Sample records for liquid crystal displays

  1. A microprocessor driven liquid crystal graphics display for aircraft use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzke, Lee Howard

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete graphics system for use in modular avionics is built around a liquid crystal flat panel display. Screen refresh is handled by display controller that provides a bit mapped representation of the display in RAM. ...

  2. Low voltage blue-phase liquid crystal displays Linghui Rao,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Low voltage blue-phase liquid crystal displays Linghui Rao,1 Zhibing Ge,1 Shin-Tson Wu,1,a of the emerging blue-phase liquid crystal displays BP-LCDs . Simulation results indicate that the generated-effect-induced isotropic-to-anisotropic transition in blue-phase liquid crystal BPLC 1­6 has potential to become next

  3. Application of Nanotechnology to liquid crystal displays H S Kwok, Z L Xie and Fion Yeung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of Nanotechnology to liquid crystal displays H S Kwok, Z L Xie and Fion Yeung Center shall report new results on the application of nanotechnology to LCD. Specifically we shall discuss as the alignment layer. Summary We describe here two experiments on the application of nanotechnology to liquid

  4. Measurement of reflective liquid crystal displays S. T. Tang and H. S. Kwoka)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of reflective liquid crystal displays S. T. Tang and H. S. Kwoka) Department . Existing measurement methods only apply to transmittive LC cells. These methods are obviously unsuitable for measuring the cell gaps of reflective LCDs with internal reflectors. This kind of LCD includes single

  5. 2002 ~OE10 Chinese Journal of Liquid Crystals and Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P : system on panel) ¸ø...­--L~¡£ ,¿¤,,,,§»fl ( SPC : solid2phase crystallization) ¡¢...·.../,,§»fl ( ELC~L­,",, , ­,,,,· ,¶l...~ø¨--»°fi·º¡££,,~ SPC TFT ¨·°°­......°i ,«° ¨­^¶¨, ,¶l§»fl´¶¨..." 600) ·´'l~ TFT ...?­¤ [2 ] ¡£......°i°°"·^»~¢ oe·¡£ TFT ~--°^¯£,,~ SPC TFT¡£«°...~¨­ª° © 1995-2005 Tsinghua

  6. Emerging Polymer-Stabilized Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Display Jin Yan, Hui-Cheng Cheng, Linghui Rao, Takahiro Ishinabe and Shin-Tson Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Emerging Polymer-Stabilized Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Display Jin Yan, Hui-Cheng Cheng, Linghui Rao, FL 32816, USA ABSTRACT Polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystals hold great potential for future display applications. Some technical challenges, such as blue-phase temperature range, operation voltage

  7. Plastic substrates for active matrix liquid crystal display incapable of withstanding processing temperature of over 200.degree. C and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Havens, John (San Diego, CA); Jones, Phil (Marlborough, GB)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright-polarizer-free, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) are formed on plastic substrates. The primary components of the display are a pixel circuit fabricated on one plastic substrate, an intervening liquid-crystal material, and a counter electrode on a second plastic substrate. The-pixel circuit contains one or more thin-film transistors (TFTs) and either a transparent or reflective pixel electrode manufactured at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid damage to the plastic substrate. Fabrication of the TFTs can be carried out at temperatures less than 100.degree. C. The liquid crystal material is a commercially made nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) film. The counter electrode is comprised of a plastic substrate coated with a transparent conductor, such as indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). By coupling the active matrix with NCAP, a high-information content can be provided in a bright, fully plastic package. Applications include any low cost portable electronics containing flat displays where ruggedization of the display is desired.

  8. Plastic substrates for active matrix liquid crystal display incapable of withstanding processing temperature of over 200 C and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Havens, J.H.; Jones, P.

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright-polarizer-free, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) are formed on plastic substrates. The primary components of the display are a pixel circuit fabricated on one plastic substrate, an intervening liquid-crystal material, and a counter electrode on a second plastic substrate. The-pixel circuit contains one or more thin-film transistors (TFTs) and either a transparent or reflective pixel electrode manufactured at sufficiently low temperatures to avoid damage to the plastic substrate. Fabrication of the TFTs can be carried out at temperatures less than 100 C. The liquid crystal material is a commercially made nematic curvilinear aligned phase (NCAP) film. The counter electrode is comprised of a plastic substrate coated with a transparent conductor, such as indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). By coupling the active matrix with NCAP, a high-information content can be provided in a bright, fully plastic package. Applications include any low cost portable electronics containing flat displays where ruggedization of the display is desired. 12 figs.

