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1

New and Underutilized Technology: Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner New and Underutilized Technology: Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner October 4, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for liquid desiccant air conditioners (LDACs) within the Federal sector. Benefits Liquid desiccant air conditioners deeply dry air using natural gas, solar energy, waste heat, bio-fuel, or other fossil fuels to drive the system. By providing mostly latent cooling, the LDAC controls indoor humidity without overcooling and reheating. This unit is supplemented by an electric chiller or DX air conditioner that sensibly cools the building's recirculation air. The liquid desiccant is a concentrated salt solution that directly absorbs moisture. Application LDACs are applicable in hospital, office, prison, school, and service

2

Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

A novel liquid-desiccant air conditioner that dries and cools building supply air will transform the use of direct-contact liquid-desiccant systems in HVAC applications, improving comfort, air quality, and providing energy-efficient humidity control.

Lowenstein, A.; Slayzak, S.; Kozubal, E.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Desiccant bed on hydrocarbon charged to and removed from underground (salt) cavern  

SciTech Connect

A hydrocarbon fluid storage system is described which consists of in operable conjunction: a cavern formed within an underground salt strata below a ground surface, the cavern comprises a lower liquid volume of saturated sodium chloride storage brine and an upper fluid volume of wet hydrocarbon storage fluid, surface fluid handling means; conduit connecting the lower storage brine and upper storage hydrocarbon fluid with the surface fluid handling means, of fluid transfer means enabling transfer of brine and hydrocarbon fluid from the surface to the cavern and from the cavern to the surface, such that brine can be added to or withdrawn from the lower brine volume and hydrocarbon fluids can be added to or withdrawn from the upper hydrocarbon fluid volume, and at least one desiccant drier means positioned at the surface in operable association with the surface fluid handling means whereby the wet hydrocarbon fluid upon withdrawal from the cavern passes through the desiccant drier means and thereby becomes dry, and dry hydrocarbon fluid intended for storage passes through the desiccant drier prior to entering the storage cavern and thereby becomes wet.

Washer, S.P.

1986-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

4

High performance liquid desiccant cooling system simulation at standard ARI conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? the experimental indirect evaporative cooler results liqdesc - the liquid desiccant solution room ? the conditioned space s ? desiccant solution tow, in - the inlet condition of the packed tower absorber tow, out ? the outlet condition of the packed tower... surface area of desiccant as well as to suspend the desiccant, which in turn exposes it to the air for a longer period of time. Humid air is blown counter currently from the bottom of the tower through the packing material and 16 Gas ]out Liquid...

McDonald, Brian Francis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

A model for a variable-volume, density-stratified, liquid desiccant storage tank.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A stratified, single-vessel liquid desiccant storage tank is an attractive option for the seasonal storage of solar energy. Maintaining stratified storage preserves the chemical energy… (more)

Mallinak, Jason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

A Preliminary Evaluation of Alternative Liquid Desiccants for a Hybrid Desiccant Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The candidate desiccants have toxicity ratings from moderate (LiC1) to low (CaC12) to relatively nontoxic (TEG). One measure of toxicity is the ID50 dose, which is the lethal dose that will result in fatality 60% of the time. Lithium chloride has an LD50..., thereby maintaining the deaiccant in solution. Table 2 Figures of Merit for Safety ID50 Relative Desiccant (02) Weight LiCl 1.23 7 LiBr 4.03 8 The saline desiccants are described aa odorless, while trietheylene glycol is described as having a mild...

Studak, J. W.; Peterson, J. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Development and modelling of a solar assisted liquid desiccant dehumidification air-conditioning system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the development and simulation of an advanced solar assisted liquid desiccant dehumidification air-conditioning system for ... regenerator, and an array of flat plate solar collectors. The sys...

Aqeel Kareem Mohaisen; Zhenjun Ma

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Retrofitting of Conditioning Systems for Existing Small Commercial Buildings - Analysis and Design of Liquid Desiccant - Vapor Compression Hybrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RETROFITTING OF CONDITIONINC SYSTEMS FOR EXISTING SMALL COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS - ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF LIQUID DESICCANT - VAPOR COMPRESSION HYBRID Ozer A. Arnas Professor Department of Mechanical Engineering Louisiana State University Baton... is combined with air heated passively in an attic to regenerate the desiccant. A prototype open-cycle, liquid desiccant dehumidification system has been adapted to the existing mechanical system of the building (Figure 1). Guidelines for retrofitting...

Arnas, O. A.; McQueen, T. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications  

SciTech Connect

Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioning: General Guidance and Site Considerations  

SciTech Connect

Dehumidification or latent cooling in buildings is an area of growing interest that has been identified as needing more research and improved technologies for higher performance. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems typically expend excessive energy by using overcool-and-reheat strategies to dehumidify buildings. These systems first overcool ventilation air to remove moisture and then reheat the air to meet comfort requirements. Another common strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove moisture from the air more efficiently; however, these systems increase fan energy consumption because of the high airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors and can add heat of absorption to the ventilation air. Alternatively, liquid desiccant air-conditioning (LDAC) technology provides an innovative dehumidification solution that: (1) eliminates the need for overcooling and reheating from traditional cooling systems; and (2) avoids the increased fan energy and air heating from solid desiccant rotor systems.

Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Indirect evaporative cooler using membrane-contained, liquid desiccant for dehumidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect evaporative cooler for cooling inlet supply air from a first temperature to a second, lower temperature using a stream of liquid coolant and a stream of exhaust or purge air. The cooler includes a first flow channel for inlet supply air and a second flow channel adjacent the first for exhaust air. The first and second flow channels are defined in part by sheets of a membrane permeable to water vapor such that mass is transferred as a vapor through the membrane from the inlet supply air to a contained liquid desiccant for dehumidification and also to the exhaust air as heat is transferred from the inlet supply air to the liquid coolant. A separation wall divides the liquid desiccant and the coolant but allows heat to be transferred from the supply air to the coolant which releases water vapor to the counter or cross flowing exhaust air.

Kozubal, Eric Joseph; Slayzak, Steven Joseph

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Simulation and study of thermal performance of liquid desiccant cooling cycle configurations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: $ g(Beg~ 'i:1. ;, "?i C. F. K ttleborough (Chair of Committee) W. He n t (Member), H. Juvka -Wold (Member) G. P. Peterson (Head of Department...) May 1995 Major Subject. Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT Simulation and Study of Thermal Performance of Liquid Desiccant Cooling Cycle Configurations. (May 1995) Rajesh Dhir, B. S. , Poona University, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. F...

Dhir, Rajesh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt concentration polarization New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt concentration polarization...

14

Solar-Powered, Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Low-Electricity Humidity Control: Report and Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the capabilities of a new high-performance, liquid-desiccant dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) to enhance cooling efficiency and comfort in humid climates while substantially reducing electric peak demand at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), which is 12 miles east of Panama City, Florida.

Dean, J.; Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Miller, J.; Lowenstein, A.; Barker, G.; Slayzak, S.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Seminar 14 - Desiccant Enhanced Air Conditioning: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation explains how liquid desiccant based coupled with an indirect evaporative cooler can efficiently produce cool, dry air, and how a liquid desiccant membrane air conditioner can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification without the carryover problems of previous generations of liquid desiccant systems. It provides an overview to a liquid desiccant DX air conditioner that can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification to high latent loads without the need for reheat, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems can outperform vapor compression based air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems work, and describes a refrigerant free liquid desiccant based cooling system.

Kozubal, E.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Zero Carryover A Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications Preprint A. Lowenstein AIL Research, Inc. S. Slayzak and E. Kozubal National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at ASME International Solar Energy Conference (ISEC2006) Denver, Colorado July 8-13, 2006 Conference Paper NREL/CP-550-39798 July 2006 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

17

Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer  

SciTech Connect

The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Sandia National Laboratories: New Liquid Salt Electrolytes Could...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergyNew Liquid Salt Electrolytes Could Lead to Cost-Effective Flow Batteries New Liquid Salt Electrolytes Could Lead to Cost-Effective Flow Batteries Sandia Tool...

19

Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort  

SciTech Connect

Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

Jalalzadeh, A. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier and hybrid solar/electric absorption refrigeration system. Annual report, January 1993--December 1993. Calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This annual report presents work performed during calendar year 1993 by the Florida Solar Energy Center under contract to the US Department of Energy. Two distinctively different solar powered indoor climate control systems were analyzed: the open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier, and an improved efficiency absorption system which may be fired by flat plate solar collectors. Both tasks represent new directions relative to prior FSEC research in Solar Cooling and Dehumidification.

Nimmo, B.G.; Thornbloom, M.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Liquid Salt Heat Exchanger Technology for VHTR Based Applications  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to evaluate performance of liquid salt fluids for use as a heat carrier for transferring high-temperature process heat from the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) to chemical process plants. Currently, helium is being considered as the heat transfer fluid; however, the tube size requirements and the power associated with pumping helium may not be economical. Recent work on liquid salts has shown tremendous potential to transport high-temperature heat efficiently at low pressures over long distances. This project has two broad objectives: To investigate the compatibility of Incoloy 617 and coated and uncoated SiC ceramic composite with MgCl2-KCl molten salt to determine component lifetimes and aid in the design of heat exchangers and piping; and, To conduct the necessary research on the development of metallic and ceramic heat exchangers, which are needed for both the helium-to-salt side and salt-to-process side, with the goal of making these heat exchangers technologically viable. The research will consist of three separate tasks. The first task deals with material compatibility issues with liquid salt and the development of techniques for on-line measurement of corrosion products, which can be used to measure material loss in heat exchangers. Researchers will examine static corrosion of candidate materials in specific high-temperature heat transfer salt systems and develop an in situ electrochemical probe to measure metallic species concentrations dissolved in the liquid salt. The second task deals with the design of both the intermediate and process side heat exchanger systems. Researchers will optimize heat exchanger design and study issues related to corrosion, fabrication, and thermal stresses using commercial and in-house codes. The third task focuses integral testing of flowing liquid salts in a heat transfer/materials loop to determine potential issues of using the salts and to capture realistic behavior of the salts in a small scale prototype system. This includes investigations of plugging issues, heat transfer, pressure drop, and the corrosion and erosion of materials in the flowing system.

Mark Anderson; Kumar Sridhara; Todd Allen; Per Peterson

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Refueling Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR), also called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR), is a new reactor concept that combines in a novel way four established technologies: (1) coated-particle graphite-matrix nuclear fuels, (2) Brayton power cycles, (3) passive safety systems and plant designs previously developed for liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors, and (4) low-pressure liquid-salt coolants. Depending upon goals, the peak coolant operating temperatures are between 700 and 1000 deg. C, with reactor outputs between 2400 and 4000 MW(t). Several fluoride salt coolants that are being evaluated have melting points between 350 and 500 deg. C, values that imply minimum refueling temperatures between 400 and 550 deg. C. At operating conditions, the liquid salts are transparent and have physical properties similar to those of water. A series of refueling studies have been initiated to (1) confirm the viability of refueling, (2) define methods for safe rapid refueling, and (3) aid the selection of the preferred AHTR design. Three reactor cores with different fuel element designs (prismatic, pebble bed, and pin-type fuel assembly) are being evaluated. Each is a liquid-salt-cooled variant of a graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor. The refueling studies examined applicable refueling experience from high-temperature reactors (similar fuel element designs) and sodium-cooled fast reactors (similar plant design with liquid coolant, high temperatures, and low pressures). The findings indicate that refueling is viable, and several approaches have been identified. The study results are described in this paper. (authors)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Peterson, Per F. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California at Berkeley, 6124a Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cahalan, James E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Enneking, Jeffrey A. [Areva NP (United States); Phil MacDonald [Consultant, Cedar Hill, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning May 29, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis This breakthrough combines desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90 percent less electricity and up to 80 percent less total energy than traditional air conditioning. This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. What are the key facts? Recent materials advances and liquid desiccant advances to design the compact and cost-effective DEVAP system. DEVAP uses 90 percent less electricity and up to 80 percent less

24

Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning Lab Breakthrough: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning May 29, 2012 - 5:22pm Addthis This breakthrough combines desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90 percent less electricity and up to 80 percent less total energy than traditional air conditioning. This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. What are the key facts? Recent materials advances and liquid desiccant advances to design the compact and cost-effective DEVAP system.

25

Energy consumption and optimization of internally cooled/heated liquid desiccant air-conditioning system: A case study in Hong Kong  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract LDAC (liquid desiccant air-conditioning system) is promising for reducing the energy consumption, and improving the indoor air quality. In this paper, the operation performance of LDAC with internally cooled/heated dehumidifier/regenerator was simulated and optimized. The cooling tower and solar collectors were employed as the cooling/heating source. Four nested iteration loops were developed and solved for system modeling. A typical commercial building in Hong Kong was selected as a case study, which air-conditioning load was obtained by Energy-plus. Results show that with the increase of solar collector area, the electricity consumption of AC (air-conditioning systems) system reduced by 11–35% in original system, but only a part of dehumidification demand was handled with liquid desiccant ventilation, which led to a low chiller COP (coefficient of performance). By adding a cooling coil for the solution entering dehumidifier, the electricity saving effectively increased to 22–47%, while the heat demand for regeneration also increased by 17%. So, a heat exchanger between water leaving regenerator and solution leaving dehumidifier was introduced. With the lower thermal requirement (reduced by 20%) and higher solar fraction (increased from 30 to 40%), the saving further increased to 29–49%, and the required collector area obviously reduced by 50–60% for the similar energy saving purpose.

Ronghui Qi; Lin Lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Selective Solid-Liquid Extraction of Lithium Halide Salts Using a Ditopic Macrobicyclic Receptor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pairs. The receptor can transport these salts from an aqueous phase through a liquid organic membrane and membrane transport, almost all reported efforts have focused on the transfer of lithium salts from this by binding the salts as contact ion pairs. Receptor 1 can also transport alkali metal halide salts out

Smith, Bradley D.

27

Transport of Alkali Halides through a Liquid Organic Membrane Containing a Ditopic Salt-Binding Receptor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the solid state as contact ion pairs. Transport experiments, using a supported liquid membrane and high saltTransport of Alkali Halides through a Liquid Organic Membrane Containing a Ditopic Salt and anion receptors. All transport systems exhibit the same qualitative order of ion selectivity; that is

Smith, Bradley D.

28

Solar Desiccant Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Desiccant Cooling Solar Desiccant Cooling Speaker(s): Paul Bourdoukan Date: December 6, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil The development of HVAC systems is a real challenge regarding its environmental impact. An innovative technique operating only by means of water and solar energy, is desiccant cooling. The principle is evaporative cooling with the introduction of a dehumidification unit, the desiccant wheel to control the humidity levels. The regeneration of the desiccant wheel requires a preheated airstream. A solar installation is a very interesting option for providing the preheated airstream. In France, at the University of La Rochelle, and at the National Institute of Solar Energy (INES), the investigation of the solar desiccant cooling technique has been

29

Low-Cost "Vacuum Desiccator"  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-Cost "Vacuum Desiccator" ... Described are individualized, low-cost, and safe desiccators that can be efficiently and rapidly made with an inexpensive kitchen aid sold for shrink-wrapping food. ... Cost-Effective Teacher ...

Frederick Sweet

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Desiccant Cooling Systems - A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling systems have been investigated extensively during the past decade as alternatives to electrically driven vapor compression systems because regeneration temperatures of the desiccant - about 160°F, can be achieved using natural gas...

Kettleborough, C. F.; Ullah, M. R.; Waugaman, D. G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Engineering Database of Liquid Salt Thermophysical and Thermochemical Properties  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a review of thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of candidate molten salt coolants, which may be used as a primary coolant within a nuclear reactor or heat transport medium from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to a processing plant, for example, a hydrogen-production plant. Thermodynamic properties of four types of molten salts, including LiF-BeF2 (67 and 33 mol%, respectively; also known as FLiBe), LiF-NaF-KF (46.5, 11.5, and 52 mol%, also known as FLiNaK), and KCl-MgCl2 (67 and 33 mol%), and sodium nitrate-sodium nitrite-potassium nitrate (NaNO3–NaNO2–KNO3, (7-49-44 or 7-40-53 mol%) have been investigated. Limitations of existing correlations to predict density, viscosity, specific heat capacity, surface tension, and thermal conductivity, were identified. The impact of thermodynamic properties on the heat transfer, especially Nusselt number was also discussed. Stability of the molten salts with structural alloys and their compatibility with the structural alloys was studied. Nickel and alloys with dense Ni coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides but not so in chlorides. Of the chromium containing alloys, Hastelloy N appears to have the best corrosion resistance in fluorides, while Haynes 230 was most resistant in chloride. In general, alloys with increasing carbon and chromium content are increasingly subject to corrosion by the fluoride salts FLiBe and FLiNaK, due to attack and dissolution of the intergranular chromium carbide. Future research to obtain needed information was identified.

Manohar S. Sohal; Matthias A. Ebner; Piyush Sabharwall; Phil Sharpe

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

far will integrate SWPF with current liquid waste facilities, such as the DWPF and the tanks farms." EM is pleased with the spirit of integration. "A key objective for us over the...

33

Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. – Officials with the EM program at Savannah River Site (SRS) recently announced a key milestone in preparation for the startup of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF): workers installed more than 1,200 feet of new transfer lines that will eventually connect existing liquid waste facilities to SWPF.

34

Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Salt Nature Bulletin No. 340-A April 12, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SALT It is fortunate that Salt -- common salt, known to chemists as sodium chloride and to mineralogists as Halite -- is one of the most abundant substances on earth, because most of us crave it and must have it. Eskimos get along without salt because they live mostly on the uncooked flesh of fish and mammals. A few nomad tribes never eat it and do not need it because their diet contains so much milk cheese, and meat eaten raw or roasted. We people who eat boiled meat and many vegetables must have salt. Of the millions of tons produced commercially each year, only about three percent is used as table salt. Large quantities are required for refrigeration meat packing, curing and preserving fish, pickles, sauerkraut, and for other foods prepared in brine. A lot of it is needed for livestock. Salt is spread on sidewalks, streets and highways to melt ice in winter. It is used to glaze pottery, sewer pipe and other ceramics. It is required in many metallurgical processes, chemical industries, and the manufacture of such products as leather, glass, soap, bleaching powder and photographic supplies. It has about 14,000 uses.

35

Three-dimensional imaging and precision metrology for liquid-salt-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

The liquid-salt-cooled very high temperature reactor, also called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR), is a new large high-temperature reactor concept that combines in a novel way four established technologies: (1) coated-particle graphite-matrix nuclear fuels, (2) Brayton power cycles, (3) passive safety systems and plant designs previously developed for liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors, and (4) low-pressure liquid-salt coolants. The AHTR will require refueling, in-service inspection, and maintenance (RIM) with supporting instrumentation systems. The fluoride salts that are being evaluated as potential reactor coolants have melting points between 350 and 500 deg. C, values that imply minimum RIM temperatures between 400 and 550 deg. C. These salts are transparent over a wider range of the light spectrum than is water. The high temperatures, the optical characteristics of the coolant, and advances in metrology may enable the use of lasers to create three-dimensional images of the reactor interior to assist refueling, monitor vibrations in components, map fluid flow, and enable inspections of internal reactor components. A description of the reactor and an initial evaluation of the use of optical techniques for AHTR instrumentation are provided. (authors)

Forsberg, C. W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6165 (United States); Varma, V. K.; Burgess, T. W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6304 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Preparation of binderless nanopore-isotropic graphite for inhibiting the liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration for molten salt nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mesocarbon microbeads and the isostatic pressing method were used to prepare binderless nanopore-isotropic graphite (NPIG) as a neutron moderator and reflector, to inhibit liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration during use in a molten salt nuclear reactor. The microstructure, thermophysical, and other properties of the NPIG were studied and compared with isostatic graphite (IG-110, TOYO TANSO CO., Ltd., Japan). A high-pressure reactor and a vacuum device were constructed to evaluate the molten salt and Xe135 penetration in the graphite, respectively. The results indicated that NPIG possessed a graphitization degree of 74% and excellent properties such as a high bending strength of 94.1 ± 2.5 MPa, a high compressive strength of 230 ± 3 MPa, a low porosity of 8.7%, and an average pore diameter of 69 nm. The fluoride salt occupation of IG-110 was 13.5 wt% under 1.5 atm, whereas the salt gain in NPIG remained steady even up to 10 atm with an increase of <0.06 wt%, demonstrating that the graphite could inhibit the liquid fluoride salt infiltration effectively. The helium diffusion coefficient for NPIG was 8.76 × 10?5 cm2/s, much less than 1.21 × 10?2 cm2/s for IG-110. The NPIG could effectively inhibit liquid fluoride salt and Xe135 penetration.

Jinliang Song; Yanling Zhao; Junpeng Zhang; Xiujie He; Baoliang Zhang; Pengfei Lian; Zhanjun Liu; Dongsheng Zhang; Zhoutong He; Lina Gao; Huihao Xia; Xingtai Zhou; Ping Huai; Quangui Guo; Lang Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Determination of Single-Ion Activities of H+ and Cl– in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid Solutions by Use of an Ionic Liquid Salt Bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many of the problems inherent to KCl-type salt bridges can be circumvented by use of a salt bridge made of a moderately hydrophobic ionic liquid, that is, an ionic liquid salt bridge (ILSB). ... A newly emerged salt bridge based on moderately hydrophobic ionic liqs. is promising to solve many of the problems that KCl-type salt bridges are unable to, possibly making the future of electroanal. ... The new salt bridge is free from most of the problems inherent to KCl-based salt bridges. ...

Hideaki Sakaida; Takashi Kakiuchi

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Small-angle neutron scattering study of structure and interaction during salt-induced liquid-liquid phase transition in protein solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in aqueous salt solutions of lysozyme protein has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. Measurements have been carried out on fixed protein concentration with varying salt concentration approaching LLPT. The data are fitted considering protein interaction by the two Yukawa (2Y) potential which combines short-range attraction and long-range repulsion. We show that LLPT arises because of enhancement of non-DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) short-range attraction without any conformational structural change of the protein. The salt concentration required for LLPT as well as corresponding short-range attraction decreases significantly with increase in protein concentration.

A. J. Chinchalikar; V. K. Aswal; J. Kohlbrecher; A. G. Wagh

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

39

Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste with High Salt Content by Colloidal Adsorbents - 13274  

SciTech Connect

Treatment processes have been fully developed for most of the liquid radioactive wastes generated during the operation of nuclear power plants. However, a process for radioactive liquid waste with high salt content, such as waste seawater generated from the unexpected accident at nuclear power station, has not been studied extensively. In this study, the adsorption efficiencies of cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) in radioactive liquid waste with high salt content were investigated using several types of zeolite with different particle sizes. Synthesized and commercial zeolites were used for the treatment of simulated seawater containing Cs and Sr, and the reaction kinetics and adsorption capacities of colloidal zeolites were compared with those of bulk zeolites. The experimental results demonstrated that the colloidal adsorbents showed fast adsorption kinetic and high binding capacity for Cs and Sr. Also, the colloidal zeolites could be successfully applied to the static adsorption condition, therefore, an economical benefit might be expected in an actual processes where stirring is not achievable. (authors)

Lee, Keun-Young; Chung, Dong-Yong; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Lee, Eil-Hee; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Review of Desiccant Dehumidification Technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper overviews applications of desiccant technology for dehumidifying commercial and institutional buildings. Because of various market, policy, and regulatory factors, this technology is especially attractive for dehumidification applications in the I990s.

Pesaran, A. A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Open-Cycle Desiccant Cooling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of staged regeneration as means of improving the desiccant cooling system performance is the subject of investigation in this study. In the staged regeneration, the regeneration section of desiccant dehumidifier is divided into two parts...

Ko, Y. J.; Charoensupaya, D.; Lavan, Z.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pressure exerted by the water vapor (in equilibrium...solutes in solution. The water vapor content of air...they often lead to a condensation of water. For example, early...pure liquid water at atmospheric pressure and at the...

M Potts

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Monitoring Vadose Zone Desiccation with Geophysical Methods  

SciTech Connect

Soil desiccation was recently field tested as a potential vadose zone remediation technology. Desiccation removes water from the vadose zone and significantly decreases the aqueous-phase permeability of the desiccated zone, thereby decreasing movement of moisture and contaminants. The 2-D and 3-D distribution of moisture content reduction over time provides valuable information for desiccation operations and for determining when treatment goals have been reached. This type of information can be obtained through use of geophysical methods. Neutron moisture logging, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography, and cross-hole ground penetrating radar approaches were evaluated with respect to their ability to provide effective spatial and temporal monitoring of desiccation during a treatability study conducted in the vadose zone of the DOE Hanford Site in WA.

Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan S.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effect of potassium halide salts on mutual solubility of water + aromatic hydrocarbons liquid–liquid interface studied with surface and interfacial tensions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface tension (?, mN/m) of benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene (EB) aromatic hydrocarbons (AHCs, low density liquids, LDL) and interfacial tension (IFT, mN/m) both with water and aqueous 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 mol kg? 1 KF, KCl, KBr, KI (high density liquids, HDL) separately at 303.15 K are reported. Contributions of –CH3 and –CH2CH3 of toluene and EB to hydrophobic interactions are calculated from ?toluene–?benzene and ?EB–?benzene, respectively. \\{IFTs\\} of water + AHCs liquid–liquid interfaces (LLI) are as toluene (34.71) > EB (32.35) > benzene (32.32 mN m? 1), with a ~ 32.32 mN m? 1 decrease from 71.40 mN m? 1 of water. \\{AHCs\\} with hyperconjugation (HC) and positive inductive effects (+ ve IE) with toluene and EB LLI have reduced IFT by 39.08, 2.39, ? 1.56 mN m? 1, respectively. The effects of ?-conjugation, –H, –CH3 and –CH2CH3 on surface tension are calculated as ?-conjugation = ?(IFTair–liquid ? IFTAPHS–benzene), –CH3 = ?(IFTAPHS–toluene ? IFTAPHS–benzene). The effects of halide salts on hypercongugation –H(–CH3)/3, –CH2CH3 are obtained from ?(IFTAPHS–EB ? IFTAPHS–benzene).

Man Singh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Experiments on sorption hysteresis of desiccant materials  

SciTech Connect

Solid desiccant cooling systems take advantage of solar energy for air conditioning. The process involves passing air through a desiccant bed for drying and subsequent evaporative cooling to provide the air conditioning. The desiccant is then regenerated with hot air provided by a gas burner or solar collectors. This performance is limited by the capacity of the desiccant, its sorption properties, and the long-term stability of the desiccant material under cyclic operation conditions. Therefore, we have developed a versatile test facility to measure the sorption properties of candidate solid desiccant materials under dynamic conditions, under different geometrical configurations, and under a broad range of process air stream conditions, characteristic of desiccant dehumidifer operation. We identified a dependence of the sorption processes on air velocity and the test cell aspect ratio and the dynamic hysteresis between adsorption and desorption processes. These experiments were geared to provide data on the dynamic performance of silica gel in a parallel-passage configuration to prepare for tests with a rotary dehumidifier that will be conducted at SERI in late FY 1984. We also recommend improving the accuracy of the isotopic perturbation technique.

Pesaran, A.; Zangrando, F.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Preliminary neutronic studies for the liquid-salt-cooled very hightemperature reactor (LS-VHTR).  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary neutronic studies have been performed in order to provide guidelines to the design of a liquid-salt cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) using Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) as coolant and a solid cylindrical core. The studies were done using the lattice codes (WIMS8 and DRAGON) and the linear reactivity model to estimate the core reactivity balance, fuel composition, discharge burnup, and reactivity coefficients. An evaluation of the lattice codes revealed that they give very similar accuracy as the Monte Carlo MCNP4C code for the prediction of the fuel element multiplication factor (kinf) and the double heterogeneity effect of the coated fuel particles in the graphite matrix. The loss of coolant from the LS-VHTR core following coolant voiding was found to result in a positive reactivity addition, due primarily to the removal of the strong neutron absorber Li-6. To mitigate this positive reactivity addition and its impact on reactor design (positive void reactivity coefficient), the lithium in the coolant must be enriched to greater than 99.995% in its Li-7 content. For the reference LS-VHTR considered in this work, it was found that the magnitude of the coolant void reactivity coefficient (CVRC) is quite small (less than $1 for 100% voiding). The coefficient was found to become more negative or less positive with increase in the lithium enrichment (Li-7 content). It was also observed that the coefficient is positive at the beginning of cycle and becomes more negative with increasing burnup, indicating that by using more than one fuel batch, the coefficient could be made negative at the beginning of cycle. It might, however, still be necessary at the beginning of life to design for a negative CVRC value. The study shows that this can be done by using burnable poisons (erbium is a leading candidate) or by changing the reference assembly design (channel dimensions) in order to modify the neutron spectrum. Parametric studies have been performed to attain targeted cycle length of 18 months and discharge burnup greater than 100 GWd/t with a constraint on the uranium enrichment (less than 20% to support non-proliferation goals). The results show that the required uranium enrichment and discharge burnup increase with the number of batches. The three-batch scheme is, however, impractical because the required uranium enrichment is greater than 20%. The required enrichment is smallest for the one-batch case, but its discharge burnup is smaller than the target value. Therefore, the two-batch scheme is desirable to satisfy simultaneously the target cycle length and discharge burnup. It was additionally shown that to increase the core power density to 150% of the reference core value, the required uranium enrichment is less than 20% in the single-batch scheme. This higher power density might not be achievable in the two- or three-batch schemes because the fuel enrichment would exceed 20%.

