional factors on nitrogen rejection unit design is important. These factors, which may influence optimum hydrocarbon recovery, installed compression, etc., include current and forecast values for natural gas and utilities, project life, plant size, feed gas composition and product specifications, feed pressure, and process variations. Prices, project life, and plant size are analyzed in detail and presented in terms of methane recoveries as a function of nitrogen content in the feed for both double and single column processes. Trends are qualitatively discussed for the remaining factors. 13 references.

Chesney, J.D.; Davis, R.A.; Hilton, M.F.; Vines, H.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS  

SciTech Connect

Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method of producing submicron size particles and product produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in ''metallic inks.'' 4 figs.

Bourne, R.S.; Eichman, C.C.; Welbon, W.W.

1988-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Method for determining processability of a hydrocarbon containing feedstock  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

Photocatalytic nanomats clean up produced water from fracking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper refers to the transfer of the results of federally funded research towards commercialization in a very short time in order to meet the needs of an emerging and fast growing industry, involving the remediation of produced water from fracking operations on site and at low cost. The focus is on photocatalytic nanogrids: ceramic mats that may be used as covers for produced water stored in ponds and pits. The electrospun mats of the self-supported ceramic photocatalysts are responding to the whole solar spectrum and oxidize benzene and other liquid hydrocarbons in water, turning them into innocuous compounds. There is no hydrocarbon pollution left in the water after catalytic reactions and the nanogrids are reusable. The scalable processing of this technology, as well as the scaled-up proof of concept, is detailed in this work. The pathway from a research funding award in response to the Gulf oil spill remediation, through the inaugural class of the National Science Foundation Innovation Corps (I-Corps) cohorts towards a small business development is also outlined. The impact of the visionary and effective I-Corps program on the fast translation of lab-based technology from proof of concept to prototyping for industry validation is also described.

P I Gouma; J Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Catalyst for steam reforming of hydrocarbons and process of preparing the catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A catalyst is provided for the steam reforming of normally liquid hydrocarbons to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which does not promote the deposition of carbonaceous materials upon the catalytic surfaces. The catalyst consists of nickel promoted with the oxides of iron and manganese within a specific manganese to iron ratio, said metal and metal oxides being supported upon a refractory support. The support is preferably aluminum oxide in its alpha phase having a surface area of less than 15 m2/gm. The metallic constituents are impregnated onto said refractory low surface area support as salts and are calcined at sufficiently high temperature to convert the salts to the oxide but at a sufficiently low temperature that they do not chemically react with the support.

Broughton, D.R.; Russ, K.J.

1980-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

Double molecular imprinting – a new sensor concept for improving selectivity in the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Highly selective and robust polymer coatings for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in liquid media have been ... of aromatic rings. Measurements of PAHs in water were also performed with...

Franz L. Dickert; Paul Achatz…

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

LNG liquid-liquid immiscibility  

SciTech Connect

Although natural gas species rarely exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility in binary systems, the presence of additional components can extend the domain of immiscibility in those few binary systems where it already exists or produce immiscibility in binary systems where it had not existed. If the solute has the proper molecular relation to the solvent mixture background, liquid-liquid-vapor (LLV) behavior will occur; such phenomena greatly complicate the design of LNG processing equipment. To aid LNG engineers, researchers mapped the thermodynamic behavior of four ternary LLV systems and examined the effects of the second solvents - ethane, propane, n-butane, and CO/sub 2/ - on the binary methane + n-octane system.

Luks, K.D.; Kohn, J.P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Utilization of Certain Hydrocarbons by Microorganisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...UTILIZATION OF CERTAIN HYDROCARBONS BY MICROORGANISMS...1940 INTRODUCTION Hydrocarbons, as a class, represent...obtained by comparing the heat of combustion of some six carbon...biological utilization of hydrocarbons as sources of energy...

L. D. Bushnell; H. F. Haas

1941-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Interaction between Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons and Nucleosides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...addition, the findings that hydrocarbons inhibit DNA syn thesis...for these carcinogens. Hydrocarbon-nucleic acid interaction...and the interactions of water molecules. Indeed, carcinogenic hydrocarbons tend to form 1 This investigation...

Ronald G. Harvey and Marilyn Halonen

1968-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry of coal liquids produced during a coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) has been applied to the analysis of coal-derived liquids from the former British Coal Point-of-Ayr coal liquefaction plant. The feed to the hydrocracker and the resulting product were analyzed. The results refer almost exclusively to the plant-derived recycle solvent, known as the liquefaction solvent; the molecular mass range of the GC does not exceed that of the solvent. The method allows for the resolution of the numerous structural isomers of tetralin and methyl indan, one pair of hydrogen-donor (necessary for the dissolution of coal) and isomeric nondonor (that reduce the hydrogen donors) components of the recycle solvent. In addition, the n-alkanes that concentrate in the recycle solvent are easily observed in comparison with the results from one-dimensional GC-MS. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Jacqui F. Hamilton; Alistair. C. Lewis; Marcos Millan; Keith D. Bartle; Alan A. Herod; Rafael Kandiyoti [University of York, York (United Kingdom). Department of Chemistry

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process for recovering hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-bearing formation  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for transporting heavy crude oil through a pipeline which involves introducing into a pipeline or well-bore with the viscous hydrocarbons an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) coupling agent whereby there is spontaneously formed a low viscosity, salt tolerant, oil-in-water emulsion. Also disclosed is a method of recovery of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon bearing formation employing an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) a coupling agent.

Alston, R.B.; Braden, W.B.; Flournoy, K.H.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

138

Process for the hydrotreatment of heavy hydrocarbons in the presence of reduced metals  

SciTech Connect

A heavy hydrocarbon charge containing sulfur, asphaltenes and/or resins is hydrotreated in the liquid phase at 250/sup 0/-500/sup 0/ C. under a pressure of 20-350 bars in the presence of a catalyst previously obtained by reacting an organic compound of a transition metal with an organic aluminum compound, in a hydrocarbon free of asphaltene and resin. The transition metal organic compound is advantageously an iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, tungsten or vanadium acetylacetonate or carboxylate.

Dinh, C.T.; Desvard, A.; Jacquin, Y.; Martino, G.

1984-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in Mississippi Fan sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sandberg, B. A. , University of Colorado Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James M. Brooks Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) distributions in Upper Pleistocene sediments of the Mississippi Fan and two intraslope basins in the Gulf of Mexico... chemistries is separate phase migration driven by hydrodynamic flow upward along fault planes. The same variables at intraslope basin sites are highly altered, possibly due to extensive gravity slump faulting. High- performance liquid chromatography...

Sandberg, William Allan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FROM INTERSTELLAR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND ICE TO ASTROBIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photolysis of these ices produces a host of new compounds, some of which show intriguing prebiotic behavior1 FROM INTERSTELLAR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND ICE TO ASTROBIOLOGY LOUIS J. ALLAMANDOLA, the concept of ices in dense molecular clouds ignored, and the notion of large, abundant, gas phase, carbon

142

A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass feedstocks were utilized to identify optimized process conditions and selective HDO catalyst for high yield production of hydrocarbons from biomass. In addition to these experimental efforts, in Tasks D and E, we have developed a mathematical optimization framework to identify carbon and energy efficient biomass-to-liquid fuel process designs that integrate the use of different primary energy sources along with biomass (e.g. solar, coal or natural gas) for liquid fuel production. Using this tool, we have identified augmented biomass-to-liquid fuel configurations based on the fast-hydropyrolysis/HDO pathway, which was experimentally studied in this project. The computational approach used for screening alternative process configurations represents a unique contribution to the field of biomass processing for liquid fuel production.

Agrawal, Rakesh

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

143

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 7. GPGP jet-fuels production program. Evaluation of technical uncertainties for producing jet fuels from liquid by-products of the Great Plains gasification plant. Interim report, 2 October 1987-30 September 1988  

SciTech Connect

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to analyze GPGP operations and develop correlations for the liquid by-products and plant operating factors such as coal feed rate and coal characteristics.

Fraser, M.D.; Rossi, R.J.; Wan, E.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Desiccant bed on hydrocarbon charged to and removed from underground (salt) cavern  

SciTech Connect

A hydrocarbon fluid storage system is described which consists of in operable conjunction: a cavern formed within an underground salt strata below a ground surface, the cavern comprises a lower liquid volume of saturated sodium chloride storage brine and an upper fluid volume of wet hydrocarbon storage fluid, surface fluid handling means; conduit connecting the lower storage brine and upper storage hydrocarbon fluid with the surface fluid handling means, of fluid transfer means enabling transfer of brine and hydrocarbon fluid from the surface to the cavern and from the cavern to the surface, such that brine can be added to or withdrawn from the lower brine volume and hydrocarbon fluids can be added to or withdrawn from the upper hydrocarbon fluid volume, and at least one desiccant drier means positioned at the surface in operable association with the surface fluid handling means whereby the wet hydrocarbon fluid upon withdrawal from the cavern passes through the desiccant drier means and thereby becomes dry, and dry hydrocarbon fluid intended for storage passes through the desiccant drier prior to entering the storage cavern and thereby becomes wet.

Washer, S.P.

1986-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon neutrals Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in deep seated HP-HT reservoirs or produced during in-situ upgrading steps... of heavy oils and oil shales. Our research shows that experimental hydrocarbon cracking results...

146

A novel concept for high conversion of coal to liquids. Final report, 1 September 1988--31 August 1992  

SciTech Connect

A batch microreactor was designed and fabricated as a means of investigating maximum yields of liquids obtainable in very short reaction times of the order of a few seconds, and the maximum ratios of liquids/hydrocarbon (HC) gases obtainable under those conditions. A Wyodak sub-bituminous coal, crushed and sieved to {minus}200 mesh particle size, was used in the experiments, with a temperature of 500{degrees}C and a pressure of 1500 psi. The fine coal particles were fed dry to the reactor and heated to reaction temperature in times of one to two seconds. At a time of 3 seconds at reaction temperature, in a single pass a liquid yield of 60% by weight of the coal was obtained, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/(HC) gases of 30/1. When the unreacted solids were recycled to the reactor, and the results combined with those of the first pass, a liquid yield of 82% by weight of the coal was achieved, accompanied by a ratio of liquids/HC gases of 30/1. This ratio represents only about 3 wt percent HC gases, much lower that is produced in current advanced technologies, and represents a large saving in hydrogen consumption. A simulated distillation technique was applied to the liquids. The liquid product contained 86% by weight (of the liquids) total distillables (boiling point below 538{degrees}C), including 70% by weight of low-boiling fractions in the gasoline, kerosene and gas oil range (boiling point up to 325{degrees}C). The liquid product exhibited a H/C ratio of 1.5, which is considerably higher than observed in current advanced technologies for the primary liquids. Several catalysts were investigated. Iron catalysts, specifically ferric chloride hexahydrate and ferric sulfate pentahydrate, each produced these high conversions and high ratios of liquids/HC gases.

Wiser, W.H.; Shabtai, J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hydrocarbon composition of crude oil from Lam Bank  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the crude oil from a new offshore field called the Lam Bank in the Caspian Sea. A segregated commercial crude was distilled and the distillation data is shown. In order to determine the content of n-paraffins, the naphthenic-paraffinic part of the narrow cuts was subjected to adsorptive separation on CaA zeolite. Owing to the high contents of naphthenic and isoparaffinic hydrocarbons and the low content of aromatic hydrocarbons in the distillate part, this crude can be used to produce high-quality fuels and oils by the use of the dewaxing processes.

Samedova, F.I.; Agaeva, R.M.; Alieva, F.Z.; Valiev, M.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

Blandford, J.W.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Isoconversional Kinetic Analysis of the Combustion of Heavy Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One method to access unconventional, heavy-oil resources as well as waterflood residual oil is to apply in situ combustion (ISC) to oxidize in place a small fraction of the hydrocarbon, thereby providing heat to reduce oil viscosity and pressure that enhances recovery. ... As shown by Vyazovkin,(12) these deviations of temperature yield erroneous values of activation energy, when such a data set is used with a model that assumes linear heating. ... Estimates were made of the heat produced, and a formula was derived for computing the heat of combustion of hydrocarbons in the high-temp. ...

Murat Cinar; Louis M. Castanier; Anthony R. Kovscek

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method and apparatus for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A halogenated hydrocarbon (HHC) detector is formed from a silent discharge (also called a dielectric barrier discharge) plasma generator. A silent discharge plasma device receives a gas sample that may contain one or more HHCs and produces free radicals and excited electrons for oxidizing the HHCs in the gas sample to produce water, carbon dioxide, and an acid including halogens in the HHCs. A detector is used to sensitively detect the presence of the acid. A conductivity cell detector combines the oxidation products with a solvent where dissociation of the acid increases the conductivity of the solvent. The conductivity cell output signal is then functionally related to the presence of HHCs in the gas sample. Other detectors include electrochemical cells, infrared spectrometers, and negative ion mobility spectrometers.

Monagle, Matthew (Los Alamos, NM); Coogan, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Improving GC-PPC-SAFT equation of state for LLE of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds with water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Improving GC-PPC-SAFT equation of state for LLE of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds The GC-PPC-SAFT model has been shown to be useful for predicting the liquid- liquid phase split: Group Contribution, GC-PPC-SAFT, binary interaction parameter, LLE, oxygenated compounds. hal-01030846

Boyer, Edmond

156

Low severity hydrocarbon steam reforming process  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for producing ammonia which comprises: (a) primary catalytically reforming at super atmospheric pressure in a direct-fired primary reforming zone, a hydrocarbon feedstock with steam to produce a gas containing carbon oxides, hydrogen and methane; (b) secondary catalytically reforming the gas from step (a) by introducing air and bringing the mixture towards equilibrium thereby producing a secondary reformer effluent gas containing nitrogen, carbon oxides, hydrogen and a decreased quantity of methane; (c) converting carbon monoxide catalytically with steam to carbon dioxide and hydrogen; (d) removing carbon oxides to give an ammonia synthesis gas comprising nitrogen and hydrogen and compressing the gas to ammonia synthesis pressure; (e) reacting the synthesis gas in an ammonia synthesis zone to produce ammonia and recovering ammonia from the reacted gas to produce an ammonia-depleted gas stream; (f) recycling at least a portion of the ammonia-depleted gas stream to the ammonia synthesis zone; and (g) treating a sidestream of the ammonia-depleted gas to separate a stream enriched in hydrogen and an inerts-enriched gas stream, and returning the enriched hydrogen stream to the ammonia synthesis zone.

Osman, R.M.; Byington, R.G.

1986-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98{degrees} C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene resin with a softening point of 105{degrees} C. The resin performs as well as the modified terpene in SIS-, SB-, and EVA-based adhesives. The new hydrocarbon resin is especially well suited for hot-melt adhesives. It exhibits low volatility, good color stability, and excellent melt viscosity stability. Since the new resin is based on petroleum hydrocarbon feedstocks, it should be available at moderate, stable prices. The other hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 85{degrees} C, produced comparable results.

Carper, J.D. (Hercules Inc., Wilmington, DE (US))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characteristics of naphthenic and paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual oil from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons segregated by liquid chromatography from a residual oil after removal of the resins and solid hydrocarbons. The studied hydrocarbons were fractionated on the basis of molecular weight (by molecular distillation) and on the basis of the content of rings (by thermal diffusion separation in a laboratory column). The results of mass-spectrometric analysis indicate that the first fraction consists mainly of isoparaffins and naphthenes with few rings. The polycyclic condensed naphthenes are concentrated in the last fraction. The content of isoparaffins drops off and the content of condensed polycyclic naphthenic structures increases from the second fraction to the next to the last. It is concluded that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual oil from mixed West Siberian crudes have a relatively narrow composition and therefore have similar physicochemical properties.

Detusheva, E.P.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Muchinskii, T.D.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fluorescence Detection of Hydrocarbons in Harbour Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In harbor water, the hydrocarbons pollution identification represents an important issue. Hydrocarbon presence derives from oil spills, for instance in bilge water, or it may come from industrial discharge ... Fl...

A. Catini; F. Dini; D. Polese; S. Petrocco; M. De Luca…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Mutual solubilities of hydrocarbon–water systems with F-SAC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the F-SAC model was extended in order to better represent the mutual solubility of hydrocarbons (alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, cycloalkenes and aromatics) in water. Aqueous mixtures of hydrocarbons exhibit an extremely non-ideal behavior, resulting in very low solubilities. A new parameter for the computation of the association energy was proposed, enabling a better agreement with temperature dependent experimental data in wide temperature ranges. Infinite-dilution activity coefficient as well as liquid–liquid equilibrium data were considered. The results were compared with some UNIFAC variants, found in the literature. For the studied systems, the proposed method performed better, including the quantitative representation of the experimentally observed minimum solubility point of hydrocarbons in the water-rich phase, while none of UNIFAC models tested were capable of predicting such behavior. Further, improved high-pressure results were obtained when the proposed model was coupled with a cubic equation of state through the SCMR mixing rule.

L.F.K. Possani; R.L. Simões; P.B. Staudt; R. de P. Soares

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Abstract: Many...

162

Extracting hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An original method for the solid-phase microextraction of hydrocarbons from water using a centrifuge is proposed. Comparative results...

A. Yu. Ryabov; A. A. Ilyina; A. V. Chuikin…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Methods of producing transportation fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Photo-oxides of Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... are involved in the biological action of carcinogenic hydrocarbons, we have attempted to isolate the photo-oxides of some of these hydrocarbons. Such ... -oxides of some of these hydrocarbons. Such photo-oxides would naturally be insoluble in water and hence would represent merely one stage in ...

J. W. COOK; R. MARTIN; E. M. F. ROE

1939-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Catalytic steam reforming of hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The hot effluent from the catalytic steam reforming of a major portion of a fluid hydrocarbon feed stream in the reformer tubes of a primary reformer, or said effluent after secondary reforming thereof, is mixed with the hot effluent from the catalytic steam reforming of the remaining portion of the feed discharged from the reformer tubes of a primary reformer-exchanger. The combined gas steam is passed on the shell side of the reformer-exchanger countercurrently to the passage of feed in the reformer tubes thereof, thus supplying the heat for the reforming of the portion of the feed passed through the reformer tubes of the reformerexchanger. At least about 2/3 of the hydrocarbon feed stream is passed to the reformer tubes of said primary reformer, heated by radiant heat transfer and/or by contact with combustion gases, at a steam/hydrocarbon mole ratio of about 2-4/1. The remainder of said feed stream is passed to the reformer tubes of said reformer -exchanger at a steam/hydrocarbon mole ratio of about 3-6/1. The reformer shell of the reformer-exchanger is internally insulated by a refractory lining or by use of a double shell with passage of water or a portion of the feed material between the inner and outer shells. There is no significant difference between the pressure inside and outside of the reformer tubes of said primary reformer-exchanger.

Fuderer, A.

1982-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

Distillation sequence for the purification and recovery of hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is an improved distillation sequence for the separation and purification of ethylene from a cracked gas. A hydrocarbon feed enters a C2 distributor column. The top of the C2 distributor column is thermally coupled to an ethylene distributor column, and the bottoms liquid of a C2 distributor column feeds a deethanizer column. The C2 distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The top of the ethylene distributor is thermally coupled with a demethanizer column, and the bottoms liquid of the ethylene distributor feeds a C2 splitter column. The ethylene distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The deethanizer and C2 splitter columns are also thermally coupled and operated at a substantially lower pressure than the C2 distributor column, the ethylene distributor column, and the demethanizer column. Alternatively, a hydrocarbon feed enters a deethanizer column. The top of the deethanizer is thermally coupled to an ethylene distributor column, and the ethylene distributor column utilizes a conventional reboiler. The top of the ethylene distributor column is thermally coupled with a demethanizer column, and the bottoms liquid of the ethylene distributor column feeds a C2 splitter column. The C2 splitter column operates at a pressure substantially lower than the ethylene distributor column, the demethanizer column, and the deethanizer column.