  9. Leaching of indium from obsolete liquid crystal displays: Comparing grinding with electrical disintegration in context of LCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodbiba, Gjergj, E-mail: dodbiba@sys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of System Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Nagai, Hiroki; Wang Lipang; Okaya, Katsunori; Fujita, Toyohisa [Department of System Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two pre-treatment methods, prior to leaching of indium from obsolete LCD modules, were described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional grinding and electrical disintegration have been evaluated and compared in the context of LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental data on the leaching capacity for indium and the electricity consumption of equipment were inputted into the LCA model in order to compare the environmental performance of each method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An estimate for the environmental performance was calculated as the sum of six impact categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical disintegration method outperforms conventional grinding in all impact categories. - Abstract: In order to develop an effective recycling system for obsolete Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs), which would enable both the leaching of indium (In) and the recovery of a pure glass fraction for recycling, an effective liberation or size-reduction method would be an important pre-treatment step. Therefore, in this study, two different types of liberation methods: (1) conventional grinding, and (2) electrical disintegration have been tested and evaluated in the context of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). In other words, the above-mentioned methods were compared in order to find out the one that ensures the highest leaching capacity for indium, as well as the lowest environmental burden. One of the main findings of this study was that the electrical disintegration was the most effective liberation method, since it fully liberated the indium containing-layer, ensuring a leaching capacity of 968.5 mg-In/kg-LCD. In turn, the estimate for the environmental burden was approximately five times smaller when compared with the conventional grinding.

  10. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  11. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft 1ft prototype panels for the worlds first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicrons patented e-Tint technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power consumption by ALCWs allows for on-board power electronics for automatic matching of transmission through windows to varying climate conditions without drawing the power from the power grid. ALCWs are capable of transmitting more sunlight in winters to assist in heating and less sunlight in summers to minimize overheating. As such, they can change the window from being a source of energy loss to a source of energy gain. In addition, the scalable AMIs roll-to-roll process, proved by making 1ft 1ftALCW prototype panels, allows for cost-effective production of large-scale window panels along with capability to change easily their color and shape. In addition to architectural glazing in houses and commercial buildings, ALCWs can be used in other applications where control of sunlight is needed, such as green houses, used by commercial produce growers and botanical gardens, cars, aircrafts, etc.

  12. Singular Limits in Polymer Stabilized Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-31-00T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate equilibrium configurations for a polymer stabilized liquid crys- tal material ... eling the cross section of the liquid crystal-polymer fiber composite.

  13. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Hoyt, Andrea E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides (1) curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 where R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are radicals selected from the group consisting of maleimide, substituted maleimide, nadimide, substituted naimide, ethynyl, and (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 where R.sup.3 is hydrogen with the proviso that the two carbon atoms of (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 are bound on the aromatic ring of A.sup.1 or A.sup.3 to adjacent carbon atoms, A.sup.1 and A.sup.3 are 1,4-phenylene and the same where said group contains one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, or propyl, alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, A.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of 1,4-phenylene, 4,4'-biphenyl, 2,6-naphthylene and the same where said groups contain one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro, lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, and propyl, lower alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl or fluoroalkoxy, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, and B.sup.1 and B.sup.2 are selected from the group consisting of --C(O)--O-- and --O--C(O)--, (2) thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions comprised of heat-cured segments derived from monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 as described above, (3) curable blends of at least two of the polyester monomers and (4) processes of preparing the curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers.

  14. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  15. Photorefractivity in polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiederrecht, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer-stabilized liquid crystals, consisting of low concentrations of a polymeric electron acceptor, are shown to exhibit significantly enhanced photorefractive properties. The charge generation and transport properties of these composite systems are strongly modified from nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donors and acceptors. The new composites are produced by polymerizing a small quantity of a 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide electron acceptor functionalized with an acrylate group in an aligned nematic liquid crystal. Photopolymerization creates an anisotropic gel-like medium in which the liquid crystal is free to reorient in the presence of a space charge field, while maintaining charge trapping sites in the polymerized regions of the material. The presence of these trapping sites results in the observation of longer lived, higher resolution holographic gratings in the polymer-stabilized liquid crystals than observed in nematic liquid crystals alone. These gratings display Bragg regime diffraction. Asymmetric beam coupling, photo-conductivity, and four-wave mixing experiments are performed to characterize the photophysics of these novel materials.

  16. Liquid crystal device and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Gu, Mingxia; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a liquid crystal device and method thereof. Subsequent to applying a first electrical voltage on a liquid crystal to induce a reorientation of the liquid crystal, a second electrical voltage with proper polarity is applied on the liquid crystal to assist the relaxation of the reorientation that was induced by the first electrical voltage. The "switch-off" phase of the liquid crystal can therefore be accelerated or temporally shortened, and the device can exhibit better performance such as fast response to on/off signals. The invention can be widely used LCD, LC shutter, LC lens, spatial light modulator, telecommunication device, tunable filter, beam steering device, and electrically driven LC device, among others.

  17. antiferroelectric liquid crystals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of phases in antiferroelectric liquid crystals Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: The free energy of antiferroelectric liquid crystal which takes into account polar order...