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Yang, W. S.

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

Experiments on sorption characteristics of solid desiccant materials for solar desiccant cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

A test facility for measuring the sorption properties of candidate solid desiccant materials under dynamic conditions as well as equilibrium conditions, those experienced during desiccant dehumidifier operation, was constructed and tested. The theory of perturbation chromatography was initially used to measure the equilibrium properties of a desiccant/water-vapor system for the first time. Silica gel, molecular sieve, and gamma-manganese dioxide were tested. The equilibrium capacity estimated by the perturbation chromatography was lower than those available in literature, which suggests that perturbation chromatography may not be applicable to desiccant/water-vapor systems. The perturbation chromatography was replaced with a gravimetric technique, and satisfactory results were obtained for a water-vapor/molecular-sieve system.

Pesaran, A.A.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Application of a solar desiccant/collector system for water recovery from atmospheric air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An integrated desiccant/solar collector system for production of fresh water from atmospheric air is described. The solar driven system provided about 1.5 l of fresh water per square meter per day. The system involves the absorption of water vapor from ambient air during the night and simultaneous desiccant regeneration and water vapor condensation during the day. To enhance the mass transfer surface, a thick corrugated layer of cloth was used as a bed to carry the liquid absorbent. In the nocturnal phase of operation, air is allowed to penetrate the desiccant bed. The airflow is driven by fans supported on one side of the desiccant/solar collector unit. In this study, the effects of different parameters on the absorption and regeneration processes are discussed, and operational conditions for the proposed equipment evaluated. Radiation intensity, ambient temperature, bed temperature and temperature of the glass surface were recorded. Also, the productivity of the system during the day and under the given operation conditions was plotted. A mathematical model was prepared and its output compared with the analyzed experimental data.

H.E Gad; A.M Hamed; I.I El-Sharkawy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effect of Desiccation Cracks on Earth Embankments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................. 4 1.4 Methodology ........................................................................................ 6 1.5 Summary .............................................................................................. 8 1.6 Layout... geometry recorded in literature ..... 17 2.5 Desiccation crack behavior during drying-wetting cycles ................... 29 2.6 Flow through a single crack ................................................................. 30 2.7 Flow through a...

Khandelwal, Siddharth

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors  

SciTech Connect

The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69% more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44% less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration. 8 refs.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Wipke, K. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dehydration of natural gas using solid desiccants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is an important source of primary energy that, under normal production conditions, is saturated with water vapor. Water vapor increases natural gases' corrosivity, especially when acid gases are present. Several methods can be used to dry natural gas and, in this paper, a solid desiccant dehydrator using silica gel is considered due to its ability to provide extremely low dew points. The design analysis of a two-tower, silica gel dehydration unit to dry one million standard m3 of natural gas per day is presented in this paper and the effects of various operating parameters on the design of the unit are discussed. The study also covers the analysis of energy requirements for the regeneration of the weak desiccant bed based on some simplified assumptions and it is found that the higher the regeneration temperature, the smaller are the required quantities of regeneration gas.

P Gandhidasan; Abdulghani A Al-Farayedhi; Ali A Al-Mubarak

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A review of desiccant dehumidification technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper overviews applications of desiccant technology for dehumidifying commercial and institutional buildings. Because of various market, policy, and regulatory factors, this technology is especially attractive for dehumidification applications in the 1990s. After briefly reviewing the principle of operation, the authors present three case studies-for supermarkets, a hotel, and an office building. The authors also discuss recent advances and ongoing research and development activities.

Pesaran, A.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Application of Desiccant Drying in Plastic Molding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATION OF DESICCANT DRYING IN PLASTIC MOLDING Michael Brown, P.E. Greg Connors, P.E. Douglas Moore, P.E. Senior Research Engr. Industrial Engr. Senior Research Engr. Ga. Tech Research Inst. Atlanta Gas Light Co. Ga. Tech Research Inst... will condense on refrigerated display doors. In ice rinks, condensation will occur on the ice surface causing it to soften if the humidity too high. In plastic molding, chilled water is provi ed to rapidly cool the finished parts. Cooling incr...

Brown, M.; Connors, G.; Moore, D.

55

Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Desiccant technology and applications, and designing them for utilization of available thermal energy in a combined heat and power (CHP) system.

56

An assessment of desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology  

SciTech Connect

Desiccant systems are heat-actuated cooling and dehumidification technology. With the recent advances in this technology, desiccant systems can now achieve a primary energy coefficient of performance (COP) between 1.3 and 1.5, with potential to go to 1.7 and higher. It is becoming one of the most promising alternatives to conventional cooling systems. Two important and well-known advantages of desiccant cooling systems are that they are CFC free and they can reduce the electricity peak load. Another important but lesser-known advantage of desiccant technology is its potential for energy conservation. The energy impact study in this report indicated that a possible 13% energy saving in residential cooling and 8% in commercial cooling is possible. Great energy saving potential also exists in the industrial sector if industrial waste heat can be used for desiccant regeneration. The latest study on desiccant-integrated building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems indicated that the initial cost for the conventional cooling equipment was greatly reduced by using desiccant technology because of downsized compressors, fans, and ductworks. This cost reduction was more than enough to offset the cost of desiccant equipment. Besides, the system operation cost was also reduced. All these indicate that desiccant systems are also cost effective. This study provides an updated state-of-the-art assessment forsiccant technology in the field of desiccant materials, systems, computer models, and theoretical analyses. From this information the technology options were derived and the future research and development needs were identified. Because desiccant technology has already been applied in the commercial building sector with very encouraging results, it is expected that future market breakthroughs will probably start in this sector. A market analysis for the commercial building application is therefore included.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lavan, Z. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)); Collier, R.K. Jr. (Collier Engineering Services, Merritt Island, FL (United States)); Meckler, G. (Gershon Meckler Associates, P.C., Herndon, VA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Modeling and Simulation of a Solar Assisted Desiccant Cooling System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling and Simulation of a Solar Assisted Desiccant Cooling System Modeling and Simulation of a Solar Assisted Desiccant Cooling System Speaker(s): Chadi Maalouf Date: December 2, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Peng Xu Increased living standards and high occupants comfort demands lead to a growth in air conditioning market. This results in high energy consumption and high CO2 emissions. For these reasons, the solar desiccant cooling system is proposed as an alternative to traditional air conditioning systems. This system comprises a desiccant wheel containing Lithium Chloride in tandem with a rotating heat exchanger and two humidifiers on both supply and return air. The required regeneration temperature for the desiccant wheel varies between 40oC and 70oC which makes possible the use

58

Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository  

SciTech Connect

Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

Simpson, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this NERI project was to perform research on high temperature fluoride and chloride molten salts towards the long-term goal of using these salts for transferring process heat from high temperature nuclear reactor to operation of hydrogen production and chemical plants. Specifically, the research focuses on corrosion of materials in molten salts, which continues to be one of the most significant challenges in molten salts systems. Based on the earlier work performed at ORNL on salt properties for heat transfer applications, a eutectic fluoride salt FLiNaK (46.5% LiF-11.5%NaF-42.0%KF, mol.%) and a eutectic chloride salt (32%MgCl2-68%KCl, mole %) were selected for this study. Several high temperature candidate Fe-Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, were exposed to molten FLiNaK with the goal of understanding corrosion mechanisms and ranking these alloys for their suitability for molten fluoride salt heat exchanger and thermal storage applications. The tests were performed at 850��������C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion was noted to occur predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries Alloy weight-loss due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys���¢�������� weight-loss was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present for the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. Experiments involving molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in Incoloy-800H crucibles under an argon cover gas showed a significantly lower corrosion for this alloy than when tested in a graphite crucible. Graphite significantly accelerated alloy corrosion due to the reduction of Cr from solution by graphite and formation on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in t

Kumar Sridharan; Mark Anderson; Todd Allen; Michael Corradini

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Condensation of Self-assembled Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystal Sunset Yellow in Aqueous Solutions Crowded with Polyethylene glycol and Doped with Salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use optical and fluorescence microscopy, densitometry, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray scattering, to study the phase behavior of the reversible self-assembled chromonic aggregates of an anionic dye Sunset Yellow (SSY) in aqueous solutions crowded with an electrically neutral polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) and doped with the salt NaCl. PEG causes the isotropic SSY solutions to condense into a liquid-crystalline region with a high concentration of SSY aggregates, coexisting with a PEG-rich isotropic (I) region. PEG added to the homogeneous nematic (N) phase causes separation into the coexisting N and I domains; the SSY concentration in the N domains is higher than the original concentration of PEG-free N phase. Finally, addition of PEG to the highly concentrated homogeneous N phase causes separation into the coexisting columnar hexagonal (C) phase and I phase. This behavior can be qualitatively explained by the depletion (excluded volume) effects that act at two different levels: at the level of aggregate assembly from monomers and short aggregates and at the level of inter-aggregate packing. We also show a strong effect of a monovalent salt NaCl on phase diagrams that is different for high and low concentrations of SSY. Upon the addition of salt, dilute I solutions of SSY show appearance of the condensed N domains, but the highly concentrated C phase transforms into a coexisting I and N domains. We suggest that the salt-induced screening of electric charges at the surface of chromonic aggregates leads to two different effects: (a) increase of the scission energy and the contour length of aggregates, and (b) decrease of the persistence length of SSY aggregates.

Heung-Shik Park; Shin-Woong Kang; Luana Tortora; Satyendra Kumar; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of advanced solar hybrid desiccant cooling systems for buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an assessment of the energy savings possible from developing hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression air conditioning systems. Recent advances in dehumidifier design for solar desiccant cooling systems have resulted in a dehumidifier with a low pressure drop and high efficiency in heat and mass transfer. A recent study on hybrid desiccant/vapor compression systems showed a 30%-80% savings in resource energy when compared with the best conventional systems with vapor compression. A system consisting of a dehumidifier with vapor compression subsystems in series was found to be the simplest and best overall performer.

Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Natural gas dehydration by desiccant materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water vapor in a natural gas stream can result in line plugging due to hydrate formation, reduction of line capacity due to collection of free water in the line, and increased risk of damage to the pipeline due to the corrosive effects of water. Therefore, water vapor must be removed from natural gas to prevent hydrate formation and corrosion from condensed water. Gas dehydration is the process of removing water vapor from a gas stream to lower the temperature at which water will condense from the stream; this temperature is called the “dew point” of the gas. Molecular sieves are considered as one of the most important materials that are used as desiccant materials in industrial natural gas dehydration. This work shows a study of natural gas dehydration using 3A molecular sieve as a type of solid desiccant materials, the scope of this work was to build up a pilot scale unit for a natural gas dehydration as simulation of actual existing plant for Egyptian Western Desert Gas Company (WDGC). The effect of different operating conditions (water vapor concentration and gas flow rate) on dehydration of natural gas was studied. The experimental setup consists of cylinder filled with 3A molecular sieve to form a fixed bed, then pass through this bed natural gas with different water vapor concentration, The experimental setup is fitted with facilities to control bed pressure, flow rate, measure water vapor concentration and bed temperature, a gas heater was used to activate molecular sieve bed. Increasing water vapor concentration in inlet feed gas leads to a marked decrease in dehydration efficiency. As expected, a higher inlet flow rate of natural gas decrease dehydration efficiency. Increasing feed pressure leads to higher dehydration efficiency.

Hassan A.A. Farag; Mustafa Mohamed Ezzat; Hoda Amer; Adel William Nashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radiation Damage and Tritium Breeding Study in a Fusion Reactor Using a Liquid Wall of Various Thorium Molten Salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new magnetic fusion reactor design, called APEX uses a liquid wall between fusion plasma and solid first wall to reach ... replacement of the first wall structure during the reactor’s operation due to the radia...

Mustafa Übeyli

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of a Fabric/Desiccant Window Cavity Dehumidifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an exploratory study of a fabric/desiccant window cavity dehumidifier system for possible use in commercial buildings. The objective was to evaluate fabrics commonly used in buildings, and system concepts...

Hunn, B. D.; Grasso, M. M.; Vadlamani, V.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Weed control and desiccation strategies in chickpea Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-harvest desiccation. Studies were conducted at Minot and Williston, ND and Bozeman, MT from 2002-2004. Sulfentrazone to excellent control of kochia, redroot pigweed, and wild buckwheat. At Williston, sulfentrazone alone, tank

Lawrence, Rick L.

66

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

67

Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field Test of Combined Desiccant-Evaporator Cycle Providing Lower Dew Points and Enhanced Dehumidification Charles J. Cromer, PhD, P.E.; Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL, 321-638-1445, charlie... of difficult criteria, some with more success than others. Combined Cycle with Desiccant and AC Coil This paper describes the field testing of a novel air conditioning desiccant cycle. This cycle uses a desiccant to move moisture within the air...

Cromer, C. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Moving Advanced Desiccant Materials into Mainstream Non-CFC Cooling Products  

SciTech Connect

Desiccant air-conditioning systems can be used as alternatives for conventional air-conditioning equipment in any commercial or residential building. Recent breakthroughs in desiccant materials technology and the creation of new markets by Indoor Air Quality issues make desiccant-based air-conditioning equipment practical for many space-conditioning applications.

Sand, J R [ORNL; Grossman, G [ORNL; Rice, C K [ORNL; Fairchild, P D [ORNL; Gross, I L [Engelhard/ICC

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ammoniated salt heat pump  

SciTech Connect

A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat.

Haas, W.R.; Jaeger, F.J.; Giordano, T.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy and economic performance analysis of an open cycle solar desiccant dehumidification air-conditioning system for application in Hong Kong  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article, a transient simulation model and the EnergyPlus were used to study the energy performance and economical feasibility for integrating a solar liquid desiccant dehumidification system with a conventional vapor compression air-conditioning system for the weather condition of Hong Kong. The vapor compression system capacity in the solar assisted air-conditioning system can be reduced to 19 kW from original 28 kW of a conventional air-conditioning system as a case study due to the solar desiccant cooling. The economical performance of the solar desiccant dehumidification system is compared with that of the conventional air-conditioning system. The results show that the energy saving potentials due to incorporation of the solar desiccant dehumidification system in a traditional air-conditioning system is significant for the hot wet weather in Hong Kong due to higher COP resulted from higher supply chilled water temperature from chiller plants. The annual operation energy savings for the hybrid system is 6760 kWh and the payback period of the hybrid system is around 7 years. The study shows that the solar assisted air-conditioning is a viable technology for utilizations in subtropical areas.

Yutong Li; Lin Lu; Hongxing Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Desiccant Moisture Exchange for Dehumidification Enhancement of Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* -led use of this inprarrPd air mtianer cycle with dssicrants will met likely occur in the cammrcial sector bbm desiccants are acmnonly IaKWn end the potential for savimy is greatar. Cne patential amnercial a~plication where the humidity pmblm...

Cromer, C. J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

International Congress Refrigeration 2003, Washington, DC ACTIVE DESICCANT INTEGRATION WITH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRATION WITH PACKAGED ROOFTOP HVAC EQUPMENT James R. Sand , John C. Fischer* Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL requirements for fresh air ventilation standards with continuous supply and increased amounts of building standard. Integration of a rooftop, unitary air conditioner with an active-desiccant module (ADM) allows

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

73

Active Humidity Control Through Gas-Fired Desiccant Humidity Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to regenerate the desiccant. Field experiments of two humidity pumps on existing commercial buildings have been initiated. Each system dehumidifies 5000 scfm of make-up air to meet all the latent loads, which is then fed to conventional, electric-driven HVAC...

Novosel, D.; Griffiths, W. C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Forty-five years of observed soil moisture in the Ukraine: No summer desiccation (yet)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forty-five years of observed soil moisture in the Ukraine: No summer desiccation (yet) Alan Robock­October for 141 stations from fields with either winter or spring cereals from the Ukraine for 1958­2002. We-five years of observed soil moisture in the Ukraine: No summer desiccation (yet), Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L

Robock, Alan

75

Iodized Salt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iodized Salt Iodized Salt Name: Theresa Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do they put iodine in salt? Replies: Iodine was introduced into salt at earlier this century when it was discovered that certain areas of the US had a mark deficiency in iodine in the diet of people, and people developed a neck swelling (goiter). The Great Lakes region is one of these areas where the soil is lacking iodine. Goiter can be caused when the thyroid gland swells because of a lack of iodine in the diet. Most medical advise now states that iodine in salt is no longer necessary due to our food sources arising from all over the world. Steve Sample Hi Theresa...see, there are a variety of elements and compounds that are necessary for the proper maintenance of our life. One of these is iodine, since a small quantity of iodine is needed for the adequate functioning of the thyroid gland. A deficiency of iodine produces dire effects, as goiter, where the thyroid gland swollens due to the lack of iodine traces in the diet. The iodine affects directly the tyrhoid gland secretions, which themselves, to a great extent, control heart action, nerve response to stimuli, rate of body growth and metabolism.

76

Relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) of desiccation in M9787 silicone pads.  

SciTech Connect

The production and aging of silicone materials remains an important issue in the weapons stockpile due to their utilization in a wide variety of components and systems within the stockpile. Changes in the physical characteristics of silicone materials due to long term desiccation has been identified as one of the major aging effects observed in silicone pad components. Here we report relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) spectroscopy characterization of the silica-filled and unfilled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polydiphenylsiloxane (PDPS) copolymer (M9787) silicone pads within desiccating environments. These studies were directed at providing additional details about the heterogeneity of the desiccation process. Uniform NMR spin-spin relaxation time (T2) images were observed across the pad thickness indicating that the drying process is approximately uniform, and that the desiccation of the M9787 silicone pad is not a H2O diffusion limited process. In a P2O5 desiccation environment, significant reduction of T2 was observed for the silica-filled and unfilled M9787 silicone pad for desiccation up to 225 days. A very small reduction in T2 was observed for the unfilled copolymer between 225 and 487 days. The increase in relative stiffness with desiccation was found to be higher for the unfilled copolymer. These R-NMRI results are correlated to local changes in the modulus of the material

Alam, Todd M; Cherry, Brian Ray; Alam, Mary Kathleen

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Demonstration and testing of an all-electric desiccant dehumidifying system at a New Jersey supermarket  

SciTech Connect

A novel all-electric desiccant dehumidifying system was demonstrated and evaluated at a supermarket field test site in New Jersey during 1995. Unlike traditional desiccant systems, this system uses waste heat from vapor-compression refrigerating condensers to regenerate a recently developed desiccant material. The 7,000-cfm (3,300-L/s) unit has a latent capacity of approximately 7 tons (25 kW), with fan energy as the only purchased energy source. This paper discusses the performance of the desiccant system under field conditions and its interactions with the refrigerating and conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Results indicate that the system is three to four times more efficient for moisture removal than a conventional HVAC system with no deleterious effects on refrigerating system operations.

Brandemuehl, M.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Center for Energy Management; Khattar, M.K. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Effects of chemical desiccation and early harvesting on Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] seed germination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field and laboratory experiments were conducted at two locations over two years in Texas. Objectives of these experiments were to study effects of chemical desiccation and seed maturity at harvest on sorghum seed germination. Sorghum plants were...

Gouveia, Sergio

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Improving Gas-Fired Heat Pump Capacity and Performance by Adding a Desiccant Dehumidification Subsystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity 50%. Increased initial manufacturing costs are estimated at around $500/ton ($142/kW) for volume production. This cost Level is expected to reduce the total initial cost per ton compared to a system without the desiccant subsystem....

Parsons, B. K.; Pesaran, A. A.; Bharathan, D.; Shelpuk, B. C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

What`s new in building energy research - desiccant cooling program  

SciTech Connect

Desiccant cooling systems are energy efficient, cost effective, and environmentally safe. They are used as stand-alone systems or with conventional air-conditioning to improve the indoor air quality of all types of buildings. In these systems, a desiccant removes moisture from the air, which releases heat and increases the air temperature. The dry air is cooled using either evaporative cooling or the cooling coils of a conventional air conditioner. The absorbed moisture in the desiccant is then removed (the desiccant is regenerated, or brought back to its original dry state) using thermal energy supplied by natural gas, electricity, waste heat, or the sun. Commercially available desiccants include silica gel, activated alumina, natural and synthetic zeolites, lithium chloride, and synthetic polymers. Currently, desiccant cooling and dehumidification are being used successfully in industrial and some commercial applications. The Office of Building Technologies in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is working with industry to broaden the market for desiccant cooling so its full energy savings and indoor air quality improvement potential can be realized. The main goals of the Desiccant Cooling Program are to (1) Reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 5 million tons (4.5 million metric tons) annually by 2005 and 18 million tons (16.3 million metric tons) annually by 2010. (2) Reduce energy consumption by 0.1 quad (105.5 petajoules) annually by 2005 and 0.3 quad (316.5 petajoules) annually by 2010. (3) Capture 5% of the air-conditioning market by 2005 and 15% by 2010.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the diameter and depth of the wheel, face flow velocity, rotational speed and other operating conditions. Bulk et al. [11] proposed NTU correlations for design calculation of latent and total effectiveness of enthalpy wheels coated with silica gel..., Wr Te1,We1 Space Fig.2. Passive desiccant system Enthalpy wheels normally use an aluminum substrate coated with a molecular sieve material or silica gel. The effectiveness of an enthalpy wheel depends on the load of desiccant materials...

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine  

SciTech Connect

Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Effects of UV-B Radiation and Periodic Desiccation on the Morphogenesis of the Edible Terrestrial Cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbial Ecology Effects of UV-B Radiation and Periodic Desiccation on...flagelliforme under low UV-B radiation and periodic desiccation...Nikon Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). RESULTS Effects of UV-B...regardless of 0.1 W m2 UV-B radiation (Fig. 3a). Furthermore...

Yan-Na Feng; Zhong-Chun Zhang; Jun-Li Feng; Bao-Sheng Qiu

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

Molten Salts for High Temperature Reactors: University of Wisconsin Molten Salt Corrosion and Flow Loop Experiments -- Issues Identified and Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

Considerable amount of work is going on regarding the development of high temperature liquid salts technology to meet future process needs of Next Generation Nuclear Plant. This report identifies the important characteristics and concerns of high temperature molten salts (with lesson learned at University of Wisconsin-Madison, Molten Salt Program) and provides some possible recommendation for future work

Piyush Sabharwall; Matt Ebner; Manohar Sohal; Phil Sharpe; Thermal Hydraulics Group

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Molten salts and nuclear energy production Christian Le Bruna*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten salts and nuclear energy production Christian Le Bruna* a Laboratoire de Physique or chlorides) have been taken in consideration very soon in nuclear energy production researches with solid fuels, liquid fuel in molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case

Boyer, Edmond

87

Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No Summer Desiccation (Yet)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forty Five Years of Observed Soil Moisture in the Ukraine: No Summer Desiccation (Yet) Alan Robock of Maryland, College Park 4 Ukrainian Research Institute for Environment and Resources, Kiev, Ukraine 5 Agrometeorology Department, Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Centre, Kiev, Ukraine Submitted to Geophysical Research

Robock, Alan

88

Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone Salt Waste Contractor Reaches Contract Milestone April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Robert Brown, SRR tank farm operator, performs daily inspections of a salt disposition process facility. The inspections and improvement upgrades have resulted in continued successful operations. Robert Brown, SRR tank farm operator, performs daily inspections of a salt disposition process facility. The inspections and improvement upgrades have resulted in continued successful operations. AIKEN, S.C. - The liquid waste cleanup contractor for the EM program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) recently surpassed a 2013 contract milestone by processing more than 600,000 gallons of salt waste. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) salt disposition process facilities

89

Effects of heat and mass transport on the hydrodynamics and stability of liquid desiccant films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the formation of the ice on the cooling coil due to thedelay the formation of ice on the cooling coil. An internalthe formation of ice on the cooling coil, thus reducing the

Pineda Vargas, Sergio Manuel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Experimental Investigation on the Operation Performance of a Liquid Desiccant Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large share of energy consumption is taken by an air-conditioning system. It worsens the electricity load of the power network. Therefore, more and more scholars are paying attention to research on new types of air-conditioning systems...

Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Wu, Z.; Gu, W.; Zhang, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. – The EM program and its liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site are improving salt waste disposition work and preparing for eventual operations of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) currently being constructed.

92

Liquid electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Retrospective salt tectonics  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

Jackson, M.P.A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

Lee, Hung-Sui (East Setauket, NY); Geng, Lin (Coram, NY); Skotheim, Terje A. (Shoreham, NY)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

96

Chemistry control and corrosion mitigation of heat transfer salts for the fluoride salt reactor (FHR)  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was a prototype nuclear reactor which operated from 1965 to 1969 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The MSRE used liquid fluoride salts as a heat transfer fluid and solvent for fluoride based {sup 235}U and {sup 233}U fuel. Extensive research was performed in order to optimize the removal of oxide and metal impurities from the reactor's heat transfer salt, 2LiF-BeF{sub 2} (FLiBe). This was done by sparging a mixture of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen gas through the FLiBe at elevated temperatures. The hydrofluoric acid reacted with oxides and hydroxides, fluorinating them while simultaneously releasing water vapor. Metal impurities such as iron and chromium were reduced by hydrogen gas and filtered out of the salt. By removing these impurities, the corrosion of reactor components was minimized. The Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison is currently researching a new chemical purification process for fluoride salts that make use of a less dangerous cleaning gas, nitrogen trifluoride. Nitrogen trifluoride has been predicted as a superior fluorinating agent for fluoride salts. These purified salts will subsequently be used for static and loop corrosion tests on a variety of reactor materials to ensure materials compatibility for the new FHR designs. Demonstration of chemistry control methodologies along with potential reduction in corrosion is essential for the use of a fluoride salts in a next generator nuclear reactor system. (authors)

Kelleher, B. C.; Sellers, S. R.; Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Scheele, R. D. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ.of Wisconsin - Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living Space in Summer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living and total heat exchanger in terms of both energy conservation and thermal comfort in summer. 1. COP

Miyashita, Yasushi

98

Aqueous Biphasic Systems Based on Salting-Out Polyethylene Glycol or Ionic Solutions: Strategies for Actinide or Fission Product Separations  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous biphasic systems can be formed by salting-out (with kosmotropic, waterstructuring salts) water soluble polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol) or aqueous solutions of a wide range of hydrophilic ionic liquids based on imidazolium, pyridinium, phosphonium and ammonium cations. The use of these novel liquid/liquid biphases for separation of actinides or other fission products associated with nuclear wastes (e.g., pertechnetate salts) has been demonstrated and will be described in this presentation.

Rogers, Robin D.; Gutowski, Keith E.; Griffin, Scott T.; Holbrey, John D.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Design, Installation, and Field Verification of Integrated Active Desiccant Hybrid Rooftop Systems Combined with a Natural Gas Driven Cogeneration Package, 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report summary of a research/demonstration project involving a custom 230 kW cogeneration package with four integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) systems

100

Ancient Salt Beds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Carolina School of Medicine. In examining fluid inclusions in the salt and solid halite crystals, scientists found abundant cellulose microfibers, estimated to be 250 million...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Inside Sea Salt | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sea salt particles are emitted into the atmosphere by the action of ocean waves and bubble bursting at the ocean surface. They are ubiquitous in the atmospheric environment....

102

Unravelling the Structure of Magnus’ Pink Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two classic examples of colorful Pt complexes featuring metallophilic interactions are Magnus’ salts, which have a long history of eluding structural characterization. ... The complete 14N WURST-CPMG and BRAIN-CP/WURST-CPMG NMR spectra were generated by mirroring the low-frequency (right) portion of the powder pattern about ? = 0 ppm, as described previously. ... The microscope was equipped with a 32× Schwarzschild objective and a liquid nitrogen cooled mercury cadmium telluride detector. ...