Reyneke, Rian (Katy, TX); Foral, Michael (Aurora, IL); Papadopoulos, Christos G. (Naperville, IL); Logsdon, Jeffrey S. (Naperville, IL); Eng, Wayne W. Y. (League City, TX); Lee, Guang-Chung (Houston, TX); Sinclair, Ian (Warrington, GB)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

Glatzmaier, Gregory C. (Boulder, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Mutual solubilities of water and hydrocarbons from the Cubic plus Association equation of state: A new mixing rule for the correlation of observed minimum hydrocarbon solubilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cubic plus association (CPA) equation of state was employed to correlate the mutual solubilities of water and hydrocarbons (n-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics). In order to reproduce the minimums observed in concentration vs. temperature curves, a new mixing rule is proposed based on Kabadi and Danner's idea, whereby the water–water dispersive term is corrected to include the hydrophobic hydration effect. With this correction, correlated hydrocarbon solubilities curves have observable curvature at low temperatures. Two binary interaction parameters are required for saturated hydrocarbons and three for aromatics, which is just one more than the original CPA formulation. Using parameters determined from binary data, this improved mixing rule was employed for multicomponent water–hydrocarbon systems, with no further regression, producing better predictions when compared to the conventional van der Waals’ rules.

Milton Medeiros

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

172

Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fly ash during coal and residual char combustion in a pressurized fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fly ash, the combustion of coal and residual char was performed in a pressurized spouted fluidized bed. After Soxhlet extraction and Kuderna-Danish (K-D) concentration, the contents of 16 PAHs recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in coal, residual char, and fly ash were analyzed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence and diode array detection. The experimental results show that the combustion efficiency is lower and the carbon content in fly ash is higher during coal pressurized combustion, compared to the residual char pressurized combustion at the pressure of 0.3 MPa. Under the same pressure, the PAH amounts in fly ash produced from residual char combustion are lower than that in fly ash produced from coal combustion. The total PAHs in fly ash produced from coal and residual char combustion are dominated by three- and four-ring PAHs. The amounts of PAHs in fly ash produced from residual char combustion increase and then decrease with the increase of pressure in a fluidized bed. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Hongcang Zhou; Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhaoping Zhong; Yaji Huang [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and expert riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A well tender system for controlling, separating, storing and offloading well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations. The system comprises a vertically aligned series of tethered cylindrical tanks which are torsionally stabilized by flexible catenary production riser and export riser bundles, and serviced by separate catenary pipe bundles. Piles are secured to the seabed, each pile assembly being pivotally connected to a lower rigid tendon, which is in turn connected to tendons arranged about the periphery of the interconnected cylindrical tanks.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Properties of Liquid Ethane and Propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of Liebig's Annalen. Owing to the greater ease with which it undergoes liquefaction, propane was first investigated. The hydrocarbon was obtained in a state of purity by means ... transferred to a gas-holder over water In order to determine the boiling-point of propane, the purified gas was first condensed to the liquid state in a U-tube ...

A. E. TUTTON

1894-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Modeling personal particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pb-pah) exposure in human subjects in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Health 2012, 11:47 http://www.ehjournal.net/content/11/1/47 Introduction Airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels

Wu, Jun; Tjoa, Thomas; Li, Lianfa; Jaimes, Guillermo; Delfino, Ralph J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hydrocarbon Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Technologies Hydrocarbon Technologies Place Lawrenceville, New Jersey Zip 8648 Sector Efficiency Product String representation "Technology-base ... onmental risks." is too long. Coordinates 36.761678°, -77.845048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.761678,"lon":-77.845048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

Shah, Yatish T. [Norfolk State University; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Chapter 3 - Hydrocarbons from Petroleum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Petroleum products (in contrast to petrochemicals) are those hydrocarbon fractions that are derived from petroleum and have commercial value as a bulk product. A major group of hydrocarbon products from petroleum (petrochemicals) are the basis of a major industry. They are, in the strictest sense, different to petroleum products insofar as the petrochemicals are the basic building blocks of the chemical industry. The specific gravity of product gases, including liquefied petroleum gas, may be determined conveniently by a number of methods and a variety of instruments. The heat value of gases is generally determined at constant pressure in a flow calorimeter in which the heat released by the combustion of a definite quantity of gas is absorbed by a measured quantity of water or air. A continuous recording calorimeter is available for measuring heat values of natural gases.

James G. Speight

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids (HGL): Recent Market Trends and Issues  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Primary sector Ethane 1.558 Ethylene for plastics production, petrochemical feedstock Plastic bags, plastics, antifreeze, detergent Industrial Propane 1.499 Propylene for...

183

Volumes of liquid hydrocarbons at high temperatures and pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. To determine effective values of a and b fo r each fraction, the following equations were applied to each of the 47 o il m ixtures: C am C - Z ai xi = ----------------------------------------------- (10) 7+ C7+ C6 - r b - - i ibm r b.... 1951. 6. Keyes, F . G. , "A New Equation of Continuity, " P roc . Nat. Acad. Sci. , Vol. 3, pp. 323-330, 1917. 7. Beattie, J. A ., and Bridgeman, O. C. , "A New Equation of State fo r Fluids, " P roc. Am. Acad. Arts and Sci. , Vol. 63, pp. 229...

Alani, Ghalib H.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

184

Method for predicting fouling tendency of a hydrocarbon-containing feedstock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock fouling tendency for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes.

Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

Determination of liquid and solid phase composition in partially frozen middle distillate fuels  

SciTech Connect

One of the tasks of the United States Navy Mobility Fuels program at the Naval Research Laboratory is to determine the effect of composition on the freezing properties of liquid fuels. The combination of requirements for ship and jet aircraft fuels of a low freezing point (to permit cold temperature operations around the world) and a flash point minimum (to reduce the hazard of storage and transport of liquid fuels on board ship) leads to opposing compositional needs. This is because many components of a fuel that tend to lower the freezing point (small hydrocarbons with higher vapor pressures) will also reduce the flash point. Because of these constraints, it is not always practical to produce fuels meeting these requirements from available crudes. This limits the amount of crudes and hence the amount of JP-5, the Navy fuel for carrier based aircraft, which can be produced from ''a barrel of crude.'' With increased knowledge and understanding of the components that first crystallize out of a cold fuel, it may be possible to modify refining techniques to increase the yield of Navy liquid fuels per barrel of crude without compromising either the freezing point or the flash point restrictions. This paper deals with the method used to separate the liquid filtrate from the precipitate in fuels cooled to predetermined temperatures below their freezing points, the method of analyzing the fuel and fuel fractions, and the results obtained from a study of one particular jet fuel.

Van Winkle, T.L.; Affens, W.A.; Beal, E.J.; Mushrush, G.W.; Hazlett, R.N.; DeGuzman, J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydrocarbon Separations in Metal–Organic Frameworks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the large differences in the physical properties of methane and C2 hydrocarbons, both size selective effects and metal–hydrocarbon interactions can be tuned to achieve a high selectivity within a metal–organic framework. ... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, are carcinogenic byproducts of incomplete combustion of organic matter such as fossil fuels. ... data and the heats of adsorption were found to fit well to a small group of mol. ...

Zoey R. Herm; Eric D. Bloch; Jeffrey R. Long

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

catalytic_upgrading_sugars_to_hydrocarbons  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

phase reforming into hydrocarbons for fuels and co-product commodities. Process Block Diagram Next Steps Additional modeling is necessary to quantify baseline costs associated...

191

Application of advanced hydrocarbon characterization and its...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

advanced hydrocarbon characterization and its consequences on future fuel properties and advanced combustion research Rafal Gieleciak, Craig Fairbridge and Darcy Hager Poster...

192

Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Solubility of Solid tert-Butyl Mercaptan in Liquid Methane and an LNG Mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge of the solubility limit of heavy hydrocarbons in liquid methane is of practical interest in the liquefaction of natural gas. Data for several binary systems were given in previous publications [1,2].The...

G. P. Kuebler; C. McKinley

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Measurement and correlation of phase equilibria for (water + aromatic hydrocarbon) binary mixtures at T = (573 to 623) K using microfluidic mixing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(Vapour + liquid) and (liquid + liquid) equilibria for (water + p-xylene) and (water + decalin) mixtures at T = (573 to 623) K were measured by a flow type apparatus with microfluidic system. The liquid–liquid slug flows in the microfluidic system were used for mixing of water and hydrocarbon due to high mass transfer between two liquid phases. The formations of the liquid–liquid slugs for (water + p-xylene) system were studied by changing the flow rate. The results of the liquid–liquid slug formations at hydrocarbon and water rich compositions were used for the measurements for (vapour + liquid) and (liquid + liquid) equilibria, respectively. It was found that the phase equilibria using the apparatus with the microfluidic system can be measured in a short residential time (1.6 to 3.2) min. The experimental results of the phase equilibria for (water + p-xylene) and (water + decalin) systems give that the regions of the (vapour + liquid) and (liquid + liquid) equilibria for both mixtures reduce with the increasing temperature. The mixture of (water + decalin) at T = (583 to 623) K forms the two phase regions of the (vapour + liquid) and (liquid + liquid) equilibria larger than those for (water + p-xylene) mixture. The experimental data of the phase equilibria obtained in this work were correlated with Peng–Robinson–Stryjek–Vera equation of state. The correlated results of the (liquid + liquid) equilibria for both systems represent the experimental data. For (vapour + liquid) equilibria, the results give the qualitative representations in the shape of the two phase region for both mixtures.

Masaki Togo; Taisuke Maeda; Akira Ito; Yusuke Shimoyama

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Design process of LNG heavy hydrocarbons fractionation: Low LNG temperature recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The liquefied natural gas (LNG) includes light hydrocarbons heavier than methane, such as ethane, propane and butane, which not only may increase the calorific values of the natural gas beyond specification limits, but also may have greater market values. During the gasification of the LNG, the energy invested in it during liquefaction process may be recovered and re-used. This paper relates to two regasification processes for separating natural gas liquids from liquefied natural gas using the low LNG temperature to produce natural gas meeting pipeline or other commercial specifications. From the two processes studied, the fractionated methane-rich stream is pressurized to pipeline pressure by pumps instead of compressors and the liquefied ethane, propane and butane are obtained directly at atmospheric pressure. Among the processes studied, the low pressure process sounds economically attractive with a saving in TAC of 4.6% over the high pressure process; however the high pressure process is more preferable for the cases where the space is limited.

Hosanna Uwitonze; Sangil Han; Choi Jangryeok; Kyu Suk Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Calorimetric study of adsorption of aliphatic hydrocarbons on reduced cobalt catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A study has been made of the heats of adsorption and the adsorption isotherms of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons on Co at 298/sup 0/K; the content of organic matter in the catalyst has been determined after use in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. It is concluded that the Fischer-Tropsch process includes stages of diffusion of the original reactants and the products through a liquid film of hydrocarbons coating the catalyst; the hydrocarbon molecules are adsorbed on the surface in the ''lying down'' position; the adsorption of paraffins is reversible and is described by the BET theory; olefins form an irreversibly chemisorbed monolayer, above which reversible adsorption takes place; the ease of desorption of the paraffins explains their preferential formation in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

Ostrovskii, V.E.; Medvedkova, E.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydrogen and elemental carbon production from natural gas and other hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Diatomic hydrogen and unsaturated hydrocarbons are produced as reactor gases in a fast quench reactor. During the fast quench, the unsaturated hydrocarbons are further decomposed by reheating the reactor gases. More diatomic hydrogen is produced, along with elemental carbon. Other gas may be added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The product is a substantially clean-burning hydrogen fuel that leaves no greenhouse gas emissions, and elemental carbon that may be used in powder form as a commodity for several processes.

Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Biodegradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Extremely Acidic Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons can occur in environments...Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occur as common...formed by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels...enrichments with aromatic hydrocarbons, mineralization assays...lysis was initiated by heat and sodium dodecyl...

Raymond D. Stapleton; Dwayne C. Savage; Gary S. Sayler; Gary Stacey

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

High Levels of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mate Drinks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons| Introduction Esophageal...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content. PAHs...usually exposed to combustion products from burning...SRM 2260a Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Toluene, SRM 2269...dichloromethane; heat: preheat cell at 100C...

Farin Kamangar; Michele M. Schantz; Christian C. Abnet; Renato B. Fagundes; and Sanford M. Dawsey

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

High Levels of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mate Drinks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons| Introduction...mechanism. However, data on the association...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content...usually exposed to combustion products from burning...dichloromethane; heat: preheat cell...

Farin Kamangar; Michele M. Schantz; Christian C. Abnet; Renato B. Fagundes; and Sanford M. Dawsey

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MICROCHEMICALJOURNAL39, 160-165Hydrocarbons in Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Waters Associates. Water used was deionized, distilled, and hydrocarbon filtered (BarnsteadMICROCHEMICALJOURNAL39, 160-165Hydrocarbons in Air to extract polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from air particulate sampleswas investigated. High

Canberra, University of

202

Metabolism of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Cell Cultures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to water-soluble and organic-soluble...metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to water-soluble and organic-soluble...cytotoxicity and conversion of hydrocarbons to water-soluble products (Chart...

Eliezer Huberman; James K. Selkirk; and Charles Heidelberger

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

High Levels of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mate Drinks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including...80C) or cold (5C) water. Measurements were...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mate drinks. | Drinking...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), including...cold (5 degrees C) water. Measurements were...

Farin Kamangar; Michele M. Schantz; Christian C. Abnet; Renato B. Fagundes; and Sanford M. Dawsey

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Hydrocarbons in rift basins: the role of stratigraphy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...versus shallow-water environments...A (1999) Hydrocarbons in rift basins...Facies and hydrocarbon potential The...availability of water. This can either...form seals for hydrocarbons. The shallow-water environ- ments...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Learning and discrimination of cuticular hydrocarbons in a social insect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...colony members. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) play a central...CHC profile with synthetic hydrocarbons [4-6] reveal that some hydrocarbons elicit aggression. However...non-volatile, insoluble in water and therefore difficult...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Method of Generating Hydrocarbon Reagents from Diesel, Natural Gas and Other Logistical Fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

Herling, Darrell R (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T. (Middleton, WI) [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Tensile Effective Stresses in Hydrocarbon Storage Caverns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tensile Effective Stresses in Hydrocarbon Storage Caverns Hippolyte Djizanne and Pierre Bérest LMS, Germany,1-2 October 2012 TENSILE EFFECTIVE STRESSES IN HYDROCARBON STORAGE CAVERNS Hippolyte Djizanne1 that effective tensile stresses can be generated at a cavern wall after a rapid increase or decrease in pressure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

The Effects of Two Isomeric Benzoflavones on Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase and the Toxicity and Carcinogenicity of Polycyclic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recrystallized from alcohol : water. For tissue culture experiments the hydrocarbons and benzoflavones...metabolism of the hydrocarbons to water-soluble derivatives...chloroform:methanol. Hydrocarbon-3 H metabolized to water-soluble derivatives...

Leila Diamond; Rosemary McFall; Joel Miller; and Harry V. Gelboin

1972-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion Hydrocarbon fouling of SCR during Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion...

210

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons...

211

DOE Perspectives on Advanced Hydrocarbon-based Biofuels | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Perspectives on Advanced Hydrocarbon-based Biofuels DOE Perspectives on Advanced Hydrocarbon-based Biofuels Zia Haq, DPA Coordinator, presentation on DOE Perspectives on...

212

Commercialization of IH2® Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and...

213

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster presented at the 16th Directions...

214

EIAs Proposed Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids 1 Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids 1 June 14, 2013 EIA's Proposed Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids Term Current Definition Proposed Definition Note Lease condensate Condensate (lease condensate): A natural gas liquid recovered from associated and non associated gas wells from lease separators or field facilities, reported in barrels of 42 U.S. gallons at atmospheric pressure and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Lease condensate: Light liquid hydrocarbons recovered from lease separators or field facilities at associated and non-associated natural gas wells. Mostly pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons. Normally enters the crude oil stream after production. Includes lease condensate as part of the crude oil stream, not an NGL. Plant condensate Plant condensate: One of the

215

Enzymantic Conversion of Coal to Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The work in this project focused on the conversion of bituminous coal to liquid hydrocarbons. The major steps in this process include mechanical pretreatment, chemical pretreatment, and finally solubilization and conversion of coal to liquid hydrocarbons. Two different types of mechanical pretreatment were considered for the process: hammer mill grinding and jet mill grinding. After research and experimentation, it was decided to use jet mill grinding, which allows for coal to be ground down to particle sizes of 5 {mu}m or less. A Fluid Energy Model 0101 JET-O-MIZER-630 size reduction mill was purchased for this purpose. This machine was completed and final testing was performed on the machine at the Fluid Energy facilities in Telford, PA. The test results from the machine show that it can indeed perform to the required specifications and is able to grind coal down to a mean particle size that is ideal for experimentation. Solubilization and conversion experiments were performed on various pretreated coal samples using 3 different approaches: (1) enzymatic - using extracellular Laccase and Manganese Peroxidase (MnP), (2) chemical - using Ammonium Tartrate and Manganese Peroxidase, and (3) enzymatic - using the live organisms Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Spectral analysis was used to determine how effective each of these methods were in decomposing bituminous coal. After analysis of the results and other considerations, such as cost and environmental impacts, it was determined that the enzymatic approaches, as opposed to the chemical approaches using chelators, were more effective in decomposing coal. The results from the laccase/MnP experiments and Phanerochaete chrysosporium experiments are presented and compared in this final report. Spectra from both enzymatic methods show absorption peaks in the 240nm to 300nm region. These peaks correspond to aromatic intermediates formed when breaking down the coal structure. The peaks then decrease in absorbance over time, corresponding to the consumption of aromatic intermediates as they undergo ring cleavage. The results show that this process happens within 1 hour when using extracellular enzymes, but takes several days when using live organisms. In addition, live organisms require specific culture conditions, control of contaminants and fungicides in order to effectively produce extracellular enzymes that degrade coal. Therefore, when comparing the two enzymatic methods, results show that the process of using extracellular lignin degrading enzymes, such as laccase and manganese peroxidase, appears to be a more efficient method of decomposing bituminous coal.