  18. antiferroelectric liquid crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of phases in antiferroelectric liquid crystals Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: The free energy of antiferroelectric liquid crystal which takes into account polar order...

  19. Shearing Flows in Liquid Crystal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Timothy

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . The director field is the realization of local averaging to de- scribe the natural state in a nematic liquid crystal, Figure 1.1. For any natural alignment of the liquid crystal, n?, one prescribes that W (n?,?n?) = 0. Since the director field is used... derivative of h by the formula D Dt h(t,x) = ?h? t +(u ~?)h. The acceleration is of the liquid crystal material through the point x is given by a(t,x) = Du Dt . Following the classical approach one assumes that for every open subset Wt ??, trav- eling along...

  20. Semiconductor liquid crystal composition and methods for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Li, Liang-shi

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor liquid crystal compositions and methods for making such compositions are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention is directed to a liquid crystal composition including a solvent and semiconductor particles in the solvent. The solvent and the semiconductor particles are in an effective amount in the liquid crystal composition to form a liquid crystal phase.

  1. Liquid crystal variable retarders in atomic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furst, J.E.; Yu, D.H.; Hayes, P.A.; DSouza, C.M.; Williams, J.F. [Physics Department, Centre for Atomic, Molecular, and Surface Physics, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands. WA. 6907 (Australia)] [Physics Department, Centre for Atomic, Molecular, and Surface Physics, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands. WA. 6907 (Australia)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applications of liquid crystal variable retarders in the production of spin-polarized electrons and in the determination of the polarization of optical radiation from atoms excited by polarized electrons are discussed. The advantages of using liquid crystal variable retarders in the measurement of Stokes parameters are insensitivity to the incident photon direction, large transmission diameter, variable retardation over large wavelength range without mechanical movement, and {ital in} {ital situ} calibration. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiederrecht, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Galili, T.; Levanon, H. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Physical Chemistry

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  3. Anisotropic wave propagation in nematic liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Biscari; Antonio DiCarlo; Stefano S. Turzi

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the fact that quantitative experimental data have been available for more than forty years now, nematoacoustics still poses intriguing theoretical and experimental problems. In this paper, we prove that the main observed features of acoustic wave propagation through a nematic liquid crystal cell -- namely, the anisotropy of sound velocity and its frequency dependence -- may be plausibly explained by a first-gradient continuum theory characterized by a hyperelastic anisotropic response from an evolving relaxed configuration. We compare and contrast our proposal with a competing theory where the liquid crystal is modeled as an isotropically compressible, anisotropic second-gradient fluid.

  4. Discotic Liquid Crystals and Polymersomes: Molecule Goniometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ya-Wen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................ 6 1.2.4 Discotic Liquid Crystals ................................................... 9 1.2.5 Microfluidics .................................................................... 11 1.3. Dissertation Outline... ........................................................... 15 2.1.2 Di-block Copolymers, Lipids, and Particles .................... 15 2.1.3 Reactive Fluorophores ...................................................... 16 2.1.4 Surface Functionalization Chemicals...

  5. Liquid crystals and Q-tensors The free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    Liquid crystals and Q-tensors The free energy A temperature-dependent model Mathematical results #12;Liquid crystals and Q-tensors The free energy A temperature-dependent model Mathematical results, Non-isothermal nematic liquid crystals flows with the Ball-Majumdar free energy, Ann. Mat. Pura Appl

  6. Stretchable liquid crystal blue phase gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Castles; S. M. Morris; J. M. C. Hung; M. M. Qasim; A. D. Wright; S. Nosheen; S. S. Choi; B. I. Outram; S. J. Elston; C. Burgess; L. Hill; T. D. Wilkinson; H. J. Coles

    2014-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystalline polymers are materials of considerable scientific interest and technological value to society [1-3]. An important subset of such materials exhibit rubber-like elasticity; these can combine the remarkable optical properties of liquid crystals with the favourable mechanical properties of rubber and, further, exhibit behaviour not seen in either type of material independently [2]. Many of their properties depend crucially on the particular mesophase employed. Stretchable liquid crystalline polymers have previously been demonstrated in the nematic, chiral nematic, and smectic mesophases [2,4]. Here were report the fabrication of a stretchable gel of blue phase I, which forms a self-assembled, three-dimensional photonic crystal that may have its optical properties manipulated by an applied strain and, further, remains electro-optically switchable under a moderate applied voltage. We find that, unlike its undistorted counterpart, a mechanically deformed blue phase exhibits a Pockels electro-optic effect, which sets out new theoretical challenges and new possibilities for low-voltage electro-optic devices.

  7. Electric field effects in liquid crystals with dielectric dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D. [Kent State University

    2014-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is focused on the experimental and theoretical exploration of the coupling of an externally applied electric field and a nematic liquid crystal.