Bryan E. G. Lucier; Karen E. Johnston; Wenqian Xu; Jonathan C. Hanson; Sanjaya D. Senanayake; Siyu Yao; Megan W. Bourassa; Monika Srebro; Jochen Autschbach; Robert W. Schurko

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

103

Analysis of solar desiccant cooling system for an institutional building in subtropical Queensland, Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Institutional buildings contain different types of functional spaces which require different types of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In addition, institutional buildings should be designed to maintain an optimal indoor comfort condition with minimal energy consumption and minimal negative environmental impact. Recently there has been a significant interest in implementing desiccant cooling technologies within institutional buildings. Solar desiccant cooling systems are reliable in performance, environmentally friendly and capable of improving indoor air quality at a lower cost. In this study, a solar desiccant cooling system for an institutional building in subtropical Queensland (Australia) is assessed using TRNSYS 16 software. This system has been designed and installed at the Rockhampton campus of Central Queensland University. The system's technical performance, economic analysis, energy savings, and avoided gas emission are quantified in reference to a conventional HVAC system under the influence of Rockhampton's typical meteorological year. The technical and economic parameters that are used to assess the system's viability are: coefficient of performance (COP), solar fraction, life cycle analysis, payback period, present worth factor and the avoided gas emission. Results showed that, the installed cooling system at Central Queensland University which consists of 10 m2 of solar collectors and a 0.400 m3 of hot water storage tank, achieved a 0.7 COP and 22% of solar fraction during the cooling season. These values can be boosted to 1.2 COP and 69% respectively if 20 m2 of evacuated tube collector's area and 1.5 m3 of solar hot water storage volume are installed.

Ali M. Baniyounes; Gang Liu; M.G. Rasul; M.M.K. Khan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Field development of a desiccant-based space-conditioning system for supermarket applications. Final report, February 1982-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

The benefits associated with the use of gas-regenerated desiccant dehumidifiers in conjunction with electric-vapor-compression sensible cooling to provide space conditioning in supermarkets were evaluated. Data collected at two field installations were used for the assessment, in addition to the results of a computer program developed by Thermo Electron to simulate the loads and equipment performance in a supermarket. Both conventional humidity-level operation (47% relative humidity at 75F) and reduced store humidity level operation were evaluated for the desiccant-based system. Reductions in food refrigeration-system electric consumption with reduced store humidities were experimentally verified at both field sites. The use of desiccant dehumidifier hybrid space-conditioning systems produced operating cost savings over all electric vapor-compression systems in climates of moderate and high humidities.

Cohen, B.M.; Manley, D.L.; Arora, R.; Levine, A.H.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Amine salts of nitroazoles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter, a method of providing chemical energy by burning said compositions, and methods of making said compositions are described. These compositions are amine salts of nitroazoles. 1 figure.

Kienyin Lee; Stinecipher, M.M.

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Salt Selected (FINAL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM WHY SALT WAS SELECTED AS A DISPOSAL MEDIUM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy Government officials and scientists chose the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site through a selection process that started in the 1950s. At that time, the National Academy of Sciences conducted a nationwide search for geological formations stable enough to contain radioactive wastes for thousands of years. In 1955, after extensive

107

A Dash of Salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tx H2O | pg. 18 A Texas A&M researcher is assessing the impact of using moderately saline water for irrigating urban landscapes in West Texas and southern New Mexico. A DASH OF SALT Researcher assesses salinity impacts on grasses, trees... and shrubs A Dash of Salt Story by Danielle Supercinski { } tx H2O | pg. 19 ?The primary purpose of using moderately saline water for irrigation, including reclaimed water, is to conserve potable [drinkable] water,? said Dr. Seiichi Miyamoto, a...

Supercinski, Danielle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Microsoft PowerPoint - S08-02_Rios-Armstrong_SRS Experience Preparing Salt Batches.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience with Preparing Salt Batches Presentation to: EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Date: November 17 th , 2010 Author: Maria A. Rios-Armstrong Position: Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Process Engineering Lead Savannah River Remediation SRR-SPT-2010-00222 Print Close 2 Agenda * SRS Composite Inventory * Salt Processing * SRS Liquid Waste System * Background * Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batches - ISDP Salt Batch 1 - ISDP Salt Batch 2 - ISDP Salt Batch 3 - ISDP Salt Batch 4 * Future Salt Batches * Summary * Questions Print Close 3 SRS Composite Inventory Saltcake Sludge Volume 37.1 Million Gallons (Mgal) Curies 183 MCi (52%) 169 MCi (48%) 352 Million Curies (MCi) 171 MCi (49%) Sludge 34.2 Mgal (92%) 2.9 Mgal (8%) 18.4 Mgal (49%) Inventory values as of 2010-06-30

109

Fundamental Properties of Salts  

SciTech Connect

Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fundamental Desiccants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. such as carbon-dioxide, and impuritics, such as dust, pollen, viruses, hydrocarbon emissions and other "rare" gases, such as radon. These impurities can and do become major health risks when they exceed quantified limits. WHAT SHOULD AIR CONDITIONING... for traditional HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems. Control air impurity level required for health and/or process requirements Dust. pollen, bacteria, viruses and radon gas are naturally occurring impurities in the air we breath. Air may...

Krebs, M. E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Salt Creek Student Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Creek Investigation Salt Creek Investigation</2> "Whales Dying in the Pacific Ocean" "Fish Dying in Lake Michigan" Recent headlines remind us of environmental problems near and far away. Scientists have been wondering if these problems could be due to the warmer temperatures this past spring and summer or could there be other reasons? Lack of rain and near drought conditions have forced many areas to restrict water use. We know from past history that pollution affects our drinking water and marine life. Remember what we read about Lake Erie and from reading A River Ran Wild by Lynne Cherry. There are many factors affecting the environment around us . . . even in Salt Creek which runs through our area. We may not be able to investigate the Pacific Ocean and Lake Michigan

112

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

113

Ionic Liquids Used as Wear Reduction, Wins R&D 100 Award | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

100 Award October 16, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis Partnered with Shell Global Solutions, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed ionic liquids (salts in a liquid state...

114

TETRAALKYLPHOSPHONIUM POLYOXOMETALATES AS NOVEL IONIC LIQUIDS.  

SciTech Connect

The pairing of a Lindqvist or Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) anion with an appropriate tetraalkylphosphonium cation, [R{sub 3}R{prime}P]{sup +}, has been shown to yield an original family of ionic liquids (POM-ILs), among them salts liquid at or near ambient temperature. The physicochemical properties of several such 'inorganic liquids', in particular their thermal properties, suggests the possible application of these compounds as robust, thermally-stable solvents for liquid-liquid extraction. A preliminary evaluation of the potential of POM-ILs in this application is presented.

DIETZ,M.L.; RICKERT, P.G.; ANTONIO, M.R.; FIRESTONE, M.A.; WISHART, J.F.; SZREDER, T.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Salt Creek Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario References Student Pages Two branches of Salt Creek run through the city of Rolling Meadows, Illinois, not far from our school. Five members of our team of eighth grade teachers from different subject areas (science, language arts, bilingual education and special education), decided to develop an interdisciplinary study of Salt Creek as a way of giving our students authentic experiences in environmental studies. The unit begins when students enter school in August, running through the third week of September, and resuming for three weeks in October. Extension activities based on using the data gathered at the creek continue throughout the school year, culminating in a presentation at a city council meeting in the spring.

116

CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT  

SciTech Connect

This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan; William M. Goodman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

now been filled. The SDUs play an essential role in the closure of the 45 liquid waste tanks on the site. About 90 percent of the waste in these tanks is salt waste that must be...

118

salt lake city.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites Locations of the Salt Lake City Processing and Disposal Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site and disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Processing and Disposal Sites Site Descriptions and History Regulatory Setting The former Salt Lake City processing site is located about 4 miles south-southwest of the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, at 3300 South and Interstate 15. The Vitro Chemical Company processed uranium and vanadium ore at the site from 1951 until 1968. Milling operations conducted at the processing site created radioactive tailings, a predominantly sandy material.

119

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

Molten salt lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Poris, Jaime (Portola Valley, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Batteries using molten salt electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Services » Waste Management » Tank Waste and Waste Processing » Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Nuclear material production operations at SRS resulted in the generation of liquid radioactive waste that is being stored, on an interim basis, in 49 underground waste storage tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms. SWPF Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications EIS-0082-S2: Amended Record of Decision Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report EIS-0082-S2: Record of Decision Waste Management Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D)

126

Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms  

Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Method for making a uranium chloride salt product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject apparatus provides a means to produce UCl.sub.3 in large quantities without incurring corrosion of the containment vessel or associated apparatus. Gaseous Cl is injected into a lower layer of Cd where CdCl.sub.2 is formed. Due to is lower density, the CdCl.sub.2 rises through the Cd layer into a layer of molten LiCl--KCL salt where a rotatable basket containing uranium ingots is suspended. The CdCl.sub.2 reacts with the uranium to form UCl.sub.3 and Cd. Due to density differences, the Cd sinks down to the liquid Cd layer and is reused. The UCl.sub.3 combines with the molten salt. During production the temperature is maintained at about 600.degree. C. while after the uranium has been depleted the salt temperature is lowered, the molten salt is pressure siphoned from the vessel, and the salt product LiCl--KCl-30 mol % UCl.sub.3 is solidified.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy...

129

Method for removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This report details the pyrometallurgical process for recycling spent metal fuels from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which involves electrorefining spent fuel in a molten salt electrolyte (LiCl-KCI-U/PuCl{sub 3}) at 500{degree}C. The total heavy metal chloride concentration in the salt will be about 2 mol %. At some point, the concentrations of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products in the salt must be reduced to lower the amount of heat generated in the electrorefiner. The heavy metal concentration in the salt must be reduced before removing the fission products from the salt. The operation uses a lithium-cadmium alloy anode that is solid at 500{degree}C, a solid mandrel cathode with a ceramic catch crucible below to collect heavy metal that falls off it, and a liquid cadmium cathode. The design criteria that had to be met by this equipment included the following: (1) control of the reduction rate by lithium, (2) good separation between heavy metal and rare earths, and (3) the capability to collect heavy metal and rare earths over a wide range of salt compositions. In tests conducted in an engineering-scale electrorefiner (10 kg uranium per cathode), good separation was achieved while removing uranium and rare earths from the salt. Only 13% of the rare earths was removed, while 99.9% of the uranium in the salt was removed; subsequently, the rare earths were also reduced to low concentrations. The uranium concentration in the salt was reduced to 0.05 ppm after uranium and rare earths were transferred from the salt to a solid mandrel cathode with a catch crucible. Rare earth concentrations in the salt were reduced to less than 0.01 wt % in these operations. Similar tests are planned to remove plutonium from the salt in a laboratory-scale (100--300 g heavy metal) electrorefiner.

Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Three-Phase Vapor?Liquid?Liquid Equilibria for Methane + n-Octane + Monoethylene Glycol + Water at Pressures from (3.1 to 15.0) MPa and Temperatures from (281 to 363) K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several commercial processes available for the dehydration of gas, such as the use of liquid or solid desiccants and expansion refrigeration. ... The gaseous part of the liquid samples, and the gas phase samples direct from the equilibrium cell, were expanded into a series of evacuated vessels of known volume from which the total amount of substance was determined from the perfect gas equation using the measured low-pressure PVT data. ... To predict the losses of MEG in processes for the dehydration of natural gas, the concentrations of MEG in the vapor phase are of interest to the gas industry. ...

Stanley J. Ashcroft; Gerd Brunner; Hansjörg Vollmer; Christopher W. Sweeney

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaporation-driven growth of large crystallized salt structures in a porous medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subflorescence refers to crystallized salt structures that form inside a porous medium. We report a drying experiment revealing major development of subflorescence in the dry region of the porous medium away from the liquid zone. Using a combination of image analyses and numerical computations, we show that the growth is directly correlated to the evaporation flux distribution along the boundary of the growing salt structure. This indicates that the salt is transported into the domain occupied by the salt structure in the porous medium up to the structure periphery, where salt deposition takes place. This is confirmed when a growing salt structure encounters dry subflorescence formed earlier during the drying process. The dry subflorescence is reimbibed and resumes its growth. The analysis also suggests that the solution within the growing subflorescence is in equilibrium with the crystallized salt wall. These results shed light on the growth mechanisms of subflorescence, a phenomenon that can play a fundamental role in several important issues such as carbon dioxide sequestration or salt weathering.

N. Sghaier; S. Geoffroy; M. Prat; H. Eloukabi; S. Ben Nasrallah

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Freshwater fish in salt water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freshwater fish in salt water Freshwater fish in salt water Name: Shannon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would actually happen if a fresh water fish had to live in salt water? Replies: For most fish, they would die. But some, like eels and salmon, can move freely between the two at certain stages of their lives. To do this they have special mechanisms of excretion and absorption of salt and water. --ProfBill If you put a freshwater fish into saltwater, most fish would lose weight (from losing water from its body) and eventually die. Approximately 2% of all 21000 species of fish actually move from freshwater to saltwater or from salt to fresh at some point in their lives, the move would kill any other fish. But even with these special varieties of fish, the move must be gradual so their bodies can adjust, or they too, will die from the change. If you want to learn more about why the freshwater fish will lose water, (or why a saltwater fish in freshwater would gain water), look up the words "diffusion" and "osmosis"

133

Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in cavern sealing and operation. The MDCF model is used in three simulations of field experiments in which indirect measures were obtained of the generation of damage. The results of the simulations help to verify the model and suggest that the model captures the correct fracture behavior of rock salt. The model is used in this work to estimate the generation and location of damage around a cylindrical storage cavern. The results are interesting because stress conditions around the cylindrical cavern do not lead to large amounts of damage. Moreover, the damage is such that general failure can not readily occur, nor does the extent of the damage suggest possible increased permeation when the surrounding salt is impermeable.

Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Why Sequence Great Salt Lake?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Salt Lake? Great Salt Lake? On average, the Great Salt Lake is four times saltier than the ocean and also has heavy metals, high concentrations of sulfur and petroleum seeps. In spite of all this, the lake is the saltiest body of water to support life. The lake hosts brine shrimp, algae and a diverse array of microbes, not to mention the roughly 5 million birds that migrate there annually. The secret to these microbes' ability to survive under such harsh conditions might be revealed in their genes. Researchers expect the genetic data will provide insight into how the microorganisms tolerate pollutants such as sulfur and detoxify pollutants such as sulfur and heavy metals like mercury. The information could then be used to develop bioremediation techniques. Researchers also expect that sequencing microorganisms sampled

135

Field development of a desiccant-based space-conditioning system for supermarket applications. Annual report, February 1982-January 1983  

SciTech Connect

The use of gas-regenerated desiccant dehumidification systems to provide space-conditioning for supermarkets was investigated. A silica gel-based dehumidification system and related components were installed in a Jewel supermarket as an adjunct to the conventional vapor-compression air-conditioning system. Instrumentation was installed to monitor this hybrid system and to allow performance comparisons with the conventional vapor-compression system operating alone. Data collected were used to develop load models for the building and to correlate indoor and ambient conditions to the energy consumption by the air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. The expected reduction in refrigeration energy consumption with decreasing store humidities was verified. The load models were used in conjunction with system characteristics to obtain cooling season cost projections for both systems operating under different conditions. Initial estimates indicate that payback periods of the hybrid system could be under 1 year.

Cohen, B.M.; Levine, A.H.; Arora, R.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Dynamics of Confined Water Molecules in Aqueous Salt Hydrates  

SciTech Connect

The unusual properties of water are largely dictated by the dynamics of the H bond network. A single water molecule has more H bonding sites than atoms, hence new experimental and theoretical investigations about this peculiar liquid have not ceased to appear. Confinement of water to nanodroplets or small molecular clusters drastically changes many of the liquid’s properties. Such confined water plays a major role in the solvation of macro molecules such as proteins and can even be essential to their properties. Despite the vast results available on bulk and confined water, discussions about the correlation between spectral and structural properties continue to this day. The fast relaxation of the OH stretching vibration in bulk water, and the variance of sample geometries in the experiments on confined water obfuscate definite interpretation of the spectroscopic results in terms of structural parameters. We present first time-resolved investigations on a new model system that is ideally suited to overcome many of the problems faced in spectroscopical investigation of the H bond network of water. Aqueous hydrates of inorganic salts provide water molecules in a crystal grid, that enables unambiguous correlations of spectroscopic and structural features. Furthermore, the confined water clusters are well isolated from each other in the crystal matrix, so different degrees of confinement can be achieved by selection of the appropriate salt.

Werhahn, Jasper C.; Pandelov, S.; Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Iglev, H.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Salt Lake Community College | .EDUconnections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLCC Partners with DOE's Rocky Mountain Solar Training Program This program is a joint partnership between DOE's Solar Energy Technogies Program, Salt Lake Community College, Solar Energy International, and the Utah Solar Energy Association that works to accelerate use of solar electric technologies, training and facilities at community and technical college solar training programs within a 15 western United States region. DOE Solar Instructor Training Network Salt Lake City, Utah DOE Applauds SLCC's Science and Technical Programs Architectural Technology Biology Biotechnology Biomanufacturing Chemistry Computer Science Electric Sector Training Energy Management Engineering Geographic Information Sciences Geosciences InnovaBio Manufacturing & Mechanical Engineering Technology

138

EMSL - liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liquids en Iodine Solubility in Low-Activity Waste Borosilicate Glass at 1000 °C. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsiodine-solubility-low-activity-waste-borosilicate...

139

Salt dome discoveries mounting in Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

Exploratory drilling around piercement salt domes in Mississippi has met with a string of successes in recent months. Exploration of these salt features is reported to have been initiated through the review of non-proprietary, 2D seismic data and subsurface control. This preliminary data and work were then selectively upgraded by the acquisition of additional, generally higher quality, conventional 2D seismic lines. This current flurry of successful exploration and ensuing development drilling by Amerada Hess Corp. on the flanks of salt domes in Mississippi has resulted in a number of significant Hosston discoveries/producers at: Carson salt dome in Jefferson Davis County; Dry Creek salt dome in Covington County, Midway salt dome in lamar County, Monticello salt dome in Lawrence County, and Prentiss salt dome in Jefferson Davis County. The resulting production from these fields is gas and condensate, with wells being completed on 640 acre production units.

Ericksen, R.L. [Mississippi Office of Geology, Jackson, MS (United States)

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

140

Synthesis of three advanced biofuels from ionic liquid-pretreated switchgrass using engineered Escherichia coli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbial cellulose utilization: Fundamentals and biotechnology . Microbiol...precursors suitable for gasoline, diesel, and jet engines directly from...ZZQQhy40 minutes in a liquid cycle. After cooling, MOPS-M9 salts...

Gregory Bokinsky; Pamela P. Peralta-Yahya; Anthe George; Bradley M. Holmes; Eric J. Steen; Jeffrey Dietrich; Taek Soon Lee; Danielle Tullman-Ercek; Christopher A. Voigt; Blake A. Simmons; Jay D. Keasling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Arylsulfatase Activity in Salt Marsh Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Arylsulfatase Activity in Salt Marsh Soils R. L. Oshrain W. J. Wiebe...Arylsulfatase Activity in Salt Marsh Soilst R. L. OSHRAIN: AND W...Gallagher, J. L., R. J. Reimold, and D...Remote sensing and salt marsh productivity, p. 338-348...

R. L. Oshrain; W. J. Wiebe

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The economics of salt cake recycling  

SciTech Connect

The Process Evaluation Section at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a major program aimed at developing cost-effective technologies for salt cake recycling. This paper addresses the economic feasibility of technologies for the recovery of aluminum, salt, and residue-oxide fractions from salt cake. Four processes were assessed for salt recovery from salt cake: (1) base case: leaching in water at 25{degree}C, with evaporation to crystallize salts; (2) high-temperature case: leaching in water at 250{degree}C, with flash crystallization to precipitate salts; (3) solventlantisolvent case: leaching in water at 25{degree}C, concentrating by evaporation, and reacting with acetone to precipitate salts; and (4) electrodialysis: leaching in water at 25{degree}C, with concentration and recovery of salts by electrodialysis. All test cases for salt recovery had a negative present value, given current pricing structure and 20% return on investment. Although manufacturing costs (variable plus fixed) could reasonably be recovered in the sales price of the salt product, capital costs cannot. The economics for the recycling processes are improved, however, if the residueoxide can be sold instead of landfilled. For example, the base case process would be profitable at a wet oxide value of $220/metric ton. The economics of alternative scenarios were also considered, including aluminum recovery with landfilling of salts and oxides.

Graziano, D.; Hryn, J.N.; Daniels, E.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Simple Method for Killing Halophilic Bacteria in Contaminated Solar Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...growth and also to sterilize solar salt. Two samples of solar salt, contaminated with red...it had a much lower buffering capacity than the used salt, presumably...economical method of freeing solar salt from halophilic bacteria...

D. J. Kushner; G. Masson; N. E. Gibbons

1965-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radar investigation of the Hockley salt dome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Geophysics RADAR INVESTIGATION OF THE HOCKLEY SALT DOME A Thesis by UAMES ANDREW HLUCHANEK A'pproved as to style and content by: (Head of Departme t ? Member) May 1. 973 ABSTRACT Radar investigation of the Hockley Salt Dome. . (Nay, 1973) James... Andrew Hluchanek, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Robert R. Unterberger Radar probing through salt was accomplished at 17 radar stations established in the United Salt Company mine at Hockley, Texas. The top of the salt dom is mapped...

Hluchanek, James Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

LNG liquid-liquid immiscibility  

SciTech Connect

Although natural gas species rarely exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility in binary systems, the presence of additional components can extend the domain of immiscibility in those few binary systems where it already exists or produce immiscibility in binary systems where it had not existed. If the solute has the proper molecular relation to the solvent mixture background, liquid-liquid-vapor (LLV) behavior will occur; such phenomena greatly complicate the design of LNG processing equipment. To aid LNG engineers, researchers mapped the thermodynamic behavior of four ternary LLV systems and examined the effects of the second solvents - ethane, propane, n-butane, and CO/sub 2/ - on the binary methane + n-octane system.

Luks, K.D.; Kohn, J.P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of Structural Modification on Ionic Liquid Physical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Structural Modification on the Physical Properties Effect of Structural Modification on the Physical Properties of Various Ionic Liquids S. I. Lall-Ramnarine, J. L. Hatcher, A. Castano, M. F. Thomas, and J. F. Wishart in "ECS Transactions - Las Vegas, NV, Vol. 33, Molten Salts and Ionic Liquids 17" D. Fox et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2010) pp 659 - 665. [Find paper at ECS] Abstract: A few classes of ionic liquids were synthesized and investigated for their physical properties as a function of structural variation. Bis(oxalato)borate (BOB) and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (NTf2) ionic liquids (ILs) containing pyridinium, 4-dimethylaminopyridinium (DMAP) and pyrrolidinium cations bearing alkyl, benzyl, hydroxyalkyl and alkoxy substituents, were prepared from the corresponding halide salts. The

147

The Savannah River Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the man  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's Site's liquid radioactive waste operations involves the management of space in the Site's 49 underground waste tanks, including the removal of waste materials. Once water is removed from the waste tanks, two materials remain: salt and sludge waste. Removing salt waste, which fills approximately 90 percent of the tank space in the SRS tank farms, is a major step toward closing the Site's waste tanks that currently contain approximately 38 million gallons of waste. Due to the limited amount of tank space available in new-style tanks, some salt waste must be dispositioned in the interim to ensure sufficient tank space for continued sludge washing and to support the initial start-up and salt processing operations at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF).

148

An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL] [ORNL; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fugate, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL] [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL] [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL] [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) will utilize a newly mined Underground Research Lab (URL) in WIPP to perform a cost effective, proof-of-principle field test of the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste and validate modeling efforts. The goals of the SDDI Thermal Test are to: * Demonstrate a proof-of-principle concept for in-drift disposal in salt. * Investigate, in a specific emplacement concept, the response of the salt to heat. * Develop a full-scale response for run-of- mine (ROM) salt. * Develop a validated coupled process model for disposal of heat-generating wastes in salt. * Evaluate the environmental conditions of the

150

Elimination of liquid discharge to the environment from the TA-50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

Alternatives were evaluated for management of treated radioactive liquid waste from the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility (RLWTF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The alternatives included continued discharge into Mortandad Canyon, diversion to the sanitary wastewater treatment facility and discharge of its effluent to Sandia Canyon or Canada del Buey, and zero liquid discharge. Implementation of a zero liquid discharge system is recommended in addition to two phases of upgrades currently under way. Three additional phases of upgrades to the present radioactive liquid waste system are proposed to accomplish zero liquid discharge. The first phase involves minimization of liquid waste generation, along with improved characterization and monitoring of the remaining liquid waste. The second phase removes dissolved salts from the reverse osmosis concentrate stream to yield a higher effluent quality. In the final phase, the high-quality effluent is reused for industrial purposes within the Laboratory or evaporated. Completion of these three phases will result in zero discharge of treated radioactive liquid wastewater from the RLWTF.

Moss, D.; Williams, N.; Hall, D.; Hargis, K.; Saladen, M.; Sanders, M.; Voit, S.; Worland, P.; Yarbro, S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt  

SciTech Connect

This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Salt River Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of Salt River Project's (SRP) Electric Vehicle Initiative is to encourage greater use of clean energy transportation. Under this program, SRP's headquarters received two Level 2...

153

Sandia National Laboratories: molten salt test loop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot, Systems Engineering AREVA and Sandia began operations of their molten salt...

154

Granular Salt Summary: Reconsolidation Principles and Applications  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of this paper are to review the vast amount of knowledge concerning crushed salt reconsolidation and its attendant hydraulic properties (i.e., its capability for fluid or gas transport) and to provide a sufficient basis to understand reconsolidation and healing rates under repository conditions. Topics covered include: deformation mechanisms and hydro-mechanical interactions during reconsolidation; the experimental data base pertaining to crushed salt reconsolidation; transport properties of consolidating granulated salt and provides quantitative substantiation of its evolution to characteristics emulating undisturbed rock salt; and extension of microscopic and laboratory observations and data to the applicable field scale.

Frank Hansen; Till Popp; Klaus Wieczorek; Dieter Stührenberg

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Project Profile: Thermally-Stable Ionic Liquid Carriers for Nanoparticle-Based Heat Transfer in CSP Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Savannah River National Laboratory, under an ARRA CSP Award, is performing research to better understand the thermal stability of low-temperature organic molten salts, which are commonly referred to as ionic liquids (ILs).

156

Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Disposal in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Caverns Salt Caverns Fact Sheet - Disposal in Salt Caverns Introduction to Salt Caverns Underground salt deposits are found in the continental United States and worldwide. Salt domes are large, fingerlike projections of nearly pure salt that have risen to near the surface. Bedded salt formations typically contain multiple layers of salt separated by layers of other rocks. Salt beds occur at depths of 500 to more than 6,000 feet below the surface. Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Domal Salt Schematic Drawing click to view larger image Schematic Drawing of a Cavern in Bedded Salt Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created by a process called solution mining. Well drilling equipment is used to drill a hole

158

Disparities in Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City Mortgage Outcomes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

who applied for Salt Lake County properties selected West Valley. · As the overall application volume). · Over 54 percent of all Salt Lake County mortgage applications from 2006 to 2011 were for homes in West Valley, unincorporated areas, West Jordan, and Salt Lake City. For Hispanic/Latino applicants

Feschotte, Cedric

159

Molten Salt Oxidation of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) can be characterized as a simple noncombustion process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes including chemical warfare agents, combustible solids, halogenated solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, plutonium-contaminated solids, uranium-contaminated solvents and fission product-contaminated oil. The MSO destruction efficiency of the hazardous organic constituents in the wastes exceeds 99.9999%. Radioactive species, such as actinides and rare earth fission products, are retained in the salt bath. These elements can be recovered from the spent salt using conventional chemical processes, such as ion exchange, to render the salt as nonradioactive and nonhazardous. This paper reviews the principles and capabilities of MSO, previous mixed waste studies, and a new US Department of Energy program to demonstrate the process for the treatment of mixed wastes.

Gay, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.; Newman, C. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover  

SciTech Connect

A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

162

Solar Policy Environment: Salt Lake  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The overall objective of the “Solar Salt Lake” (SSL) team is to develop a fully-scoped city and county-level implementation plan that will facilitate at least an additional ten megawatts of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations in the government, commercial, industrial, and residential sectors by 2015. To achieve this aggressive goal, the program strategy includes a combination of barrier identification, research, and policy analysis that utilizes the input of various stakeholders. Coupled with these activities will be the development and implementation of pilot installations in the government and residential sectors, and broad outreach to builders and potential practitioners of solar energy products in the process. In this way, while creating mechanisms to enable a demand for solar, SSL will also facilitate capacity building for suppliers, thereby helping to ensure long-term sustainability for the regional market.

163

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant February 5, 2014 March 2014 Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Haul Truck Fire at the...

164

Sandia National Laboratories: Molten Nitrate Salt Initial Flow...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Gill, ddgill@sandia.gov, (505)-844-1524. Tagged with: Concentrating Solar Power * CSP * Molten Salt * molten salt test loop * National Solar Thermal Test Facility * NSTTF *...