Richard Troiano

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Federal Environmental Regulations Impacting Hydrocarbon Exploration, Drilling, and Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Waste handling and disposal from hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through federal and state regulations and/or through implementation of federal regulations. Some wastes generated in these operations are exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) but are not exempt under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and other federal environmental laws. Exempt wastes remain exempt only if they are not mixed with hazardous wastes or hazardous substances. Once mixture occurs, the waste must be disposed as a hazardous material in an approved hazardous waste disposal facility. Before the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990, air emissions from production, storage, steam generation, and compression facilities associated with hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production industry were not regulated. A critical proposed regulatory change which will significantly effect Class II injection wells for disposal of produced brine and injection for enhanced oil recovery is imminent. Federal regulations affecting hydrocarbon exploration, drilling and production, proposed EPA regulatory changes, and a recent significant US Court of Appeals decision are covered in this report. It appears that this industry will, in the future, fall under more stringent environmental regulations leading to increased costs for operators.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting low H.sub.2 /CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200.degree. to 350.degree. C. in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinium, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n+1).gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n.gtoreq.x.gtoreq.O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Goldberg, Robert I. (Selden, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Catalysts for the production of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting low H/sub 2//CO ratio syngas to carbonaceous products comprising reacting the syngas with water or steam at 200 to 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a metal catalyst supported on zinc oxide. Hydrocarbons are produced with a catalyst selected from cobalt, nickel or ruthenium and alcohols are produced with a catalyst selected from palladium, platinum, ruthenium or copper on the zinc oxide support. The ratio of the reactants are such that for alcohols and saturated hydrocarbons: (2n + 1) greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O and for olefinic hydrocarbons: 2n greater than or equal to x greater than or equal to O where n is the number of carbon atoms in the product and x is the molar amount of water in the reaction mixture.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Goldberg, R.I.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydrodeoxygenation processes: Advances on catalytic transformations of biomass-derived platform chemicals into hydrocarbon fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignocellulosic biomass provides an attractive source of renewable carbon that can be sustainably converted into chemicals and fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) processes have recently received considerable attention to upgrade biomass-derived feedstocks into liquid transportation fuels. The selection and design of HDO catalysts plays an important role to determine the success of the process. This review has been aimed to emphasize recent developments on HDO catalysts in effective transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules into hydrocarbon fuels with reduced oxygen content and improved H/C ratios. Liquid hydrocarbon fuels can be obtained by combining oxygen removal processes (e.g. dehydration, hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, decarbonylation etc.) as well as by increasing the molecular weight via C–C coupling reactions (e.g. aldol condensation, ketonization, oligomerization, hydroxyalkylation etc.). Fundamentals and mechanistic aspects of the use of HDO catalysts in deoxygenation reactions will also be discussed.

Sudipta De; Basudeb Saha; Rafael Luque

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Solubility of Oxygen and Ozone in Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review covers the solubility of oxygen and ozone in liquids as a function of temperature and pressure. Solubility data for individual systems were critically evaluated and recommended or tentative values presented in many cases. The trend of solubilities in homologous series or related solvents is discussed. Liquids include water;seawater; aqueous salt solutions; mixed solvents; hydrocarbons; organic compounds containing oxygen halogen sulfur nitrogen or silicon; olive oil; and human blood. For ozone only its solubility in water is presented. Key words: aqueous solutions; biological fluids; gas solubility; hydrocarbons; mixed solvents; organic solvents; oxygen; ozone;seawater;water.

Rubin Battino; Timothy R. Rettich; Toshihiro Tominaga

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Process for minimizing solids contamination of liquids from coal pyrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a continuous process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a solid carbonaceous material by pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material in the presence of a particulate source of heat, particulate contamination of the liquid hydrocarbons is minimized. This is accomplished by removing fines from the solid carbonaceous material feed stream before pyrolysis, removing fines from the particulate source of heat before combining it with the carbonaceous material to effect pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material, and providing a coarse fraction of reduced fines content of the carbon containing solid residue resulting from the pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material before oxidizing carbon in the carbon containing solid residue to form the particulate source of heat.

Wickstrom, Gary H. (Yorba Linda, CA); Knell, Everett W. (Los Alamitos, CA); Shaw, Benjamin W. (Costa Mesa, CA); Wang, Yue G. (West Covina, CA)

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

An analysis of the regenerative expansion cycle in multi-component hydrocarbon separation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of information on this type of process was found in the literature. It was, therefore, necessary to work out a suitable cycle, make a prototype design, and field test the completed unit. The prototype verified the predicted theory. However, its performance... with water vapor and contains significant quantities of hydrocarbon fractions heavier than ethane, These heavier ends are valuable as liquid products. They also increase the heating value of the gas to a level not needed in most reciprocating engines...

Horton, John Leroy

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre (Rijswijk, NL); Schoeling, Lanny Gene (Katy, TX)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

224

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

1988-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Modeling of structure H hydrate equilibria for methane, intermediate hydrocarbon molecules and water systems  

SciTech Connect

Clathrate hydrates are inclusion compounds in which guest molecules are engaged by water molecules under favorable conditions of pressure and temperature. The well known structures 1 and 2 have been discovered since last century, while a new structure called H has been recently described in the literature. Since that time, structure H hydrate equilibrium data involving methane and different intermediate liquid hydrocarbon molecules have been published. The equilibrium calculations involving hydrates are based on the fact that the chemical potential of water in the aqueous liquid phase is equal to the one in the hydrate phase. The chemical potential of water in the liquid aqueous phase can be easily described by classical thermodynamic relations, while the chemical potential of water in the hydrates phase is described by the expressions proposed by Van der Walls and Platteeuw derived from an adsorption model based on statistical thermodynamics. The authors present in this paper a set of Kihara potential parameters which enable the calculation of Langmuir constants which characterize the adsorption of some naphthenic and iso-paraffinic intermediate hydrocarbons in the larger cage of structure H hydrates. This work thus allows the computation of structural H hydrate equilibrium conditions for systems made of methane, intermediate hydrocarbon molecules and water.

Thomas, M.; Behar, E. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for treatment in EU, followed by spreading on land, which accounted for 37% of the sewage sludge produced allow recycling of nutrients. Hence, bioprocessed sewage sludge application on agricultural soilRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N

228

Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Gas CDT Quantifying the role of groundwater in hydrocarbon systems using noble gas isotopes by groundwater (or oil) degassing. Other natural gas fields may have been produced in-situ or migrated as a free expert academics from across the CDT and also experienced oil and gas industry professionals

Henderson, Gideon

229

Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Berkeley, CA); Sun, Hai (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons in water is the major factor limiting the degradation rates of these compounds (Zhang and Miller, 1994). The fraction that is more soluble in the aqueous phase is degraded at higher rates, while less soluble...

Kanga, Shahrukh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method And Apparatus For Converting Hydrocarbon Fuel Into Hydrogen Gas And Carbon Dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon fuel reforming method is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel is directed into a first tube 108 to produce a first reaction reformate. A second mixture of steam and a second fuel is directed into a second tube 116 annularly disposed about the first tube 108 to produce a second reaction reformate. The first and second reaction reformates are then directed into a reforming zone 144 and subject to a catalytic reforming reaction. In another aspect of the method, a first fuel is combusted with an oxygen-containing gas in a first zone 108 to produce a reformate stream, while a second fuel under steam reforming in a second zone 116. Heat energy from the first zone 108 is transferred to the second zone 116.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (Cambridge, MA)

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

232

Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Commercialization of coal to liquids technology  

SciTech Connect

After an overview of the coal market, technologies for producing liquids from coal are outlined. Commercialisation of coal-to-liquid fuels, the economics of coal-to-liquids development and the role of the government are discussed. Profiles of 8 key players and the profiles of 14 projects are finally given. 17 figs., 8 tabs.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Selection of Controlled Variables for a Natural Gas to Liquids Process Mehdi Panahi and Sigurd Skogestad*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection of Controlled Variables for a Natural Gas to Liquids Process Mehdi Panahi and Sigurd variables (CVs) for a natural gas to hydrocarbon liquids (GTL) process based on the idea of self of operation are studied. In mode I, where the natural gas flow rate is given, there are three unconstrained

Skogestad, Sigurd

235

Thermocatalytic process for CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel process and apparatus are disclosed for sustainable CO.sub.2-free production of hydrogen and carbon by thermocatalytic decomposition (dissociation, pyrolysis, cracking) of hydrocarbon fuels over carbon-based catalysts in the absence of air and/or water. The apparatus and thermocatalytic process improve the activity and stability of carbon catalysts during the thermocatalytic process and produce both high purity hydrogen (at least, 99.0 volume %) and carbon, from any hydrocarbon fuel, including sulfurous fuels. In a preferred embodiment, production of hydrogen and carbon is achieved by both internal and external activation of carbon catalysts. Internal activation of carbon catalyst is accomplished by recycling of hydrogen-depleted gas containing unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons back to the reactor. External activation of the catalyst can be achieved via surface gasification with hot combustion gases during catalyst heating. The process and apparatus can be conveniently integrated with any type of fuel cell to generate electricity.

Muradov, Nazim Z. (Melbourne, FL)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

EMSL - liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liquids en Iodine Solubility in Low-Activity Waste Borosilicate Glass at 1000 °C. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsiodine-solubility-low-activity-waste-borosilicate...

238

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our proposal...production of liquid hydrocarbons. Thus, the goal...sustainable production of hydrocarbon fuel for the transportation...The resulting combustion energy not only provides heat for the endothermic...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

240

Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 and ZSM-5 Composite Catalyst System  

SciTech Connect

A composite Pd/ZnO/Al2O3-HZSM-5 (Si/Al=40) catalytic system was evaluated for the synthesis of gasoline-range hydrocarbons directly from synthesis gas. Bifunctional catalyst comprising PdZn metal and acid sites present the required catalytically active sites necessary for the methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration, and methanol-to-gasoline reactions. This system provides a unique catalytic pathway for the production of liquid hydrocarbons directly from syngas. However, selectivity control is difficult and poses many challenges. The composite catalytic system was evaluated under various process conditions. Investigated were the effects of temperature (310-375oC), pressure (300-1000 psig), time-on-stream (50 hrs), and gas-hour space velocity (740-2970 hr-1), using a H2/CO molar syngas ratio of 2.0. By operating at the lower end of the temperature range investigated, liquid hydrocarbon formation was favored, as was decreased amounts of undesirable light hydrocarbons. However, lower operating temperatures also facilitated undesirable CO2 formation via the water-gas shift reaction. Higher operating pressures slightly favored liquid synthesis. Operating at relatively low pressures (e.g. 300 psig) was made possible, whereas for methanol synthesis alone higher pressure are usually required to achieve similar conversion levels (e.g. 1000 psig). Thermodynamic constraints on methanol synthesis are eased by pushing the equilibrium through hydrocarbon formation. Catalytic performance was also evaluated by altering Pd and Zn composition of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. Of the catalysts and conditions tested, selectivity toward liquid hydrocarbon was highest when using a 5% Pd metal loading and Pd/Zn molar ratio of 0.25 and mixed with HZMS-5, operating at 310oC and 300 psig, CO conversion was 43 % and selectivity (carbon weight basis) to hydrocarbons was 49 wt. %. Of the hydrocarbon fraction, 44wt. % was in the C5-C12 liquid product range and consisted primarily of aromatic polymethylbenzenes. However, as syngas conversion increases with increasing temperature, selectivity to liquid product diminished. This is attributed, in large part, to increased saturation of the olefinic intermediates over PdZn metal sites. Under all the conditions and catalysts evaluated in this study, generating liquid product in high yield was challenging (<10 wt. % C5+ yield).

Dagle, Robert A.; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reaction of aromatic compounds and coal-derived liquids with steam over alumina supported nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program has been to explore and define the potential of steam reforming to produce light gases from coal-derived liquids. This was achieved through a study of the reaction of a model aromatic compound and of a coal-derived liquid with steam over an alumina supported nickel catalyst. The reaction of steam with benzene and SRC-II liquids over an alumina supported nickel-catalyst has been investigated in a plug flow reactor. The primary process variables investigated were reactor pressure and temperature, contact time, and steam/carbon ratio. A proposed reaction network was also developed to explain the data obtained in this study. The empirical rate equation for the benzene steam reforming reaction at 973 K, 300 psig, and a steam/carbon ratio of approximately 3 was r/sub C6H6/ = 1.92 x 10 TP/sub C6H6/. The activation energy was 88 KJ/mol, or 21 kcal/mol in the temperature range 748-973 K. A correlation was developed to predict product yields and hydrocarbon conversion over the range of process variables investigated. A second correlation was developed to predict the yields and conversion beyond the range of variables investigated.

Chen, I.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Inc Hydrocarbon Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc Address 2016 Main St Place Houston, Texas Zip 77002 Sector Biofuels Product Wholesale marketing of biodiesel and ethanol to refiners, blenders and petroleum distributors Website http://www.gulfhydrocarbon.com Coordinates 29.749227°, -95.371693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.749227,"lon":-95.371693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

245

Investigation on the solidification of several pure cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons at pressures to 300 MPa  

SciTech Connect

The effect of pressure on the solidification of several saturated cyclic hydrocarbons and three xylene isomers are experimentally determined with a variable-volume view cell at pressures to 300 MPa and temperatures starting at 293.15 K. Solid–liquid transitions are observed for cyclooctane, cis-1,2-dimethylcyclohexane, trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, p-xylene, o-xylene, and 2-methylnaphthalene. However, methylcyclohexane, ethylcyclohexane, cis-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane, and m-xylene remained liquid over the same operating pressure and temperature ranges. The experimental solid–liquid transition data are well represented with two empirical equations, the Simon equation and a 2nd-order polynomial equation. Data obtained in this study agree with literature data within ±0.4% for 2-methylnaphthalene and ±0.2% for p-xylene.

Wu, Yue; Liu, Kun; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; McHugh, Mark A.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

One-step catalytic conversion of biomass-derived carbohydrates to liquid fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method for manufacture of hydrocarbon fuels and oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels such as alkyl substituted tetrahydrofurans such as 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, 5-methylfurfural and mixtures thereof. The method generally entails forming a mixture of reactants that includes carbonaceous material, water, a metal catalyst and an acid reacting that mixture in the presence of hydrogen. The reaction is performed at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce a furan type hydrocarbon fuel. The process may be adapted to provide continuous manufacture of hydrocarbon fuels such as a furan type fuel.

Sen, Ayusman; Yang, Weiran

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

Essays on Bank Optimal Portfolio Choice under Liquidity Constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the bank securities business produces a chasm between a real liquidity of economy and market liquidity. Banks can have more liquidity by selling their securitized loans, and as our model already pointed out, a good liquidity condition makes the bank have...

Kim, Eul Jin

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Method for estimating processability of a hydrocarbon-containing feedstock for hydroprocessing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method involving the steps of (a) precipitating an amount of asphaltenes from a liquid sample of a first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock having solvated asphaltenes therein with one or more first solvents in a column; (b) determining one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; (c) analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitated asphaltenes; and (d) correlating a measurement of feedstock reactivity for the first hydrocarbon-containing feedstock sample with a mathematical parameter derived from the results of analyzing the one or more solubility characteristics of the precipitates asphaltenes. Determined parameters and processabilities for a plurality of feedstocks can be used to generate a mathematical relationship between parameter and processability; this relationship can be used to estimate the processability for hydroprocessing for a feedstock of unknown processability.

Schabron, John F; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons evaluated Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorbers were...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons part Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorbers were...

251

Sexual selection on cuticular hydrocarbons of male sagebrush crickets in the wild  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...association between cuticular hydrocarbon composition and desiccation...temperature on cuticular lipids and water balance in a desert Drosophila...interactions for cuticular hydrocarbon expression in Drosophila simulans...evolutionary roles of cuticular hydrocarbons in Diptera. In Insect hydrocarbons...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A field example of a gas orifice meter with debris-ridden liquid in mist flow  

SciTech Connect

A field example of debris-ridden liquids in an orifice meter is presented in this paper. Flow conditions in gas pipelines containing hydrocarbon liquids and particulate matter are discussed. Known effects on measurement of the presence of these materials in orifice meters is presented. By definition, gas measurement is accurate if performed on a clean and dry flow stream. This paper demonstrates the importance of removing as much liquid and debris as possible prior to measurement.

Chisholm, J.L.; Mooney, C.V. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States); Datta-Barua, L.; Feldmann, R.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Sustainable treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated industrial land   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons is a widespread and global environmental pollution issue from recovery and refining of crude oil and the ubiquitous use of hydrocarbons in industrial processes and applications. ...

Cunningham, Colin John

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemical nature of high-molecular hydrocarbons of gaseous condensates  

SciTech Connect

Mass spectrometry was used to study the group-structure composition of high-boiling 50 deg (200/degrees/-250/degrees/, 250/degrees/-300/degrees/, and 300/degrees/-350/degrees/C) fractions of East Turkmenistan condensates: the hydrocarbons composition is characterized by a high content of paraffinic hydrocarbons, and that of others by aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons. For all the condensates under investigation, as the boiling temperature of fractions increases, the content of paraffinic hydrocarbons in them is increased, while that of naphthenic hydrocarbons is reduced. The distribution of naphthenic hydrocarbons according to the number of rings is identical. In high-paraffin condensates, monoaromatic hydrocarbons consist mainly structures with alkyl substituents, but in condensates with a high content of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons they consist mainly of structures with naphthenic substituents. 4 references, 1 figures, 2 tables.

Kul'dzhayev, B.A.; Makarov, V.V.; Sergiyenko, S.R.; Khramova, E.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Chapter 9 - Chemical and Physical Properties of Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Hydrocarbons are the simplest organic compounds and contain only carbon and hydrogen but they can be straight chain or branched chain with the same empirical formula but showing differences in properties. Chemical change results in the hydrocarbon yielding a product that may be entirely different in composition to the starting hydrocarbon—the exception is the isomerization reaction where a straight-chain hydrocarbon is converted to a branched-chain hydrocarbon. Chemical properties of hydrocarbons describe the potential of hydrocarbons to undergo chemical change or reaction by virtue of the hydrocarbon structure. Physical properties can be observed or measured without changing the composition of matter. Physical properties are used to observe and describe matter. Physical properties that are of interest in the current context include: boiling point, melting point, density, vapor density, flash point, ignition temperature, and dew point.

James G. Speight

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Liquid fossil fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1981  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for the following major areas of investigation: liquid fossil fuel cycle; extraction (resource assessment, enhanced recovery); liquid processing (characterization of petroleum and synthetic crude, thermodynamics; process technology); utilization; project integration and technology transfer. Highlights for this period in research studies are listed as those in extraction research and processing and thermodynamics research. Searches for microorganisms that will be useful in enhanced oil recovery have produced two promising leads. At Oklahoma State University, bacteria of the genus Clostridia have been found which can live in a brine solution as found in most petroleum reservoirs. These bacteria produce carbon dioxide, acetic acid, alcohols, and ketones as metabolic products. At the University of Georgia, a culture of bacteria has been found which will reduce the viscosity of a 10/sup 0/ API gravity oil by 95 percent. The analysis of heavy oils requires differentiation of sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen-containing compounds from hydrocarbons. The most effective way to do this is with a high-resolution mass spectrometer that can distinguish between compounds having molecular weights only a fractional unit apart. These molecular weights are calculated from the computer acquired time-moments of the various ions in a mass spectrum. Thus, the accuracy of results reflects, in part, the numerical methods used in data processing. Consequently, the effect of the mathematical functions on the accuracy of mass measurement is being determined.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons methyl Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy 2 Quantification of Local Ozone Production Attributable to Automobile Hydrocarbon Emissions Summary: -fueled automobiles, most cyclic hydrocarbons are...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons progress Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Chemistry 3 Quantification of Local Ozone Production Attributable to Automobile Hydrocarbon Emissions Summary: -fueled automobiles, most cyclic hydrocarbons are...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons fluorene Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins are lipophilic organic pollutants occurring... absorption, pig INTRODUCTION Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons based Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aromatic Hydrocarbons Volatile Organic... Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... Rana Novini ATOC 3500 Burn...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons pah5 Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, recalcitrant, and potentially carcinogenic pollutants. Plants Summary: 1461 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous,...

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons inenvironmental Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon o-quinones Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons assessment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aromatic Hydrocarbons Volatile Organic... Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... of airborne soot. The air...