  8. Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals: a tutorial [Invited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals: a tutorial [Invited] Jin Yan and Shin-Tson Wu@mail.ucf.edu Abstract: Blue phase liquid crystals exhibit several attractive features, such as self-assembled three, and submillisecond response time. This tutorial gives step-by-step introduction on basic blue- phase materials

  9. Switchable Fresnel lens using polymer-stabilized liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Switchable Fresnel lens using polymer-stabilized liquid crystals Yun-Hsing Fan, Hongwen Ren@mail.ucf.edu http:/lcd.creol.ucf.edu Abstract: A switchable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using a polymer controllable liquid crystal Fresnel lens," Proc. SPIE 1168, 352-357 (1989). 2. J. S. Patel and K. Rastani

  10. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, S.D.; Marshall, K.L.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite optical devices are disclosed using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device. 7 figures.

  11. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Stephen D. (Pittsford, NY); Marshall, Kenneth L. (Henrietta, NY); Cerqua, Kathleen A. (Fairport, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite optical devices using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device.

  12. ac-plasma display panel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: crystal, 12;ferro-electric liquid crystal, plasma panel, and light emitting diode displays. In our, they are presently only available in developer kits. Light...

  13. White light emitting diode as liquid crystal display backlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soon, Chian Myau

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of high brightness (white) light emitting diode (LED) is considered as a real threat to the current lighting industry in various applications. One of the most promising sectors would be using white LED to ...

  14. HIGH BIREFRINGENCE NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTALS FOR DISPLAY AND TELECOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    . An appropriate selection of the fluorine atom's position can lower the viscosity, reduce melting points, depress, isothiocyanato (NCS) terminal group was introduced. Another goal of this study was reduction of melting point applications because of lowest absorption and light efficiency. To steer a k 1.55 mm laser beam, the required

  15. Liquid crystal-enabled electroosmosis through spatial charge separation in distorted regions as a novel mechanism of electrokinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israel Lazo; Chenhui Peng; Jie Xiang; Sergij V. Shiyanovskii; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically-controlled dynamics of fluids and particles at microscales is a fascinating area of research with applications ranging from microfluidics and sensing to sorting of biomolecules. The driving mechanisms are electric forces acting on spatially separated charges in an isotropic medium such as water. Here we demonstrate that anisotropic conductivity of liquid crystals enables new mechanism of highly efficient electro-osmosis rooted in space charging of regions with distorted orientation. The electric field acts on these distortion-separated charges to induce liquid crystal-enabled electro-osmosis (LCEO). LCEO velocities grow with the square of the field, which allows one to use an AC field to drive steady flows and to avoid electrode damage. Ionic currents in liquid crystals that have been traditionally considered as an undesirable feature in displays, offer a broad platform for versatile applications such as liquid crystal enabled electrokinetics, micropumping and mixing.

  16. JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2013 87 Time-Multiplexed Dual-View Display Using a Blue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Using a Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Jian-Peng Cui, Yan Li, Jin Yan, Hui-Chuan Cheng, and Qiong-Hua Wang Abstract--A time-multiplexed dual-view display device using a blue phase liquid crystal is proposed. In this design, a vertical field switching blue phase liquid crystal display (VFS-BPLCD) panel is used to achieve

  17. Enhancing cholesteric liquid crystal laser performance using a cholesteric reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    laser based on a free- standing film of photo polymerized cholesteric liquid crystal," Appl. Phys. Lett as an optic fiber-based temperature sensor," Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2691-2693 (2004). 15. Y. Huang, Y. Zhou

  18. Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Thermotropic Liquid Crystal Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jun Young

    This paper focuses on the fabrication via simple melt blending of thermotropic liquid crystal polyester (TLCP) nanocomposites reinforced with a very small quantity of modified carbon nanotube (CNT) and the unique effects ...

  19. Liquid crystal devices especially for use in liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Kenneth L. (Rochester, NY)

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) systems that can provide real-time, phase-shifting interferograms that are useful in the characterization of static optical properties (wavefront aberrations, lensing, or wedge) in optical elements or dynamic, time-resolved events (temperature fluctuations and gradients, motion) in physical systems use improved LCPDI cells that employ a "structured" substrate or substrates in which the structural features are produced by thin film deposition or photo resist processing to provide a diffractive element that is an integral part of the cell substrate(s). The LC material used in the device may be doped with a "contrast-compensated" mixture of positive and negative dichroic dyes.