165

Sandia National Laboratories: molten salt energy storage demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

molten salt energy storage demonstration Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power,...

166

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Trasfer Fluid Technology for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Trasfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Development of Molten-Salt Heat Trasfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar...

167

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tatum Salt Dome Test Site...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Tatum Salt Dome Test Site - MS 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Tatum Salt Dome Test Site (MS.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

168

Project Profile: Modular and Scalable Baseload Molten Salt Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

salt receiver A distributed molten salt transport system Hybridization with natural gas or biofuels. Publications, Patents, and Awards J. E. Pacheco, C. Moursund, D. Rogers;...

169

Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power...

170

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes...

171

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic Particles: Surprising Reactivity of NaCl with Weak Organic Acids Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt...

172

Project Profile: Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids Halotechnics...

173

Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002  

SciTech Connect

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken. S.C., 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks  

SciTech Connect

Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was previously known the liquidus temperature of the molten salt would change as spent fuel is processed through the Mk-IV electrorefiner. However, the extent of the increase in liquidus temperature was not known. This work is first of its kind in determining thermodynamic properties of a molten salt electrolyte containing transuranics, fission products and bond sodium. Experimental data concluded that the melting temperature of the electrolyte will become greater than the operating temperature of the Mk-IV ER during current fuel processing campaigns. Collected data also helps predict when the molten salt electrolyte will no longer be able to support electrorefining operations.

Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Asse salt mine nuclear waste repository simulation experiments  

SciTech Connect

The field tests underway in Asse, Federal Republic of Germany are dicected toward the development of test plans, techniques and equipment to be used in Exploratory Shafts or At Depth Test Facilities confirmation tests. These simulated repository tests will also provide information which address the following issues: brine migration (liquid and vapor); radiation effects of gamma rays; gas generation caused by radiation and corrosion; accelerated corrosion and leaching; altered properties of salt (the effects of heat, radiation and brine); and the effects of heat and radiation on test assemblies, instruments, and various materials exposed to repository conditions. This paper is a status of the first 82 days of operation of the Asse Brine Migration Tests, which were initiated on May 25, 1983. 6 references.

Coyle, A.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)  

SciTech Connect

Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

Jackson, Ayanna U. [Purdue University; Talaty, Nari [Purdue University; Cooks, R G [Purdue University; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Category:Salt Lake City, UT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UT UT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Salt Lake City, UT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 57 KB SVHospital Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVHospital Salt Lake C... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeHotel Salt Lake... 55 KB SVLargeOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVLargeOffice Salt Lak... 57 KB SVMediumOffice Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVMediumOffice Salt La... 62 KB SVMidriseApartment Salt Lake City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png

179

Acoustic probing of salt using sonar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACOUSTIC PROBING OF SALT USING SONAR A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN BUTLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Oecember 1977 Major Subject...: Geophysics ACOUSTIC PROBING OF SALT USING SONAR A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN BUTLER Approved as to style and content by: C airman of Com ttee ea of e r nt em er ember December 1977 ABSTRACT Acoustic Probing of Salt Using Sonar. (December 1977...

Butler, Kenneth Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Molten Salt Batteries and Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter describes recent work on batteries and fuel cells using molten salt electrolytes. This entails a comparison with other batteries and fuel cells utilizing aqueous and organic electrolytes; for...(1,2)

D. A. J. Swinkels

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Determining Salt Tolerance Among Sunflower Genotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crop lands around the world are becoming more salt-affected due to natural processes and agricultural practices. Due to this increase of salinization, acquisition of saline tolerant germplasm for breeding purposes is becoming a priority. Although...

Masor, Laura Lee

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidance Document Cryogenic Liquids [This is a brief and general summary. Read the full MSDS for more details before handling.] Introduction: All cryogenic liquids are gases at normal temperature liquefies them. Cryogenic liquids are kept in the liquid state at very low temperatures. Cryogenic liquids

184

The Effect of Salt Water on Rice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERIME .-- - --- - -- BULLETIN NO. izz. June, 1909. THE EFFECT OF SALT WATE ON RICE, LAPS, Che Postoffice College Station, 1 --- Texas. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT S I'ATIONS. OFFICERS. GOVERNING BOARD. (Board of Directors A. and M... is Col- lege Station, Texas. Reports and bulletins are sent upon application to the Director. The Effect of Salt Water on Rice. . ...... By G. S. FRAPS. At some of the rice farms located near the coast, the amount of water lxml~etl is sometimes...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1909-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation. This salt has been found to be useful as an explosive alone and in eutectic mixtures with ammonium nitrate and/or other explosive compounds. Its eutectic with ammonium nitrate has been demonstrated to behave in a similar manner to a monomolecular explosive such as TNT, and is less sensitive than the pure salt. Moreover, this eutectic mixture, which contains 87.8 mol % of ammonium nitrate, is close to the CO.sub.2 -balanced composition of 90 mol %, and has a relatively low melting point of 110.5 C. making it readily castable. The ternary eutectic system containing the ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole, ammonium nitrate and ethylenediamine dinitrate has a eutectic temperature of 89.5 C. and gives a measured detonation pressure of 24.8 GPa, which is 97.6% of the calculated value. Both the pure ethylenediamine salt and its known eutectic compounds behave in substantially ideal manner. Methods for the preparation of the salt are described.

Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM); Coburn, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions  

SciTech Connect

Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

HEDENGREN, D.C.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Use of Stable Isotope Labeling and Liquid Chromatography—Tandem Mass Spectrometry Techniques To Simultaneously Determine the Oral and Ophthalmic Bioavailability of Timolol in Dogs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......liquid chromatography with atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization...Phillipsburg, NJ). Water (deionized) was generated using a Barnstead generator (Dubuque, IA). Dosing...solution of its maleate salt in water at a concentration of 0......

J.D. Gilbert; T.V. Olah; M.J. Morris; A. Bortnick; J. Brunner

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

189

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports Conservation Education, Other Public Initiatives November 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Approximately 1.8 million tons of salt have been mined out of the underground at WIPP. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. Proceeds from the WIPP salt allowed hundreds of southeast New Mexico students to learn about resource conservation. The crushed salt is used as a supplement in cattle feed. Since the salt from WIPP has been mined from the middle of a large salt formation, its quality is high, according to Magnum Minerals.

190

A liquid film motor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that electro-hydrodynamical effects in freely suspended liquid films can force liquids to flow. Here, we report a purely electrically driven rotation in water and some other liquid suspended film...

A. Amjadi; R. Shirsavar; N. Hamedani Radja…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with a particularly large advantage near the...of the glass. The thermal transition characteristics...the minimal surface area to the vapor phase...release relatively large amounts of water...Here, wetting frequency is of importance...indicates that extremely large and negative values...

M Potts

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recombinant gene products represent an energy demand that can induce higher death rates...brown- ing) reaction. It seems that the energy changes involved in the loss of cell viability...consider these alternatives. The free energy of stabilization of globular proteins...

M Potts

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...until dry, under a vapor phase of controlled humidity...Immobilization of cells on dry sand or dry paper has been...Effect of sucrose on phase behavior of membranes intact pollen...leakage are linked with phase transitions of mem- brane...

M Potts

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rehydration is a very rapid onset of cellular metabolism in conjunction with a stepwise and stringent...stringent fashion, to resume integrated metabolism (and all that it means) upon rehydration...that the curtailment of respiratory metabolism prior to rehydration may be essential...

M Potts

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...worldwide are unwittingly in the business of distributing samples of...gene products represent an energy demand that can induce higher...reaction. It seems that the energy changes involved in the loss...these alternatives. The free energy of stabilization of globular...

M Potts

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mirror those described for other natural and synthetic glass-forming...they are stored under an inert gas phase (64, 291). What is...sugars zones. The simplest natural representative is trehalose...information on the positioning of natural chro- mophores or artificially...

M Potts

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermal storage for solar cooling using paired ammoniated salt reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the program were to investigate the feasibility of using various solid and liquid ammoniates in heat pump/thermal storage systems for space heating and cooling. The study included corrosion testing of selected metallic and non-metallic specimens in the ammoniates, subscale testing of the candidate ammoniates singly and in pairs, trade studies and conceptual design of a residential system, prototype testing, and ammoniation/deammoniation cyclic testing of manganese chloride. Results of the corrosion testing showed that problems exist with manganese and magnesium chloride ammoniates, except with the teflon which displayed excellent resistance in all environments. Also, all liquid ammoniates are unsuitable for use with uncoated carbon steel. Cycling of the manganese chloride between the high and low ammoniates does not affect its properties. However, the density change between the high and low ammoniates could cause packing problems in a reactor which constrains the salt volume. Subscale tests with solid ammoniates indicated that the heat transfer coefficient in a fixed bed reactor is low (approx. 1 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F). Therefore solid ammoniates are not practical because of the high heat exchanger cost requirement. Forced ammonia recirculation was tested as a means of increasing heat transfer rate in the fixed bed reactor with solid salts, but was not successful. Conversely, the subscale testing with liquid ammoniates produced heat transfer coefficients of 40 to 45 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F. Thus, the residential design was based on a liquid ammoniate/ammonia system using ammonium nitrate as the salt.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF3SO3-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3SO2)2N-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3CF2SO2)2N-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF3SO2)3C-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes.

Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Tonazzi, Juan C. L. (Tucson, AZ); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. Status report. Preliminary data on the performance of a rotary parallel-passage silica-gel dehumidifier  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. The facility can test bench-scale rotary dehumidifiers over a wide range of controlled conditions. We constructed and installed in the test loop a prototype parallel-passage rotary dehumidifier that has spirally wound polyester tape coated with silica gel. The initial tests gave satisfactory results indicating that approximately 90% of the silica gel was active and the overall Lewis number of the wheel was near unity. The facility has several minor difficulties including an inability to control humidity satisfactorily and nonuniform and highly turbulent inlet velocities. To completely validate the facility requires a range of dehumidifier designs. Several choices are available including constructing a second parallel-passage dehumidifier with the passage spacing more uniform.

Schultz, K.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Oxygen vs. Liquid Nitrogen - Liquid Oxygen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Paramagnetism) Paramagnetism Liquid Oxygen and Fire! What happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a test tube of liquid nitrogen! Steve: And this is a test tube of liquid oxygen! Joanna: Let's see what happens when nitrogen and oxygen are exposed to fire. Steve: Fire?! Joanna: Yeah! Steve: Really?! Joanna: Why not! Steve: Okay! Joanna: As nitrogen boils, it changes into nitrogen gas. Because it's so cold, it's denser than the air in the room. The test tube fills up with

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole and preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole has been found to be useful as an explosive alone and in eutectic mixtures with ammonium nitrate and/or other explosive compounds. Its eutectic with ammonium nitrate has been demonstrated to behave in a similar manner to a monomolecular explosive such as TNT, and is less sensitive than the pure salt. Moreover, this eutectic mixture, which contains 87.8 mol% of ammonium nitrate, is close to the CO/sub 2/-balanced composition of 90 mol%, and has a relatively low melting point of 110.5 C making it readily castable. The ternary eutectic system containing the ethylenediamine salt of 5-nitrotetrazole, ammonium nitrate and ethylenediamine dinitrate has a eutectic temperature of 89.5 C and gives a measured detonation pressure of 24.8 GPa, which is 97.6% of the calculated value. Both the pure ethylenediamine salt and its known eutectic compounds behave in substantially ideal manner. Methods for the preparation of the salt are described.

Lee, K.; Coburn, M.D.

1984-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

202

Chemistry and mechanism of molten-salt catalysts in coal-gasification processes. Final report, January 1984-January 1985  

SciTech Connect

Alkali metal salts have been recognized as effective catalysts in coal gasification. However, the presence of reducing gases, in particular carbon monoxide, has recently been shown to have serious inhibitory effects on the catalyst performance. This program has addressed the question of the chemical interactions between carbon monoxide gas containing mixtures and the salt catalysts in liquid form by probing the solution chemistry by dynamic electrochemical techniques. The results of this study show that oxalate ions are formed by the reaction between carbonate ions and carbon monoxide gas. At temperatures above 700/sup 0/C, sulfate ions are directly attacked by carbon monoxide. The oxalate ions are electroactive and their electrochemistry has been studied and found to involve adsorption of oxalate and formation of reactive intermediates. The pathway likely involves an ECE sequence. The formation of active adsorbed species such as oxalate or sulfides at high temperature may be the means by which catalytic function of the salts is inhibited.

White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals, utilizing salt caverns for storage and the existing comprehensive pipeline system has profound implications for the next generation of LNG terminals. LNG imports are expected to become an increasingly more important part of the U.S. energy supply and the capacities to receive LNG securely, safely, and economically must be expanded. Salt cavern LNG receiving terminals both in onshore and offshore locations can be quickly built and provide additional import capacity into the U.S. exceeding 6-10 Bcf/day in the aggregate.

Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ionic Liquids: Structure and Photochemical Reactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure and Photochemical Reactions Structure and Photochemical Reactions E. W. Castner, Jr., C. J. Margulis, M. Maroncelli, and J. F. Wishart in "Annual Reviews of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 62"; Annual Reviews, Palo Alto, CA, (2011) pp. 85-105. [Find paper at Annual Reviews] Abstract: Ionic liquids are subjects of intense current interest within the physical chemistry community. A great deal of progress has been made in just the past five years toward identifying the factors that cause these salts to have low melting points and other useful properties. Supramolecular structure and organization have emerged as important and complicated topics that may be key to understanding how chemical reactions and other processes are affected by ionic liquids. New questions are posed, and an active

205

Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

206

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

207

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geology of Damon Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Geological investigation of the stratigraphy, cap-rock characteristics, deformation and growth history, and growth rate of a shallow coastal diapir. Damon Mound salt dome, located in Brazoria County, has salt less than 600 feet and cap rock less than 100 feet below the surface; a quarry over the dome provides excellent exposures of cap rock as well as overlying Oligocene to Pleistocene strata. These conditions make it ideal as a case study for other coastal diapirs that lack bedrock exposures. Such investigations are important because salt domes are currently being considered by chemical waste disposal companies as possible storage and disposal sites. In this book, the author reviews previous research, presents additional data on the subsurface and surface geology at Damon Mound, and evaluates Oligocene to post-Pleistocene diapir growth.

Collins, E.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Molten nitrate salt technology development status report  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options  

SciTech Connect

During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Control of Soluble Salts in Farming and Gardening.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Soluble Salts in Farming and Gardening This publication on soluble salts is dedicated to Dr. Paul Lyerl!. Resident Director of Texas A&M University Agricultural Research Center at El Paso. From his arrival at the Center in 1942 until his... 23 23 26 27 28 28 29 29 29 29 30 30 31 31 7- :.- 31 32 33 33 34 SUMMARY INTRODUCTION SOLUBLE SALTS IN WATERS AND SOILS Where Salts Come From Kinds and Amounts of Salt How Salt Problems Develop Definition of Terms...

Longenecker, D. E.; Lyerly, P. J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Salt Industry at Sterling, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Exhaust stean of the engine plant is ad- mitted to the first evaporator and warms the "brine, then passes to the second and warns it lesD and condenses, causing a partial vacuum in the first where the brine then boils violent- ly. The vapor thus... and is condensed by a jet condenser, whereupon the third boils. Each evaporator has its own electric prop- eller stirrers and its own electric elevator to remove the salt. Nearly all the handling is done by electric conveyors until the salt is discharged...

Horner, Robert Messenger

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Effect of Salt Water on Rice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mq A QTF *'. ' . - - . 1 bC1 r*. .. r * - .=.-ksl-, G v $. THE EFFECT OF SALT WATER ON RICE AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President \\ STATION ,,,bfINISTRATION: *B. YOUNGBLOOD, M. S., Ph. D.,, Director A B CONNER... of Agriculture. ****In cooperation with the School of Agriculture. SYNOPSIS Rice farmers sometimes have trouble with salt in the water used for irrigation. Varying conditions, such as character of soil, amount of water already on the land, stage of growth...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Solubility of Oxygen and Ozone in Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review covers the solubility of oxygen and ozone in liquids as a function of temperature and pressure. Solubility data for individual systems were critically evaluated and recommended or tentative values presented in many cases. The trend of solubilities in homologous series or related solvents is discussed. Liquids include water;seawater; aqueous salt solutions; mixed solvents; hydrocarbons; organic compounds containing oxygen halogen sulfur nitrogen or silicon; olive oil; and human blood. For ozone only its solubility in water is presented. Key words: aqueous solutions; biological fluids; gas solubility; hydrocarbons; mixed solvents; organic solvents; oxygen; ozone;seawater;water.

Rubin Battino; Timothy R. Rettich; Toshihiro Tominaga

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Assessment of Silicon Carbide Composites for Advanced Salt-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept that uses a liquid fluoride salt coolant and a solid high-temperature fuel. Several alternative fuel types are being considered for this reactor. One set of fuel options is the use of pin-type fuel assemblies with silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. This report provides (1) an initial viability assessment of using SiC as fuel cladding and other in-core components of the AHTR, (2) the current status of SiC technology, and (3) recommendations on the path forward. Based on the analysis of requirements, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix (CVI SiC/SiC) composites are recommended as the primary option for further study on AHTR fuel cladding among various industrially available forms of SiC. Critical feasibility issues for the SiC-based AHTR fuel cladding are identified to be (1) corrosion of SiC in the candidate liquid salts, (2) high dose neutron radiation effects, (3) static fatigue failure of SiC/SiC, (4) long-term radiation effects including irradiation creep and radiation-enhanced static fatigue, and (5) fabrication technology of hermetic wall and sealing end caps. Considering the results of the issues analysis and the prospects of ongoing SiC research and development in other nuclear programs, recommendations on the path forward is provided in the order or priority as: (1) thermodynamic analysis and experimental examination of SiC corrosion in the candidate liquid salts, (2) assessment of long-term mechanical integrity issues using prototypical component sections, and (3) assessment of high dose radiation effects relevant to the anticipated operating condition.

Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator parameters for subcritical reactors have usually been based on using solid nuclear fuel much like that used in all operating critical reactors as well as the thorium burning accelerator-driven energy amplifier proposed by Rubbia et al. An attractive alternative reactor design that used molten salt fuel was experimentally studied at ORNL in the 1960s, where a critical molten salt reactor was successfully operated using enriched U235 or U233 tetrafluoride fuels. These experiments give confidence that an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt reactor will work better than conventional reactors, having better efficiency due to their higher operating temperature, having the inherent safety of subcritical operation, and having constant purging of volatile radioactive elements to eliminate their accumulation and potential accidental release in dangerous amounts. Moreover, the requirements to drive a molten salt reactor can be considerably relaxed compared to a solid fuel reactor, especially regarding accelerator reliability and spallation neutron targetry, to the point that much of the required technology exists today. It is proposed that Project-X be developed into a prototype commercial machine to produce energy for the world by, for example, burning thorium in India and nuclear waste from conventional reactors in the USA.

Johnson, Roland (Muons, Inc.) [Muons, Inc.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

218

Mineral Salt: A Source of Costly Energy?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...required to pump salt water into a solution cavity...the flow of cooling water of a conventional or...con-siderable preliminary treatment. Os-motic flow through...process of in-verse electrodialysis, only the ions pass...nor extensive pre-treatment of the fluids (1...

W. GARY WILLIAMS

1979-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.  

SciTech Connect

Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE HEAVY METAL SALTS (selected)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSDS ___Special training provided by the department/supervisor ___Review of the OSHA Lab Standard ___Review of the departmental safety manual ___Review of the Chemical Hygiene Plan ___Safety meetings12.1 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for HEAVY METAL SALTS (selected) Location

Pawlowski, Wojtek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solar with a Grain of Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...zone, and a bot-tom storage zone. The upper zone...electricity. Hot water is pumped out of the bottom zone...sequentially on the top of the storage zone. Howard C. Bryant...leached salts to the storage zone. One way to do...says French, but the seawater itself is turbid and...

THOMAS H. MAUGH II

1982-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

NOVEL GRAPHITE SALTS OF HIGH OXIDIZING POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hr volatiles none AsFS AsFS > CF4 AsFS AsFS AsFS C13.l AsF 6C16.l AsF 6 C24.3AsF6·l/2 F2 > CF4> CF4 > CF4 Table VI-7. Graphite hexafluoroarsenate salts +

McCarron III, Eugene Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Salt repository project closeout status report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the scope and status of the US Department of Energy (DOE`s) Salt Repository Project (SRP) at the time when the project was terminated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987. The report reviews the 10-year program of siting a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste in rock salt formations. Its purpose is to aid persons interested in the information developed during the course of this effort. Each area is briefly described and the major items of information are noted. This report, the three salt Environmental Assessments, and the Site Characterization Plan are the suggested starting points for any search of the literature and information developed by the program participants. Prior to termination, DOE was preparing to characterize three candidate sites for the first mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The sites were in Nevada, a site in volcanic tuff; Texas, a site in bedded salt (halite); and Washington, a site in basalt. These sites, identified by the screening process described in Chapter 3, were selected from the nine potentially acceptable sites shown on Figure I-1. These sites were identified in accordance with provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. 196 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

NONE

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

225

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

226

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories Experiments were used to examine water content in Permian salt samples (Salado Formation) collected from the WIPP site. The profile of water release and movement is recognized as a function of temperature from 30 to 275 oC using classical gravimetric methods to measure weight loss as a result of heating. The amount of water released from heating the salt was found to be correlated with the salts accessory mineral content (clay, other secondary minerals lost up to 3 wt % while pure halite salt lost less than 0.5 wt % water). Water released from salt at lower temperature was reversible and is attributed to clay hydration and dehydration processes. The analysis

227

Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for CSP Applications - FY13 Q1 Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for CSP Applications - FY13 Q1...

228

Ketone Production from the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylate Salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MixAlco process uses an anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentation to convert lignocellulosic biomass to carboxylate salts. The fermentation broth must be clarified so that only carboxylate salts, water, and minimal impurities remain. Carboxylate...

Landoll, Michael 1984-

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars, site tours, presentations, and written correspondence.

Barnett, Kimberly

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Salt or Sodium Chloride Content of Feeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, Preeident BULLETIN NO. 271 OCTOBER, 1920 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY THE SALT OR SODIUM CHLORIDE CONTENT OF FEEDS B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOK COLLEGE.... ............... Salt content of feecls.. ......... Salt content of mixed feeds.. ................... Summary ancl conclusions. Page. l1 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] BULLETIN XO. 271. OCTOBE- '"On THE SALT OR SODIUM CHLORIDE CONTENT OF FEI The Texas feed...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Lomanitz, S. (Sebastian)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, Albert P. (Vernon, CT)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

Grasso, A.P.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

233

Interactions among Plant Species and Microorganisms in Salt Marsh Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a New England salt marsh. Ecology 72: 138-148...L. Melville, and R. L. Peterson. 1994...Broome, and S. R. Shafer. 1993...mycorrhizae in salt marshes in North Carolina...a New England salt marsh. J. Ecol. 86: 285-292. 30 Linderman, R. G. 1988. Mycorrhizal...

David J. Burke; Erik P. Hamerlynck; Dittmar Hahn

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Self-potential monitoring of a salt plume  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...salt-migration process. By this we...salt-migration process needs to be much...salt migration process is relatively...written as a MATLAB routine. The...The numerical simulation was used to compute...gradient in the chemical potential of...digitaledition.pdf .. Fournier...

P. Martínez-Pagán; A. Jardani; A. Revil; A. Haas

235

Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

236

Occurrence of gypsum in Gulf coast salt domes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Occurrence of gypsum in Gulf coast salt domes Barton Donald Clinton...OF GYPSUM IN THE GULF COAST SALT DOMES. Sir: On accountof thepaucityof...concerningtheoccurrenceof gypsumandanhydriteon the salt domes. The followingremarksmay...5o-footsill of saltat 3,350feetat Palangana,possiblyalsoStrattonRidge...

Donald Clinton Barton

237

Structural restoration of Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is suited for seismic stratigraphic analysis and salt tectonism analysis. Jurassic strata include the Louann Salt on the continental shelf and upper slope of the Destin Dome OCS area...

Guo, Mengdong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Flow, Salts, and Trace Elements in the Rio Grande: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

must then focus on either in- creasing salt removal, minimizing salt inflow into the Rio Grande, or reducing evaporative losses of water, which concentrate salts. Although techniques to remove salts such as reverse os- mosis and electrodialysis exist...

Miyamoto, S.; Fenn, L. B.; Swietlik, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Seismic stratigraphy and salt tectonics of the Alaminos Canyon area, Gulf of Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

morphology, salt structure, and suprasalt sediments indicate the majority of the slope is covered by a shallow salt canopy. The salt structure map indicates that the Alaminos Canyon study area represents a transition from a semi-continuous salt sheet...

Mechler, Suzanne Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Viscosity, specific (for liquids)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

n. The ratio between the viscosity of a liquid and the viscosity of water at the same temperature. Specific viscosity is sometimes used interchangeably with relative viscosity for liquids.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Protic Ionic Liquids: Preparation, Characterization, and Proton Free Energy Level Representation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interesting properties, including the ability to serve as electrolytes in solvent-free fuel cell systems. We in a fuel cell.2,7,8 This is an application which requires the presence of a special type of ionic liquids continue to be found. They are the low-melting relatives of molten salts whose place in the history

Angell, C. Austen

242

Liquid Piston Stirling Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fluidyne liquid piston engine is a simple free-piston Stirling engine that can be made from nothing more...

Graham Walker Ph. D.; J. R. Senft Ph.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Enrichment and Association of Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sippewissett salt marsh, Falmouth, Massachusetts, and Palo Alto salt marsh...Sippewissett salt marsh, Falmouth, Massachusetts, and Palo Alto salt marsh...Sippewissett salt marsh, Falmouth, Massachusetts, and Palo Alto salt marsh...largely attributed to intense solar radiation. There have been...

R. W. Harvey; L. Y. Young

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology Provider Salt River Electric Cooperative Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for energy efficiency. The Touchstone Energy Home Program provides a rebate of up to $250 to customers

245

Salt River Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Salt River Project Place Tempe, Arizona Utility Id 16572 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] Energy Information Administration Form 826[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Salt River Project Smart Grid Project was awarded $56,859,359 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $114,003,719.

246

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

247

Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Hydrocarbon Exploration In The Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aksaray And Ecemis Faults - Diapiric Salt Relationships- Relevance To The Hydrocarbon Exploration In The Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Due to activitiy of the Aksaray and Ecemis Faults, volcanic intrusion and westward movement of the Anatolian plate, diapiric salt structures were occurred in the Tuz Golu (Salt Lake) basin in central Anatolia, Turkey. With the collisions of the Arabian and Anatolian plates during the late Cretaceous and Miocene times, prominent ophiolitic

248

WIPP Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members WIPP Shares Expertise with Salt Club Members November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Carlsbad Field Office’s Abe Van Luik, third from right, examines rock salt taken from the Morsleben mine in Germany. Carlsbad Field Office's Abe Van Luik, third from right, examines rock salt taken from the Morsleben mine in Germany. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) participated in the second meeting of the Nuclear Energy Agency's (NEA) Salt Club and the 4th U.S.-German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design & Operation in Berlin. CBFO, which has responsibility for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the National Transuranic (TRU) Program, was represented by International Programs and Policy Advisor Dr. Abe Van Luik.

249

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot Granular Salt Consolidation, Constitutive Model and Micromechanics The report addresses granular salt reconsolidation from three vantage points: laboratory testing, modeling, and petrofabrics. The experimental data 1) provide greater insight and understanding into the role of elevated temperature and pressure regimes on physical properties of reconsolidated crushed salt, 2) can supplement an existing database used to develop a reconsolidation constitutive model and 3) provide data for model evaluation. The constitutive model accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent

250

Molten Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF)  

Sandia has developed a heat transfer fluid (HTF) for use at elevated temperatures that has a lower freezing point than any molten salt mixture available commercially. This allows the HTF to be used in applications in which the expensive parasitic energy costs necessary for freeze protection can be significantly reduced. The higher operating temperature limit significantly increases power cycle efficiency and overall power plan sun-to-net electric efficiency....

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Stationary phase deposition based on onium salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Onium salt chemistry can be used to deposit very uniform thickness stationary phases on the wall of a gas chromatography column. In particular, the stationary phase can be bonded to non-silicon based columns, especially microfabricated metal columns. Non-silicon microfabricated columns may be manufactured and processed at a fraction of the cost of silicon-based columns. In addition, the method can be used to phase-coat conventional capillary columns or silicon-based microfabricated columns.

Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Dirk, Shawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Trudell, Daniel E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Salt Lake County Residential Solar Financing Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of our engagement with the National Renewable Energy Laboratories conducting the Salt Lake County Solar America Residential Finance Study, we have drafted this report summarizing the tools and mechanisms available for residential solar projects. These include the financial incentives available, possible financing models that could be used in the County, and a review of the community-scale solar project in St. George, Utah. We have also provided cost estimates for each system.

253

New public information resources on salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect

For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has funded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

254

New public information resources on salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect

For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has fi.mded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental results show similar trends as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results presented in this report; however, some differences exist that will need to be assessed in future studies. The results of this testing will be used to improve the diode design to be tested in the liquid salt loop system.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Liquid Wall Chambers  

SciTech Connect

The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

Meier, W R

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Sliding Luttinger liquid phases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study systems of coupled spin-gapped and gapless Luttinger liquids. First, we establish the existence of a sliding Luttinger liquid phase for a system of weakly coupled parallel quantum wires, with and without disorder. It is shown that the coupling can stabilize a Luttinger liquid phase in the presence of disorder. We then extend our analysis to a system of crossed Luttinger liquids and establish the stability of a non-Fermi-liquid state: the crossed sliding Luttinger liquid phase. In this phase the system exhibits a finite-temperature, long-wavelength, isotropic electric conductivity that diverges as a power law in temperature T as T?0. This two-dimensional system has many properties of a true isotropic Luttinger liquid, though at zero temperature it becomes anisotropic. An extension of this model to a three-dimensional stack exhibits a much higher in-plane conductivity than the conductivity in a perpendicular direction.

Ranjan Mukhopadhyay; C. L. Kane; T. C. Lubensky

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

A hypothesis concerning the distribution of salt and salt structures in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A IIYPO'rklESIS CO/iCI, RI~ IG TktE DISTRIIoUTIO l OE SALT I'D cAET STRU TURES Rci TIIE GU:I 0= VEXICO A Thesis by JOIIN 'O'OODYJ ORTII A ?TOINE Subrnitte. ' to th, Graouate CoU~ Se Texas A i~. '4 University in partial fv~t'Ub~s "u o I... the reouirernent 'or th ~ cl . . gree o', ' i%I A S T E R 0 E S C IF. U C E ivla y 1 9 I 6 Mr jo? Subject: Geolnsical Oceanography A HYPOTHESIS CONCERNING THE DISTRIBUTION OF SALT AND SALT STRUCTURES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by JOHN WOODWORTH ANTOINE...

Antoine, John Woodworth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Excess lithium salt functions more than compensating for lithium loss when synthesizing Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12 in alumina crucible  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Garnet type electrolyte “Li6.5La3Ta0.5Zr1.5O12” (LLZTO) was prepared by conventional solid-state reaction in alumina crucibles and excess lithium salt (from 0% to 50 mol%) was added into the starting materials to investigate the effects of excess lithium salt on the property of LLZTO. SEM, XRD and AC impedance were used to determine the microstructure, phase formation and Li-ion conductivity. Cubic garnet with a minor second phase LiAlO2 in the grain boundary was obtained for the pellets with excess lithium salt. As the amount of excess lithium salt increased, more Al element diffused from alumina crucibles to LLZTO pellets and reacted with excess lithium salt to form liquid Li2O–Al2O3 phase in the grain boundary, which accelerated the pellets' densification and reduced lithium loss at a high temperature. Ionic conductivity of LLZTO pellets increased with the amount of excess lithium salt added and leveled off at ?4 × 10?4 S cm?1 when lithium salt exceeded 30 mol%. The performance of Li-air batteries with hybrid electrolytes, using homemade LLZTO thin pellets as solid electrolytes, was investigated. The LLZTO thin pellet with more excess lithium salt in starting material had a higher density and resulted in better cell performance.

Kai Liu; Jiang-Tao Ma; Chang-An Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Liquid Vortex Shielding for Fusion Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Swirling liquid vortices can be used in fusion chambers to protect their first walls and critical elements from the harmful conditions resulting from fusion reactions. The beam tube structures in heavy ion fusion (HIF) must be shielded from high energy particles, such as neutrons, x-rays and vaporized coolant, that will cause damage. Here an annular wall jet, or vortex tube, is proposed for shielding and is generated by injecting liquid tangent to the inner surface of the tube both azimuthally and axially. Its effectiveness is closely related to the vortex tube flow properties. 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is being conducted to precisely characterize its turbulent structure. The concept of annular vortex flow can be extended to a larger scale to serve as a liquid blanket for other inertial fusion and even magnetic fusion systems. For this purpose a periodic arrangement of injection and suction holes around the chamber circumference are used, generating the layer. Because it is important to match the index of refraction of the fluid with the tube material for optical measurement like PIV, a low viscosity mineral oil was identified and used that can also be employed to do scaled experiments of molten salts at high temperature.

Bardet, Philippe M. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Supiot, Boris F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Peterson, Per F. [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Savas, Oemer [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Destruction of XM-46 (aka LGP-1846) using the Molten Salt Destruction Process  

SciTech Connect

The experimental work done on the destruction of the liquid gun propellant XM-46 (or LGP-1846) using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the US Army is described in this report. The current methods of disposal of large quantities of high explosives (HE), propellants and wastes containing energetic materials by open burning or open detonation (OB/OD), or by incineration, are becoming undesirable. LLNL is developing MSD as an alternative to OB/OD and incineration of energetic materials. A series of 18 continuous experimental runs were made wherein a solution of XM-46 and water was injected into a bed of molten salt comprising the carbonates of sodium, potassium and lithium, along with air. The results from these experiments, described in detail in the main body of this report, show that: XM-46 can be safely and completely destroyed in a bed of molten salt at temperatures well below those needed for incineration. Under optimum operating conditions, less than 1% of the chemically bound nitrogen in the XM-46 is converted to NO{sub x}, and less than 1% carbon is converted to CO. There exist, however, a number of technical uncertainties: We need to understand better why nitrates build up in the salt bath, and what we can do to reduce this amount. We need to understand the mechanism of XM-46 oxidation and ways to minimize the formation of CO and NO{sub x}. In addition, we would like to find out ways by which a more concentrated solution of XM-46 can be introduced into the reactor, so as to increase the throughputs.

Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The logic behind thick, liquid-walled, fusion concepts  

SciTech Connect

It may be possible to surround the region where fusion reactions are taking place with a neutronically thick liquid blanket which has penetrations that allow only a few tenths of a percent of the neutrons to leak out. Even these neutrons can be attenuated by adding an accurately placed liquid or solid near the target to shadow-shield the beam ports from line-of-sight neutrons. The logic of such designs are discussed and their evolution is described with examples applied to both magnetic and inertial fusion (HYLIFE-II). These designs with liquid protection are self healing when exposed to pulsed loading and have a number of advantages-over the usual designs with solid first walls. For example, the liquid-protected solid components will last the life of the plant, and therefore the capacity factor is estimated to be approximately 10% higher than for the non-liquid-walled blankets, because no blanket replacement shutdowns are required. The component replacement, operations, and maintenance costs might be half the usual value because no blanket change-out costs or accompanying facilities are required. These combined savings might lower the cost of electricity by 20%. Nuclear-grade construction should not be needed, largely because the liquid attenuates neutrons and results in less activation of materials. Upon decommissioning, the reactor materials should qualify for disposal by shallow burial even when constructed of ordinary 304 stainless steel. The need for a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron test facility to develop first-wall materials is avoided or greatly reduced, saving billions of development dollars. Flowing molten Li, the molten salt Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), and molten Li{sub l7}Pb{sub 83} have been considered. An advantage of molten salt is that it will not burn and has a low tritium solubility and therefore low tritium inventory.

Moir, R.W.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) Project. The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at the SWPF Project. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred during August - September 2012. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

266

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Decades' worth of transuranic waste from Los Alamos is being laid to rest at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico March 25, 2013 Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Depending on the impurities embedded within it, the salt from WIPP can be anything from a reddish, relatively opaque rock to a clear crystal like the one shown here. Ordinary salt effectively seals transuranic waste in a long-term repository Transuranic waste, made of items such as lab coats and equipment that have been contaminated by radioactive elements heavier than uranium, is being shipped from the Los Alamos National Laboratory to a long-term storage

267

Salt tectonics, patterns of basin fill, and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect

Salt structures, which develop due to sediment loading, gravity creep, and/or buoyance, include boundary-fault grabens and half grabens, rollers, anticlines, domes and walls, diapirs, sills, massifs, and compressional toe structure. Associated features include fault systems and turtle structures. Of these, six directly relate to basin fill and all directly influence the distribution of reservoir facies. Salt structuring is initiated by sedimentation, which in turn is localized by salt withdrawal. Withdrawal produces individual salt structures, migrating sills, dissected massifs, and regional depocenters bordered by salt walls. Composite withdrawals dictate the patterns of basin fill. Relative rates of structural growth and sedimentation control the distribution of reservoir facies. When growth dominates, sands are channeled into lows. When sedimentation dominates and maintains flat surfaces, facies distribution is not impacted except where faulting develops. This paper presents techniques for using seismic data to determine the controls on salt structural growth and sedimentation and the patterns of basin fill and reservoir distribution.

Yorston, H.J.; Miles, A.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

Neal, J.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Consolidation and permeability of salt in brine  

SciTech Connect

The consolidation and loss of permeability of salt crystal aggregates, important in assessing the effects of water in salt repositories, has been studied as a function of several variables. The kinetic behavior was similar to that often observed in sintering and suggested the following expression for the time dependence of the void fraction: phi(t) = phi(0) - (A/B)ln(1 + Bt/z(0)/sup 3/), where A and B are rate constants and z(0) is initial average particle size. With brine present, A and phi(0) varied linearly with stress. The initial void fraction was also dependent to some extent on the particle size distribution. The rate of consolidation was most rapid in brine and least rapid in the presence of only air as the fluid. A brine containing 5 m MgCl/sub 2/ showed an intermediate rate, presumably because of the greatly reduced solubility of NaCl. A substantial wall effect was indicated by an observed increase in the void fraction of consolidated columns with distance from the top where the stress was applied and by a dependence of consolidation rate on the column height and radius. The distance through which the stress fell by a factor of phi was estimated to change inversely as the fourth power of the column diameter. With increasing temperature (to 85/sup 0/C), consolidation proceeded somewhat more rapidly and the wall effect was reduced. The permeability of the columns dropped rapidly with consolidation, decreasing with about the sixth power of the void fraction. In general, extrapolation of the results to repository conditions confirms the self-sealing properties of bedded salt as a storage medium for radioactive waste.

Shor, A.J.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Canonico, C.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts  

SciTech Connect

This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Reavis, J.G.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Salt River Project electric vehicle program  

SciTech Connect

Electric vehicles (EV) promise to be a driving force in the future of America. The quest for cleaner air and efforts to trim the nation's appetite for foreign oil are among the reasons why. America's EV future is rapidly approaching, with major automakers targeting EV mass production and sales before the end of the decade. This article describes the Salt River Project (SRP), a leader among electric utilities involved in EV research and development (R and D). R and D efforts are underway to plan and prepare for a significant number of EVs in SRP's service territory and to understand the associated recharging requirements for EVs.

Morrow, K.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Squire, Dwight V. (Livermore, CA); Robinson, Jeffrey A. (Manteca, CA); House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ultrasonic liquid level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

Integrated demonstration of molten salt oxidation with salt recycle for mixed waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal, nonflame process that has the inherent capability of completely destroying organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has prepared a facility and constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO processor with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. This integrated system was designed and engineered based on laboratory experience with a smaller engineering-scale reactor unit and extensive laboratory development on salt recycle and final forms preparation. In this paper we present design and engineering details of the system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is identification of the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

Hsu, P.C.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes.

Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Columbus Salt Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

277

salt-water pumped-storage hydroelectric plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

salt-water pumped-storage hydroelectric plant, saltwater pumped-storage hydroelectric station, seawater pumped-storage hydroelectric plant, seawater pumped-storage hydroelectric station ? Salzwasser-...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - May 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project - February 2013 CRAD,...

279

Sedimentation and resuspension in a New England salt marsh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particulate matter in a salt marsh can undergo repeated sedimentation and resuspension. Sedimentation measured with sediment traps, increases ... suggests that sedimentation is more than offset by resuspension. Resuspension

Thomas E. Jordan; Ivan Valiela

1983-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Method for the production of uranium chloride salt  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Project Profile: Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES), under the Thermal Storage FOA, created a composite thermal energy storage material by embedding nanoparticles in a molten salt base material.

282

Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

in the SPA SEIS, short- term impacts are incurred during operation of the salt waste processing facilities, and long-term impacts are those resulting from release of...

283

Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for CSP Applications Savannah River National Laboratory April 15, 2013 | Garcia-Diaz * The overall project approach will combine...

284

Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for CSP Applications Savannah River National Laboratory Garcia-Diaz A 1152013:Garcia-Diaz * The overall project approach will...

285

Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful...

286

Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Molten Salt Systems for CSP Applications - FY13 Q1 Advanced Ceramic Materials and Packaging Technologies for Realizing Sensors for Concentrating Solar Power Systems...

287

Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

THE PARTIAL EQUIVALENT VOLUMES OF SALTS IN SEAWATER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

of the major salts in seawater have been mcasurcd over the salinity ... model of seawater by considering seawater .... mained essentially constant during storage.

289

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Excavated Salt Agreement Supports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

result in large volumes of excavated salt. Seeking an innovative alternative to landfill disposal, EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) reached an agreement with Magnum...

290

Sustainable Energy Source for Water Pumping at Puttalam Salt Limited.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The cost of grid based electrical and diesel sea water pumping to salt fields is one of the major cost components out of the… (more)

Kamaldeen, Mohammed Rizwan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR): Method and System to fully...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR): Method and System to fully fission actinides for electric power production without fuel enrichment, fabrication, or reprocessing A method for...

292

"Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System" Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System" Inventor ..--.. Richard P. Majeski Disclosed is a design for a fully axisymmetric, fast flowing liquid lithium plasma facing "wall" or surface which, in its present form, is intended for implementation in a tokamak. The design employs JxB forces to form a free-surface flow along a guide wall at the outer boundary of the plasma. The implementation of the disclosure design includes a system for recirculating the liquid metal within the volume of the toroidal field coils using inductive pumping, an approach wich allows independent energizing of the wall-forming and recirculating pumping systems, cooling of the recirculating liquid using fluid heat exchange with a molten salt,

293

Excavation Damaged Zones In Rock Salt Formations  

SciTech Connect

Salt formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be sealed in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. For optimising the sealing techniques knowledge about the excavation damaged zones (EDZ) around these openings is essential. In the frame of a project performed between 2004 and 2007, investigations of the EDZ evolution were performed in the Stassfurt halite of the Asse salt mine in northern Germany. Three test locations were prepared in the floor of an almost 20 year old gallery on the 800-m level of the Asse mine: (1) the drift floor as existing, (2) the new drift floor shortly after removing of a layer of about 1 m thickness of the floor with a continuous miner, (3) the new drift floor 2 years after cutting off the 1-m layer. Subject of investigation were the diffusive and advective gas transport and the advective brine transport very close to the opening. Spreading of the brine was tracked by geo-electric monitoring in order to gain information about permeability anisotropy. Results obtained showed that EDZ cut-off is a useful method to improve sealing effectiveness when constructing technical barriers. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Savannah River Site- Salt Waste Processing Facility: Briefing on the Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a presentation outlining the Salt Waste Processing Facility process, major risks, approach for conducting reviews, discussion of the findings, and conclusions.

295

From pre-salt sources to post-salt traps: A specific petroleum system in Congo coastal basin  

SciTech Connect

The Bas Congo basin extends from Gabon to Angola and is a prolific oil province where both pre-salt and post salt sources and reservoirs have been found. In the northern part of the basin referred to as the Congo coastal basin, the proven petroleum system is more specific: mature source rocks are found only in pre-salt series whereas by contrast 99 % proven hydrocarbon reserves am located in post-salt traps. Such a system is controlled by the following factors: Source rocks are mostly organic rich shales deposited in a restricted environment developed in a rift prior to the Atlantic Ocean opening; Migration from pre-salt sources to post-salt traps is finalized by local discontinuities of the regional salt layer acting otherwise as a tight seal; Post-salt reservoirs are either carbonates or sands desposited in the evolutive shelf margin developped during Upper Cretaceous; Geometric traps are linked to salt tectonics (mostly turtle-shaped structures); Regional shaly seals are related to transgressive shales best developped during high rise sea level time interval. Stratigraphically, the age of hydrocarbon fields trends are younger and younger from West to East: lower Albian in Nkossa, Upper Albian and lower Cenomanian in Likouala, Yanga, Sendji, Upper Cenomanian in Tchibouela, Turonian in Tchendo, Turanian and Senonian in Emeraude.

Vernet, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Carbon monoxide absorbing liquid  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure is directed to a carbon monoxide absorbing liquid containing a cuprous ion, hydrochloric acid and titanum trichloride. Titanium trichloride is effective in increasing the carbon monoxide absorption quantity. Furthermore, titanium trichloride remarkably increases the oxygen resistance. Therefore, this absorbing liquid can be used continuously and for a long time.

Arikawa, Y.; Horigome, S.; Kanehori, K.; Katsumoto, M.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Precision liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquid Fuels Market Module Liquid Fuels Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 145 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the LFMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The LFMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. petroleum refining

300

Reading Comprehension - Liquid Nitrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Liquid Nitrogen Nitrogen is the most common substance in Earth's _________ crust oceans atmosphere trees . In the Earth's atmosphere, nitrogen is a gas. The particles of a gas move very quickly. They run around and bounce into everyone and everything. The hotter a gas is, the _________ slower faster hotter colder the particles move. When a gas is _________ cooled warmed heated compressed , its particles slow down. If a gas is cooled enough, it can change from a gas to a liquid. For nitrogen, this happens at a very _________ strange warm low high temperature. If you want to change nitrogen from a gas to a liquid, you have to bring its temperature down to 77 Kelvin. That's 321 degrees below zero _________ Kelvin Celsius Centigrade Fahrenheit ! Liquid nitrogen looks like water, but it acts very differently. It

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Measurement of vibrational spectrum of liquid using monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy–electron energy loss spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......application to lithium-ion battery and hence has been well studied...Atom-by-atom spectroscopy at graphene edge. Nature (2010) 468...temperature molten salts as lithium battery electrolyte. Electrochim...additive systems as lithium-ion battery ionic liquid electrolytes......

Tomohiro Miyata; Mao Fukuyama; Akihide Hibara; Eiji Okunishi; Masaki Mukai; Teruyasu Mizoguchi

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Populations of Methanogenic Bacteria in a Georgia Salt Marsh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...28. Oremland, R. S., L. M. Marsh, and S. Polcin...reduction in anoxic, salt marsh sediments. Nature...29. Oremland, R. S., and S. Polcin...Pomeroy, L. R., and R. G. Wiegert. 1981. The ecology of a salt marsh. Springer-Verlag...

Michael J. Franklin; William J. Wiebe; William B. Whitman

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alternative Waste Forms for Electro-Chemical Salt Waste  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to examine alternate crystalline (ceramic/mineral) and glass waste forms for immobilizing spent salt from the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) electrochemical separations process. The AFCI is a program sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a process for recycling spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The electrochemical process is a molten salt process for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in an electrorefiner and generates spent salt that is contaminated with alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanide fission products (FP) that must either be cleaned of fission products or eventually replaced with new salt to maintain separations efficiency. Currently, these spent salts are mixed with zeolite to form sodalite in a glass-bonded waste form. The focus of this study was to investigate alternate waste forms to immobilize spent salt. On a mole basis, the spent salt is dominated by alkali and Cl with minor amounts of alkaline earth and lanthanides. In the study reported here, we made an effort to explore glass systems that are more compatible with Cl and have not been previously considered for use as waste forms. In addition, alternate methods were explored with the hope of finding a way to produce a sodalite that is more accepting of as many FP present in the spent salt as possible. This study was done to investigate two different options: (1) alternate glass families that incorporate increased concentrations of Cl; and (2) alternate methods to produce a mineral waste form.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Brian J.; Matyas, Josef; Arreguin, Shelly A.; Vienna, John D.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

SALT DAMAGE CRITERION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to conduct a field-scale application demonstrating the use of continuum damage mechanics to determine the minimum allowable operating pressure of compressed natural gas storage caverns in salt formations. A geomechanical study was performed of two natural gas storage caverns (one existing and one planned) utilizing state-of-the-art salt mechanics to assess the potential for cavern instability and collapse. The geomechanical study consisted primarily of laboratory testing, theoretical development, and analytical/numerical tasks. A total of 50 laboratory tests was performed on salt specimens to aid in the development and definition of the material model used to predict the behavior of rock salt. Material model refinement was performed that improved the predictive capability of modeling salt during damage healing, recovery of work-hardened salt, and the behavior of salt at stress states other than triaxial compression. Results of this study showed that the working gas capacity of the existing cavern could be increased by 18 percent and the planned cavern could be increased by 8 percent using the proposed method compared to a conventional stress-based method. Further refinement of the continuum damage model is recommended to account for known behavior of salt at stress conditions other than triaxial compression that is not characterized accurately by the existing model.

Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Influence of Salt Purity on Na+ and Palmitic Acid Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Ultrapure (UP) and ACS grade NaCl salts are used for aqueous the interfacial water structure. These results suggest that the alkali salt grade even after pretreatment to many chemical, biochemical, and atmospheric processes.1-8 Particularly, Na+ and K+ , as the two most

306

Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect

Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

307

Brachybacterium squillarum sp. nov., isolated from salt-fermented seafood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brachybacterium squillarum sp. nov., isolated from salt-fermented seafood Seong-Kyu Park, Min salt-fermented seafood in Korea. The organism grew in 0­10 % (w/v) NaCl and at 25­37 6C, with optimal

Bae, Jin-Woo

308

Kocuria salsicia sp. nov., isolated from salt-fermented seafood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kocuria salsicia sp. nov., isolated from salt- fermented seafood Ji-Hyun Yun,1 Seong Woon Roh,1 salt-fermented seafood in Korea. It was a Gram- positive, non-motile, coccus-shaped bacterium-fermented seafood (`gajami-sikhae') from Korea. Following isolation on marine agar 2216 (MA, BBL) at 30 uC, a pure

Bae, Jin-Woo

309

Salt tectonics, patterns of basin fill, and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect

Salt structures, which develop due to sediment loading, gravity creep, and/or buoyancy, include boundary-fault grabens and half grabens, rollers, anticlines, domes and walls, diapirs, sills, massifs, and compressional toe structures. Associated features include fault systems and turtle structures. Of these, six directly relate to basin fill and all directly influence the distribution of reservoir facies. Salt structuring is initiated by sedimentation, which in turn is localized by salt withdrawal. Withdrawal produces individual salt structures, migrating sills, dissected massifs, and regional depocenters bordered by salt walls. Composite withdrawals dictate the patterns of basin fill. Relative rates of structural growth and sedimentation control the distribution of reservoir facies. When growth dominates, sands are channeled into lows. When sedimentation dominates and maintains flat surfaces, facies distribution is not impacted except where faulting develops. Turtle structures, developed by the inversion of peripheral synclines, can move sands into favorable structural position and/or serve as platforms for carbonate reservoir development. Salt growth varies with type structure, stage of development, and rate of sedimentation. Sedimentation at a specific location depends on basin position, sediment transport system, sea level stand, and rate of salt withdrawal. This paper presents techniques for using seismic data to determine the controls on salt structural growth and sedimentation and the patterns of basin fill and reservoir distribution.

Yorston, H.J.; Miles, A.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Air Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquide - Biogas & Fuel Cells Hydrogen Energy Biogas Upgrading Technology 12 June 2012 Charlie.Anderson@airliquide.com 2 Air Liquide, world leader in gases for industry,...

311

Sandia National Laboratories: ionic liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

liquid Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic Liquids Effective for Pretreating Mixed Blends of Biofuel Feedstocks On February 26, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Energy,...

312

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the safety basis and design development for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The review was performed February 12-14, 2013 by DOE's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the safety basis, design, and the associated technical documents developed for

313

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Organization Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada Published U.S. Department of the Interior, 2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project Citation Bureau of Land Management (Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada). 2011. BLM Fact Sheet- Ormat Technologies Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Project. Carson City, Nevada: U.S. Department of the

314

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility - August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development. This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the safety basis and design development for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The review was performed February 12-14, 2013 by DOE's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the safety basis, design, and the associated technical documents developed for

315

ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility General Information Name ENEL Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Facility Salt Wells Geothermal Facility Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Churchill, NV Coordinates 39.651603422063°, -118.49778413773° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.651603422063,"lon":-118.49778413773,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Activity Date 2004 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resource contracted Willowstick Technologies, LLC to conduct a Controlled Source-Frequency Domain Magnetics (CS-FDM) geophysical investigation at Salt Wells in order to characterize and delineate areas showing the greatest concentrations and highest temperatures of geothermal groundwater. The investigation also sought to map blind faults beneath the

317

Salt River Project SRP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SRP SRP Jump to: navigation, search Name Salt River Project (SRP) Place Tempe, Arizona Zip 85281-1298 Sector Biomass, Solar Product US utility which sources a percentage of its electricity from biomass plants. It is also involved in the solar power industry. Coordinates 33.42551°, -111.937419° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.42551,"lon":-111.937419,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Weakly-Basic Anion Exchange Resin Scavenges Impurities in Ionic Liquid Synthesized from Trialkyloxonium Salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Lewis acidic parts of these impurities, that is, H+ and BF3, were demonstrated to be able to transfer to dimethylamino groups of the weakly basic anion exchange resin (DOWEX MARATHON WBA) in aqueous solutions, releasing 1-methylimidazole (mim). ... Although intense reddish brown color was given to the residual oil of [emim]BF4, further purification and decolorization have been achieved by using silica-gel column chromatography (eluent: acetone) and treatment with activated carbon in water. ... The detection and determination of [emim]+, mim, [Hmim]+, [BF3(mim)], and BF4– in the recovered oils and collected volatiles from each batch were performed by using chemical shifts and peak integrals in the 1H and 19F NMR spectra. ...

Koichiro Takao; Taro Tsubomura

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Ceramicrete stabilization of radioactive-salt-containing liquid waste and sludge water. Final CRADA report.  

SciTech Connect

It was found that the Ceramicrete Specimens incorporated the Streams 1 and 2 sludges with the adjusted loading about 41.6 and 31.6%, respectively, have a high solidity. The visible cracks in the matrix materials and around the anionite AV-17 granules included could not obtain. The granules mentioned above fixed by Ceramicrete matrix very strongly. Consequently, we can conclude that irradiation of Ceramecrete matrix, goes from the high radioactive elements, not result the structural degradation. Based on the chemical analysis of specimens No.462 and No.461 used it was shown that these matrix included the formation elements (P, K, Mg, O), but in the different samples their correlations are different. These ratios of the content of elements included are about {+-} 10%. This information shows a great homogeneity of matrix prepared. In the list of the elements founded, expect the matrix formation elements, we detected also Ca and Si (from the wollastonite - the necessary for Ceramicrete compound); Na, Al, S, O, Cl, Fe, Ni also have been detected in the Specimen No.642 from the waste forms: NaCl, Al(OH){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Fe(OH){sub 3}, nickel ferrocyanide and Ni(NO{sub 3})2. The unintelligible results also were found from analysis of an AV-17 granules, in which we obtain the great amount of K. The X-ray radiographs of the Ceramicrete specimens with loading 41.4 % of Stream 1 and 31.6% of Stream 2, respectively showed that the realization of the advance technology, created at GEOHKI, leads to formation of excellent ceramic matrix with high amount of radioactive streams up to 40% and more. Really, during the interaction with start compounds MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} with the present of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and Wollastonite this process run with high speed under the controlled regimes. That fact that the Ceramicrete matrix with 30-40% of Streams 1 and 2 have a crystalline form, not amorphous matter, allows to permit that these matrix should be very stable, reliable for incorporation of a radionuclides.

Ehst, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

New lithium-based ionic liquid electrolytes that resist salt concentration polarization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Inexpensive, Nonfluorinated (or Partially Fluorinated) Anions for Lithium Salts and Ionic Liquids for Lithium Battery Electrolytes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

322

Inexpensive, Nonfluorinated (or Partially Fluorinated) Anions for Lithium Salts and Ionic Liquids for Lithium Battery Electrolytes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

323

Propylene/Propane Separation with a Gas/Liquid Membrane Contactor Using a Silver Salt Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pavan Chilukuri ,† Karlijn Rademakers ,† Kitty Nymeijer ,‡ Louis van der Ham ,† and Henk van den Berg *† ...