267

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzymes Acid + Caustic Wastewater Treatment Process Heat and Power Integration Biogas + Sludge Fuel Finishing (hydroprocessing, as needed) Electricity Hydrogen Hydrocarbon...

268

THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion of solar energy is the production of hydrocarbonsproduction of hydrocarbons. Mankind's use of biologically converted solar energy

Bauer, T.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

aromatic hydrocarbons coated: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: ??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, known human lung carcinogens, and potent mammary carcinogens in animal models....

270

Nonlinear dependence of the solubility of water in hydrocarbons on the molar volume of the hydrocarbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solubility of water in fifty hydrocarbon solvents at 20°C is estimated by ... in nonspecific cohesion forces, and assuming that water is primarily monomeric in solution, the prediction ... breaking of the H-b...

Paul Ruelle; Ulrich W. Kesselring

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Laser spectroscopy of hydrocarbon radicals  

SciTech Connect

The author reports the application of supersonic jet flash pyrolysis to the specific preparation of a range of organic radicals, biradicals, and carbenes in a skimmed molecular beam. Each species was produced cleanly and specifically, with little or no secondary reactions by the thermal dissociation of appropriately designed and synthesized organic precursors. Photoelectron spectra of the three isomeric C{sub 3}H{sub 2} carbenes, ortho-benzyne, and the {alpha},3-dehydrotoluene biradical, were used to establish adiabatic ionization potentials for use in thermochemical determinations.

Chen, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and its heterodimerization partner the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...WI 53706 The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is...The mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is...complex with the 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90) and...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as {beta...cigarette smoking and other combustion processes, initiate...

Jo Anne Powell-Coffman; Christopher A. Bradfield; William B. Wood

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and its heterodimerization partner the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor...the 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as {beta...smoking and other combustion processes...we searched data from the...Helminth HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins...Molecular Sequence Data Protein Binding...Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon genetics metabolism...

Jo Anne Powell-Coffman; Christopher A. Bradfield; William B. Wood

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal  

SciTech Connect

A process is claimed for the production of substantial amounts of ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds, such as benzene from coal. Coal is reacted with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C at a partial pressure less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds, and preferably at a temperature of approximately 850/sup 0/C, and a partial pressure of 50 psig for a period of approximately 2 seconds. Ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds may be separated from the product stream so produced, and the methane recycled for further production of ethylene. In another embodiment, other compounds produced, such as by-product tars, may be burned to heat the recycled methane.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

275

EIA-856,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, oil sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is...

276

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from oil sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is...

277

--No Title--  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is...

278

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from oil sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is...

279

All Consumption Tables.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is...

280

Hydrocarbon composition of crude oils near the Caspian depression  

SciTech Connect

The structural-group composition of hydrocarbons of Mesozoic crude oils near the Caspian depression was investigated by mass-spectrometry, followed by the analysis of the mass-spectra using a computer. The distribution of naphthenic hydrocarbons, according to the number of rings and of aromatic hydrocarbons, according to the degree of hydrogen unsaturation is similar for all the crude oils examined. The hydrocarbon composition of Mesozoic crude oils is characterized by a reduction in the content of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alkyl benzenes.

Botneva, T.A.; Khramova, E.V.; Nekhamkina, L.G.; Polyakova, A.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Composition of paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons in petroleum asphalts  

SciTech Connect

Uses a combination of chromatographic, chemical, and spectroscopic methods to determine the composition of the paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons recovered from asphalts. Monitors the completeness of separation of the hydrocarbons from the aromatics on the basis of UV spectra. Finds that in the mixture of adduct-forming hydrocarbons, along with the n-paraffins there were admixtures of isoparaffins and longchain alkylnaphthenes. Concludes that a comparison of the structural-group composition of the asphalt fractions from the different crudes shows that there are only slight differences in the structure of the paraffinic/naphthenic hydrocarbons present in these asphalts, particularly with regard to those hydrocarbons that do not react with urea.

Botvin'eva, A.M.; Dubkova, R.V.; Shkredova, N.A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes from water and from hydrocarbons. A palladium membrane, when utilized in cooperation with a nickel catalyst in a reactor, has been found to drive reactions such as water gas shift, steam reforming and methane cracking to substantial completion by removing the product hydrogen from the reacting mixture. In addition, ultrapure hydrogen is produced, thereby eliminating the need for an additional processing step.

Willms, R. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The thermodynamic properties of mixtures of normal octane and branched paraffin hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to that predicated by Raoult's law. Eight years later, Nyers (17) measured the vapor- liquid equilibrium data of eighteen binary hydrocarbon mixtures containing naphthene, paraffin and aromatic bina- ry mixtures at 760 mm Hg absolute pressure by using a vapor..., it was shown that the five paraffin-aromatic systems have the greatest deviation from ideality, with activity coeffi- cients ranging from 1. 3 to 1. 8. For the naphthene-aro- matic systems, activity coefficients are slightly lower, varying from 1. 2 to 1. 4...

Liu, Edward Kou-Shan

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fischer?Tropsch Synfuels from Biomass: Maximizing Carbon Efficiency and Hydrocarbon Yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper collects yield and efficiency estimates for FT synfuel production from biomass feedstocks. ... In comparison to other biofuels, advantages include (i) flexible use of all kinds of biomass feedstocks (including waste materials) and, therefore, no competition with the production of food, (ii) relatively high yields per arable land (100?180 GJ ha?1 year?1), and (iii) high fuel qualities to be used in present distribution infrastructures and high-efficiency engine technologies. ... Flow scheme for the conversion of biomass feedstocks to liquid hydrocarbon fuels (BTL) and formal chemical reactions. ...

Dominik Unruh; Kyra Pabst; Georg Schaub

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Envlron. Sci. Technol. 1993, 27, 1885-1891 On-Road Hydrocarbon Remote Sensing in the Denver Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), oxides of nitrogen (NO,), and other toxic air pollutants. These emissions play important roles in all emission control technology. Introduction Automobile emissionsoriginate from fuelrich-burning, misfiring or nonfunctional emission control system can produce high emission rates for carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC

Denver, University of

287

Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane. 12 figures.

Liu, P.K.T.; Gallaher, G.R.; Wu, J.C.S.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

288

Method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane and associated product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing a carbon coated ceramic membrane including passing a selected hydrocarbon vapor through a ceramic membrane and controlling ceramic membrane exposure temperature and ceramic membrane exposure time. The method produces a carbon coated ceramic membrane of reduced pore size and modified surface properties having increased chemical, thermal and hydrothermal stability over an uncoated ceramic membrane.

Liu, Paul K. T. (O'Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Gallaher, George R. (Oakmont Borough, PA); Wu, Jeffrey C. S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROCARBON AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS  

SciTech Connect

Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present period, the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) has been modified to improve its volumetric and equilibrium predictions. Specifically, the attractive term of the PGR equation was modified to enhance the flexibility of the model, and a new expression was developed for the temperature dependence of the attractive term in this segment-segment interaction model. The predictive capability of the modified PGR EOS for vapor pressure, and saturated liquid and vapor densities was evaluated for selected normal paraffins, normal alkenes, cyclo-paraffins, light aromatics, argon, carbon dioxide and water. The generalized EOS constants and substance-specific characteristic parameters in the modified PGR EOS were obtained from the pure component vapor pressures, and saturated liquid and vapor molar volumes. The calculated phase properties were compared to those of the Peng-Robinson (PR), the simplified-perturbed-hard-chain theory (SPHCT) and the original PGR equations. Generally, the performance of the proposed EOS was better than the PR, SPHCT and original PGR equations in predicting the pure fluid properties (%AAD of 1.3, 2.8 and 3.7 for vapor pressure, saturated liquid and vapor densities, respectively).

KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Methods of hydrotreating a liquid stream to remove clogging compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method includes producing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a gas stream. At least a portion of the liquid stream is provided to a hydrotreating unit. At least a portion of selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions in the liquid stream are removed to produce a hydrotreated liquid stream by hydrotreating at least a portion of the liquid stream at conditions sufficient to remove the selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions.

Minderhoud, Johannes Kornelis [Amsterdam, NL; Nelson, Richard Gene [Katy, TX; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX; Ryan, Robert Charles [Houston, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

292

Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water  

SciTech Connect

Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

Du, Yongzhai [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Whitten, William B [ORNL; Li, Haiyang [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Xu, Jun [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm/sup 2/. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000/degree/C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity. 2 figs.

Hsu, Wen Ling

1987-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

Regressing Gas/Particle Partitioning Data for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Regressing Gas/Particle Partitioning Data for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ... Although PAHs can be emitted to the environment as a result of natural combustion processes (e.g., forest fires and volcanoes), human activities are believed to dominate global PAH emissions, because high atmospheric concentrations of PAHs are usually observed in urban and industrial areas where vehicle traffic, aluminum smelting, residential heating, and other activities emit PAHs into the atmosphere (4, 5). ... One of the earliest approaches to describing the G/P partitioning equilibrium of PAHs, known as the Junge?Pankow model, relates ? to PL using the following: The parameter A in this equation is sometimes interpreted as the product of two terms c and ?. ? is the surface area of particles in a unit volume of air (cm2·cm-3) and c (Pa·cm) is a substance-specific factor depending on ambient temper ature, compound, sorption sites, and the heats of desorption from surface and vaporization from the liquid compound (7, 10, 14). ...

Yushan Su; Ying Duan Lei; Frank Wania; Mahiba Shoeib; Tom Harner

2006-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

Ohkawa, Tihiro (La Jolla, CA); Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development and Full-Scale Testing New Process Produces Ethylene More Efficiently and Reduces Coke...

299

Fiber-optic liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Dynamic nuclear polarization of liquid 3He  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...March 1998 research-article Dynamic nuclear polarization of liquid 3He B. Bleaney...3PU, UK Methods of producing dynamic nuclear polarization of liquid 3He by the solid...method have been proposed using enhanced nuclear paramagnetic resonance in Van Vleck compounds...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Detonation and deflagration characteristics of p-Xylene/gaseous hydrocarbon fuels/air mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract p-Xylene is an important intermediate for the production of polyethylene terephthalate, it has growing chemical industrial demand based on the statistics in the last few decades. In the process of producing p-Xylene, gaseous hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., H2, C1–C3) are usually involved, which renders p-Xylene highly possible mix with those gaseous hydrocarbon fuels as leaking occurs, this presents fire or explosion/detonation hazard at some specific conditions. To date, very limited data regarding its detonation and deflagration characteristics are available in previous literatures. In this study, experiments of measuring the overpressure and velocity of p-Xylene/gaseous hydrocarbon fuels (i.e., H2, C2H4, C3H8, CO)/air mixtures are carried out in a vertical detonation tube with an inner diameter of 200 mm and a length of 6.5 m to explore the detonation and deflagration characteristics of p-Xylene. The experimental results indicate that under the same initiation energy of 0.189 MJ m?2, pure p-Xylene/air and p-Xylene/CO/air cannot achieve detonation, only deflagrations are observed. However, under this same initiation energy, detonations occur in p-Xylene/H2/air, p-Xylene/C2H4/air and p-Xylene/C3H8/air mixtures. By comparing the combinatorial compositions of p-Xylene along with gaseous hydrocarbon fuels that within which detonation observed, the detonation sensitive of the mixtures in increasing order are obtained as following: p-Xylene/H2/air, p-Xylene/C3H8/air and p-Xylene/C2H4/air. The results also indicate the relative ease that p-Xylene/gaseous hydrocarbon fuel/air can be detonated mainly depends on the detonation sensitive of the gaseous fuel, which is supported by the critical energy of direct detonation initiation and chemical kinetic analysis.

Bo Zhang; Guangli Xiu; Jian Chen; Shaopeng Yang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

System and method for producing substitute natural gas from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a system and method for producing substitute natural gas and electricity, while mitigating production of any greenhouse gasses. The system includes a hydrogasification reactor, to form a gas stream including natural gas and a char stream, and an oxygen burner to combust the char material to form carbon oxides. The system also includes an algae farm to convert the carbon oxides to hydrocarbon material and oxygen.

Hobbs, Raymond (Avondale, AZ)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Method for Detection of Microorganisms That Produce Gaseous Nitrogen Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with 02-free nitrogen; the tubes were...dishes to reduce water evaporation...Detection of gas producers. Culture...conductivity detector; nitrogen was used as the...Low-pressure solubility of gases in liquid water. Chem. Rev...

Gary E. Jenneman; Anne D. Montgomery; Michael J. McInerney

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Multimedia fate of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil: Oil matrix of constructed biopiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dynamic multimedia fugacity model was used to evaluate the partitioning and fate of petroleum hydrocarbon fractions and aromatic indicator compounds within the soil: oil matrix of three biopiles. Each biopile was characterised by four compartments: air, water, soil solids and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). Equilibrium partitioning in biopile A and B suggested that most fractions resided in the NAPL, with the exception of the aromatic fraction with an equivalent carbon number from 5 to 7 (EC5?7). In Biopile C, which had the highest soil organic carbon content (13%), the soil solids were the most important compartment for both light aliphatic fractions (EC5?6 and EC6?8) and aromatic fractions, excluding the EC16?21 and EC21?35. Our starting hypothesis was that hydrocarbons do not degrade within the NAPL. This was supported by the agreement between predicted and measured hydrocarbon concentrations in Biopile B when the degradation rate constant in NAPL was set to zero. In all scenarios, biodegradation in soil was predicted as the dominant removal process for all fractions, except for the aliphatic EC5?6 which was predominantly lost via volatilization. The absence of an explicit NAPL phase in the model yielded a similar prediction of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) behaviour; however the predicted concentrations in the air and water phases were significantly increased with consequent changes in potential mobility. Further comparisons between predictions and measured data, particularly concentrations in the soil mobile phases, are required to ascertain the true value of including an explicit NAPL in models of this kind.

Frédéric Coulon; Michael J. Whelan; Graeme I. Paton; Kirk T. Semple; Raffaella Villa; Simon J.T. Pollard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the technology "Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview This invention discloses a method to reform hydrocarbon fuels using hexa- aluminate catalysts. In general, the method successfully disrupts the forma- tion of carbon that leads to the deactivation of the catalyst, a key element in the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. When researchers are designing catalysts to reform hydrocarbon fuels, one

307

Monitoring Environmental Recovery at Terminated Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana Waters  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of terminated produced water discharge sites in the coastal waters of Louisiana. Environmental recovery at the sites is documented by comparing pre-termination and post-termination (six months and one year) data. Produced water, sediments, and sediment interstitial water samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons. Benthic infauna were identified from samples collected in the vicinity of the discharge and reference sites. Radium isotope activities were determined in fish and crustacean samples. In addition, an environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing them from carbonaceous biomass feedstock are provided. The carbonaceous biomass feedstock is pyrolyzed in the presence of a catalyst comprising base metal-based catalysts, noble metal-based catalysts, treated zeolitic catalysts, or combinations thereof to produce pyrolysis gases. During pyrolysis, the catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction whereby at least a portion of the oxygenated hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis gases are converted into hydrocarbons. The oxygen is removed as carbon oxides and water. A condensable portion (the vapors) of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

Marinangeli, Richard; Brandvold, Timothy A; Kocal, Joseph A

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Process and apparatus for the production of hydrogen by steam reforming of hydrocarbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the steam reforming of hydrocarbon, particularly methane, under elevated temperature and pressure to produce hydrogen, a feed of steam and hydrocarbon is fed into a first reaction volume containing essentially only reforming catalyst to partially reform the feed. The balance of the feed and the reaction products of carbon dioxide and hydrogen are then fed into a second reaction volume containing a mixture of catalyst and adsorbent which removes the carbon dioxide from the reaction zone as it is formed. The process is conducted in a cycle which includes these reactions followed by countercurrent depressurization and purge of the adsorbent to regenerate it and repressurization of the reaction volumes preparatory to repeating the reaction-sorption phase of the cycle.

Sircar, Shivaji (Wescosville, PA); Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond (Fogelsville, PA); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon fuel reformer 100 suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. A first tube 108 has a first tube inlet 110 and a first tube outlet 112. The first tube inlet 110 is adapted for receiving a first mixture including an oxygen-containing gas and a first fuel. A partially oxidized first reaction reformate is directed out of the first tube 108 into a mixing zone 114. A second tube 116 is annularly disposed about the first tube 108 and has a second tube inlet 118 and a second tube outlet 120. The second tube inlet 118 is adapted for receiving a second mixture including steam and a second fuel. A steam reformed second reaction reformate is directed out of the second tube 116 and into the mixing zone 114. From the mixing zone 114, the first and second reaction reformates may be directed into a catalytic reforming zone 144 containing a reforming catalyst 147.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (7 Rocky Brook Rd., Dover, MA 02030); Mitchell, William L. (111 Oakley Rd., Belmont, MA 02178); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (20 Landmark Rd., Westford, MA 01886); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (1 Richdale Ave.#2, Cambridge, MA 02140)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon fuel reformer (200) is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. The reformer (200) comprises first and second tubes (208,218). The first tube (208) includes a first catalyst (214) and receives a first mixture of steam and a first fuel. The second tube (218) is annularly disposed about the first tube (208) and receives a second mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a second fuel. In one embodiment, a third tube (224) is annularly disposed about the second tube (218) and receives a first reaction reformate from the first tube (208) and a second reaction reformate from the second tube (218). A catalyst reforming zone (260) annularly disposed about the third tube (224) may be provided to subject reformate constituents to a shift reaction. In another embodiment, a fractionator is provided to distill first and second fuels from a fuel supply source.

Clawson, Lawrence G. (Dover, MA); Mitchell, William L. (Belmont, MA); Bentley, Jeffrey M. (Westford, MA); Thijssen, Johannes H. J. (Cambridge, MA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fractionation Hydrogen Acid, Caustic, Enzymes Wastewater Treatment Insoluble solids Biogas + Sludge Process Heat and Power Integration Corn Stover Hydrocarbon Biofuels (i.e....

313

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with...

314

CSIA of Petroleum Hydrocarbons: Forensic Fingerprinting and Oil Spill Characterisation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis has identified a suite of hydrocarbon diagnostic indices to be applied in the forensic fingerprinting of diesel oil characterisation and source identification using… (more)

Muhammad, Syahidah Akmal binti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The mobility of petroleum hydrocarbons in Athabasca oil sands tailings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Several oil sands tailings from Suncor Energy Inc. were analysed with respect to the mobility and solubility of the petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) contaminants. At sites… (more)

Brickner, Heather

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Process for making unsaturated hydrocarbons using microchannel process technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosed invention relates to a process for converting a feed composition comprising one or more hydrocarbons to a product comprising one or more unsaturated hydrocarbons, the process comprising: flowing the feed composition and steam in contact with each other in a microchannel reactor at a temperature in the range from about 200.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to convert the feed composition to the product, the process being characterized by the absence of catalyst for converting the one or more hydrocarbons to one or more unsaturated hydrocarbons. Hydrogen and/or oxygen may be combined with the feed composition and steam.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee (Dublin, OH); Yuschak, Thomas (Lewis Center, OH); LaPlante, Timothy J. (Columbus, OH); Rankin, Scott (Columbus, OH); Perry, Steven T. (Galloway, OH); Fitzgerald, Sean Patrick (Columbus, OH); Simmons, Wayne W. (Dublin, OH); Mazanec, Terry (Solon, OH) Daymo, Eric (Dublin, OH)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Selective aerobic oxidation of hydrocarbons over supported gold catalysts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The selective oxidation of hydrocarbons is of vital importance for the production of valuable chemicals from crude oil and natural gas resources. Unfortunately, when using… (more)

Hereijgers, B.P.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Poisoning of A Urea SCR Catalyst  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Understanding what reactions and which catalytic functions are affected by hydrocarbons can lead to improved tolerances for selective catalytic reduction performance

322

Electrical dispersion of water drops suspended in hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of alternating (50 Hz) and direct current fields on drops of distilled water in a nonpolar hydrocarbon medium were examined.