  20. LIQUID CRYSTAL THERMOGRAPHY ON THE FLUID SOLID INTERFACE OF ROTATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    = Aluminum c = centrifugal lc = liquid crystal o = aerodynamic wall friction related p = at constant pressu

  1. Polarization controllable Fresnel lens using dye-doped liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Polarization controllable Fresnel lens using dye- doped liquid crystals Tsung-Hsien Lin,1,2 Yuhua controllable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using a photo-induced alignment of the dye-doped liquid. X. Ren, S. Liu, and X. Zhang, "Fabrication of off-axis holographic Fresnel lens used as multiplexer

  2. NMR STUDIES OF LIQUID CRYSTALS AND MOLECULES DISSOLVED IN LIQUID CRYSTAL SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drobny, G.P.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes several studies in which nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure, orientation and dynamics of liquid crystal mesogens and molecules dissolved in liquid crystalline phases. In addition, a modern high field nmr spectrometer is described which has been used to perform such nmr studies. Chapter 1 introduces the quantum mechanical formalisms used throughout this thesis and briefly reviews the fundamentals of nuclear spin physics and pulsed nmr spectroscopy. First the density operator is described and a specific form for the canonical ensemble is derived. Then Clebsch-Gordon coefficients, Wigner rotation matrices, and irreducible tensor operators are reviewed. An expression for the equilibrium (Curie) magnetization is obtained and the linear response of a spin system to a strong pulsed r.f. irradiation is described. Finally, the spin interaction Hamiltonians relevant to this work are reviewed together with their truncated forms. Chapter 2 is a deuterium magnetic resonance study of two 'nom' liquid crystals which possess several low temperature mesomorphic phases. Specifically, deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy is used to determine the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules in smectic phases, the changes in molecular orientation and motion that occur at smectic-smectic phase transitions, and the order of the phase transitions. For both compounds, the phase sequence is determined to be isotropic, nematic, smectic A, smectic C, smectic B{sub A}, smectic B{sub C}, and crystalline. The structure of the smectic A phase is found to be consistent with the well-known model of a two dimensional liquid in which molecules are rapidly rotating about their long axes and oriented at right angles to the plane of the layers. Molecules in the smectic C phase are found to have their long axes tilted with respect to the layer normal, and the tilt angle is temperature dependent, increasing from zero at the smectic A - smectic C transition and reaching a maximum at 9{sup o} at the smectic C - smectic B{sub A} transition. This finding contradicts the results of X-ray diffraction studies which indicate that the tilt angle is 18{sup o} and temperature independent. The smectic B{sub A} - smectic B{sub C} phase transition is observed for the first time, and is found to be first order, a result that contradicts the prediction of a mean theory by McMillian. Chapter 3 is a multiple quantum nmr study of n-hexane oriented in a nematic liquid crystal solvent. The basic three pulse multiple quantum experiment is discussed which enables the observation of transitions for which |{Delta}m|>1, and then the technique of the separation of multiple quantum orders by phase incrementation in the multiple quantum evolution period is reviewed (TPPI). An explicit example of multiple quantum nmr is given by the calculation of the multiple quantum spectrum of an oriented methyl group.

  3. The ImmersaDesk3 -Experiences With A Flat Panel Display for Virtual Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Andrew

    crystal, #12;ferro-electric liquid crystal, plasma panel, and light emitting diode displays. In our, they are presently only available in developer kits. Light Emitting Diode displays are bright and potentially

  4. Polarization fields: dynamic light field display using multi-layer LCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanman, Douglas

    We introduce polarization field displays as an optically-efficient design for dynamic light field display using multi-layered LCDs. Such displays consist of a stacked set of liquid crystal panels with a single pair of ...

  5. Long DNA molecule as a pseudoscalar liquid crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Petrosyan; Chin-Kun Hu

    2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a long DNA molecule can form a novel condensed phase of matter, the pseudoscalar liquid crystal, that consists of aperiodically ordered DNA fragments in right-handed B and left-handed Z forms. We discuss the possibility of transformation of B-DNA into Z-DNA and vice versa via first-order phase transitions as well as transformations from the phase with zero total chirality into pure B- or Z-DNA samples through second-order phase transitions. The presented minimalistic phenomenological model describes the pseudoscalar liquid crystal phase of DNA and the phase transition phenomena. We point out to a possibility that a pseudoscalar liquid nano-crystal can be assembled via DNA-programming.

  6. Nanoparticle-chiral nematic liquid crystal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Jeffrey C. (Jeffrey Christopher), 1981-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of the fabrication of a one-dimensional photonic crystal without time-reversal and space-inversion symmetries was pursued. Theoretical studies predict that such a system would exhibit unusual optical ...

  7. Equilibrium configurations of nematic liquid crystals on a torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Segatti; Michael Snarski; Marco Veneroni

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The topology and the geometry of a surface play a fundamental role in determining the equilibrium configurations of thin films of liquid crystals. We propose here a theoretical analysis of a recently introduced surface Frank energy, in the case of two-dimensional nematic liquid crystals coating a toroidal particle. Our aim is to show how a different modeling of the effect of extrinsic curvature acts as a selection principle among equilibria of the classical energy, and how new configurations emerge. In particular, our analysis predicts the existence of new stable equilibria with complex windings.