Pavan Chilukuri; Karlijn Rademakers; Kitty Nymeijer; Louis van der Ham; Henk van den Berg

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Inexpensive, Nonfluorinated Anions for Lithium Salts and Ionic Liquids for Lithium Battery Electrolytes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

325

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

326

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Liquid-level detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aliquid level sensor is described which has a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

328

Liquid metal electric pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian sea salt Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early salt tectonic processes and depositional systems in the Summary: -Permian Salt Basin, Southern North Sea Supervisors: Jrgen Adam (RHUL), Chris Elders (RHUL) Project...

330

Evolution in salt: Genomic and structural approaches to halophilic archaea and their viruses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Extremely saline environments include salt lakes, evaporation ponds, and terrestrial environments, such as salt deserts and underground halite deposits. They are inhabited by halophilic microbes… (more)

Jaakkola, Salla

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoid salt induced Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Salt Ions: An Electrostatic Theory for the Hofmeister Effect Summary: , an image charge is induced and a repulsive interaction between the salt ion and its image...

332

Elucidation of Mechanisms of Salinity Tolerance in Zoysia matrella Cultivars: A Study of Structure and Function of Salt Glands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salt glands are important structural adaptations in some plant and animal species that are involved in the excretion of excess salts. Zoysia matrella is a highly salt tolerant turf grass that has salt glands. Two cultivars of Z. matrella, ‘Diamond...

Rao, Sheetal

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Development of pyro-processing technology for thorium-fuelled molten salt reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is classified as the non-classical nuclear reactor type based on the specific features coming out from the use of liquid fuel circulating in the MSR primary circuit. Other uniqueness of the reactor type is based on the fact that the primary circuit of the reactor is directly connected with the on-line reprocessing technology, necessary for keeping the reactor in operation for a long run. MSR is the only reactor system, which can be effectively operated within the {sup 232}Th- {sup 233}U fuel cycle as thorium breeder with the breeding factor significantly higher than one. The fuel cycle technologies proposed as ford the fresh thorium fuel processing as for the primary circuit fuel reprocessing are pyrochemical and mainly fluoride. Although these pyrochemical processes were never previously fully verified, the present-day development anticipates an assumption for the successful future deployment of the thorium-fuelled MSR technology. (authors)

Uhlir, J.; Straka, M.; Szatmary, L. [Nuclear Research Inst. ReZ Plc, ReZ 130, Husinec - CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Renewable Liquid Fuels Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program anticipates that distributed reforming of biomass-derived liquid fuels could be commercial during the transition to hydrogen and used in the mid- and long-term time frames.

335

Molten salt destruction as an alternative to open burning of energetic material wastes  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has built a small-scale (about 1 kg/hr throughput unit to test the destruction of energetic materials using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) process. We have modified the unit described in the earlier references to inject energetic waste material continuously into the unit. In addition to the HMX, other explosives we have destroyed include RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. We have also destroyed a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyl ammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, we have destroyed a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10 (HMX/Viton), LX-16 (PETN/FPC461, LX-17 (TATB/Kel F), and PBX-9404 (HMX)/CEF/Nitro cellulose). Our experiments have demonstrated that energetic materials can be safely and effectively treated by MSD.We have also investigated the issue of steam explosions in molten salt units, both experimentally and theoretically, and concluded that steam explosions can be avoided under proper design and operating conditions. We are currently building a larger unit (nominal capacity 5 kg/hr,) to investigate the relationship between residence time, temperature, feed concentration and throughputs, avoidance of back-burn, a;nd determination of the products of combustion under different operating conditions.

Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

336

Mobile hydraulic power supply: Liquid piston Stirling engine pump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional mobile hydraulic power supplies involve numerous kinematic connections and are limited by the efficiency, noise, and emissions of internal combustion engines. The Stirling cycle possesses numerous benefits such as the ability to operate from any heat source, quiet operation, and high theoretical efficiency. The Stirling engine has seen limited success due to poor heat transfer in the working chambers, difficulty sealing low-molecular weight gases at high pressure, and non-ideal piston displacement profiles. As a solution to these limitations, a liquid piston Stirling engine pump is proposed. The liquid pistons conform to irregular volumes, allowing increased heat transfer through geometry features on the interior of the working chambers. Creating near-isothermal operation eliminates the costly external heat exchangers and increases the engine efficiency through decreasing the engine dead space. The liquid pistons provide a positive gas seal and thermal transport to the working chambers. Controlling the flow of the liquid pistons with valves enables matching the ideal Stirling cycle and creates a direct hydraulic power supply. Using liquid hydrogen as a fuel source allows cooling the compression side of the engine before expanded the fuel into a gas and combusting it to heat the expansion side of the engine. Cooling the compression side not only increases the engine power, but also significantly increases the potential thermal efficiency of the engine. A high efficiency Stirling engine makes energy regeneration through reversing the Stirling cycle practical. When used for regeneration, the captured energy can be stored in thermal batteries, such as a molten salt. The liquid piston Stirling engine pump requires further research in numerous areas such as understanding the behavior of the liquid pistons, modeling and optimization of a full engine pump, and careful selection of materials for the extreme operating temperatures. Addressing these obtainable research quandaries will enable a transformative Stirling engine pump with the potential to excel in numerous applications.

James D. Van de Ven

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Laboratory simulation of salt dissolution during waste removal  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were performed to support the field demonstration of improved techniques for salt dissolution in waste tanks at the Savannah River Site. The tests were designed to investigate three density driven techniques for salt dissolution: (1) Drain-Add-Sit-Remove, (2) Modified Density Gradient, and (3) Continuous Salt Mining. Salt dissolution was observed to be a very rapid process as salt solutions with densities between 1.38-1.4 were frequently removed. Slower addition and removal rates and locating the outlet line at deeper levels below the top of the saltcake provided the best contact between the dissolution water and the saltcake. It was observed that dissolution with 1 M sodium hydroxide solution resulted in salt solutions that were within the current inhibitor requirements for the prevention of stress corrosion cracking. This result was independent of the density driven technique. However, if inhibited water (0.01 M sodium hydroxide and 0.011 M sodium nitrite) was utilized, the salt solutions were frequently outside the inhibitor requirements. Corrosion testing at conditions similar to the environments expected during waste removal was recommended.

Wiersma, B.J.; Parish, W.R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mixed Waste Salt Encapsulation Using Polysiloxane - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A proof-of-concept experimental study was performed to investigate the use of Orbit Technologies polysiloxane grouting material for encapsulation of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste salts leading to a final waste form for disposal. Evaporator pond salt residues and other salt-like material contaminated with both radioactive isotopes and hazardous components are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and may exceed 250,000,000 kg of material. Current treatment involves mixing low waste percentages (less than 10% by mass salt) with cement or costly thermal treatment followed by cementation to the ash residue. The proposed technology involves simple mixing of the granular salt material (with relatively high waste loadings-greater than 50%) in a polysiloxane-based system that polymerizes to form a silicon-based polymer material. This study involved a mixing study to determine optimum waste loadings and compressive strengths of the resultant monoliths. Following the mixing study, durability testing was performed on promising waste forms. Leaching studies including the accelerated leach test and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure were also performed on a high nitrate salt waste form. In addition to this testing, the waste form was examined by scanning electron microscope. Preliminary cost estimates for applying this technology to the DOE complex mixed waste salt problem is also given.

Miller, C.M.; Loomis, G.G.; Prewett, S.W.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Application of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes.  

SciTech Connect

Metallothermic reductions have been extensively studied in the field of extractive metallurgy. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we have developed a molten-salt based reduction process using lithium. This process was originally developed to reduce actinide oxides present in spent nuclear fuel. Preliminary thermodynamic considerations indicate that this process has the potential to be adapted for the extraction of other metals. The reduction is carried out at 650 C in a molten-salt (LiCl) medium. Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), produced during the reduction of the actinide oxides, dissolves in the molten salt. At the end of the reduction step, the lithium is regenerated from the salt by an electrowinning process. The lithium and the salt from the electrowinning are then reused for reduction of the next batch of oxide fuel. The process cycle has been successfully demonstrated on an engineering scale in a specially designed pyroprocessing facility. This paper discusses the applicability of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes with specific reference to our process. Results are presented from our work on actinide oxides to highlight the role of lithium and its effect on process variables in these molten-salt based reduction processes.

Gourishankar, K. V.

1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Using Encapsulated Phase Change Salts for Concentrated Solar Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Storing thermal energy as latent heat of fusion in phase change material (PCM), such as inorganic salt mixtures, can improve the energy density by as much as 50% while reducing the cost by over 40%. However, to discharge stored energy from PCMs, which has low thermal conductivity, requires a large heat transfer area which drives up the cost. Fortunately, salts encapsulated into small capsules can provide high specific surface area thus alleviating this problem. However, a technical barrier with encapsulating salts is that when it is produced, a void must be created inside the shell to allow for expansion of salt when it is heated above its melting point to 550 °C. Terrafore's method to economically create this void consists of using a sacrificial polymer which is coated as the middle layer between the salt prill and the shell material. The polymer is selected such that it decomposes much below the melting point of salt to gas leaving a void in the capsule. Salts with different melting points are encapsulated using the same recipe and contained in a packed bed consisting of salts with progressively higher melting points from bottom to top of the tank. This container serves as a cascaded energy storage medium to store heat transferred from the sensible heat energy collected in solar collectors. Mathematical models indicate that over 90% of salt in the capsules undergo phase change improving energy density by over 50% from a sensible-only thermal storage. Another advantage of this method is that it requires only a single tank as opposed to the two-tanks used in a sensible heat storage, thereby reducing the cost from a nominal $27 per kWht to $16 per kWht and coming close to the SunShot goal for thermal storage of $15 per kWht.

A. Mathur; R. Kasetty; J Oxley; J Mendez; K. Nithyanandam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fracturing around excavations in salt at the WIPP  

SciTech Connect

Salt is a plastic material when subjected to high confining pressures. However, salt can behave in a brittle manner with the development of fracturing when subject to deviatoric stresses and low confining pressures. Field data demonstrating brittle behavior have been collected and evaluated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. This facility is being developed to prove technology for the safe emplacement and storage of transuranic nuclear wastes in deep excavations in salt. Studies using visual, instrumentation and geophysical techniques have been carried out in the underground facility to identify and characterize the types of fractures that develop around openings. 11 refs., 7 figs.

Cook, R.F. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (USA). Waste Isolation Div.); Roggenthen, W.M. (South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Molten salts in nuclear science and technology: a scientometric perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper attempts to highlight quantitatively and qualitatively the growth and development of world literature on molten salts in terms of publication output as per INIS database (1972-2011). The objective of the study was to perform a scientometric analysis of all research publications on molten salts in the world. The parameters studied include year-wise growth of publications, country-wise distribution of publications, activity index of top countries, highly productive institutes, language-wise distribution of publications, distribution of publications as per document type, highly preferred journals and identification of highly cited publications on molten salts.

Ganesh Surwase; Lalit Mohan; B. S. Kademani; K. Bhanumurthy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

CO2-Binding Organic Liquids, an Integrated Acid Gas Capture System  

SciTech Connect

Amine systems are effective for CO2 capture, but they are still inefficient because the solvent regeneration energy is largely defined by the amount of water in the process. Most amines form heat-stable salts with SO2 and COS resulting in parasitic solvent loss and degradation. Stripping the CO2-rich solvent is energy intensive it requires temperatures above 100 ?C due to the high specific heat and heat of vaporization of water. CO2-capture processes could be much more energy efficient in a water free amine process. In addition, if the capture-material is chemically compatible with other acid gases, less solvent would be lost to heat-stable salts and the process economics would be further improved. One such system that can address these concerns is Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs), a class of switchable ionic liquids.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

346

Observations on the incorporation of trace elements in halite of Oligocene salt beds, Bourg-en-Bresse Basin, France  

SciTech Connect

It is common practice to employ trace elements found in chloride salts as indicators of the conditions of deposition. Because some halite contains abundant fluid inclusions, it is necessary to separate the salt from the inclusions before analysis. This study presents the data derived from the use of a simple preparative technique which permits analysis of the trace elements in solid halite, and provides a guide to test the success in elimination of the contaminants contained in the fluid inclusions. The differentiation is accomplished simply by crushing the salt in alcohol followed by separate analysis of the fluid and solid components, thus yielding accurate trace element concentrations in the solids (crystal lattice, dislocations, and grain boundaries) and the fluids. Br and K are present both in the solid and liquid phases of the halite, but Mg is exclusively in the fluid inclusions. The elimination of the Mg from the analysis of the solid phase may thus be employed as a monitor to indicate the degree of purification of the samples being analyzed.

Moretto, R. (Universite de Nancy I, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced Reactor Research Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced Reactor Research May 20, 2013 - 12:52pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC - The U.S. Department of Energy recently joined with the U.S. Embassy in Prague and the Czech Republic's Ministry of Industry and Trade to complete the transfer of 75 kilograms of fluoride salt from the Department's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to the Czech Nuclear Research Institute Řež for experiments at Řež's critical test facility. This partnership builds on a strong history of U.S.-Czech energy collaboration and follows President Obama's speech in Prague in April 2009, where he laid out the importance of international

348

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Abstract Surface indicators of geothermal activity are often present above blind or concealed geothermal systems in the Great Basin, but their expressions are sometimes subtle. When mapped in detail, these indicators yield valuable information on the location, structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County, Nevada, USA, where

349

BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Projects Energy Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Colleen Sievers Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/28/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Citation Colleen Sievers. BLM Approves Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects [Internet]. 09/28/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada. [updated 2011/09/28;cited 2013/08/21]. Available from: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/fo/carson_city_field/blm_information/newsroom/2011/september/blm_approves_salt.html

350

Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

351

Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 07/22/2011 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Energy Projects Environmental Impact Statement [Internet]. 07/22/2011. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City

352

DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site DOE Issues Salt Waste Determination for the Savannah River Site January 18, 2006 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the waste determination for the treatment and stabilization of low activity salt-waste at the Savannah River Site allowing for significant reductions in environmental and health risks posed by the material. Stored in forty-nine underground tanks, approximately 36 million gallons of radioactive waste is left over from plutonium production during the Cold War. In addition, the department issued an amended Record of Decision and Implementation Plan to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. "Today's announcement clears the way for the removal and treatment of this

353

Salt River Project Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt River Project Smart Grid Project Salt River Project Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Salt River Project Country United States Headquarters Location Tempe, Arizona Recovery Act Funding $56,859,359.00 Total Project Value $114,003,719.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Salt River Project Smart Grid Project Coordinates 33.414768°, -111.9093095° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

354

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Penn Salt Manufacturing Co Whitemarsh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Penn Salt Manufacturing Co Penn Salt Manufacturing Co Whitemarsh Research Laboratories - PA 20 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PENN SALT MANUFACTURING CO., WHITEMARSH RESEARCH LABORATORIES (PA.20) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Penn Salt Company PA.20-1 Location: Philiadelphia , Pennsylvania PA.20-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 PA.20-1 Site Operations: Conducted process studies for recovery of uranium from fluoride scrap. PA.20-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC licensed operation. Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote due to limited quantities and scope of operations. PA.20-2 PA.20-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium PA.20-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

355

Project Profile: Advanced Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Abengoa, under the Baseload CSP FOA, will demonstrate a 100-megawatt electrical (MWe) central receiver plant using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator.

356

Supramolecular structures and physicochemical properties of norfloxacin salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seven new molecular salts of norfloxacin were synthesized and structurally elucidated by single-crystal structure analysis. Physical and chemical properties were evaluated by a variety of analytical techniques.

Xu, Y.

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Trasfer Fluid Technology for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- ranged from 450C to 585C M easurement frequency: salt chemistry - 200 hours off-gas composition - 12 hours Innovat ive Technology Solut ions f or Sustainability ABENGOA...

358

Conversion of carboxylate salts to carboxylic acids via reactive distillation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to convert carboxylate salts (e.g. calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate) into carboxylic acids (e.g., acetic, propionic, and butyric acids).… (more)

Williamson, Shelly Ann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Salt Tolerance of Landscape Plants Common to the Southwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With sharply increasing costs of providing potable water, many communities in the Southwest are attempting to utilize non-potable saline water for irrigating large landscapes. This publication provides the information related to salt effects...

Miyamoto, S.

360

Project Profile: Long-Shafted Molten Salt Pump | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CSP R&D FOA, is validating the manufacturability of a large-scale molten salt receiver panel and then confirming its operation in prototypic solar flux. This work is an...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

THERMAL EVALUATION OF CONTAMINATED LIQUID ONTO CELL FLOORS  

SciTech Connect

For the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP), postulated events in the new Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) can result in spilling liquids that contain Cs-137 and organics onto cell floors. The parameters of concern are the maximum temperature of the fluid following a spill and the time required for the maximum fluid temperature to be reached. Control volume models of the various process cells have been developed using standard conduction and natural convection relationships. The calculations are performed using the Mathcad modeling software. The results are being used in Consolidated Hazards Analysis Planning (CHAP) to determine the controls that may be needed to mitigate the potential impact of liquids containing Cs-137 and flammable organics that spill onto cell floors. Model development techniques and the ease of making model changes within the Mathcad environment are discussed. The results indicate that certain fluid spills result in overheating of the fluid, but the times to reach steady-state are several hundred hours. The long times allow time for spill clean up without the use of expensive mitigation controls.

(NOEMAIL), J

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

Vertebrate survey of a dredge spoil salt marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]ect: Wildlife and Fisheries Science VERTEBRATE SURVEY OF A DREDGE SPOIL SALT MARSH A Thesis by BETTY JO LEE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1976 ABSTRACT Vertebrate Survey... of this ecotone are salinity, amount of fresh water, agitation by tides and currents, temperatut'e, wind, and industrial pollutants (Odum 1971). Clark (1974) points out the environmental importance of salt marshes to the waters of estuaries and bays by acting...

Lee, Betty Jo

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Analysis of salt concentrations in the Brazos River Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF SALT CONCENTRATIONS IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN, TEXAS A Thesis by CHARLES KEITH GANZE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Analysis of Salt Concentrations in the Brazos River Basin, Texas A Thesis by CHARLES KEITH GANZE Approved as to style and content by: Ralph A. Wurbs (Chair of Committee) James S. Bonner...

Ganze, Charles Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Comparison of linear and nonlinear acoustic probing of rock salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO WANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1980 Major Subject: Geophysics COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC PROBING OF ROCK SALT A Thesis by ALBERT MIN-HAO 'RANG Approved as to style and content by: l('-/c~k~&(. Chairman o Comm ' ee Member) Member / I Member Head...

Wang, Albert Min-Hao

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

A procedure to screen cucumber for salt tolerance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A PROCEDURE TO SCREEN CUCUMBER FOR SALT TOLERANCE A Thesis by LEONARD FRANK YOURMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A1IM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major... Subject: Horticulture A PROCEDURE TO SCREEN CUCUMBER FOR SALT TOLERANCE A Thesis by LEONARD FRANK VOURMAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) 0ugust 1979 ABSTRACT A Procedure...

Yourman, Leonard Frank

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

366

A screening technique for salt tolerance in onion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A SCREENING TECHNIQUE FOR SALT TOLERANCE IN ONION A Thesis by MARY JORDAN WANNAMAKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major... Subject: Horticulture A SCREENING TECHNIQUE FOR SALT TOLERANCE IN ONION A Thesis by NARY JORDAN WANNAMAKER Approved as to style and content by: Leonard M. Pike (Chairma f Cp 'ttee) 'eg C. Cobb (Member) Ron Newton (Member) . Grant Vest (Head...

Wannamaker, Mary Jordon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Estimation of Salt and Molasses in Mixed Feeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 425 MAY, 1931 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Estimation of Salt and Molasses in Mixed Feeds AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE....: ~gricultural Engineering J. IT. KNOX, M. S., Animal IIushandry A. K. MACKEY, M. S., Animnl Hrrshondry *Dean School of Veterinary Medicine. ?As of May 1. 1931. **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. A statement of the percentage of salt...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Synthesis and analysis of streamflow and salt loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYNTHESIS AND ANALYSIS OF STREAMFLOW AND SALT LOADS A Thesis ISHTIAQUE SALEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August ] 993... Major Subject: Civil Engineering SYNTHESIS AND ANALYSIS OF STREAMFLOW AND SALT LOADS A Thesis by ISHTIAQUE SALEH Approved as to style and content by: Ralph A. Wurbs (Chair of Committee) 'Og Juan B. Valdes (Member) Tep Sastri (Member) ames T...

Saleh, Ishtiaque

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

370

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility- August 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development.

371

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility- April 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Fire Protection Systems

372

Paleoarchaic Surface Assemblages in the Great Salt Lake Desert, Northwestern Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

desert scrubs, such as sagebrush, shadscale, horsebrush, snake- PALEOARCHAIC ASSEMBLAGES IN THE GREAT SALT

Arkush, Brooke S; Pitblado, Bonnie L

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A new equation of state of salt-free flexible-chain polyelectrolyte solution: phase equilibria and osmotic pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a first-principle equation of state of salt-free polyelectrolyte solution in the limit of infinitely long flexible polymer chains in the framework of a field-theoretical formalism beyond the linear Debye-Hueckel theory and predict a liquid-liquid phase separation induced by strong correlation attraction. As a reference system we choose a set of two independent ideal subsystems -- charged macromolecules immersed in a structureless oppositely charged background created by counterions (polymer one component plasma) and couterions immersed in oppositely charged background created by polymer chains (hard-core one component plasma). We calculate the excess free energy of polymer one component plasma in the framework of Modified Random Phase Approximation, whereas a contribution of charge densities fluctuations of neutralizing backgrounds we evaluate at the level of Gaussian approximation. We show that our theory is in a very good agreement with the results of Monte-Carlo and MD simulations for critical parameters of liquid-liquid phase separation and osmotic pressure in a wide range of monomer concentration above the critical point, respectively.

Yu. A. Budkov; A. L. Kolesnikov; N. Georgi; E. A. Nogovitsyn; M. G. Kiselev

2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

Freezing processes. Hydrate processes. Liquid-liquid extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ice which separates from brine is almost pure. A salt concentration builds up at the interface of the brine and the ice. In freezing processes, as applied in desalting, many small ice crystals are formed w...

Anthony A. Delyannis; Eurydike A. Delyannis

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt Waste Processing Facility Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report Kurt D. Gerdes Harry D. Harmon Herbert G. Sutter Major C. Thompson John R. Shultz Sahid C. Smith July 13, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 ii This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iii Signatures SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment July 13, 2009 iv This page intentionally left blank SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility

376

Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier Proteases OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT1 and -2 Regulate Salt Stress Responses in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Salt Stress Responses in Arabidopsis [W] Lucio Conti Gillian Price Elizabeth ODonnell Benjamin Schwessinger 1 Peter Dominy Ari...reveals a requirement for RUB modification for control of ethylene biosynthesis and proper induction of basic chitinase and PDF1...

Lucio Conti; Gillian Price; Elizabeth O'Donnell; Benjamin Schwessinger; Peter Dominy; Ari Sadanandom

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

EIS-0099: Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Chemical Company Site, South Salt Lake, Salt Lake County, Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the environmental impacts of various scenarios associated with the cleanup of those residues remaining at the abandoned uranium mill tailings site located in South Salt Lake, Utah.

378

Liquid Scintillator Purification  

SciTech Connect

The KamLAND collaboration has studied background requirements and purification methods needed to observe the 7Be neutrino from the sun. First we will discuss the present background situation in KamLAND where it is found that the main background components are 210Pb and 85Kr. It is then described how to purify the liquid scintillator. The present status and results on how to remove 210Pb from the liquid scintillator are discussed. Specifically, the detailed analysis of the effects of distillation and adsorption techniques are presented.

Kishimoto, Y. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University (Japan)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Salt Lake City Fuels Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas on AddThis.com... May 14, 2011 Salt Lake City Fuels Vehicles With Natural Gas W atch how Salt Lake City fuels vehicles with liquefied and compressed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! Previous Video (Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Freeze the Rainbow! Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! What happens when the world's most beloved cryogenic liquid meets one of the most common household appliances? Find out when we try to microwave liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: A little while ago we received an email from Star of the Sea Catholic School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, asking what happens when you place liquid nitrogen in a microwave. Well, I just happen to have some liquid nitrogen! Steve: And I just happen to have a microwave!

382

Lyophilic liquid porosimetry and a new liquid autoporosimeter  

SciTech Connect

Lyophilic liquid porosimetry determines the volumes of different size pores by measuring the amount of liquid in these pores, thus, providing pore volume distribution (PVD) data for porous structures. Any liquid that wets the sample may be used. This opens unique opportunities for porous structure evaluation. It provides realistic PVD analysis when the liquid of interest changes the porous structure. It determines uptake/drainage hysteresis of real liquids. It allows direct measurements of uptake and retention capillary pressures with different amounts of liquid in a sample. Lyophilic liquid porosimetry determines liquid/solid contact angles of different size pores within the sample. It can also be used for PVD analysis of both soft, brittle materials and porous metal materials.

Tyomkin, I. [TRI/Princeton, NJ (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

DETERMINATION OF CORROSION INHIBITOR CRITERIA FOR TYPE III IIIA TANKS DURING SALT DISSOLUTION OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Preparation of high level waste for vitrification involves in part the dissolution of salt cake from the carbon steel storage tanks. The salt crystals composing this cake are high in nitrate concentration with the interstitial liquid being high in hydroxide and nitrite concentration. During the salt dissolution process, a stage is reached in which the inhibitors, hydroxide and nitrite, are insufficient to prevent nitrate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fall outside the requirements of the corrosion control program. Additional inhibitors, which are necessary to meet the requirements, may be counterproductive to the efficiency of the process and waste minimization. Corrosion testing was initiated to better characterize the necessary inhibitor concentration for high nitrate waste during salt dissolution processing. A four-phase test program is being conducted: (1) electrochemical characterization, (2) accelerated or polarized U-bend testing, (3) long-term (non-polarized) U-bend testing and (4) vapor space U-bend tests. Electrochemical testing, which included cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) and open-circuit potential (OCP) measurements, was performed to identify stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, to characterize pitting resistance and to determine the general corrosion rate. Polarized U-bend tests were utilized to assess the effect of minimum inhibitor concentrations and heat treatment on SCC and to determine test parameters for future long-term U-bend testing. Results from CPP, LPR and OCP tests demonstrated that carbon steel formed a protective oxide film and the potential became electropositive during exposure to the waste at all inhibitor concentrations. The tenacity of this film improved as the inhibitor concentration level was increased and the temperature was decreased. This passive film increased the resistance to localized corrosion significantly. Therefore if any of these inhibitor levels are selected for storage of dissolved salt solutions, no changes to the service life estimates that were based on general corrosion are necessary. The breakdown potential for SCC as well as the other electrochemical parameters were independent of nitrate concentration (4.5-8.5 M). The breakdown potential, however, was strongly affected by temperature (i.e., 25 and 50 C) and inhibitor concentration. These results indicate that for this nitrate concentration range a critical inhibitor level is necessary for minimizing the occurrence of SCC. The polarized U-bend tests were in good agreement with the electrochemical tests. The U-bend testing clearly demonstrated that the heat treating of the samples clearly improved the SCC resistance of A537 carbon steel even at the low inhibitor concentration (0.01 M hydroxide and 0.01 M nitrite). This concentration was insufficient to prevent cracking for any tested nitrate concentration (4.5-8.5 M). At a 7 M nitrate concentration, SCC was prevented for inhibitor concentrations as low as 0.3 M hydroxide and 0.1 M nitrite. The current inhibitor requirements for a waste containing 7 M nitrate are 0.6 M hydroxide and 1.1 M hydroxide and nitrite. Thus, a considerable reduction in the amount of inhibitor necessary may be attained. It will also be recommended that the temperature of the dissolved salt solution be maintained below 50 C.

Wiersma, B

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

LIFE Materails: Molten-Salt Fuels Volume 8  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the Laser Inertial Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) is to use fusion neutrons to fission materials with no enrichment and minimum processing and have greatly reduced wastes that are not of interest to making weapons. Fusion yields expected to be achieved in NIF a few times per day are called for with a high reliable shot rate of about 15 per second. We have found that the version of LIFE using TRISO fuel discussed in other volumes of this series can be modified by replacing the molten-flibe-cooled TRISO fuel zone with a molten salt in which the same actinides present in the TRISO particles are dissolved in the molten salt. Molten salts have the advantage that they are not subject to radiation damage, and hence overcome the radiation damage effects that may limit the lifetime of solid fuels such as TRISO-containing pebbles. This molten salt is pumped through the LIFE blanket, out to a heat exchanger and back into the blanket. To mitigate corrosion, steel structures in contact with the molten salt would be plated with tungsten or nickel. The salt will be processed during operation to remove certain fission products (volatile and noble and semi-noble fission products), impurities and corrosion products. In this way neutron absorbers (fission products) are removed and neutronics performance of the molten salt is somewhat better than that of the TRISO fuel case owing to the reduced parasitic absorption. In addition, the production of Pu and rare-earth elements (REE) causes these elements to build up in the salt, and leads to a requirement for a process to remove the REE during operation to insure that the solubility of a mixed (Pu,REE)F3 solid solution is not exceeded anywhere in the molten salt system. Removal of the REE will further enhance the neutronics performance. With molten salt fuels, the plant would need to be safeguarded because materials of interest for weapons are produced and could potentially be removed.