G. M. Panchenkov; V. V. Papko; V. Ya. Baranov

1968-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster Location P-19 Gregory K. Lilik, Andr L. Boehman Department of Energy & Mineral Engineering EMS Energy...

324

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 5. Recovery of benzene/benzene plus phenol from the Great Pplains Gasification Plant crude phenol stream. Interim report, September 1987-February 1988  

SciTech Connect

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential for production of jet fuels from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant located in Buelah, North Dakota. Funding was provided to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This report details the program with Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., a subcontractor to Burns and Roe Services Corporation, who, as a subcontractor to DOE, investigated the potential of producing benzene or benzene plus phenol from the crude phenol stream.

Harris, E.C.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Energy and Climate Impacts of Producing Synthetic Hydrocarbon Fuels from CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These platforms make the case for (more) research on the conversion of CO2 into synthetic fuels as means to utilize CO2 and thereby mitigate its accumulation in the atmosphere. ... Stechel, E. B.; Miller, J. E.Re-energizing CO2 to fuels with the sun: Issues of efficiency, scale, and economics J. CO2 Util. ... Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per ton of CO2, making it cost competitive with mainstream CO2 mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO2 emitting point sources. ...

Coen van der Giesen; René Kleijn; Gert Jan Kramer

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cyclic Versus Linear Isomers Produced by Reaction of the Methylidyne Radical (CH) with Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are constructed byflux and assembled into the PIE spectrum. Computationaloverall shape and onset of the PIE curves. The FC spectral

Goulay, Fabien

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Chemical Recycling of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol and Dimethyl Ether: From Greenhouse Gas to Renewable, Environmentally Carbon Neutral Fuels and Synthetic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Recycling of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol and Dimethyl Ether: From Greenhouse Gas to Renewable, Environmentally Carbon Neutral Fuels and Synthetic Hydrocarbons ... (1, 3-6) Methanol and derived dimethyl ether (DME) are also excellent fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE) and in a new generation of direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFC), as well as convenient starting materials for producing light olefins (ethylene and propylene) and subsequently practically any derived hydrocarbon product. ... Methanol produced this way was used in the 19th century for lighting, cooking, and heating purposes but was later replaced by cheaper fuels, especially kerosene. ...

George A. Olah; Alain Goeppert; G. K. Surya Prakash

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Liquid electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Effect of Natural Gas Composition on the Design of Natural Gas Liquid Demethanizers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Natural Gas Composition on the Design of Natural Gas Liquid Demethanizers ... The hydrocarbon composition of natural gas varies fairly significantly from location to location. ... The relative amounts of methane (C1) and ethane (C2) have a profound effect on the cryogenic high-pressure distillation column used to recover the C2 and heavier components as a bottoms product called “natural gas liquid” (NGL). ...

William L. Luyben

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mutagenicity of Soot and Associated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to Salmonella typhimurium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were quantitatively...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon constituent in a kerosene...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fraction in terms of...formed by the incomplete combustion of organic material...and sediments (1), heat and power generation...

Debra A. Kaden; Ronald A. Hites; and William G. Thilly

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon investigation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on ... Source: Kim, Ji Man - Department...

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons investigated Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on ... Source: Kim, Ji Man - Department...

336

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon components Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on ... Source: Kim, Ji Man - Department...

337

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon molecules Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on monolithic ... Source: Kim, Ji Man -...

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons molecules Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on monolithic ... Source: Kim, Ji Man -...

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons resulting Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... and conversion of various hydrocarbons on monolithic ... Source: Kim, Ji Man -...

340

The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion...mammals. The fate of fossil fuel hydrocarbons in marine animals. | Journal Article...Carcinogens 0 Epoxy Compounds 0 Fuel Oils 0 Hydrocarbons 0 Naphthalenes...

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ozonation of Mutagenic and Carcinogenic Polyaromatic Amines and Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Amines and Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons in Water 1 1 Supported by a grant...amines and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in water. | The Salmonella-microsome...g., 13 halogenated hydrocarbons were identified in the drinking water of New Orleans (13...

Gary R. Burleson; Michael J. Caulfield; and Morris Pollard

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Determination of hydrocarbons in water – interlaboratory method validation before routine monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The clarification of hydrocarbon input into the Baltic sea via rivers ... of a new method for the determination of hydrocarbons by solvent extraction and gas chromatography. Surrogate oil solutions with known hydrocarbon

P. Woitke; Reinhard Kreßner; Peter Lepom

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Polyhalogenated hydrocarbon refrigerants and refrigerant oils colored with fluorescent dyes and method for their use as leak detectors  

SciTech Connect

A leak detectable refrigeration composition is described comprising: (A) a refrigeration liquid selection from the group consisting of: (1) a polyhalogenated hydrocarbon refrigerant; (2) a refrigeration oil selected from the group consisting of naphthenic oils, paraffinic oils, alkylated benzenes, silicones, polyglycols, diesters or triesters of dicarboxylic or tricarboxylic acids, and polyalkyl silicate oils, and (3) a mixture of A(1) and A(2), and (B) a fluorescent dye compound or composition comprising the dye selected from the group consisting of: (1) a fluorescent dye selected from the group consisting of perylene, naphthoxanthene, monocyclic aromatic compounds having an organometallic compound, (2) a solution of fluorescent dye in a solvent, and (3) a mixture of B(1) and B(2). The fluorescent dye compound or composition is soluble in the refrigeration liquid. The concentration of the dye being at least 0.001 grams per 100 grams of the refrigeration liquid.

Parekh, M.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

Morgan, Peter E. D. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Pugar, Eloise A. (Newbury Park, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hydrocarbon steam reforming using series steam superheaters  

SciTech Connect

In a process for steam reforming of a hydrocarbon gas feedstream wherein: the hydrocarbon gas feedstream is partially reformed at elevated temperatures in indirect heat exchange with hot combustion gases in a direct fired primary reforming furnace provided with a convection section for recovery of excess heat from said combustion gases; and the partially reformed feedstream is then further reformed in the presence of an oxygen-containing gas and steam in a secondary reformer to form a secondary reformer gaseous effluent; the improvement which comprises recovering waste heat from said secondary reformer effluent gas and from said primary reforming combustion products by heating a high pressure saturated steam in a first steam superheating zone by indirect heat exchange with at least a portion of said secondary reformer effluent gas to form a first superheated steam stream; and further heating said first superheated steam in a second steam superheating zone by indirect heat exchange with at least a portion of said primary reformer hot combustion gases for form a second superheated steam stream.

Osman, R. M.

1985-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

Method of producing drive fluid in situ in tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. The heat may be allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation such that a drive fluid is produced in situ in the formation. The drive fluid may move at least some mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons from a first portion of the formation to a second portion of the formation. At least some of the mobilized, visbroken, and/or pyrolyzed hydrocarbons may be produced from the formation.

Mudunuri, Ramesh Raju (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Honeywell developing low-GWP liquid blowing agent for foam insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Honeywell reports that it is developing a new blowing agent with low global warming potential (GWP) for energy-efficient polyurethane foam insulation. The non-flammable liquid blowing agent will provide customers with an alternative to hydrocarbons and traditional hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and assist customers in reducing the overall environmental impact of foam, the company says.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

349

Scroll compressor modelling for heat pumps using hydrocarbons as refrigerants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Scroll compressor modelling for heat pumps using hydrocarbons as refrigerants Paul BYRNE and to install heat pumps in unoccupied spaces. Nevertheless manufacturers keep working on components for hydrocarbons. In the frame of a research project on heat pumps for simultaneous heating and cooling, an R407C

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

Contemplation on the heats of combustion of isomeric hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the Hückel molecular orbital theory, the heats of combustion of isomeric hydrocarbons are related to some topological factors. The standard heats of combustion values of alternant hydrocarbons, expressed as kcal/g, seem to be related to a4 coefficient of their secular polynomials.

Lemi Türker

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs up to 788 amu (C64H20) were detected in the combustion gases. Only the most applications including heating systems and gas turbines for electric power generation.62­64 The combustionFormation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames K. Siegmanna) Swiss

Sattler, Klaus

352

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

354

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts. 19 figs.

Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

355

High levels of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mate drinks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mate drinks Farin Kamangar...exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including known...80 oC) or cold (4 oC) water and two commonly used brands...Infusions were made by adding water to the leaves, steeping for...

Farin Kamangar; Michele Schantz; Christian Abnet; Renato Fagundes; and Sanford Dawsey

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Total Synthesis of Convex Polyhedral Hydrocarbons The Platonic Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O H H Total Synthesis of Convex Polyhedral Hydrocarbons The Platonic Solids O O t-BuO3C Br O O Br Br Ph PhPh Ph PhPh Ph Ph COOH HOOC Total Synthesis of Convex Polyhedral Hydrocarbons The Five Matter Icosahedron Water · Polyhedron: a closed surface made up of polygonal regions. · Regular

Stoltz, Brian M.

357

Review of storage stability characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels, 1952-1982  

SciTech Connect

This discussion and data compilation relating to the storage stability of hydrocarbon liquids is divided into four principal sections: 1) background narrative, 2) references, 3) summary table, and 4) data tables. The Background narrative section provides a general discussion of various types of storage stability tests arranged by type of sample involved. This generic review will provide an introduction for those new in the field or cited in this section to aid in further investigation. The second section is the References, consisting of an alphabetical listing of the literature cited along with an abstract for each entry. This section should provide additional details for anyone needing to use the data provided in the tables. Since many of the publications are difficult, if not impossible, to obtain today, these abstracts may have to suffice in place of the actual report. The third section, or Summary Table, serves as a multientry index for the approximately 230 tables of raw data to follow. Information has been grouped according to the type of material involved, such as gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, coal liquid, etc. In addition, any compounds added are described along with the conditions under which the test was run. This should provide easy identification of data tables relevant to a particular investigation. References to original publications are provided so that more detail can be pursued. The final section is made up entirely of Data Tables. These tables have all been retypeset for easier reading and rapid scanning. Formats have been changed from those in the original articles where it seemed it would help in understanding the data without access to the entire publication. This compilation is as complete as practical, and represents a broad spectrum of stability data. In combination, these four sections should provide a ready reference source of data for those involved in the study of the storage stability of hydrocarbon liquids. 143 references, 231 tables.

Goetzinger, J.W.; Thompson, C.J.; Brinkman, D.W.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microbial Degradation in Soil Microcosms of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons from Drilling Cuttings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbial Degradation in Soil Microcosms of Fuel Oil Hydrocarbons from Drilling Cuttings ... Relation between Bioavailability and Fuel Oil Hydrocarbon Composition in Contaminated Soils ...

Claude-Henri. ChaIneau; Jean-Louis. Morel; Jean. Oudot

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons affect Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 3 Quantification of Local Ozone Production Attributable to Automobile Hydrocarbon Emissions Summary: -fueled automobiles, most cyclic hydrocarbons are...

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons annual Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Quantification of Local Ozone Production Attributable to Automobile Hydrocarbon Emissions Summary: releases about 5 billion kilograms of hydrocarbons...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons implications Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Quantification of Local Ozone Production Attributable to Automobile Hydrocarbon Emissions Summary: -fueled automobiles, most cyclic hydrocarbons are...

362

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon exposure Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aust. J. Mar. Freshw. Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Port Phillip Bay... of aromatic hydrocarbons in coastal waters, using solvent extraction and...

363

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon contamination Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are...

364

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon receptor Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aromatic hydrocarbons... the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), through which dioxins and dioxin-like compounds cause altered gene... -methylcholanthrene AHH: aryl...

365

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons extracted Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Toxic Contamination Summary: called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)....

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrocarbon is introduced into the ocean via oil spillage, offshore drilling leaks, industrial... hydrocarbons have been attributed to inhibition of ... Source: National...

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ydrocarbonDegradation It was hypothesized... aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Hypothesis Test Result Groundwater stimulates Fe(lll) reduction Cell... Hydrocarbon Degradation At...

368

Chlorinated C$_{1}$ and C$_{2}$ Hydrocarbons in the Marine Environment [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the marine environment. | Journal Article | 0 Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated | Air Pollution analysis Animals Fresh Water Great Britain Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated analysis metabolism Seawater Water Pollution, Chemical analysis The Royal Society...

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids [This is a brief and general summary. Read the full MSDS for more details before handling.] Introduction: All cryogenic liquids are gases at normal temperature liquefies them. Cryogenic liquids are kept in the liquid state at very low temperatures. Cryogenic liquids

370

Bioremediation of soil contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy metals  

SciTech Connect

This investigation showed that a soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals had sufficient indigenous microbial activity for hydrocarbon biodegradation under nonlimiting conditions. Nutrient supplementation with nitrogen and phosphate, together with aeration, seemed to be the most important factors for enhancing biodegradation. Hydrocarbon biodegradation occurred to a much greater extent under aerobic than under anaerobic conditions. Biodegradation did, however, induce low pH conditions and thus caused high heavy-metal concentrations in the leachate. Anaerobic conditions inhibited hydrocarbon biodegradation with no subsequent drop in pH and low heavy-metal concentrations in the leachate. Thus, anaerobic conditions were shown to facilitate less metal mobility than low pH conditions. Air sparging did not cause a significant increase in biodegradation. Adsorption of heavy-fraction hydrocarbons (> C{sub 20}) to microorganisms and colloidal material in the leachate was suspected of facilitating mobility of these fractions and thus their subsequent detection in the leachate.

Plessis, C.A. du; Phaal, C.B.; Senior, E. [Univ. of Natal, Scottsville (South Africa)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof is disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Assessment of soil pollution based on total petroleum hydrocarbons and individual oil substances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Different oil products like gasoline, diesel or heavy oils can cause soil contamination. The assessment of soils exposed to oil products can be conducted through the comparison between a measured concentration and an intervention value (IV). Several national policies include the IV based on the so called total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) measure. However, the TPH assessment does not indicate the individual substances that may produce contamination. The soil quality assessment can be improved by including common hazardous compounds as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aromatic volatile hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). This study, focused on 62 samples collected from different sites throughout The Netherlands, evaluates TPH, PAH and BTEX concentrations in soils. Several indices of pollution are defined for the assessment of individual variables (TPH, PAH, B, T, E, and X) and multivariables (MV, BTEX), allowing us to group the pollutants and simplify the methodology. TPH and PAH concentrations above the IV are mainly found in medium and heavy oil products such as diesel and heavy oil. On the other hand, unacceptable BTEX concentrations are reached in soils contaminated with gasoline and kerosene. The TPH assessment suggests the need for further action to include lighter products. The application of multivariable indices allows us to include these products in the soil quality assessment without changing the IV for TPH. This work provides useful information about the soil quality assessment methodology of oil products in soils, focussing the analysis into the substances that mainly cause the risk.

J. Pinedo; R. Ibáñez; J.P.A. Lijzen; Á. Irabien

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

VLE MEASUREMENTS FOR ASYMMETRIC MIXTURES OF FISCHER-TROPSCH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to model the thermodynamic phase behavior of long-chain and short-chain alkane mixtures is of considerable industrial and theoretical interest. However, attempts to accurately describe the phase behavior of what we call asymmetric mixtures of hydrocarbons (AMoHs) have met with only limited success. Vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data are surprisingly scarce, and the limited data that are available suggest that cubic equations of state may not be capable of fitting (much less predicting) the phase behavior of AMoHs. The following tasks, which address the problems described above, were accomplished during the one-year period of this Phase I UCR grant: (1) A continuous-flow apparatus was modified for the measurement of AMoHs and used to measure VLE for propane + hexadecane mixtures at temperatures from 473 to 626 K and pressures up to the mixture critical pressures of about 100 bar. (2) The extent to which cubic vs. modern, statistical mechanics-based equations of state (EoS) are applicable to AMoHs was evaluated. Peng-Robinson (PR) was found to be a surprisingly accurate equation for fitting AMoHs, but only if its pure component parameters were regressed to liquid densities and vapor pressures. However, even this form of PR was still not a predictive equation, as there was a significant variation of kij with temperature. In spite of its deficiencies in terms of vapor-phase predictions and modeling of the critical region, PC-SAFT was found to be the most appropriate EoS for truly predicting the phase behavior of highly asymmetric mixtures of alkanes. (3) Finally, a dense-gas extraction (DGE) apparatus was designed and constructed for the fractionation of F-T waxes into cuts of pure oligomers. Such oligomers are needed in g-sized quantities to perform VLE measurements with long-chain alkanes with carbon numbers greater than 40. The dense gas and the solute mixture to be extracted are contacted in a packed column that has a separation power significantly greater than what can be achieved in one equilibrium stage. Thus, wax oligomer purities are expected to be much better than what can be obtained by conventional supercritical extraction processes.

Mark C. Thies

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

Leininger, Thomas F. (Chino Hills, CA); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA); Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Suggitt, Robert M. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Water addition for increased CO/H[sub 2] hydrocarbon synthesis activity over catalysts comprising cobalt, ruthenium and mixtures thereof which may include a promoter metal  

SciTech Connect

A once-through, fixed or slurry bed Fischer Tropsch process is described with enhanced CO conversion activity and C[sub 5] + liquid hydrocarbon selectivity comprising contacting a feed mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a reaction zone with about 1 Vol % to about 70 Vol % water based on the total volume of feed mixture, at a pressure above one atmosphere and a temperature ranging from about 150 C to about 300 C, with a catalyst selected from the group consisting of cobalt, ruthenium, and mixtures thereof on a titania support, wherein said titania support is less than 40 m[sup 2]/g, converting at least 90 Vol % of the carbon monoxide to liquid hydrocarbons, and in the substantial absence of CO[sub 2] formation.

Kim, C.J.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

376

Conversion of Ethanol to Hydrocarbons on Hierarchical HZSM-5 Zeolites  

SciTech Connect

This study reports synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity of the nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolite with high mesoporosity produced via a solvent evaporation procedure. Further, this study compares hierarchical zeolites with conventional HZSM-5 zeolite with similar Si/Al ratios for the ethanol-to-hydrocarbon conversion process. The catalytic performance of the hierarchical and conventional zeolites was evaluated using a fixed-bed reactor at 360 °C, 300 psig, and a weight hourly space velocity of 7.9 h-1. For the low Si/Al ratio zeolite (~40), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical HZSM-5 was approximately 2 times greater than the conventional HZSM-5 despite its coking amount deposited 1.6 times higher than conventional HZSM-5. For the high Si/Al ratio zeolite (~140), the catalytic life-time for the hierarchical zeolite was approximately 5 times greater than the conventional zeolite and the amount of coking deposited was 2.1 times higher. Correlation was observed between catalyst life time, porosity, and the crystal size of the zeolite. The nano-size hierarchical HZSM-5 zeolites containing mesoporosity demonstrated improved catalyst life-time compared to the conventional catalyst due to faster removal of products, shorter diffusion path length, and the migration of the coke deposits to the external surface from the pore structure.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease  

SciTech Connect

Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A liquid film motor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that electro-hydrodynamical effects in freely suspended liquid films can force liquids to flow. Here, we report a purely electrically driven rotation in water and some other liquid suspended film...