  8. Non-polar Flexoelectrooptic Effect in Blue Phase Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Outram; S. J. Elston; F. Castles; M. M. Qasim; H. Coles; H. -Y. Chen; S. -F. Lu

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Blue phase liquid crystals are not usually considered to exhibit a flexoelectrooptic effect, due to the polar nature of flexoelectric switching and the cubic or amorphous structure of blue phases. Here, we derive the form of the flexoelectric contribution to the Kerr constant of blue phases, and experimentally demonstrate and measure the separate contributions to the Kerr constant arising from flexoelectric and dielectric effects. Hence, a non-polar flexoelectrooptic effect is demonstrated in blue phase liquid crystals, which will have consequences for the engineering of novel blue-phase electrooptic technology.

  9. Graphene and chiral nematic liquid crystals: a focus on lasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Ammar; Kamarudin, Muhammad Akmal; Kidambi, Piran; Hofmann, Stephan; Wilkinson, Tim; Qasim, Malik

    2015-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and chiral nematic liquid crystals: a focus on lasing Journal: RSC Advances Manuscript ID: RA-ART-05-2015-009415.R1 Article Type: Paper Date Submitted by the Author: 11-Jun-2015 Complete List of Authors: Khan, Ammar... margins Please do not adjust margins Received 00th January 20xx, Accepted 00th January 20xx DOI: 10.1039/x0xx00000x www.rsc.org/ Graphene and chiral nematic liquid crystals: a focus on lasing Ammar A. Khana, Muhammad A. Kamarudina, Piran. R...

  10. Soluble fullerene derivative in liquid crystal: polymer composites and their impact on photorefractive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Soluble fullerene derivative in liquid crystal: polymer composites and their impact photorefractive efficiency in polymer liquid crystal composites in comparison to previous works on similar) and containing a conducting polymer matrix, such as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) doped with N

  11. Liquid Crystal Optics and Photonics CPHY Assignment 2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Liquid Crystal Optics and Photonics CPHY 74495 Assignment 2. P. Paly-Muhoray Jan. 24, 2014 Due: Feb 4, 2014 1. Read pages 25 - 37 of the text (Guenther, Modern Optics). 2. Read Ch 2., Review of Electricity and Magnetism (http://mpaly.lci.kent.edu/optics) 3. Red light with wavelength = 632:8nm

  12. Blow up criterion for incompressible nematic liquid crystal flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guochun Wu

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the short time classical solution to a simplified hydrodynamic flow modeling incompressible, nematic liquid crystal materials in dimension three. We establish a criterion for possible breakdown of such solutions at a finite time. More precisely, if $(u,d)$ is smooth up to time $T$ provided that $\\int_0^T|\

  13. A MOLECULAR THEORY OF SURFACE TENSION IN NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1187 A MOLECULAR THEORY OF SURFACE TENSION IN NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTALS J. D. PARSONS Departamento de 1976, accepte le 10 mai 1976) Rsum. - On calcule la tension superficielle la surface libre d le plan de la surface; b) il y a un saut de la tension de surface la transition nmatique

  14. Role of dye structure in photoinduced reorientation of dye-doped liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    -doped nematic liquid crystals has been measured for a homologous set of dyes belonging to the anthraquinone

  15. Second and Fourth Harmonic Frequencies in Electric Field-Induced Liquid Crystal Reorientations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Second and Fourth Harmonic Frequencies in Electric Field-Induced Liquid Crystal Reorientations of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA The second and fourth harmonics of low frequency electric field-optical modulation; liquid crystal; second and fourth harmonics 1. INTRODUCTION Nematic liquid crystal (LC) has been

  16. Generation of vector beams with liquid crystal disclination lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miha ?an?ula; Miha Ravnik; Slobodan umer

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that guiding light beams, ranging from continuous beams to femtosecond pulses, along liquid crystal defect lines can transform them into vector beams with various polarization profiles. Using Finite Difference Time Domain numerical solving of Maxwell equations, we confirm that the defect in the orientational order of the liquid crystal induces a defect in the light field with twice the winding number of the liquid crystal defect, coupling the topological invariants of both fields. For example, it is possible to transform uniformly-polarized light into light with a radial polarization profile. Our approach also correctly yields a zero-intensity region near the defect core, which is always present in areas of discontinuous light polarization or phase. Using circularly polarized incident light, we show that defects with non-integer winding numbers can be obtained, where topological constants are preserved by phase vortices, demonstrating coupling between the light's spin, orbital angular momentum and polarization profile. Further, we find an ultrafast femtosecond laser pulse travelling along a defect line splits into multiple intensity regions, again depending on the defect's winding number, allowing applications in beam steering and filtering. Finally, our approach describing generation of complex optical fields via coupling with topological defect lines in optically birefringent nematic fluids can be easily extended to high-intensity beams that affect nematic ordering.