Moir, R; Brown, N; Caro, A; Farmer, J; Halsey, W; Kaufman, L; Kramer, K; Latkowski, J; Powers, J; Shaw, H; Turchi, P

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessment of the Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride for Purifying Coolant and Heat Transfer Salts in the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an assessment of the use of nitrogen trifluoride for removing oxide and water-caused contaminants in the fluoride salts that will be used as coolants in a molten salt cooled reactor.

Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Viscosity of Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

6 November 1952 research-article Viscosity of Liquids E. N. da C. Andrade The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences. www.jstor.org

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Viscosity of Liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of momentum between them. In the case of a gas, Maxwell showed how the viscosity can be derived by considering this momentum as being communicated by molecules transferring themselves bodily ... fulfilment of the conditions postulated in Maxwell's treatment, and the fact that while gas viscosity goes up with temperature liquid ...

E. N. DA C. ANDRADE

1930-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Detonation in Liquid Explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Laboratory, on the initiative of Dr. A. H. Davis, into the process of detonation in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the ... in explosives, the programme including a photographic study of the detonation Waves in transparent liquid explosives—the sensitivity of some of which can be varied by ...

D. CRONEY

1948-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

389

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

Air Liquide- Biogas & Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation about Air Liquide's biogas technologies and integration with fuel cells. Presented by Charlie Anderson, Air Liquide, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

391

In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model  

SciTech Connect

As directed by ''Technical Work Plan For: Engineered Barrier System Department Modeling and Testing FY03 Work Activities'' (BSC 2003 [165601]), the In-Drift Precipitates/Salts (IDPS) model is developed and refined to predict the aqueous geochemical effects of evaporation in the proposed repository. The purpose of this work is to provide a model for describing and predicting the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the proposed Engineered Barrier System (EBS). Application of this model is to be documented elsewhere for the Total System Performance Assessment License Application (TSPA-LA). The principal application of this model is to be documented in REV 02 of ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2003 [165601]). The scope of this document is to develop, describe, and validate the IDPS model. This model is a quasi-equilibrium model. All reactions proceed to equilibrium except for several suppressed minerals in the thermodynamic database not expected to form under the proposed repository conditions within the modeling timeframe. In this revision, upgrades to the EQ3/6 code (Version 8.0) and Pitzer thermodynamic database improve the applicable range of the model. These new additions allow equilibrium and reaction-path modeling of evaporation to highly concentrated brines for potential water compositions of the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at temperatures in the range of 0 C to 125 C, pressures in the atmospheric range, and relative humidity in the range of 0 to 100 percent. This system applies to oxidizing conditions only, and therefore limits the model to applications involving oxidizing conditions. A number of thermodynamic parameters in the Pitzer database have values that have not been determined or verified for the entire temperature range. In these cases, the known values are used to approximate the values for the rest of the temperature range. Although such treatment contributes to uncertainty in model outputs, the model validation test cases indicate that the model, with its associated uncertainty, is valid for its intended use. The intended use of this model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period.

P. Mariner

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

High temperature liquid level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

3-D physical modeling of a complex salt canopy  

SciTech Connect

Recent drilling has confirmed both significant reservoir potential and the presence of commercial hydrocarbons below salt structures in the Gulf of Mexico. Obtaining definitive seismic images with standard processing schemes beneath these salt structures is very difficult if not impossible. Because of the complicated seismic behavior of these structures, full volume 3-D prestack depth migration is required. Unfortunately, carrying out the multitude of calculations needed to create a proper image requires the largest and fastest supercomputers and rather complex numerical algorithms. Furthermore, developing and testing the imaging algorithms is quite involved and requires appropriate test data sets. To better understand the problems and issues of subsalt imaging, Marathon Oil Company and Louisiana Land and Exploration Company contracted with the University of Houston`s Allied Geophysical Laboratories (AGL) to construct a salt canopy physical model. The model is patterned after the SEG/EAEG Salt Model and is made from synthetic materials. It is a full three-dimensional model with an irregularly shaped, lateral salt structure embedded in five distinct sedimentary layers. The model was used to acquire a multi-offset 3-D marine-style survey. These data are being used to address problems of subsalt imaging. In addition to standard processing techniques, the authors investigate algorithms for multiple removal and prestack depth migration.

Wiley, R.W. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Sekharan, K.K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States). Allied Geophysical Labs.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Disposal of soluble salt waste from coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses pollutants in the form of soluble salts and resource recovery in the form of water and land. A design for disposal of soluble salts has been produced. The interactions of its parameters have been shown by a process design study. The design will enable harmonious compliance with United States Public Laws 92-500 and 94-580, relating to water pollution and resource recovery. In the disposal of waste salt solutions, natural water resources need not be contaminated, because an encapsulation technique is available which will immobilize the salts. At the same time it will make useful landforms available, and water as a resource can be recovered. There is a cost minimum when electrodialysis and evaporation are combined, which is not realizable with evaporation alone, unless very low-cost thermal energy is available or unless very high-cost pretreatment for electrodialysis is required. All the processes making up the proposed disposal process are commercially available, although they are nowhere operating commercially as one process. Because of the commercial availability of the processes, the proposed process may be a candidate 'best commercially available treatment' for soluble salt disposal.

McKnight, C.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Oil field waste disposal in salt caverns: An information website  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has completed the construction of a Website for the US Department of Energy (DOE) that provides detailed information on salt caverns and their use for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Specific topics in the Website include the following: descriptions of salt deposits and salt caverns within the US, salt cavern construction methods, potential types of wastes, waste emplacement, regulatory issues, costs, carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic human health risks associated with postulated cavern release scenarios, new information on cavern disposal (e.g., upcoming meetings, regulatory issues, etc.), other studies supported by the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) (e.g., considerations of site location, cavern stability, development issues, and bedded salt characterization in the Midland Basin), and links to other associated Web sites. In addition, the Website allows downloadable access to reports prepared on the topic that were funded by DOE. Because of the large quantities of NOW and NORM wastes generated annually by the oil industry, information presented on this Website is particularly interesting and valuable to project managers, regulators, and concerned citizens.

Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes  

SciTech Connect

Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

Siemer, D.D. [Idaho National Laboratory, 12N 3167E, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effect of water in salt repositories. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Additional results confirm that during most of the consolidation of polycrystalline salt in brine, the previously proposed rate expression applies. The final consolidation, however, proceeds at a lower rate than predicted. The presence of clay hastens the consolidation process but does not greatly affect the previously observed relationship between permeability and void fraction. Studies of the migration of brine within polycrystalline salt specimens under stress indicate that the principal effect is the exclusion of brine as a result of consolidation, a process that evidently can proceed to completion. No clear effect of a temperature gradient could be identified. A previously reported linear increase with time of the reciprocal permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine was confirmed, though the rate of increase appears more nearly proportional to the product of sigma ..delta..P rather than sigma ..delta..P/sup 2/ (sigma is the uniaxial stress normal to the interface and ..delta..P is the hydraulic pressure drop). The new results suggest that a limiting permeability may be reached. A model for the permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine is developed that is reasonably consistent with the present results and may be used to predict the permeability of bedded salt. More measurements are needed, however, to choose between two limiting forms of the model.

Baes, C.F. Jr.; Gilpatrick, L.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Bronstein, H.R.; Shor, A.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ion Distributions Near a Liquid-Liquid Interface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Distributions Near a Liquid-Liquid Interface Ion Distributions Near a Liquid-Liquid Interface Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago; Northern Illinois University; the University of California, Santa Cruz; and ChemMatCARS (sector 15 at the APS) used x-ray reflectivity from ion distributions at the liquid-liquid interface to provide strong evidence that the interfacial structure of a liquid alters the ion distributions near a charged interface, contrary to earlier theories about ions at charged surfaces. Coulomb's Law describes the interaction between two, otherwise isolated, point charges. If many charges are present in the region between these two charges, the net interaction between them is modified. This is commonly found in real systems, such as a plasma gas of electrons and ionized

400

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freeze the Rainbow! Freeze the Rainbow! Previous Video (Freeze the Rainbow!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!) Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze! What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: What happens when the freezing power of liquid nitrogen... Steve: ...meets the antifreezing power of ethylene glycol! Joanna: While a mix of 70 percent ethylene glycol and 30 percent water doesn't freeze until 60 degrees below zero, it's still no match for liquid nitrogen. At 321 degrees below zero, liquid nitrogen easily freezes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Let's Freeze Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shattering Pennies! Shattering Pennies! Previous Video (Shattering Pennies!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave!) Liquid Nitrogen in a Microwave! Let's Freeze Liquid Nitrogen! By removing the hottest molecules, we're able to freeze liquid nitrogen! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Today, we're going to freeze liquid nitrogen! Joanna and Steve: Yeah! Joanna: The obvious way to do this is to put the liquid nitrogen into something colder. Something that we have lots of around here! Something like... liquid helium! Steve: Yes! Joanna: Yeah, but we're not going to do that. Instead, we're going to freeze the nitrogen by removing the hottest molecules!

402

Development of high temperature transport technology for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in pyroprocessing  

SciTech Connect

The development of high-temperature transport technologies for molten salt is a prerequisite and a key issue in the industrialization of pyro-reprocessing for advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The solution of a molten salt centrifugal pump was discarded because of the high corrosion power of a high temperature molten salt, so the suction pump solution was selected. An apparatus for salt transport experiments by suction was designed and tested using LiC-KCl eutectic salt. The experimental results of lab-scale molten salt transport by suction showed a 99.5% transport rate (ratio of transported salt to total salt) under a vacuum range of 100 mtorr - 10 torr at 500 Celsius degrees. The suction system has been integrated to the PRIDE (pyroprocessing integrated inactive demonstration) facility that is a demonstrator using non-irradiated materials (natural uranium and surrogate materials). The performance of the suction pump for the transport of molten salts has been confirmed.

Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Hansoo; Kim, In Tae; Kim, Jeong-Guk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daaro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Recovery and utilization of waste liquids in ultra-clean coal preparation by chemical leaching  

SciTech Connect

Coal with ash lower than 1%, being called an ultra-clean coal, has many potential applications, such as a substitute for diesel fuel, production of carbon electrodes, superior activated carbon and other chemical materials. It is difficult to reduce coal ash to such a level by conventional coal preparation technology. By means of chemical leaching with the proper concentration of alkali and acid solutions, any coal can be deeply deashed to 1% ash level. However, the cost of chemical methods is higher than that of physical ones, additionally, the waste liquids would give rise to environmental pollution if used on a large scale. If the waste liquids from chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal can be recovered and utilized, so as to produce salable by-products, the cost of chemical leaching will be reduced. This processing will also solve the pollution problem of these waste liquids. This paper describes recovery and utilization methods for these liquids used in chemical leaching, including the recoveries of alkali, silica, sodium-salt and aluminium-salt. A preliminary estimate was made regarding its economic benefits. It shows that this research solves the two problems in the chemical preparation of ultra-clean coal. One is the high-cost and the other is environmental pollution. This research demonstrates good potential for the production of ultra-clean coal on an industrial scale.

Xu Zesheng; Shi Zhimin; Yang Qiaowen; Wang Xinguo [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). Beijing Graduate School

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Determinants of Hospital's Financial Liquidity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of the articles is to identify key factors that may affect the level of hospital's liquidity ratio. We’ve posed four research hypotheses, assuming that, the level of financial liquidity in hospitals depends on several factors (number of beds, annual income per bed, profitability ratios, debt ratio). We’ve found that: 1) there is a positive relationship between debt ratio and liquidity and profitability ratio and liquidity 2) the relationship between the size of the hospital and the financial liquidity is not statistically significant. In the study we’ve use statistical tools: Pearson's correlation coefficient, T-Student's test with Cohran-Cox's correction.

Agnieszka Bem; Katarzyna Pr?dkiewicz; Pawe? Pr?dkiewicz; Paulina Ucieklak-Je?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Savannah River Site - Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW November 22, 2006 Conducted by: Harry Harmon, Team Lead Civil/Structural Sub Team Facility Safety Sub Team Engineering Sub Team Peter Lowry, Lead James Langsted, Lead George Krauter, Lead Robert Kennedy Chuck Negin Art Etchells Les Youd Jerry Evatt Oliver Block Loring Wyllie Richard Stark Tim Adams Tom Anderson Todd LaPointe Stephen Gosselin Carl Costantino Norman Moreau Patrick Corcoran John Christian Ken Cooper Kari McDaniel _____________________________ Harry D. Harmon ITR Team Leader SPD-SWPF-217 SPD-SWPF-217: Salt Waste Processing Facility Independent Technical Review 11/22/2006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The ITR Team wishes to thank Shari Clifford of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for

406

Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species.

Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Injector nozzle for molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An injector nozzle has been designed for safely injecting energetic waste materials, such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels, into a molten salt reactor in a molten salt destruction process without premature detonation or back burn in the injection system. The energetic waste material is typically diluted to form a fluid fuel mixture that is injected rapidly into the reactor. A carrier gas used in the nozzle serves as a carrier for the fuel mixture, and further dilutes the energetic material and increases its injection velocity into the reactor. The injector nozzle is cooled to keep the fuel mixture below the decomposition temperature to prevent spontaneous detonation of the explosive materials before contact with the high-temperature molten salt bath.

Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Stress measurements in rock salt using hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing was applied in horizontal drillholes in the Salado salt formation near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Testing took place approximately 650 m below surface in order to support the design of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense activities of the United States. Hydraulic fracturing was performed primarily to determine whether the virgin in situ stress state at the WIPP site is isotropic and whether the magnitudes of the the virgin in situ stresses correspond to the weight of the overburden. Beyond these limited objectives, measurements are being analyzed to evaluate the usefulness of hydraulic fracturing in salt formations in general. Such measurements are desirable to determine stresses induced by mining and to monitor time-dependent stress changes around underground excavations in salt masses. Hydraulic fracturing measurements are also relevant to the evaluation of allowable pressures before fracturing is induced in pressurized boreholes and storage caverns.

Wawersik, W.R.; Stone, C.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Analytical methods for determining the reactivity of pyrochemical salts  

SciTech Connect

Pyrochemical processes used for the purification of plutonium have generated quantities of residue that contain varying amounts of reactive metals such as potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium. These residues are currently considered hazardous and are being managed under RCRA because of the reactivity characteristic. This designation is based solely on process knowledge. Currently there is no approved procedure for determining the reactivity of a solid with water. A method is being developed to rapidly evaluate the reactivity of pyrochemical salts with water by measuring the rate of hydrogen generation. The method was initially tested with a magnesium containing pyrochemical salt. A detection limit of approximately 0.004 g of magnesium was established. A surrogate molten salt extraction residue was also tested. Extrapolation of test data resulted in a hydrogen generation rate of 4.4 mg/(g min).

Phillips, A.G.; Stakebake, J.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

411

Quantal Ising Liquid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An example is presented of a model of an amorphous quantum mechanical system, a liquid of quantal Ising spins, which can be solved exactly within certain many-body theories. Analytical solutions of the model in mean-field theory are shown to reveal a decrease in the extent of the ferromagnetic region (compared to an equivalent classical system) and the occurrence of some degree of quantum localization. Both phenomena are analyzed as a competition between quantum mechanics and the condensed phase.

Richard M. Stratt

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

RHIC The Perfect Liquid  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

BNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Theory of fermion liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a general theory of fermion liquids in spatial dimensions greater than 1. The principal method, bosonization, is applied to the cases of short- and long-range longitudinal interactions and to transverse gauge interactions. All the correlation funtions of the system may be obtained with the use of a generating functional. Short-range and Coulomb interactions do not destroy the Landau-Fermi fixed point. Non-Fermi liquid fixed points are found, however, in the cases of a super-long-range longitudinal interaction in two dimensions and transverse gauge interactions in two and three spatial dimensions. We consider in some detail the (2+1)-dimensional problem of a Chern-Simons gauge action combined with a longitudinal two-body interaction V(q)??q?y-1, which controls the density, and hence gauge, fluctuations. For y0 the interaction is relevant and the fixed point cannot be accessed by bosonization. Of special importance is the case y=0 (Coulomb interaction), which describes the Halperin-Lee-Read theory of the half-filled Landau level. We obtain the full quasiparticle propagator, which is of a marginal Fermi-liquid form. Using Ward identities, we show that neither the inclusion of nonlinear terms in the fermion dispersion nor vertex corrections alters our results: the fixed point is accessible by bosonization. As the two-point fermion Green’s function is not gauge invariant, we also invetigate the gauge-invariant density response function. Near momentum Q=2kF, in addition to the Kohn anomaly we find other nonanalytic behavior. In the appendies we present a numerical calculation of the spectral function for a Fermi liquid with Landau parameter f0?0. We also show how Kohn’s theorem is satisfied within the bosonization framework.

H.-J. Kwon; A. Houghton; J. B. Marston

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

What constitutes a simple liquid?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple liquids are traditionally defined as many-body systems of classical particles interacting via radially symmetric pair potentials. We suggest that a simple liquid should be defined instead by the property of having strong correlation between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble. There is considerable overlap between the two definitions, but also some notable differences. For instance, in the new definition simplicity is not a property of the intermolecular potential only because a liquid is usually only strongly correlating in part of its phase diagram. Moreover, according to the new definition not all simple liquids are atomic (i.e., with radially symmetric pair potentials) and not all atomic liquids are simple. The main part of the paper motivates the new definition of liquid simplicity by presenting evidence that a liquid is strongly correlating if and only if its intermolecular interactions may be ignored beyond the first coordination shell (FCS). This is demonstrated by NVT simulations of structure and dynamics of 15 atomic and molecular model liquids with a shifted-forces cutoff placed at the first minimum of the radial distribution function. No proof is given that the chemical characterization follows from the strong correlation property, but it is shown to be consistent with the existence of isomorphs in strongly correlating liquids' phase diagram. Finally, we note that the FCS characterization of simple liquids calls into question the basis for standard perturbation theory, according to which the repulsive and attractive forces play fundamentally different roles for the physics of liquids.

Trond S. Ingebrigtsen; Thomas B. Schrøder; Jeppe C. Dyre

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Liquid fossil fuel technology  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented under the following headings: (1) extraction (technology assessment, oil research, gas research); (2) liquid processing (characterization, thermodynamics, processing technology); (3) utilization (energy conservation); and (4) project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are also listed. Some of the highlights for this period are: the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center was converted into NIPER, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research on October 1, 1983; modelling of enthalpies, heat capacities and volumes of aqueous surfactant solutions began using a mass action model; a series of experiments were run on upgrading by hydrogenation SRC-II coal liquid at different degrees of severity and the products have been analyzed; heavy crude oil extracts were separated into fraction with high performance liquid chromatography by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the mass spectra and electron spin resonance were determin ed; and particulates from exhaust gases of diesel engines using fire fuel types are being collected and will be analyzed by chemical methods and results will be compared with those obtained by biological assay. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Heat driven heat pump using paired ammoniated salts  

SciTech Connect

A cycle for a heat driven heat pump using two salts CaCl/sup 2/.8NH/sup 3/, and ZnCl/sup 2/.4NH3 which may reversibly react with ammonia with the addition or evolution of heat. These salts were chosen so that both ammoniation processes occur at the same temperature so that the heat evolved may be used for comfort heating. The heat to drive the system need only be slightly hotter than 122 C. The low temperature source need only be slightly warmer than 0 C.

Dunlap, R.M.

1980-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geology of the Salt Creek area, Mason County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to the entrapment of. surface water in the fractures. GEOLXiBPBOLOGY The Salt Creek area in @aeon County, Texas is located on the southwestern flank of the Llano Uplift, a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes.... STSUCT "SALCEOL00Y IIegional Structure The Llano region, which includes the Salt Creek area, is a structural dome which has been reduced to a topographic basin by erosional processes. The dose is roughly elliptical with a maximum diameter...

Harwood, William Eugene

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radar investigation of the Cote Blanche salt dome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PADAR IiVVESTICATIOH CF THE COZE ELANCHR SALT DO&: A Thests EOHEET DOSAED SZEVAET Subm-'tt. ii' to the Crsduete Coilege of Ter: s AVi', i;nlu xsity in partfal fulfi' line?t of th ': quiremen fc z' tht degree o %P t S "t Clt. 'iCE iugust. l...HIC major Sub jest: Ceoohysfes RADAR INVESTIGATION OP THE COTE BLANCHE SALT DOME A Thesis by ROBERT DONALD STEWART Approved as to style and nor. tent by: (Chairman of Comml ee) ( Ir~c" (Head of De rtment ? Member) (Member) August 1974 ABSTRACT...

Stewart, Robert Donald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

A mechanical model of early salt dome growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MECHANICAL MODEL OF EARLY SALT DOME GROWTH A Thesis by FRANK ALBERT IRWIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988... Major Subject: Geology A MECHANICAL MODEL OF EARLY SALT DOME GROWTH A Thesis by FRANK ALBERT IRWIN Approved as to style and content by: aymond C. Fletcher (Chair of Committee) John H. Spang (Member) Wi tamR. B ant (Mem ) John H. Sp g (Head...

Irwin, Frank Albert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Study of maximizing acoustic energy coupling to salt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY OF MAXIMIZING ACOUSTIC ENERGY COUPLING TO SALT A Thesis by YNG-JOV HNANG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major... Subject: Geophysics STUDY OF &MAXIMIZING ACOUSTIC ENERGY COUPLING TO SALT A Thesis by YNG-JOU HWANG Approved as to style and content by: C arrman o ommit e em er em e er Hea o epartment December 1979 ABSTRACT Study of Haximizing Acoustic Energy...

Hwang, Yng-Jou

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Let's Pour Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shattering Flowers! Shattering Flowers! Previous Video (Shattering Flowers!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Giant Koosh Ball!) Giant Koosh Ball! Let's Pour Liquid Nitrogen on the Floor! Liquid nitrogen?! On the floor?! Who's going to clean that mess up?! See what really happens when one of the world's most beloved cryogenic liquids comes into contact with a room temperature floor. [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: From time to time, we spill a little liquid nitrogen! The reaction we sometimes get is.... Shannon: Did they just pour LIQUID NITROGEN on the FLOOR?!?! Joanna: Yes. Yes we did. Steve: One thing people seem to have a problem with is the mess that liquid

423

Microbiological and Physical Properties of Salt Marsh and Microecosystem Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MES. ATP in the high marsh was found to be significantly...sediment properties (r = 0.539, s = 0...sampled in the high marsh. r witha: Variable Ma...PROPERTIES OF SALT MARSH AND MES SEDIMENTS 667 9. Fallon, R. D., and F. K...

Michael Reichgott; L. Harold Stevenson

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

SALT DAMAGE CRITERION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

This document is the annual technical progress report for Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT41026 entitled Proof-of-Concept Research for an Advanced Design Criterion to Improve Working Gas Capacity for Natural Gas Storage Caverns in Salt Formations. This report covers the reporting period from October 1, 2000, through September 30, 2001. During this reporting period, the project was initiated and work was performed to develop structural models that will be used to evaluate two compressed natural gas storage caverns in the McIntosh Dome northwest of Mobile, Alabama. Information necessary to define the structural models include site-specific stress, temperature, geometry, stratigraphy, and operating scenarios in the dome and for the caverns. Additionally, material model development for the salt at the McIntosh Dome was initiated. Material model development activities include acquisition of salt core for testing, laboratory testing, and regression analyses to determine site-specific model parameter values that describe the behavior of salt around a storage cavern. Although not performed during this reporting period, the information and models developed will be used to perform advanced design storage cavern analyses for the Bay Gas caverns to determine the operating pressure ranges to maintain stable conditions.

Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Study on Natural Radioactivity in Khewra Salt Mines, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......The excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) was calculated...salt mines (Excluding Uranium) of some other countries...and Excess Life Time Cancer Risk (%) in the Khewra...than the other non-uranium mines.5) The average...and Excess Life Time Cancer Risk (100%) are calculated......

Muzahir Ali Baloch; Aziz Ahmed Qureshi; Abdul Waheed; Muhammad Ali; Nawab Ali; Muhammad Tufail; Saima Batool; Muhammad Akram; Poonam Iftikhar; Hamza Qayyum; Shahid Manzoor; Hameed Ahmed Khan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Acoustic propagation characteristics of the estuarine salt wedge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge—a layer of denser seawater advected by the rising tide under fresh water discharged by the river. The nature of the stratification is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance river discharge volumetric flow rate and river mouth morphology. The competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed present the question: Is the salt wedge acoustically observable? Using temperature and salinity profiles collected in situ numerical results show that the salt wedge can impact acoustic propagation. Acoustically this environment consists of two isospeed layers separated by a thin gradient. While this three-layer very shallow water acoustic waveguide is typically dominated by high angle multipath propagation refraction occurring in the gradient layer allows some low-angle energy from near-surface sources to be trapped in the upper layer. Acoustic fluctuations observed at an upstream or downstream receiver depend upon the interaction between the advancing and receding tide and the river discharge which can include the presence of internal waves propagating along the top of the salt wedge.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Acoustic propagation characteristics of the estuarine salt wedge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge-a layer of denser seawater advected by the rising tide under fresh water discharged by the river. The nature of the stratification is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance river discharge volumetric flow rate and river mouth morphology. The competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed present the question: Is the salt wedge acoustically observable? Using temperature and salinity profiles collected in situ numerical results show that the salt wedge can impact acoustic propagation. Acoustically this environment can be approximated by two isospeed layers separated by a thin gradient. While this three-layer very shallow water acoustic waveguide is typically dominated by high angle multipath propagation refraction occurring in the gradient layer allows low-angle energy from near-surface sources to be trapped above the gradient and creates a shadow zone below the gradient. Energy from near-bottom sources is refracted to higher angles and attenuated more quickly. Acoustic fluctuations observed at an upstream/downstream receiver depend upon the presence/absence of bedforms and the interaction between the advancing/receding tide and the river discharge which can include the presence of internal waves propagating along the top of the salt wedge.

D. B. Reeder

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Supporting Information for: Salt concentration differences alter membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The membrane area available for ion transport was 11.4 cm2 . Platinum mesh electrodes that spanned the crossS1 Supporting Information for: Salt concentration differences alter membrane resistance in reverse-814-867-1847 #12;S2 Membrane resistance measurement Without a concentration difference Membrane resistance

429

Continuous Commissioning of Salt Lake Community College South City Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], and a very old building, the South City campus of Salt Lake Community College. This paper describes the measures and savings results from the CC® process at the Community College. The energy savings amounted to 15% of the annual utility bill. While most...

Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Hood, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Thermohaline convection with nonlinear salt profiles N. J. Balmfortha)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tem- perature and salinity; the background temperature gradient is constant, while the salt profile tangent profile is presented. It is shown that nonlinearity in the background salinity profile leads of temperature and salinity. Hence we need to jus- tify our study of the stability of this background

Julien, Keith

431

Salt Lake City, Utah: Solar in Action (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Salt Lake City, UT, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Nitrate Salt Bearing Waste Container  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEPA filtration. On April 11, 2014, in anticipation of investigation of the source of a radiological on the possibility that a container of inadequately remediated nitrate salt bearing waste had caused the release and is the most Page 1 of 17 #12;likely source of the release. Further investigation is underway to determine

Napp, Nils

433

Salt structures and hydrocarbons in the Pricaspian basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...could be used unrefined to fuel diesel-engine Russian armored vehicles during...4a). This folding and the more general Early Jurassic (Cimmerian) uplift...Figure 4b) and so is found in the general region of salt overhangs (Figure...