A. Amjadi; R. Shirsavar; N. Hamedani Radja…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Glossary API Gravity: An  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

380

Glossary Glossary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, residual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

382

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3. Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons pro- duced from oil sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is...

383

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, re- sidual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

384

DOE/EIA-0487(98) Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

385

DOE/EIA-0487(99) Petroleum Marketing Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

386

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, residual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

387

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drip gas, as well as liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gil- sonite, and oil shale. Excludes topped crude oil, resid- ual oil, other unfinished oils, and liquids...

388

OXIDATION OF DRY HYDROCARBONS AT HIGH-POWER DENSITY ANODES  

SciTech Connect

This work builds upon discoveries by the University of Pennsylvania and others pertaining to the oxidation of dry hydrocarbon fuels in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The work reported here was restricted primarily to dry methane and confirms that YSZ-based cells, having ceria in the anode as a catalyst and copper in the anode as a current collector, can operate on dry methane for extended periods. Thirty-three lab-scale cells of various designs were fabricated and operated under a variety of conditions. The longest-lived cell gave stable performance on dry methane at 800 C for over 305 hours. Only slight carbon deposition was noted at the completion of the test. A corresponding nickel/YSZ-based anode would have lasted for less than an hour under these test conditions (which included open circuit potential measurements) before carbon fouling essentially destroyed the cell. The best performing cell achieved 112 mW/cm{sub 2} on dry methane at 800 C. Several problems were encountered with carbon fouling and declining open circuit voltages in many of the test cells after switching from operation on hydrogen to dry methane. Although not rigorously confirmed by experimentation, the results suggested that air infiltration through less than perfect perimeter seals or pinholes in the electrolytes, or both gave rise to conditions that caused the carbon fouling and OCV decline. Small amounts of air reacting with methane in a partial oxidation reaction could produce carbon monoxide that, in turn, would deposit the carbon. If this mechanism is confirmed, it implies that near perfect hardware is required for extended operation. Some evidence was also found for the formation of electrical shorts, probably from carbon deposits bridging the electrolyte. Work with odorized methane and with methane containing 100-ppm hydrogen sulfide confirmed that copper is stable at 800 C in dry hydrocarbon fuels in the presence of sulfur. In a number of cases, but not exclusively, the performance life on dry methane with sulfur compounds was much longer than with dry methane alone. The effect of sulfur compounds in these cases appeared to correlate with inhibition of carbon deposition. Mixed results were obtained for the effect of the sulfur compounds on power density. Progress also was made in understanding the mechanisms involved in direct utilization of dry natural gas. Evidence was developed for three possible mechanisms for dry methane utilization in addition to the usually cited mechanism--direct oxidation of methane by oxygen anions. Further work is required at a fundamental level before the knowledge gained here can be translated into higher levels of performance.

K.Krist; O. Spaldon-Stewart; R. Remick

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation and use thereof. [DOE patent application  

SciTech Connect

A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint.

Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

1981-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hydrocarbon concentrations at the Alpine mountain sites Jungfraujoch and Arosa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile hydrocarbons have been measured for 1 yr at Arosa (2010 m asl) to determine the contribution of European emissions to the trace gas concentrations at this remote site. Results are compared to concurrent hydrocarbon concentrations at the high Alpine background site Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl). Hydrocarbon concentrations at Arosa are generally much higher than at Jungfraujoch. The influence of the Alpine boundary layer air was studied based on the diurnal variation of hydrocarbon concentrations, i.e. rising pollutant concentrations in the morning at Arosa and in the afternoon at Jungfraujoch. Different hydrocarbon emission sources of the uplifting air were found at the two sites. At Jungfraujoch, several transatlantic events were detected from October 2001 to January 2002 based on analysis of hydrocarbon ratios and air parcel trajectories. The OH concentration during the transatlantic transport was estimated to be around 5×105 cm?3, derived from simultaneous hydrocarbon oxidation and dilution in the free troposphere. These transatlantic transport events were tracked back to warm conveyor belts, characterized by uniform dynamics and relatively uniform surface sources. In addition, ozone production in the free tropospheric transport was also documented in these events.

Yingshi Li; Mike Campana; Stefan Reimann; Daniel Schaub; Konrad Stemmler; Johannes Staehelin; Thomas Peter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Method for the production of hydrocarbons using iron-carbon-based catalysts  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for producing C/sub 2/+ aliphatic hydrocarbons from a CO and H/sub 2/ mixture comprising the step of contacting the mixture with a catalyst comprising finely divided nonpyrophoric iron-carbon catalyst particles comprising iron and carbon, in the substantial absence of silicon, a substantial portion of which is dementite, which was produced in a reaction zone in the presence of laser radiation under such conditions of laser flux density, power adsorption, concentration of iron compound reactants selected from the group consisting of iron carbonyls, iron acetylacetonate, and ferrocene, and pressure sufficient to produce non-pyrophoric iron-carbon particles having average diameters between 1 and 100 nm.

Rice, G.W.; Fiato, R.A.; Soled, S.L.

1988-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Growth of Microbial Cells on Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...9 Virgin gas oil, IB range 13...90 9.09 1.5 Gas oil CCU 12.7 97...transferred from the gas to the liquid...factor operating cost of the fermentor...important costs of production are for raw materials...prohibit aseptic operation. The environ-mental...

Marvin J. Johnson

1967-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

394

Iraq`s significant hydrocarbon potential remains relatively undeveloped  

SciTech Connect

Iraq is probably one of the least explored countries in the Middle East, despite the fact that it possesses one of the richest hydrocarbon basins in the world almost on a par to Saudi Arabia`s potential, if not more. The aim of this article is to state the facts about Iraq and focus on the huge but untapped and undeveloped hydrocarbon resources to the international oil community. Perhaps it is best to start by describing briefly the sedimentary and tectonic elements responsible for accumulating such large hydrocarbon resources. The paper describes the basin, tectonic elements, structural anomalies, deep drilling, source rocks, reservoir rocks, characteristics, and new reserves.

AL-Gailani, M. [GeoDesign Ltd., Kingston-upon-Thames (United Kingdom)

1996-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400 C for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide. 4 figs.

Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Doshi, R.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

Method for making hydrogen rich gas from hydrocarbon fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Doshi, Rajiv (Downers Grove, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon emission Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aromatic hydrocarbon emission...

399

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

Dennis, J A

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Report on Produced Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2009 Produced Water Volumes and Management Practices Page 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 7 Chapter 1 - Introduction ............................................................................................................. 11 1.1 Purpose .......................................................................................................................... 11 1.2 Background ................................................................................................................... 11 1.3 Overview ....................................................................................................................... 11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Report on Produced Water  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

402

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

404

Phase Behavior of Light Gases in Hydrocarbon and Aqueous Solvents  

SciTech Connect

Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present reporting period, our solubility apparatus was refurbished and restored to full service. To test the experimental apparatus and procedures used, measurements were obtained for the solubility Of C0{sub 2} in benzene at 160{degrees}F. Having confirmed the accuracy of the newly acquired data in comparison with our previous measurements and data reported in the literature for this test system, we have begun to measure the solubility of hydrogen in hexane. The measurements for this system will cover the temperature range from 160 to 280{degrees}F at pressures to 2,500 psia. As part of our model evaluation efforts, we examined the predictive abilities of an alternative approach we have proposed for calculating the phase behavior properties of highly non-ideal systems. Using this approach, the liquid phase fugacities generated from an equation of state (EOS) are augmented by a fugacity deviation function correction. The correlative abilities of this approach are compared with those of an EOS equipped with the recently introduced Wong-Sandler (MWS) mixing rules. These two approaches are compared with the current methods for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) calculations, i.e., the EOS (0/0) approach with the van der Waals mixing rules and the split (y/0) approach. The evaluations were conducted on a database comprised of non-ideal low pressure binary systems as well as asymmetric high pressure binary systems. These systems are of interest in the coal liquefaction and utilization processes. The Peng-Robinson EOS was selected for the purposes of this evaluation.

Gasem, K.A.M.; Robinson, R.L., Jr.; Trvedi, N.J., Gao, W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Temporary Anion States of Polyatomic Hydrocarbons KENNETH D. JORDAN'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temporary Anion States of Polyatomic Hydrocarbons KENNETH D. JORDAN' OSpemnenr Of C%sITIkby. M k I. A biographyand photograph of Kenneth D. Jordan appear In previous paper in this issue. far outweighsthat

Simons, Jack

407

Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered...

Desai, Anuradha M.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

408

Experiments on Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates in Unconsolidated Sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out to observe the formation and decomposition of hydrocarbon gas hydrates in an unconsolidated sand pack 4.4 cm in diameter and ... 43 bars and 5 to 10°C; gas used was 90% methane and 10...

P. E. Baker

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Filtration Combustion in Hydrocarbon Desorption from a Porous Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated theoretically and experimentally the process of filtration combustion with hydrocarbon desorption from a porous skeleton realized, in particular, in heat cleaning of porous media out of resid...

S. I. Fut'ko; K. V. Dobrego; E. S. Shmelev…

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Fireball during combustion of hydrocarbon fueld releases II. Thermal radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processes of radiative heat transfer in a fireball which develops upon ignition of a cloud of hydrocarbon fuel near the Earth’s surface are simulated numerically. The emissive characteristics of combustion pr...

G. M. Makhviladze; J. P. Roberts; S. E. Yakush

411

Effect of the Composition of Hydrocarbon Streams on HCCI Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of hydrocarbon samples and can be treated as compositional variables which could describe bulk properties of the samples Sample fingerprint STEP 1: Data receiving Q(2d)RPR How...

412

Hydrocarbon pollution control and remediation of groundwater: a brief review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil-contaminated sediments. There are two main remediation techniques: soil washing and bio- remediation. With soil washing, contaminated soil is leached with water containing a surfactant to assist in hydrocarbon removal. In situ washing is undertaken...

L. Clark

413

THE HEATS OF COMBUSTION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND HEXAMETHYLENE.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

THE HEATS OF COMBUSTION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND HEXAMETHYLENE. ... Citation data is made available by participants in CrossRef's Cited-by Linking service. ... Experimental methods included adiabatic heat-capacity calorimetry (5 K to 420 K), comparative ... ...

Theodore W. Richards; Frederick Barry

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Measurements of dissolved nonmethane hydrocarbons in sea water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An automated stripping technique for the measurement of dissolved hydrocarbons in sea water is presented together with some results obtained ... cruise from Europe to Brazil. The sea water concentrations of NMHC ...

C. Plass; R. Koppmann; J. Rudolph

415

Hygienic rating of hydrocarbons in bottom deposits of water ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors of this article draw the reader’s attention to the topical problem of the contamination of bottom deposits of water ecosystems by hydrocarbons, such as oil and gas condensate,...

Rauf Valievich Galiulin…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Conversion of methane and acetylene into gasoline range hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONVERSION OF METHANE AND ACETYLENE INTO GASOLINE RANGE HYDROCARBONS A Thesis by AMMAR ALKHAWALDEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering CONVERSION OF METHANE AND ACETYLENE INTO GASOLINE RANGE HYDROCARBONS A Thesis by AMMAR ALKHAWALDEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Alkhawaldeh, Ammar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

Characterization of an iodine-based ionic liquid ion source and studies on ion fragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrosprays are a well studied source of charged droplets and ions. A specific subclass is the ionic liquid ion source (ILIS), which produce ion beams from the electrostatically stressed meniscus of ionic liquids. ILIS ...

Fedkiw, Timothy Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Prospects for Coal-To-Liquid Conversion: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the economics of coal-to-liquid (CTL) conversion, a polygeneration technology that produces liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity by coal gasification and Fischer-Tropsch process. CTL is more expensive ...

Chen, Y.-H. Henry

419

Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China  

SciTech Connect

Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Rock types, pore types, and hydrocarbon exploration  

SciTech Connect

A proposed exploration-oriented method of classifying porosity in sedimentary rocks is based on microscopic examination cores or cuttings. Factors include geometry, size, abundance, and connectivity of the pores. The porosity classification is predictive of key petrophysical characteristics: porosity-permeability relationships, capillary pressures, and (less certainly) relative permeabilities. For instance, intercrystalline macroporosity typically is associated with high permeability for a given porosity, low capillarity, and favorable relative permeabilities. This is found to be true whether this porosity type occurs in a sucrosic dolomite or in a sandstone with pervasive quartz overgrowths. This predictive method was applied in three Rocky Mountain oil plays. Subtle pore throat traps could be recognized in the J sandstone (Cretaceous) in the Denver basin of Colorado by means of porosity permeability plotting. Variations in hydrocarbon productivity from a Teapot Formation (Cretaceous) field in the Powder River basin of Wyoming were related to porosity types and microfacies; the relationships were applied to exploration. Rock and porosity typing in the Red River Formation (Ordovician) reconciled apparent inconsistencies between drill-stem test, log, and mud-log data from a Williston basin wildcat. The well was reevaluated and completed successfully, resulting in a new field discovery. In each of these three examples, petrophysics was fundamental for proper evaluation of wildcat wells and exploration plays.

Coalson, E.B.; Hartmann, D.J.; Thomas, J.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A preliminary evaluation model for reservoir hydrocarbon-generating potential established based on dissolved hydrocarbons in oilfield water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large number of oilfield water samples were analyzed in this work. Research ... relationship between the concentrations and distribution of dissolved hydrocarbons suggested that the contents and composition of ...

Hongjing Zhao; Weilin Sun; Baotian He; Bowen Mei…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

BIODEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM-WASTE BY BIOSURFACTANT-PRODUCING BACTERIA  

SciTech Connect

The degradation of petroleum waste by mixed bacterial cultures which produce biosurfactants: Ralstonia pickettii SRS (BP-20), Alcaligenes piechaudii SRS (CZOR L-1B), Bacillus subtilis (1'- 1a), Bacillus sp. (T-1) and Bacillus sp. (T'-1) was investigated. The total petroleum hydrocarbons were degraded substantially (91 %) by the mixed bacterial culture in 30 days (reaching up to 29 % in the first 72 h). Similarly, the toxicity of the biodegraded petroleum waste decreased 3 times after 30 days as compared to raw petroleum waste. Thus, the mixed bacterial strains effectively clean-up the petroleum waste and they can be used in other bioremediation processes.

Brigmon, R; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; Kamlesh Jangid, K; Krystyna Lukasik, K; Grzegorz Nalecz-Jawecki, G; Topher Berry, T

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

Liquid soap film generates electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed that a rotating liquid soap film generates electricity when placed between two non-contact electrodes with a sufficiently large potential difference. In our experiments suspended liquid film (water + soap film) is formed on the surface of a circular frame, which is forced to rotate in the $x-y$ horizontal plane by a motor. This system is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply an external electric voltage difference in the $x-$direction. The produced electric current is collected from the liquid film using two conducting electrodes that are separated in the $y-$direction. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this paper we report a novel technique, in which a similar device can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to electrical energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed similarly in very small scales like micro scales with different applications. Although the device is comparable to commercial electric motors or electric generators, there is a significant difference in their working principles. Usually in an electric motor or generator the magnetic field causes the driving force, while in a LFM or LFEG the Coulomb force is the driving force. This fact is also interesting from the Bio-science point of view and brings a similarity to bio motors. Here we have investigated the electrical characteristics of such a generator for the first time experimentally and modelled the phenomenon with electroconvection governing equations. A numerical simulation is performed using the local approximation for the charge-potential relation and results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

424

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Enhanced solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigation included two similarly-designed experiments. In the first, a biological surfactant produced by Rhodococcus strain H13-A and a commonly-used synthetic surfactant, Tween-80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate), were...

Page, Cheryl Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, A.P.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electric field as pretreatment to enhance the activity of a whole-cell biocatalyst for hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a method using two successive cultures, solid then liquid, for the production and use of a hydrocarbon degrading biocatalyst (BC) is proposed. Hexadecane (HXD) was used as a model hydrocarbon. An electric field was applied during the solid state culture (SSC) as a novel approach, denoted the electric field pretreatment, to enhance the HXD degrading activity. Afterward, the catalytic activity (CA) was determined in liquid culture. The CA of the biocatalyst pretreated and untreated was evaluated, discriminating between sorption capacity and HXD degradation rate; biomass production on the electric field pretreated biocatalyst was only 20% of that on the untreated biocatalyst, but the maximum biocatalyst sorption capacity was enhanced from 119 ± 41 mg (g BC)?1 to 207 ± 23 mg (g BC)?1 by the effect of the electric field pretreatment. The activity of the biocatalyst was mainly associated with the pretreated fungal biomass; its activity was 9-fold higher than that of the untreated biomass. Linear model was used to obtain the affinity constant and Langmuir to adjust maximum sorption capacity. This enhancement in sorption capacity was associated with the high HXD degradation rate observed here; 86% of the initial HXD was eliminated in 42 h by the pretreated biocatalyst, whilst 53% was eliminated in 48 h by the untreated biocatalyst.

V. Sánchez-Vázquez; I. González; M. Gutiérrez-Rojas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Solids precipitation and polymerization of asphaltenes in coal-derived liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The precipitation and removal of particulate solids from coal-derived liquids by adding a process-derived anti-solvent liquid fraction and continuing the precipitation process at a temperature above the melting point of the mixed liquids for sufficient time to allow the asphaltenes to polymerize and solids to settle at atmospheric pressure conditions. The resulting clarified light hydrocarbon overflow liquid contains less than about 0.02 W % ash and is suitable as turbine fuel or as boiler fuel for burning without particulate emission control equipment. An underflow liquid fraction containing less than about 0.1 W % solids along with low sulfur and nitrogen concentrations is suitable as a boiler fuel with emission control equipment.

Kydd, Paul H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

In Situ Hydrocarbon Degradation by Indigenous Nearshore Bacterial Populations  

SciTech Connect

Potential episodic hydrocarbon inputs associated with oil mining and transportation together with chronic introduction of hydrocarbons via urban runoff into the relatively pristine coastal Florida waters poses a significant threat to Florida's fragile marine environment. It is therefore important to understand the extent to which indigenous bacterial populations are able to degrade hydrocarbon compounds and also determine factors that could potentially control and promote the rate at which these compounds are broken down in situ. Previous controlled laboratory experiments carried out by our research group demonstrated that separately both photo-oxidation and cometabolism stimulate bacterial hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected from a chronically petroleum contaminated site in Bayboro Bay, Florida. Additionally, we also demonstrated that stable carbon and radiocarbon abundances of respired CO{sub 2} could be used to trace in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations at this same site. This current proposal had two main objectives: (a) to evaluate the cumulative impact of cometabolism and photo-oxidation on hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial assemblages collected the same site in Bayboro Bay, Florida and (b) to determine if in situ hydrocarbon degradation by indigenous bacterial populations this site could be traced using natural radiocarbon and stable carbon abundances of assimilated bacterial carbon. Funds were used for 2 years of full support for one ESI Ph.D. student, April Croxton. To address our first objective a series of closed system bacterial incubations were carried out using photo-oxidized petroleum and pinfish (i.e. cometabolite). Bacterial production of CO{sub 2} was used as the indicator of hydrocarbon degradation and {delta}{sup 13}C analysis of the resultant CO{sub 2} was used to evaluate the source of the respired CO{sub 2} (i.e. petroleum hydrocarbons or the pinfish cometabolite). Results from these time series experiments demonstrated that short-term exposure of petroleum to UV light enhanced hydrocarbon degradation by 48% over that observed for non-photo-oxidized petroleum. Despite the greater bio-availability of the photo-oxidized over the non-photo-oxidized petroleum, an initial lag in CO{sub 2} production was observed indicating potential phototoxicity of the photo- by-products. {delta}{sup 13}C analysis and mass balance calculations reveal that co-metabolism with pinfish resulted in increased hydrocarbon degradation for both photo-oxidized and non-photo-oxidized petroleum each by over 100%. These results demonstrate the cumulative effect of photo-oxidation and co-metabolism on petroleum hydrocarbon degradation by natural bacterial populations indigenous to systems chronically impacted by hydrocarbon input. To address the second objective of this proposal bacterial concentrates were collected from Bayboro Harbor in April 2001 for nucleic acid extraction and subsequent natural radiocarbon abundance analyses. Unfortunately, however, all of these samples were lost due to a faulty compressor in our -70 freezer. The freezer was subsequently repaired and samples were again collected from Bayboro Harbor in June 2002 and again December 2002. Several attempts were made to extract the nucleic acid samples--however, the student was not able to successfully extract and an adequate amount of uncontaminated nucleic acid samples for subsequent natural radiocarbon abundance measurements of the bacterial carbon by accelerator mass spectrometry (i.e. require at least 50 {micro}g carbon for AMS measurement). Consequently, we were not able to address the second objective of this proposed work.