  17. On the Disclination Lines of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yucheng Hu; Yang Qu; Pingwen Zhang

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Defects in liquid crystals are of great practical importance and theoretical interest. Despite tremendous efforts, predicting the location and transition of defects under various topological constraint and external field remains to be a challenge. We investigate defect patterns of nematic liquid crystals confined in three-dimensional spherical droplet and two-dimensional disk under different boundary conditions, within the Landau-de Gennes model. We implement a spectral method that numerically solves the Landau-de Gennes model with high accuracy, which allows us to study the detailed static structure of defects. We observe five types of defect structures. Among them the 1/2-disclination lines are the most stable structure at low temperature. Inspired by numerical results, we obtain the profile of disclination lines analytically. Moreover, the connection and difference between defect patterns under the Landau-de Gennes model and the Oseen-Frank model are discussed. Finally, four conjectures are made to summarize some important characteristics of defects in the Landau-de Gennes theory. This work is a continuing effort to deepen our understanding on defect patterns in nematic liquid crystals.

  18. Dye-Induced Enhancement of Optical Nonlinearity in Liquids and Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenster, R.; Jarasch, M.; Zhuang, X.; Shen, Y. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical nonlinearity of liquid crystals (LC) in the isotropic phase can be enhanced by 1 order of magnitude by dissolving 0.1{percent} of anthraquinone dye in the LC. The enhancement decreases by {approximately}30{percent} when the LC transforms into the nematic phase. The same guest-host effect also exists in non-LC liquids. It can be explained by a model based on the change of guest-host interaction induced by optical excitations of the dye. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Millisecond time resolution neutron reflection from a nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalgliesh, R.M.; Lau, Y.G.J.; Richardson, R.M.; Riley, D.J. [ISIS Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The director reorientation of the liquid crystal 4,4' octyl cyanobiphenyl in the nematic phase under application of bursts of ac field have been observed using time-resolved neutron scattering in reflection geometry. The relaxation of the director has been shown to agree with existing theory, as determined by material and cell parameters. This result shows that it is possible to use neutron reflection measurements from buried interfaces to follow kinetic processes on a time scale comparable with the pulse length of the ISIS neutron source (20 ms)

  20. Ultra-high-resolution time projection chambers with liquid crystal backplanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monreal, Benjamin

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the possibility of incorporating a liquid-crystal device into a gas ionization detector. After extensive R&D on several candidate liquid-crystal technologies, we developed some novel materials allowing twisted nematic liquid-crystal layers to be coupled directly to gas ionization counters. However, the resulting structures were unsuitable for large-scale or practical use. We tested several technologies known to result in mechanically-robust liquid crystal electrooptic layers, but found poor behavior in the detector context.

  1. Generation of harmonics and supercontinuum in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyushkov, B N; Trashkeev, S I; Klementyev, Vasilii M; Pivtsov, V S; Kobtsev, Sergey M

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical properties of nematic liquid crystals (NLC) have been investigated. A technique for efficient laser frequency conversion in a microscopic NLC volume deposited on an optical fibre end face is experimentally demonstrated. An efficient design of a compact NLC-based IR frequency converter with a fibre input and achromatic collimator is proposed and implemented. Simultaneous generation of the second and third harmonics is obtained for the first time under pumping NLC by a 1.56-mm femtosecond fibre laser. The second-harmonic generation efficiency is measured to be about 1 %, while the efficiency of third-harmonic generation is several tenths of percent. A strong polarisation dependence of the third-harmonic generation efficiency is revealed. When pumping NLC by a cw laser, generation of spectral supercontinua (covering the visible and near-IR spectral ranges) is observed. The nonlinear effects revealed can be due to the light-induced change in the orientational order in liquid crystals, which breaks the initial symmetry and leads to formation of disclination structures. The NLC optical nonlinearity is believed to be of mixed orientationalelectronic nature as a whole. (laser optics 2012)

  2. Correlation functions in liquids and crystals : Free energy functional and liquid - crystal transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atul S. Bharadwaj; Swarn L. Singh; Yashwant Singh

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A free energy functional for a crystal that contains both the symmetry conserved and symmetry broken parts of the direct pair correlation function has been used to investigate the crystallization of fluids in three-dimensions. The symmetry broken part of the direct pair correlation function has been calculated using a series in ascending powers of the order parameters and which contains three- and higher-bodies direct correlation functions of the isotropic phase. It is shown that a very accurate description of freezing transitions for a wide class of potentials is found by considering the first two terms of this series. The results found for freezing parameters including structure of the frozen phase for fluids interacting via the inverse power potential u(r) = \\epsilon (\\sigma/r)^{n} for n ranging from 4 to \\infty are in very good agreement with simulation results. It is found that for n > 6.5 the fluid freezes into a face centred cubic (fcc) structure while for n \\leq 6 the body centred cubic (bcc) structure is preferred. The fluid-bcc-fcc triple point is found to be at 1/n = 0.158 which is in good agreement with simulation result.