Yuri Volozh; Christopher Talbot; Alik Ismail-Zadeh

434

Water, Vapor, and Salt Dynamics in a Hot Repository  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a new model study examining the high temperature nuclear waste disposal concept at Yucca Mountain using MULTIFLUX, an integrated in-drift- and mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model. The results show that a large amount of vapor flow into the drift is expected during the period of above-boiling temperatures. This phenomenon makes the emplacement drift a water/moisture attractor during the above-boiling temperature operation. The evaporation of the percolation water into the drift gives rise to salt accumulation in the rock wall, especially in the crown of the drift for about 1500 years in the example. The deposited salts over the drift footprint, almost entirely present in the fractures, may enter the drift either by rock fall or by water drippage. During the high temperature operation mode, the barometric pressure variation creates fluctuating relative humidity in the emplacement drift with a time period of approximately 10 days. Potentially wet and dry conditions and condensation on salt-laden drift wall sections may adversely affect the storage environment. Salt accumulations during the above-boiling temperature operation must be sufficiently addressed to fully understand the waste package environment during the thermal period. Until the questions are resolved, a below-boiling repository design is favored where the Alloy-22 will be less susceptible to localized corrosion. (authors)

Bahrami, Davood; Danko, George [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV, 89557 (United States); Walton, John [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University, El Paso, TX, 79968 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Bile Salts and Nuclear Receptors in Biliary Epithelial Cell Pathophysiology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Michigan. This opportunity to complete a research program allowed me to pursue my career as an associate receptors 17 3. Research program 19 3.1. VDR in biliary-type liver diseases 20 3.2. VDR in fatty liverBile Salts and Nuclear Receptors in Biliary Epithelial Cell Pathophysiology by Dr. Nicolas Chignard

Boyer, Edmond

436

Anionic Salt Programs for Close-Up Dry Cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dairy farmers can improve long-term milk production by having a well-managed program for dry cows during the last 3 weeks before calving. This publication explains how an anionic salt program can help control subclinical hypocalcemia and "droopy cow...

Stokes, Sandra R.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

TGS measurements of pyrochemical salts at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect

A new skid-mounted tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) was designed to assist in the decommissioning of Rocky Flats Building 37 1, This instrument was used to assay pyrochemical salts as a prerequisite for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The following paper discusses measurement challenges and results from the first year of operation of the instrument.

Mercer, D. J. (David J.); Hansen, J. S. (J. Steven); Lestone, J. P. (John P.); Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

Waldrip, Karen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Kerley, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation The 3rd U.S./German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operation was held in Albuquerque and Carlsbad, New Mexico on October 8-11, 2012. Approximately 60 salt research scientists from Germany and the United States met to discuss repository science state of the art. Workshop topics included: 1) Safety case for heat-generating waste disposal in salt; 2) Benchmark modeling in preparation for thermomechanical field-scale tests; and 3) Reconsolidation of granular salt. Collaboration being pursued by U.S. and German salt repository researchers is presented in the report.

440

Vegetation Change in Salt Marshes of Cape Cod National Seashore (Massachusetts, USA) Between 1984 and 2013  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vegetation patterns in salt marshes are largely based on elevation in relation to tidal flooding. In New England salt marshes, vegetation is distinctly zoned into species that occur in the high marsh (elevatio...

Stephen M. Smith

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Physiological Diversity of the Rhizosphere Diazotroph Assemblages of Selected Salt Marsh Grasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from the rhizosphere of salt marsh grasses, abstr. N-208 . Bally R. Thomas-Bauzon D. Heulin...W. Gas transport in the marsh grass, Spartina alterniflora. . Turner R. E. Geographic variations in salt marsh macrophyte production: a...

Christopher E. Bagwell; Yvette M. Piceno; Amy Ashburne-Lucas; Charles R. Lovell

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Effects of electrolyte salts on the performance of Li-O2 batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrolyte salts on the performance of Li-O2 batteries. Effects of electrolyte salts on the performance of Li-O2 batteries. Abstract: It is well known that the stability of...

443

Effects of Nutrient Additions on Three Coastal Salt Marsh Plants Found in Sunset Cove, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eutrophication, particularly due to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) input, has been massively altered by anthropogenic activities. Thus it is important to understand the impact on salt marsh plants; however studies on salt marsh plants within...

Rulon, Leslie

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

444

Increment of specific heat capacity of solar salt with SiO2 nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, salt-based nanofluid based on solar salt and SiO2...nanoparticles prepared by the Shin and Banerjee method was investigated. The optimal nanoparticle concentration was found and the stability of the...

Patricia Andreu-Cabedo; Rosa Mondragon; Leonor Hernandez…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Salt deformation history and postsalt structural trends, offshore southern Gabon, West Africa  

SciTech Connect

Salt deformation in offshore southern Gabon is represented by mobilization of an Aptian salt layer in reaction to Tertiary clastic progradation. Seismic mapping of salt bodies and associated faulting has resulted in increased understanding of the types and distribution of these salt bodies, their associated faulting patterns, and some aspects of their origin. Away from the Tertiary depocenter, the growth history of salt swells or pillows can be determined by examining onlapping and draping seismic reflectors. Significant Tertiary clastic progradation into the area mobilized the salt and resulted in a series of linear, deep salt walls and asymmetric, basinward-dipping salt rollers, commonly associated with significant up-to-basin faulting dominates the southern Gabon subbasin. The expansion history of associated sediments suggests that these faults expanded episodically throughout the Tertiary, continuing to present-day bathymetric fault scarps. The bias toward up-to-basin faults, to the apparent exclusion of down-to-basin expansion faults, remains enigmatic.

Liro, L.M. [Texaco Exploration and Production Technology Dept., Houston, TX (United States); Coen, R. [British Gas, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal efficiency from 54 percent to 63 percent. However, very few thermal storage materials are compatible for these high temperatures. Molten salts are thermally stable up to 600 degrees C and beyond. Using the molten salts as the TES materials...

Shin, Donghyun

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

447

Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this research is to examine sea salt aerosols and their impact on polluted environments. Sea salt aerosols act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) as well as providing a surface for heterogeneous reactions. Such reactions have implications for trace gases...

Benoit, Mark David

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution salt Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

salt Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution salt Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Contact: Lori M. Quillen, Director of...

449

Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

450

Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system customer interface document.  

SciTech Connect

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL is a test capability that allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt. The components tested can range from materials samples, to individual components such as flex hoses, ball joints, and valves, up to full solar collecting systems such as central receiver panels, parabolic troughs, or linear Fresnel systems. MSTL provides realistic conditions similar to a portion of a concentrating solar power facility. The facility currently uses 60/40 nitrate %E2%80%9Csolar salt%E2%80%9D and can circulate the salt at pressure up to 40 bar (600psi), temperature to 585%C2%B0C, and flow rate of 44-50kg/s(400-600GPM) depending on temperature. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for customers to evaluate the applicability to their testing needs, and to provide an outline of expectations for conducting testing on MSTL. The document can serve as the basis for testing agreements including Work for Others (WFO) and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA). While this document provides the basis for these agreements and describes some of the requirements for testing using MSTL and on the site at Sandia, the document is not sufficient by itself as a test agreement. The document, however, does provide customers with a uniform set of information to begin the test planning process.

Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electrodialysis-based separation process for salt recovery and recycling from waste water  

SciTech Connect

A method for recovering salt from a process stream containing organic contaminants is provided, comprising directing the waste stream to a desalting electrodialysis unit so as to create a concentrated and purified salt permeate and an organic contaminants-containing stream, and contacting said concentrated salt permeate to a water-splitting electrodialysis unit so as to convert the salt to its corresponding base and acid. 6 figs.

Tsai, S.P.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

453

Electrodialysis-based separation process for salt recovery and recycling from waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering salt from a process stream containing organic contaminants is provided, comprising directing the waste stream to a desalting electrodialysis unit so as to create a concentrated and purified salt permeate and an organic contaminants containing stream, and contacting said concentrated salt permeate to a water-splitting electrodialysis unit so as to convert the salt to its corresponding base and acid.

Tsai, Shih-Perng (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids lead salts Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-Partial list Chemical Incompatibilities Summary: hypochlorite, all oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium Chlorates Ammonium salts, acids, powdered metals... ammonium...

455

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid ammonium salt Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-Partial list Chemical Incompatibilities Summary: hypochlorite, all oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium Chlorates Ammonium salts, acids, powdered metals... ammonium...

456

Low Temperature Reduction of Alumina Using Fluorine Containing Ionic Liquids  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of the project is to establish the feasibility of using specific ionic liquids capable of sustaining aluminum electrolysis near room temperature at laboratory and batch recirculation scales. It will explore new technologies for aluminum and other valuable metal extraction and process methods. The new technology will overcome many of the limitations associated with high temperatures processes such as high energy consumption and corrosion attack. Furthermore, ionic liquids are non-toxic and could be recycled after purification, thus minimizing extraction reagent losses and environmental pollutant emissions. Ionic liquids are mixture of inorganic and organic salts which are liquid at room temperature and have wide operational temperature range. During the last several years, they were emerging as novel electrolytes for extracting and refining of aluminum metals and/or alloys, which are otherwise impossible using aqueous media. The superior high temperature characteristics and high solvating capabilities of ionic liquids provide a unique solution to high temperature organic solvent problems associated with device internal pressure build-up, corrosion, and thermal stability. However their applications have not yet been fully implemented due to the insufficient understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms involved in processing of aluminum with ionic liquids. Laboratory aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquids has been investigated in chloride and bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide based ionic liquids. The electrowinning process yielded current density in the range of 200-500 A/m2, and current efficiency of about 90%. The results indicated that high purity aluminum (>99.99%) can be obtained as cathodic deposits. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry studies have shown that initial stages of aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquid electrolyte at 30°C was found to be quasi-reversible, with the charge transfer coefficient (0.40). Nucleation phenomena involved in aluminum deposition on copper in AlCl3-BMIMCl electrolyte was found to be instantaneous followed by diffusion controlled three-dimensional growth of nuclei. Diffusion coefficient (Do) of the electroactive species Al2Cl7¯ ion was in the range from 6.5 to 3.9×10–7 cm2?s–1 at a temperature of 30°C. Relatively little research efforts have been made toward the fundamental understanding and modeling of the species transport and transformation information involved in ionic liquid mixtures, which eventually could lead to quantification of electrochemical properties. Except that experimental work in this aspect usually is time consuming and expensive, certain characteristics of ionic liquids also made barriers for such analyses. Low vapor pressure and high viscosity make them not suitable for atomic absorption spectroscopic measurement. In addition, aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquid electrolytes are considered to be governed by multi-component mass, heat and charge transport in laminar and turbulent flows that are often multi-phase due to the gas evolution at the electrodes. The kinetics of the electrochemical reactions is in general complex. Furthermore, the mass transfer boundary layer is about one order of magnitude smaller than the thermal and hydrodynamic boundary layer (Re=10,000). Other phenomena that frequently occur are side reactions and temperature or concentration driven natural convection. As a result of this complexity, quantitative knowledge of the local parameters (current densities, ion concentrations, electrical potential, temperature, etc.) is very difficult to obtain. This situation is a serious obstacle for improving the quality of products, efficiency of manufacturing and energy consumption. The gap between laboratory/batch scale processing with global process control and nanoscale deposit surface and materials specifications needs to be bridged. A breakthrough can only be realized if on each scale the occurring phenomena are understood and quantified. Multiscale numerical modeling nevertheless can help t

Dr. R. G. Reddy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Process for preparing liquid wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing radioactive and other hazardous liquid wastes for treatment by the method of vitrification or melting is provided for.

Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

FLARE, Fermilab Liquid Argon Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mature technology of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers in conjunction with intense neutrino beams constructed at Fermilab offer a broad program of neutrino physics for the next decade.

L. Bartoszek

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multi-component crystals of the anti-inflammatory drug acemetacin were prepared by melt crystallization and their X-ray crystal structures solved using single-crystal and high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) data. The acemetacin-para-aminobenzoic acid adduct and the acemetacin piperazine salt are stable to hydration in the aqueous medium (up to 24 h).

Sanphui, P.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Arabidopsis salt overly sensitive 4 Mutants Uncover a Critical Role for Vitamin B6 in Plant Salt Tolerance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and development in many different ways. Excess salt causes ion toxicity inside the cell...Phosphate 69-65-8 Mannitol 7439-93-2 Lithium 7440-09-7 Potassium 7440-23-5...Regulation, Plant Genetic Complementation Test Lithium metabolism pharmacology Mannitol pharmacology...

Huazhong Shi; Liming Xiong; Becky Stevenson; Tiegang Lu; Jian-Kang Zhu

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquid desiccant salt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Bases, Assumptions, and Results of the Flowsheet Calculations for the Decision Phase Salt Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect

The HLW salt waste (salt cake and supernate) now stored at the SRS must be treated to remove insoluble sludge solids and reduce the soluble concentration of radioactive cesium radioactive strontium and transuranic contaminants (principally Pu and Np). These treatments will enable the salt solution to be processed for disposal as saltstone, a solid low-level waste.

Elder, H.H.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Comparison of Nitrogen Fixation Activity in Tall and Short Spartina alterniflora Salt Marsh Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...North Carolina salt marshes. Ecology 44:445-456. 2. Brooks, R. H., P. L. Brezonik...of a Virginia salt marsh. Chesapeake Sci...Marsho, T. V., R. P. Burchard, and...limitation in salt marsh vegetation, p. 547-563. In R. J. Reimold and...

Roger B. Hanson

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Enumeration of Particle-Bound and Unattached Respiring Bacteria in the Salt Marsh Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Respiring Bacteria in the Salt Marsh Environment R. W. Harvey L. Y. Young...Respiring Bacteria in the Salt Marsh Environment R. W. HARVEY AND L. Y...and particulates in salt marsh surface water. Appl...6. Hobbie, J. E., R. J. Daley, and S...

R. W. Harvey; L. Y. Young

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Molten salt as heat transfer fluid for a 500 m2 dish concentrator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten salt as heat transfer fluid for a 500 m2 dish concentrator Nicolás del Pozo 1 , Rebecca Dunn. Specifically, the objective was to research the behaviour of molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for the SG4, this initial investigation suggests that the use of molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for the ANU 500 m2

465

Genome Sequence of Lentibacillus jeotgali GrbiT, Isolated from Traditional Korean Salt-Fermented Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from Traditional Korean Salt-Fermented Seafood Mi-Ja Jung Seong Woon Roh Min-Soo...a traditional Korean salt-fermented seafood, is a strictly aerobic, Gram-positive...Jeotgal is a traditional Korean fermented seafood made from salted marine organisms, including...

Mi-Ja Jung; Seong Woon Roh; Min-Soo Kim; Tae Woong Whon; Jin-Woo Bae

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Genome Sequence of Brachybacterium squillarum M-6-3T, Isolated from Salt-Fermented Seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...M-6-3T, Isolated from Salt-Fermented Seafood Seong-Kyu Park Seong Woon Roh Tae Woong...M-6-3T was isolated from salt-fermented seafood in Korea and belongs to the Dermabacteraceae...nov., isolated from salt-fermented seafood. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol...

Seong-Kyu Park; Seong Woon Roh; Tae Woong Whon; Jin-Woo Bae

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

On the biogeography of salt limitation: A study of ant communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Taxonomic decomposition of salt use across 17 ant communities...trophic level decreases salt recruitment. We did so...Arizona 4 Stateline 9 Warm desert 389 4 31.95 N 109...Green 32.5 Florida 6 Scrub 11 Pine scrub 4 4 27.59...the same way that “salt licks” increase the...

Michael Kaspari; Stephen P. Yanoviak; Robert Dudley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The results of HLW processing using zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Zirconium salt of dibutyl-phosphoric acid (ZS HDBP) dissolved in a diluent, is a promising solvent for liquid HLW processing. The investigations carried out earlier showed that ZS HDBP can recover a series of radionuclides (TPE, RE, U, Pu, Np, Sr) and some other elements (Mo, Ca, Fe) from aqueous solutions. The possibility of TPE and RE effective recovery and separation into appropriate fractions with high purification from each other was demonstrated as well. The results of extraction tests in the mixer-settlers in the course of liquid HLW treatment in hot cells, using ZS HDBP (0.4 M HDBP and 0.044 M Zr) dissolved in 30% TBP are presented. 30 liters of the feed solution containing TPE, RE, Sr and Cs with the total specific activity of 520 MBq/L and acidity of 2 M HNO{sub 3} were processed using the two-cycle flowsheet. TPE and RE recovery with subsequent stripping was realized in the first cycle, while Sr was recovered and concentrated in the second cycle. Raffinate of the latter contained almost all Cs. The degree of TPE and RE recovery was 104, and that of Sr was {approx}10. Decontamination factor of TPE and RE from Cs and Sr was 104, and that of Sr from TPE and Cs was 103. So, ZS HDBP can be used for separation of long-lived radionuclides from HLW with respect to radio-toxic category of the process products. (authors)

Fedorov, Yury; Zilberman, Boris; Shmidt, Olga; Saprikin, Vladimir; Ryasantsev, Valery [V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 194021, 28, 2nd Murinsky pr., Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this research conducted under the auspices of the USDOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid- liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Disposal of high- level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 10,000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals.1 Quite simply, if the radioactive matter and bulk inorganic chemicals could be separated into separate streams, large cost savings would accrue, because the latter stream is much cheaper to dispose of. In principle, one could remove the radionuclides from the waste, leaving behind the bulk of the waste; or one could remove certain bulk chemicals from the waste, leaving behind a mixture of radionuclides and minor inorganic salts. The preponderance of effort over the past two decades has focused on the former approach, which produces a high- level stream for vitrification and a low-activity stream for either vitrification (Hanford) or grout (Savannah River). At Hanford, a particular concern arises in that vitrification of a large volume of low-activity waste will be unacceptably expensive. To make matters worse, a projected future deficit of tank space may necessitate construction of expensive new tanks. These problems have raised questions as to whether a solution could be devised based on separation of sodium from the waste, resulting in the reduction of the total volume of waste that must be vitrified.

Moyer, Bruce A; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Marchand, Alan P.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Conversion of glucose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural with boric acid in molten mixtures of choline salts and carboxylic acids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The conversion of glucose into a potential platform chemical for fuels and plastics, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), has been studied using B(OH)3 as a promoter in different solvents, namely molten mixtures made of choline salts and carboxylic acids, with the aim of developing an inexpensive and less harmful alternative to Cr/ionic liquid systems. Choline chloride-based molten mixtures afforded poor yields of HMF, whereas the yields were improved by replacing choline chloride with choline dihydrogen citrate. The combination of choline dihydrogen citrate and glycolic acid was the best choice, providing an HMF yield of ?60% at 140 °C within 4 h by adding a small volume of water as a co-solvent.

Hiroaki Matsumiya; Takeyoshi Hara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Salt Disposal Investigations to Study Thermally Hot Radioactive Waste In A Deep Geologic Repository in Bedded Rock Salt - 12488  

SciTech Connect

A research program is proposed to investigate the behavior of salt when subjected to thermal loads like those that would be present in a high-level waste repository. This research would build upon results of decades of previous salt repository program efforts in the US and Germany and the successful licensing and operation of a repository in salt for disposal of defense transuranic waste. The proposal includes a combination of laboratory-scale investigations, numerical simulations conducted to develop validated models that could be used for future repository design and safety case development, and a thermal field test in an underground salt formation with a configuration that replicates a small portion of a conceptual repository design. Laboratory tests are proposed to measure salt and brine properties across and beyond the range of possible repository conditions. Coupled numerical models will seek to describe phenomenology (thermal, mechanical, and hydrological) observed in the laboratory tests. Finally, the field test will investigate many phenomena that have been variously cited as potential issues for disposal of thermally hot waste in salt, including buoyancy effects and migration of pre-existing trapped brine up the thermal gradient (including vapor phase migration). These studies are proposed to be coordinated and managed by the Carlsbad Field Office of DOE, which is also responsible for the operation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) within the Office of Environmental Management. The field test portion of the proposed research would be conducted in experimental areas of the WIPP underground, far from disposal operations. It is believed that such tests may be accomplished using the existing infrastructure of the WIPP repository at a lower cost than if such research were conducted at a commercial salt mine at another location. The phased field test is proposed to be performed over almost a decade, including instrumentation development, several years of measurements during heating and then subsequent cooling periods, and the eventual forensic mining back of the test bed to determine the multi-year behavior of the simulated waste/rock environment. Funding possibilities are described, and prospects for near term start-up are discussed. Mining of the access drifts required to create the test area in the WIPP underground began in November 2011. Because this mining uses existing WIPP infrastructure and labor, it is estimated to take about two years to complete the access drifts. WIPP disposal operations and facility maintenance activities will take priority over the SDI field test area mining. Funding of the SDI proposal was still being considered by DOE's Offices of Environmental Management and Nuclear Energy at the time this paper was written, so no specific estimates of the progress in 2012 have been included. (authors)

Nelson, Roger A. [DOE, Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad NM (United States); Buschman, Nancy [DOE, Office of Environmental Management, Washington DC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Modular CSSX Unit (CSSX), and Waste Transfer Line System of Salt Processing Program (U)  

SciTech Connect

All of the waste streams from ARP, MCU, and SWPF processes will be sent to DWPF for vitrification. The impact these new waste streams will have on DWPF's ability to meet its canister production goal and its ability to support the Salt Processing Program (ARP, MCU, and SWPF) throughput needed to be evaluated. DWPF Engineering and Operations requested OBU Systems Engineering to evaluate DWPF operations and determine how the process could be optimized. The ultimate goal will be to evaluate all of the Liquid Radioactive Waste (LRW) System by developing process modules to cover all facilities/projects which are relevant to the LRW Program and to link the modules together to: (1) study the interfaces issues, (2) identify bottlenecks, and (3) determine the most cost effective way to eliminate them. The results from the evaluation can be used to assist DWPF in identifying improvement opportunities, to assist CBU in LRW strategic planning/tank space management, and to determine the project completion date for the Salt Processing Program.

CHANG, ROBERT

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

473

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Liquid Nitrogen and Fire!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antifreeze! Antifreeze! Previous Video (Liquid Nitrogen and Antifreeze!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery!) Liquid Nitrogen and the Tea Kettle Mystery! Liquid Nitrogen and Fire! A burning candle is placed in a container of liquid nitrogen! Filmed in front of a live studio audience. Well, they were live when we started... [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Steve: Now, then. I'm a little bit afraid to ask this next question because I think I already know the answer, but is anyone in here feeling a little... dangerous? You're willing to take a chance? Because I am willing to do an experiment they haven't let me do since 'The Incident.' Now, because of the danger, I cannot have a volunteer. I must do this on my

474

A new Diffractometer for Studies of Liquid-Liquid Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

We have designed a novel, dedicated diffractometer for surface x-ray scattering studies of liquid-liquid and liquid-gas interfaces for the PETRA III High Resolution Diffraction Beamline. Using a double crystal beam-tilter in Bragg geometry this new instrument enables reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction investigations without moving the sample, which is mechanically decoupled from the rest of the diffractometer. This design minimizes external excitation of surface vibrations, a key prerequisite for studies of liquid interfaces. The instrument operates over the energy range 6.4 keV to 30 keV, the higher energy range being optimal for penetration through liquid sample environments. Vertical momentum transfer up to q{sub z} 2.5 A{sup -1} and lateral q{sub ||} up to 4 A{sup -1}will be available.

Murphy, B. M.; Greve, M.; Runge, B.; Koops, C. T.; Elsen, A.; Stettner, J.; Magnussen, O. M. [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Seeck, O. H. [PETRA III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

475

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Cells vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconductors! Superconductors! Previous Video (Superconductors!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Oxygen and Fire!) Liquid Oxygen and Fire! Cells vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Let's say you've carelessly dunked your hand into a vat of liquid nitrogen and let it freeze solid. Every movie you've seen where this happens tells you that your hand will shatter like fine china should you bump it into something. If you're extremely careful, will your hand be okay once it thaws out? We'll explore this issue, using flower and onion cells rather than our hands! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: By now, we all know what happens when you place a flower in liquid

476

LITERATURE REVIEWS TO SUPPORT ION EXCHANGE TECHNOLOGY SELECTION FOR MODULAR SALT PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of literature reviews conducted to support the selection of a cesium removal technology for application in a small column ion exchange (SCIX) unit supported within a high level waste tank. SCIX is being considered as a technology for the treatment of radioactive salt solutions in order to accelerate closure of waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) technology development program. Two ion exchange materials, spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) and engineered Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST), are being considered for use within the SCIX unit. Both ion exchange materials have been studied extensively and are known to have high affinities for cesium ions in caustic tank waste supernates. RF is an elutable organic resin and CST is a non-elutable inorganic material. Waste treatment processes developed for the two technologies will differ with regard to solutions processed, secondary waste streams generated, optimum column size, and waste throughput. Pertinent references, anticipated processing sequences for utilization in waste treatment, gaps in the available data, and technical comparisons will be provided for the two ion exchange materials to assist in technology selection for SCIX. The engineered, granular form of CST (UOP IE-911) was the baseline ion exchange material used for the initial development and design of the SRS SCIX process (McCabe, 2005). To date, in-tank SCIX has not been implemented for treatment of radioactive waste solutions at SRS. Since initial development and consideration of SCIX for SRS waste treatment an alternative technology has been developed as part of the River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) Research and Technology program (Thorson, 2006). Spherical RF resin is the baseline media for cesium removal in the RPP-WTP, which was designed for the treatment of radioactive waste supernates and is currently under construction in Hanford, WA. Application of RF for cesium removal in the Hanford WTP does not involve in-riser columns but does utilize the resin in large scale column configurations in a waste treatment facility. The basic conceptual design for SCIX involves the dissolution of saltcake in SRS Tanks 1-3 to give approximately 6 M sodium solutions and the treatment of these solutions for cesium removal using one or two columns supported within a high level waste tank. Prior to ion exchange treatment, the solutions will be filtered for removal of entrained solids. In addition to Tanks 1-3, solutions in two other tanks (37 and 41) will require treatment for cesium removal in the SCIX unit. The previous SCIX design (McCabe, 2005) utilized CST for cesium removal with downflow supernate processing and included a CST grinder following cesium loading. Grinding of CST was necessary to make the cesium-loaded material suitable for vitrification in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Because RF resin is elutable (and reusable) and processing requires conversion between sodium and hydrogen forms using caustic and acidic solutions more liquid processing steps are involved. The WTP baseline process involves a series of caustic and acidic solutions (downflow processing) with water washes between pH transitions across neutral. In addition, due to resin swelling during conversion from hydrogen to sodium form an upflow caustic regeneration step is required. Presumably, one of these basic processes (or some variation) will be utilized for MSP for the appropriate ion exchange technology selected. CST processing involves two primary waste products: loaded CST and decontaminated salt solution (DSS). RF processing involves three primary waste products: spent RF resin, DSS, and acidic cesium eluate, although the resin is reusable and typically does not require replacement until completion of multiple treatment cycles. CST processing requires grinding of the ion exchange media, handling of solids with high cesium loading, and handling of liquid wash and conditioning solutions. RF processing requires h

King, W

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Lead, zinc, and strontium in limestone cap rock from Tatum salt dome, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

Limestone cap rock at Tatum salt dome, Mississippi, contains disseminated pyrite, sphalerite, and galena, and disseminated to massive amounts of strontianite (SrCO/sub 3/) and celestite (SrSO/sub 4/). Sulfide minerals are locally present in bitumen-rich areas of the upper, massive portion of the limestone cap rock, whereas strontium minerals are disseminated throughout this zone. However, sulfide and strontium minerals are most abundant in the lower banded portion of the limestone cap rock, which consists of alternating subhorizontal light and dark-colored bands. The dark bands are composed of calcite of variable grain size, sulfides, quartz, dolomite, albite, and up to 1% bitumen that apparently formed by the biodegradation of crude oil. Lighter bands are composed of variable amounts of coarsely crystalline, euhedral calcite, strontianite, and celestite resulting in strontium (Sr) contents of up to 30% locally. Banded limestone cap rock at Tatum dome formed at the top of the actively dissolving anhydrite zone by a combination of sulfate reduction and oxidation of liquid hydrocarbons by bacteria to cause the precipitation of calcite and sulfide minerals and the accumulation of insoluble residue from the anhydrite (quartz, albite, dolomite). Lead and zinc in the sulfide minerals could have been derived from the dissolving anhydrite, but the abundance of Sr minerals present requires an external source. Present-day oil field brines in central Mississippi contain up to 3000 ppm Sr, and basin brines of similar composition apparently contributed Sr to the cap-rock environment during formation.

Saunders, J.A.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Uncertainty Studies of Real Anode Surface Area in Computational Analysis for Molten Salt Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 hours of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

Sungyeol Choi; Jaeyeong Park; Robert O. Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson; Kwang-Rag Kim; Il Soon Hwang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Enhanced liquid hydrocarbon recovery process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for recovering liquid hydrocarbons. It comprises: injecting into a fractured subterranean formation a polymer enhanced foam comprising a polymer selected from a synthetic polymer or a biopolymer, a surfactant, an aqueous solvent and a gas, recovering liquid hydrocarbons from the formation.

Sydansk, R.D.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

480

Laboratory solvent reuse -- Liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to develop a method for reduction of waste solvent in the Process Engineering Chemistry Laboratory. The liquid chromatographs are the largest generators of explosive-contaminated waste in the laboratory. We developed a successful process for the reuse of solvents from the liquid chromatographs and demonstrated the utility of the process in the assay of hexanitrostilbene.

Quinlin, W.T.; Schaffer, C.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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