Cherrier, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

Viscosity, specific (for liquids)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n. The ratio between the viscosity of a liquid and the viscosity of water at the same temperature. Specific viscosity is sometimes used interchangeably with relative viscosity for liquids.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

An improved equation of state for molal volumes of liquid hydrocarbons at high temperatures and pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'IONS ARE SUCH THAT THEY CAN BE RKADII?Y RKCOQHIZKD FRQN THE NATKRIAL PRESENTED IN THK NAIN BODY OF THK THESIS? DINENSION A){ {15) tBN{ 15) ?PRES{15)?TKNP(85) ?XNC?P(15) tQC7P(15) tX(15s XI I ) ?V{ 15) ?X){{7) ~ XN{7) ?XK(7)?C(7)?AI t500)?81 (500)s T(50Q) REWIND 8 KO){T e... of the Beattie-Bridgeman equation. It is written p I+ 82+ g+~+~ (I y )e V V ~V V V VT where Bi = RT B2 = BoRT Ao CoT 2 B3 =bRT-a Bb =4. a go& A&? C&? ~b ~a ~c g and oc are empirical constants for each material. I t I s surprisingly accurate for pure...

Latimer, James K

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels from syngas. Second annual report, March 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect

Initial Task 1 tests used methanol as the feed. It was found that catalysts of interest tended to make highly methylated aromatics in the Berty reactor. Although a simulated distillation showed that these products boiled in the gasoline and diesel range, most were solid at room temperature. Aromatic products frequently are desirable constituents of gasoline, but highly methylated aromatics which precipitate at the concentrations found are undesirable. Since small olefins are products and intermediates in reactions over Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, propylene was chosen as feedstock to replace methanol. Catalysts for syngas feed (task 2) have a metal component (MC) and a shape-selective component (SSC). Four techniques have been used in synthesizing our bi-functional catalysts. The data presented show that catalysts and conditions have been found which enable converting 1:1 H/sub 2//CO syngas feed at reasonable conversions in one step to motor fuel range products with quite acceptable selectivity to C/sub 5//sup +/ products. Two effects should be noted. The molecular sieves used reduced the high boiling (wax) component of the product as compared to physical mixture with the relatively inert ..cap alpha..-alumina. Also the quality of the gasoline range product with the molecular sieve is much better than with the F-T type catalyst.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbons in a Novel Hydrogen-Selective Membrane-Based Fuel Processor  

SciTech Connect

In this work, asymmetric dense Pd/porous stainless steel composite membranes were fabricated by depositing palladium on the outer surface of the tubular support. The electroless plating method combined with an osmotic pressure field was used to deposit the palladium film. Surface morphology and microstructure of the composite membranes were characterized by SEM and EDX. The SEM and EDX analyses revealed strong adhesion of the plated pure palladium film on the substrate and dense coalescence of the Pd film. Membranes were further characterized by conducting permeability experiments with pure hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium gases at temperatures from 325 to 450 C and transmembrane pressure differences from 5 to 45 psi. The permeation results showed that the fabricated membranes have both high hydrogen permeability and selectivity. For example, the hydrogen permeability for a composite membrane with a 20 {micro}m Pd film was 3.02 x 10{sup -5} moles/m{sup 2}.s.Pa{sup 0.765} at 450 C. Hydrogen/nitrogen selectivity for this composite membrane was 1000 at 450 C with a transmembrane pressure difference of 14.7 psi. Steam reforming of methane is one of the most important chemical processes in hydrogen and syngas production. To investigate the usefulness of palladium-based composite membranes in membrane-reactor configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen, steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift was studied. The steam reforming of methane using a packed-bed inert membrane tubular reactor (PBIMTR) was simulated. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model with parallel flow configuration was developed for steam reforming of methane. The shell volume was taken as the feed and sweep gas was fed to the inside of the membrane tube. Radial diffusion was taken into account for concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system and then solved by finite difference method with appropriate boundary and initial conditions. An iterative scheme was used to obtain a converged solution. Membrane reactor performance was compared to that in a traditional non-membrane packed-bed reactor (PBR). Their performances were also compared with thermodynamic equilibrium values achievable in a conventional non-membrane reactor. Numerical results of the models show that the methane conversions in the PBIMTR are always higher than that in the PBR, as well as thermodynamic equilibrium conversions. For instance, at a reaction pressure of 6 atm, a temperature of 650 C, a space velocity of 900/16.0 SCCM/gm{sub cat}, a steam to methane molar feed ratio of 3.0, a sweep ratio of 0.15, the conversion in the membrane reactor is about 86.5%, while the conversion in the non-membrane reactor is about 50.8%. The corresponding equilibrium conversion is about 56.4%. The effects on the degree of conversion and hydrogen yield were analyzed for different parameters such as temperature, reactor pressure, feed and sweep flow rate, feed molar ratio, and space time. From the analysis of the model results, it is obvious that the membrane reactor operation can be optimized for conversion or yield through the choice of proper operating and design parameters. Comparisons with available literature data for both membrane and non-membrane reactors showed a good agreement.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

Preliminary assessment of hydrocarbon potential in southern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon exploration has been sparse south of the Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois. Over 240,000 ac in this area are within the Shawnee National Forest (SNF). Upcoming review of mineral exploration policy on SNF land and a recent amendment to the Mineral Leasing Act (1987) will result in release of portions of the SNF for competitive and potentially noncompetitive bidding for mineral exploration tracts in the near future. Preliminary assessment of hydrocarbon potential has been carried out in southern Illinois. Numerous oil shows occur in Paleozoic strata south of the Cottage Grove fault system, which, at present, describes the southern boundary of most oil production in Illinois. Only Mitchellsville oil field in southern Saline County lies south of the Cottage Grove fault system. The Upper Devonian New Albany Shale, though to be the primary source rock for Illinois basin hydrocarbons, underlies most of the area. Older potential source rocks may be present. Depositional trends of prolific oil-productive Mississippian strata in Illinois continue southward through the area. Few drill holes have tested strata older than Mississippian in the area. Complex faulting in the Rough Creek-Shawneetown fault system may have improved the potential for hydrocarbon emplacement and entrapment in this region. Preliminary assessment of hydrocarbon potential indicates that this wildcat region deserves further tests.

Crockett, J.E.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Liquid Piston Stirling Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fluidyne liquid piston engine is a simple free-piston Stirling engine that can be made from nothing more...

Graham Walker Ph. D.; J. R. Senft Ph.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Utilization of the PHOSter [trademark] process to improve in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

PHOSter[trademark] is a patented gas-phase nutrient delivery system that can be used to control the addition of vapor phase phosphorus and improve in situ bioremediation processes. PHOSter[trademark] can be easily and cost-effectively added to most existing biosparging or bioventing systems to provide the phosphorus that is often lacking for an optimally healthy microbial environment. Traditional approaches for adding phosphate to sites are based on addition of liquid fertilizer or phosphoric acid vapors. Such systems have been shown to influence very small areas and often result in overstimulation of the microbial population, which can lead to undesirable effects such as formation clogging. The PHOSter[trademark] system uses a relatively safe form of organic phosphate, triethylphosphate or TEP. TEP is added to an air injection stream by contacting or infusing the vapors from the liquid. With PHOSter[trademark], the presence of the ethyl groups on the phosphate reduces the nutrient's dissolution rate into water and provides a [open quotes]time released[close quotes] stimulation and prevents clogging, and because the phosphorus is in a gas form, it is more readily dispersed in the formation. PHOSter[trademark] has been successfully utilized in three states (South Carolina, Michigan, and New York) on petroleum hydrocarbon and trichloroethane contamination. A goal of a fourth test that is underway in Panama City, Florida at a gasoline distribution terminal is to improve the in situ remediation of BTEX and eliminate fugitive emissions from a multipoint airsparging process.

Looney, B.B. (Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)); Easton, S. (Citgo Petroleum Corp., Doralville, GA (United States)); Haselow, J. (Synesis Environmental Inc., Aiken, SC (United States)); Klemm, D. (S ME, Spartanburg, SC (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Utilization of the PHOSter {trademark} process to improve in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

PHOSter{trademark} is a patented gas-phase nutrient delivery system that can be used to control the addition of vapor phase phosphorus and improve in situ bioremediation processes. PHOSter{trademark} can be easily and cost-effectively added to most existing biosparging or bioventing systems to provide the phosphorus that is often lacking for an optimally healthy microbial environment. Traditional approaches for adding phosphate to sites are based on addition of liquid fertilizer or phosphoric acid vapors. Such systems have been shown to influence very small areas and often result in overstimulation of the microbial population, which can lead to undesirable effects such as formation clogging. The PHOSter{trademark} system uses a relatively safe form of organic phosphate, triethylphosphate or TEP. TEP is added to an air injection stream by contacting or infusing the vapors from the liquid. With PHOSter{trademark}, the presence of the ethyl groups on the phosphate reduces the nutrient`s dissolution rate into water and provides a {open_quotes}time released{close_quotes} stimulation and prevents clogging, and because the phosphorus is in a gas form, it is more readily dispersed in the formation. PHOSter{trademark} has been successfully utilized in three states (South Carolina, Michigan, and New York) on petroleum hydrocarbon and trichloroethane contamination. A goal of a fourth test that is underway in Panama City, Florida at a gasoline distribution terminal is to improve the in situ remediation of BTEX and eliminate fugitive emissions from a multipoint airsparging process.

Looney, B.B. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States); Easton, S. [Citgo Petroleum Corp., Doralville, GA (United States); Haselow, J. [Synesis Environmental Inc., Aiken, SC (United States); Klemm, D. [S& ME, Spartanburg, SC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Coal and Biomass to Liquids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal to Liquids » Coal and Coal to Liquids » Coal and Biomass to Liquids Coal and Biomass to Liquids Over the last several decades, the Office of Fossil Energy performed RD&D activities that made significant advancements in the areas of coal conversion to liquid fuels and chemicals. Technology improvements and cost reductions that were achieved led to the construction of demonstration-scale facilities. The program is now supporting work to reduce the carbon footprint of coal derived liquids by incorporating the co-feeding of biomass and carbon capture. In the area of direct coal liquefaction, which is the process of breaking down coal to maximize the correct size of molecules for liquid products, the U.S. DOE made significant investments and advancements in technology in the 1970s and 1980s. Research enabled direct coal liquefaction to produce

440

Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PEMFC cathode where liquid-water is produced in the catalystcathode side of the PEMFC, causing less oxygen to reach the active catalyst

Das, Prodip K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Shades of Perfection in Perfect Liquids | U.S. DOE Office of...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

produced at the LHC. This finding defies intuition as conventional liquids, such as oil, flow more easily the hotter they get. The Impact These results help answer questions...

442

Method for producing superconductors  

SciTech Connect

A method for producing a V3Al superconductor is disclosed which comprises making a composite composed of a sheath portion of a copper alloy containing 1 to 15 atomic percent of germanium, 1 to 15 atomic percent of silicon or 2 to 25 atomic percent of gallium and surrounded by the sheath portion, at least one core portion of a vanadium-aluminum alloy containing 0.5 to 20 atomic percent of aluminum; elongating the composite; and then heat-treating the elongated composite thereby to form a V3(Al, Ge), V3(Al, Si) or V3(Al, Ga) layer between the sheath portion and the core portion.

Inoue, K.; Tachikawa, K.; Togano, K.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Method for producing catalysts from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Method for producing catalysis from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hepatic coenzyme Q redox balance of fishes as a potential bioindicator of environmental contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...at the land-water interface are...polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination...Markers 0 Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic 0 Water Pollutants, Chemical...metabolism Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic toxicity...Ubiquinone metabolism Water Pollutants, Chemical...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Liquid Wall Chambers  

SciTech Connect

The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

Meier, W R

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Upgrading of petroleum oil feedstocks using alkali metals and hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of upgrading an oil feedstock by removing heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals from the oil feedstock composition. This method reacts the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and an upgradant hydrocarbon. The alkali metal reacts with a portion of the heteroatoms and/or one or more heavy metals to form an inorganic phase separable from the organic oil feedstock material. The upgradant hydrocarbon bonds to the oil feedstock material and increases the number of carbon atoms in the product. This increase in the number of carbon atoms of the product increases the energy value of the resulting oil feedstock.

Gordon, John Howard

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide hydrogen-steam mixtures, unusual product distributions and mechanistic implications  

SciTech Connect

Over recent years, considerable interest has developed in hydrocarbon synthesis via direct processing of H/sub 2/-lean synthesis gases which are produced by the ''second generation'' of thermally efficient coal gasifiers. To directly process gases with a H/sub 2//CO ratio less than 0.5, requires that water be mixed with the reactor feed gas so that additional H/sub 2/ is generated in-situ via the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction. This obviously requires the use of catalysts which are active for both the synthesis and WGS reactions. The fact that most Group VIII metals are active for both reactions is well demonstrated by the development of the Kolbel-Engelhardt (KE) synthesis in which all the H/sub 2/ is formed in-situ. The authors previously examined the effect of H/sub 2//CO/H/sub 2/2O feed ratios on CO conversion rates (4); the present report concerns its effect upon hydrocarbon product distributions. In the experiments described, as the H/sub 2//CO ratio was reduced from 2.0 (Typical Fischer-Tropsch (FT) conditions), sufficient H/sub 2/O was added to compensate for the H/sub 2/ deficiency based on the assumption that all added H/sub 2/O was converted to H/sub 2/ via the WGS reaction.

Chaffee, A.L.; Ekstrom; Lapszewica, J.; Loeh, H.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Sliding Luttinger liquid phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T?0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

Ranjan Mukhopadhyay; C. L. Kane; T. C. Lubensky

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

451

Process for producing ethanol  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

1993-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

Experimental and artificial neural network modeling study on soot formation in premixed hydrocarbon flamesq  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental and artificial neural network modeling study on soot formation in premixed hydrocarbon after the methane flames, respectively. Three-layer, feed- forward type artificial neural networks rights reserved. Keywords: Soot; Hydrocarbon flames; Artificial neural networks 1. Introduction

Senkan, Selim M.

453

The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

20 May 1975 research-article The Fate of Fossil Fuel Hydrocarbons in Marine Animals [and Discussion] E...have been made of their fate in mammals. The fate of fossil fuel hydrocarbons in marine animals. | Journal Article...

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Syngas upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels is one of eight priority pathways chosen to convert biomass into hydrocarbon fuels by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. These pathways were down-selected from an initial list of 18.

455

Dynamic study of coupled heavy hydrocarbon pyrolysis and combustion. N. Gascoina*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/28 Dynamic study of coupled heavy hydrocarbon pyrolysis and combustion. N. Gascoina* , P of the heat transfer dynamics. Finally, the combustion mechanism is applied and validated experimentally for kerosene pyrolysis application. Keywords Regenerative cooling; Hydrocarbon pyrolysis; Supersonic Combustion

Boyer, Edmond

456

The Energies of the Atomic Linkages in the Normal Paraffin Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...normal paraffin hydrocarbons, in the gaseous...values for the heats of combustion of these gases...values for the heats of combustion of the hydrocarbon gases,4'5...Jessup4 on the heats of combustion of normal heptane...

Frederick D. Rossini

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons molecular Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

various hydrocarbons on monolithic hydrocarbon adsorber Dae Jung Kim,a Ji Man Kim,a Jae Eui Yie... ,b, Seong Gyu Seo,c and Sang-Chai Kim d a Department of Molecular Science and...

458

LiMnPO4 Nanoplate Grown via Solid-State Reaction in Molten Hydrocarbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LiMnPO4 Nanoplate Grown via Solid-State Reaction in Molten Hydrocarbon for Li-ion Battery Cathode. LiMnPO4 Nanoplate Grown via Solid-State Reaction in Molten Hydrocarbon for Li-ion...

459

Vibration Spectra of Hydrocarbon Molecules. II. Skeletal Frequencies in Certain Branched Paraffins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

25 October 1949 research-article Vibration Spectra of Hydrocarbon Molecules. II...characteristic frequencies should be assigned as vibrations of the carbon skeleton of these structural...problem of the interpretation of the vibration spectra of hydrocarbons is considered...

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Environmental and Transport Effects on Core Measurements of Water Saturation, Salinity, Wettability, and Hydrocarbon Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and core surfacing operations can significantly alter the water saturation, salinity, hydrocarbon measurements of water saturation, salinity, hydrocarbon composition, and wettability are critical for accurateSPE 166154 Environmental and Transport Effects on Core Measurements of Water Saturation, Salinity

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Light hydrocarbons in the surface water of the mid-Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a cruise of RV Polarstern over the Atlantic in September/October 1988, C2?C4 hydrocarbons were measured in surface sea water. The ship passed through three different ocean ... at 8° N and 3° S. Hydrocarbon

C. Plass; R. Koppmann; J. Rudolph

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Experiments Upon the Explosions of Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of such experiments* B. Reference to previous experimental work. C* Object of present s e r i e s of experiments. (See plan of experiments.) a. Heat produced by explosion of H~C mixture. b. Duration of pressure. c• .Rate of combustion and explosion. d. E f f e... as possible the heat produced by the explosion under c e r t a i n conditions. I t i s true that the t o t a l amount of heat / developed may be c a l c u l a t e d matematically i f s u f f i c i e n t data i s a v a i l a b l e , but i t i s also true...

Stone, Fred

1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Process for producing gasoline of high octane number, in particular lead-free gasoline  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for producing gasoline of high octane number from C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ olefinic cuts, such as those obtained by fractional distillation of a C/sub 3/ / C/sub 4/ catalytic cracking cut. It includes the steps of: (A) oligomerizing propylene of the C/sub 3/ cut to obtain a first gasoline fraction, (B) reacting the isobutene of the C/sub 4/ cut with methanol to produce methyl tert.-butyl ether which is separated from the unreacted C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons to form a second gasoline fraction, (C) alkylating said unreacted C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons with isobutane in the presence of an alkylation catalyst such as hydrofluoric acid, to form a third gasoline fraction, and (D) admixing, at least partially, said first, second and third gasoline fractions, so as to obtain gasoline of high octane number.

Chauvin, Y.; Gaillard, J.; Hellin, M.; Torck, B.; Vu, Q.D.

1981-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

464

Chemical Fate of Contaminants in the Environment: Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in the Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) are the most common contaminant found at hazardous waste sites and are the most prevalent contaminants on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons production sites. Many of the CHCs are either known or suspected carcinogens and thus pose health risks to the public and/or site workers. Unlike simple hydrocarbons, CHCs are resistant to biodegradation, but can degrade by abiotic processes such as hydrolysis, nucleophilic substitution, and dehydrochlorination. Unfortunately, few studies of the reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons have been reported in literature, and disagreement still exists about the mechanisms and rates of many of the key reactions. In this work, we modeled the reactions involved in the degradation of CHCs in the groundwater. The goals of the research proposed are: • development of a computational approach that will allow reaction pathways and rate constants to be accurately calculated • development of more approximate approaches, evaluated against the more accurate approach, which will lay the groundwork for exploratory studies of more complex CHCs • application of these approaches to study the degradation pathways of CHCs in aqueous liquids • application of the more approximate approaches to study the mechanism of forming complex CHC polychlorinated benzene compounds and dioxins. We examined elementary reactions involved in the aqueous-phase chemistry of chlorinated methanes and ethylenes in an attempt to obtain a detailed understanding of the abiotic processes involved in the degradation of this important class of contaminants. We began by studying the reactions of CHnCl(4-n) and C2HnCl(4-n) with OH¯, as these are thought to be the dominant processes involved in the degradation of these chlorinated species. We used state-of-the-art theoretical techniques to model the elementary reactions of CHCs important in the groundwater. We employed high-accuracy electronic structure methods (e.g., perturbation theory and coupled cluster methods with correlation-consistent basis sets) to determine the energies of the various stable species, intermediates, and transition states involved in the elementary reactions of CHCs. Effects of solvation on the reaction energetics were studied by including small numbers of solvent molecules (microsolvation). Our own N-layered molecular orbital + molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method was used because it allows the number of solvent molecules to be increased, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods and continuum solvation models were used to estimate the effects of bulk solvation. Rate constants for the gas-phase, microsolvated, and bulk-phase reactions were computed using variational transition state theory (VTST).

Truhlar, Donald G.; Cramer, Christopher; Gao, Jiali; Garrett, Bruce C.; Dupuis, Michel; Straatsma, TP; Morokuma, Keiji; Dunning, Thomas H.; Borisov, Yurii A.; Arcia, Edgar E.; Thompson, Jacob S.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

UPTAKE AND LOSS OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS BY THE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, IN LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UPTAKE AND LOSS OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS BY THE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, IN LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ROBERT C. CLARK, JR., AND JOHN S. FINLEY' ABSTRACT Petroleum paraffin hydrocarbons (n-CI4H30 to n-C37H76 system that simulated tides. The mussels were exposed to levels of petroleum hydrocarbons from a surface

466

A 4D Synchrotron X-Ray-Tomography Study of the Formation of Hydrocarbon-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbons and the growing production of hydrocarbons from low-permeability tight rocks. Quantitative models, University of Oslo, Idaho National Laboratory, and Institute for Energy Technology Summary Recovery of oil from oil shales and the natural primary migration of hydrocarbons are closely related processes

Mazzini, Adriano

467

The Interaction of Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons with Tissues VII. Fractionation of Mouse Skin Proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Inferaction of Hydrocarbons with Tissues. VII...separation of the water- soluble proteins...in Chart 1, and water-soluble proteins...Interaction of Hydrocarbons with Tissues. VII...noncarcinogenic hydrocarbons could be detected...electrophoretic separation of water-soluble proteins...

G. Rodman Davenport; C. W. Abell; and Charles Heidelberger

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Male-derived cuticular hydrocarbons signal sperm competition intensity and affect ejaculate expenditure in crickets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...taxa has shown that cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), contact pheromones...They were supplied with water and fed cat food ad libitum...between-family variation in male hydrocarbon profiles (Thomas Simmons...variation within the blends of hydrocarbons in this experiment, male...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Extraction of Biofuels and Biofeedstocks from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extraction of Biofuels and Biofeedstocks from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquids Luke D. Simoni-Butanol, Extraction, Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium, Excess Gibbs Energy Models, Biofuels #12;1 1. Introduction other organic compounds can be produced biologically, and thus can be considered as biofuel candidates

Stadtherr, Mark A.

470

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

471

Method for producing superconductors  

SciTech Connect

In a method for producing v/sub 3/Ga superconductors which comprises forming a composite of a core portion and a sheath portion surrounding said core portion, said sheath portion being composed of a gallium-containing alloy selected from the group consisting of copper-gallium and copper-silver-gallium alloys, and said core portion being composed of a vanadium metal, elongating said composite, and heat-treating the resulting elongated composite to form a v/sub 3/Ga layer between said sheath and core portions; the improvement wherein the gallium-containing alloy has a gallium content of 0.1 to 30 atomic percent and additionally contains at least one metal selected from the group consisting of 0.05 to 5 atomic percent of magnesium, 0.5 to 10 atomic percent of aluminum , 0.1 to 10 atomic percent of cerium and 0.05 to 10 atomic percent of sodium, and the vanadium metal is a vanadium alloy containing 0.1 to 15 atomic percent of gallium.

Asano, T.; Tachikawa, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Yoshida, Y.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

472

Improving liquid chemical intervention methods to control pathogens on fresh-cut fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Factors that affect liquid chemical intervention methods of controlling pathogens on fresh-cut produce were investigated. The relationship between produce tissue structure (intercellular space, cell size, and cell distribution) and the sanitizing...

Troya, Maria Rosa

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

473

Speciation and Quantitation of Hydrocarbons in Gasoline Engine Exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......laboratory engines or reactors. In this paper we...computer technology have advanced to the state where...2-1 m), and the heavy (C5 -C1 2 ) hydrocarbons...PLOT column with water or heavy hy drocarbons...technology to prevent water vapor from condensing...computer technology have advanced to the state where......

Keith L. Olson; Robert M. Sinkevitch; Thompson M. Sloane

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Hydrocarbon Condensation in Heavy-Duty Diesel Exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon Condensation in Heavy-Duty Diesel Exhaust ... The semivolatile mass fraction of diesel exhaust particles was studied using size-resolved on-line techniques (DMA-ELPI; TDMA-ELPI). ... The measured size resolved values of mass transfer imply that condensation, or diffusion-limited mass transfer, plays a major role in driving the volatile matter to the diesel exhaust particles. ...

Jyrki Ristimäki; Kati Vaaraslahti; Maija Lappi; Jorma Keskinen

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

475

High Levels of Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mate Drinks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leaves and/or exposure to combustion products or formation of ash...analysis of the mainstream smoke chemistry of samples of the U.S. cigarette...comparison of the tumors induced by coal tar and benzo[a]pyrene...Spectrometry Ilex paraguariensis chemistry Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic...

Farin Kamangar; Michele M. Schantz; Christian C. Abnet; Renato B. Fagundes; and Sanford M. Dawsey

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Seismic Analysis Using Wavelet Transform for Hydrocarbon Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data quality is good. This technique can be directly applied to the processed 2D and 3 D pre-stack/post-stack data sets (1) to detect hydrocarbon zones in both clastic and carbonate reservoirs by analyzing the low frequency signals in the decomposed...

Cai, Rui

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another.

Westbrook, C.K.

2000-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

478

Energy Conservation Opportunities in Hydrocarbon Resin Manufacturing Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The results of a plant-wide assessment of the manufacturing facilities of Neville Chemical Company, a manufacturer of hydrocarbon resins will be presented in this paper. The project was co-funded by US Department of Energy under its Plant...

Ganji, A. R.; Hackett, B.; Chow, S.; Lonergan, R.; Wimer, J.

479

Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals  

SciTech Connect

Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Climatically driven emissions of hydrocarbons from marine sediments during deglaciation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...destabilizing hydrates shown in the lighter...destabilization of methane hydrates and release of...in SBC suggest gas emissions during...investigate the sand-sized fraction...the presence of sand layers (23...hydrocarbons and methane hydrate, which is widely...4) (24). Gas hydrates commonly...

T. M. Hill; J. P. Kennett; D. L. Valentine; Z. Yang; C. M. Reddy; R. K. Nelson; R. J. Behl; C. Robert; L. Beaufort

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid hydrocarbons produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Hydrocarbons Heterogeneous Pyrolysis: Experiments and Modeling for Scramjet Thermal Management : United States (2008)" #12;2 I. Introduction One of the main issues of the development of scramjet, an air to the endothermicity of its thermal decomposition. Because of the large heat load found in a scramjet, engine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

482

Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

483

Increased olefins production via recovery of refinery gas hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

In the process of catalytically cracking heavy petroleum fractions to make gasoline and light fuel oil, by-product waste gases are also generated. The waste gases, normally used as fuel, are themselves rich sources of ethylene, propylene and other light hydrocarbons which can be recovered inexpensively via a cryogenic dephlegmator process. This gas separation technique is exploited in a system, in operation since spring of 1987, which reclaims C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a refinery gas. The reclamation process bolsters production in a nearby ethylene plant. Causing no disruption of ethylene plant operations, the cryogenic hydrocarbon recovery system functions smoothly with existing systems. The dephlegmation unit operation melds distillation and heat transfer processes in a single easily-controlled step which boosts the hydrocarbon purity and recovery above the levels profitably achievable with conventional cryogenic separation techniques. Very attractive operating economics follow from high purity, high recovery, and high energy efficiency. This paper discusses process concepts, economic benefits, plant operation, and early performance results.

Bernhard, D.P.; Rowles, H.C.; Moss, J.A.; Pickering, J.L. Jr.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMOCATALYTIC CO2- FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS N. Muradov Florida Solar Energy Center 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, Florida 32922 tel. 321-638-1448, fax. 321-638-1010, muradov (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO2 byproducts

485

Biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in Jordanian petroleum sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioremediation, or the use of micro-organisms to decontaminate soil or groundwater, is being increasingly seen as an effective, environment-friendly treatment for oil-contaminated sites. In this study, the results are presented concerning a laboratory screening of several natural bacterial consortia and laboratory tests to establish the performance in degradation of hydrocarbons contained in oily sludge from the Jordan Oil Refinery Plant. As a result of the laboratory screening, 18 isolates were selected and grouped into two main clusters; cluster 1 containing 12 isolates grown at 43°C, and cluster 2 containing six isolates grown at 37°C. Three natural bacterial consortia with ability to degrade total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were prepared from these isolates. Experiments were conducted in Erlenmeyer flasks under aerobic conditions, with TPH removal percentage varying from 5.9% to 25.1%, depending upon consortia type and concentration. Consortia 7B and 13B exhibited the highest TPH removal percentages of 25% and 23%, respectively before nutrient addition. TPH removal rate was enhanced after addition of nutrients to incubated flasks. The highest TPH reduction (37%) was estimated after addition of a combination of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur to consortia 7B. This is the first report concerning biological treatment of total petroleum hydrocarbon by bacteria isolated from the oil refinery plant, where it lay the ground for full integrated studies recommended for hydrocarbon degradation that assist in solving sludge problems.

Bassam Mrayyan; Mohammad Battikhi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Hydrocarbons in rift basins: the role of stratigraphy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...succession that causes the shales to reach thermal maturity and generate hydrocarbons. Simple...T. J. 1988 Rift basins of interior Sudan--petroleum exploration and discovery...basins? Is that what we could call the thermal subsidence phase? J. J. Lambiase...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Application of Resource-Ratio Theory to Hydrocarbon Biodegradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of Resource-Ratio Theory to Hydrocarbon Biodegradation ... We suggest that the procedures outlined here can be used to help guide practical decisions about the nutrients that are most likely to be growth-limiting and help define the subsequent nutrient application rates. ...

Val H. Smith; David W. Graham; Dale D. Cleland

1998-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

488

Theoretical studies of hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. Annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

The author reports here the results of DZP CISD calculations for methylcarbene. Geometry, symmetry, and vibrational modes for the radical are reported for both the singlet and the triplet state. Future work will focus on the ethyl radical-oxygen interaction relevant to hydrocarbon combustion.

Schaefer, H.F. III

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The effects of deposit thermal history on microstructure produced by uniform droplet spray forming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uniform droplet spray forming is a process aimed at producing near-net-shape parts directly from the liquid melt by spraying micron-sized droplets onto a movable target. In spray forming, the solidification rate of the ...

Cherng, Jean-Pei Jeanie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

491

In situ method for recovering hydrocarbon from subterranean oil shale deposits  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes in situ method for recovering hydrocarbons from subterranean oil shale deposits, the deposits comprising mineral rock and kerogen, comprising (a) penetrating the oil shale deposit with at least one well; (b) forming a zone of fractured and/or rubbilized oil shale material adjacent the well by hydraulic or explosive fracturing; (c) introducing a hydrogen donor solvent including tetralin into the portion of the oil shale formation treated in step (b) in a volume sufficient to fill substantially all of the void space created by the fracturing and rubbilizing treatment; (d) applying hydrogen to the tetralin and maintaining a predetermined pressure for a predetermined period of time sufficient to cause disintegration of the oil shale material; (e) thereafter introducing an oxidative environment into the portion of the oil shale deposit (f) producing the solvent in organic fragments to the surface of the earth, and (g) separating the organic fragments from the solvent.

Friedman, R.H.

1987-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

492

Controling factors on hydrocarbon accumulation in Strait of Hormuz, Persian Gulf  

SciTech Connect

Several structures with reasonable magnatiud has been detected on the seismic survey, carried out by IRAN and OMAN between the Coordinates of 56{degrees} to 57{degrees} East in the strait of HORMUZ. Some of these anticlines found to be commercially oil bearing in the middle and Upper Cretaceous horizons (Local names of SARVAK and ILAM reservoir). Where as in the other surrounding structures despite of presence the same conditions of large anticlines & reservoir horizons no sign of hydrocarbon accumulation has been observed. The reasons of this anomally which depends an many factors is highly vital to the regional producing countries. This controling factors will be evaluated on this paper. The berif reasons are as follow: Regional deformation versus Geological history. Tectonic events of the OMAN Region. Lower CAMBERIAN SALT Diapirism. Thickness and facies variation of the area. Fractured porosity extention.

Vasseghi, B. [Iranian Offshore Oil Co., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Reclamation and groundwater remediation at a hydrocarbon site in Alaska  

SciTech Connect

As part of a joint hydrocarbon cleanup project between Unocal and Marathon, we have initiated the use of constructed wetlands for restoration of the 40-acre Poppy Lane gravel pit located near Kenai, Alaska. Gravel excavated from this site was used to construct roads and drilling pads in the 1960`-70`s. During this period it was also used as a refuse dump for waste from the Kenai gas field and from local residents. The bulk wastes were removed and pockets of oily sand were removed, treated and returned to a stockpile on the site. This left the site with residual pockets of hydrocarbon-impacted sand (<1000 TPH) plus traces of hydrocarbon contamination in the uppermost shallow groundwater flowing through the outwash gravels. The final part of the cleanup will be land restoration and bioremediation of the final traces of hydrocarbons, which are predominantly diesel-range. High resolution gas chromatography analysis indicated that common plants already growing on the site (willow, cottonwood, and alder) did not concentrate diesel-range petroleum hydrocarbons in their foliage when growing in soils containing these contaminants. As part of the planned restoration and shallow groundwater remediation, two 1/3 acre test plots were constructed to promote in-situ biodegradation processes. In spring 1995, the first test, a tree root-barrier plot, was planted with dormant cuttings of four native wetland tree and shrub species, which were planted to depths up to five feet. Alder and elderberry did not succeed under any conditions, nor did any species planted in standing water. For cottonwood and willow species, approximately one half of each rooted and survived. When the water table dropped the second year, the willow cuttings rooted deeper in the vadose zone, while cottonwood did not. As a result of these findings, a tree root-barrier wetland is not considered to be a viable option for groundwater treatment at Poppy Lane.

Ririe, G.T. [Unocal, Brea, CA (United States); Drake, L.D. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Olson, S.S. [Marathon Oil, Tyler, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

EA-1811: NewPage Corporation Wood Biomass to Liquid Fuel, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide federal funding to NewPage for final design, construction and operation of a demonstration scale biorefinery. The NewPage biorefinery facility would be integrated with the existing paper mill and produce up to 555 barrels per day (bpd) of clean hydrocarbon biofuel. This EA is has been cancelled.

495

Simultaneous liquid–liquid and vapour–liquid equilibria predictions of selected oxygenated aromatic molecules in mixtures with alkanes, alcohols, water, using the polar GC-PC-SAFT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Phase equilibria of oxygen-bearing aromatic compounds, hydrocarbons and water mixtures are of essential interest in many processes using feeds originating from biomass. The strong non-ideal thermodynamic behavior of these systems sometimes results in immiscibility with both water and alkanes. To address this problem, the GC-PPC-SAFT equation of state [Tamouza et al., 2004; Nguyen-Huynh et al., 2008a] is extended to some selected components: phenol, alkyl-phenols, alkyl-benzoates, benzaldehyde and anisole. However, as in these multifunctional compounds, the proximity of polar functional groups may result in a lack of transferability of the parameters from the monofunctional homologous species, some parameters have been adapted in view of physical arguments. Next, liquid–vapour and liquid–liquid equilibria of mixtures with n-alkanes were evaluated, using a predictive method for the binary interaction parameters (kij) [Nguyen-Huynh et al., 2008b]. Finally, mixtures with other associating compounds, as alcohols and water have also been considered. In all cases, both correlations and predictions are qualitatively and quantitatively satisfactory. The relative deviations obtained on bubble pressure of vapor–liquid equilibria are 4–8%, that is comparable to those obtained on previously investigated systems.

Nguyen-Huynh Dong; de Hemptinne Jean-Charles; Lugo Rafael; Passarello Jean-Philippe; Tobaly Pascal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Hydrotreating of coal-derived liquids  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Sandia`s refining of coal-derived liquids project is to determine the relationship between hydrotreating conditions and Product characteristics. The coal-derived liquids used in this work were produced In HTI`s first proof-of-concept run using Illinois No. 8 coal. Samples of the whole coal liquid product, distillate fractions of this liquid, and Criterion HDN-60 catalyst were obtained from Southwest Research Inc. Hydrotreating experiments were performed using a continuous operation, unattended, microflow reactor system. A factorial experimental design with three variables (temperature, (310{degrees}C to 388{degrees}C), liquid hourly space velocity (1 to 3 g/h/cm{sup 3}(cat)), pressure (500 to 1000 psig H{sub 2}) is being used in this project. Sulfur and nitrogen contents of the hydrotreated products were monitored during the hydrotreating experiments to ensure that activity was lined out at each set of reaction conditions. Results of hydrotreating the whole coal liquid showed that nitrogen values in the products ranged from 549 ppM at 320{degrees}C, 3 g/h/cm{sup 3}(cat), 500 psig H{sub 2} to <15 ppM at 400{degrees}C, 1 g/h/ cm{sup 3}(cat), 1000 psig H{sub 2}.

Stohl, F.V.; Lott, S.E.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.; Oelfke, J.B.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Ultrasonic liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

499

Interaction of Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons with Tissues: VIII. Binding of Tritium-labeled Hydrocarbons to the Soluble Proteins of Mouse Skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treated as described in "Materials and Methods." A demonstration...of the unbound radio active hydrocarbon was removed...migrated toward the cathode, a neutral in dicator...pro teins toward the cathode was affected by electro...dermis as described in "Materials and Methods." The...

C. W. Abell and Charles Heidelberger

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z