  3. CdS MINERALIZATION OF HEXAGONAL, LAMELLAR, AND CUBIC LYOTROPIC LIQUID CRYSTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    a nanostructure with hexagonal symmetry, a lamellar liquid crystal yielded a lamellar nano- structure, and a cubic liquid crystal (consisting of spherical micelles) yielded a hollow, spherical product. The product grown of the cubic phase yielded hollow spheres of CdS, 20­100 nm in diameter, 1­5 times the diameter of the micelles

  4. Direction controllable linearly polarized laser from a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Direction controllable linearly polarized laser from a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal Ying demonstrate a direction controllable linearly polarized laser from a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC superposition of two orthogonal polarization states, the output laser light becomes linearly polarized and its

  5. Novel Cholesteric Glassy Liquid Crystals Comprising Benzene Functionalized with Hybrid Chiral-Nematic Mesogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shaw H.

    of Chemical Engineering, UniVersity of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1212, and Laboratory for Laser reported herein. Films of the 1,3,5-trisubstituted and meta-disubstituted systems show a selective, including liquid crystals, tend to crystallize upon cooling through the melting point, Tm. Crystallization

  6. The OCT-Penlight: In-Situ Image Display for Guiding Microsurgery Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stetten, George

    emitting diode (OLED) display and a reflective liquid crystal display (LCD). The OLED has the advantage surgical access. The two prototypes constructed thus far have used, respectively, a miniature organic light

  7. 4.1: Rollable Reflective Multicolor Cholesteric Displays Haiqing Xianyu, Tsung-Hsien Lin, and Shin-Tson Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    reactive mesogen and none reactive cholesteric liquid crystal is observed. The electrically undulated display application. Blue Shift in Cholesteric Reactive Mesogen The electrically controllable blue shift: A rollable reflective multicolor display using an electrically tunable blue shift of both cholesteric

  8. Nematic ordering of topological defects in active liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand U. Oza; Jrn Dunkel

    2015-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying the ordering principles of intracellular matter is key to understanding the physics of microbiological systems. Recent experiments show that ATP-driven microtubule-kinesin bundles can form non-equilibrium networks of liquid-crystalline order when trapped in an oil-water interface near a solid boundary. At high densities, the bundles realize a 2D active nematic phase characterized by spontaneous creation and annihilation of topological defects, reminiscent of particle-pair production processes in quantum systems. This remarkable discovery sparked considerable theoretical interest, yet a satisfactory mathematical description has remained elusive, primarily for the following two reasons. First, prevailing multi-component theories feature a large number of unknown parameters that make quantitative comparison with experiment infeasible. Second, the currently favored hydrodynamic models assume divergence-free 2D interfacial flow, thereby promoting turbulent pattern formation through upward cascades. Such cascades are unlikely to occur in experiments, where interface and bulk fluid can continuously exchange matter. Here, we propose a compact alternative continuum theory for dense active liquid crystals by merging ideas from the Landau-de Gennes and Swift-Hohenberg theories. The resulting fourth-order model agrees quantitatively with experimental data, correctly predicts a regime of long-range nematic alignment of defects, and manifests an analogy with a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii quantum theory. Generally, our results suggest that universal ordering principles may govern a wide range of active materials.

  9. NMR studies of molecules in liquid crystals and graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, M.E.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR experiments to measure proton dipole couplings were performed on a series of n-alkanes (n-hexane through n-decane) dissolved in nematic liquid crystals. Computer modeling of the experimental NMR-spectra was done using several different models for intermolecular interactions in these systems. The model of Photinos et al. was found to be best in describing the intermolecular interactions in these systems and can provide a statistical picture of the conformation and orientation of the alkane molecules in their partially-oriented environment. Order parameters and conformational distributions for the alkanes can be calculated from the modeling. The alkanes are found to have conformational distributions very much like those found in liquid alkanes. Proton NMR spectra of tetrahydrofuran (THF) intercalated in two graphite intercalation compounds were also measured. Computer simulations of these spectra provide a picture of THF in the constrained environment between the graphene layers where the THF is oriented at a particular angle, can translate and rotate freely, but does not appear to pseudorotate.

  10. Formation of a Columnar Liquid Crystal in a Simple One-Component System of Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Metere; Tomas Oppelstrup; Sten Sarman; Mikhail Dzugutov

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a molecular dynamics simulation demonstrating that a columnar liquid crystal, commonly formed by disc-shaped molecules, can be formed by identical particles interacting via a spherically symmetric potential. Upon isochoric cooling from a low-density isotropic liquid state the simulated system performed a weak first order phase transition which produced a liquid crystal phase composed of parallel particle columns arranged in a hexagonal pattern in the plane perpendicular to the column axis. The particles within columns formed a liquid structure and demonstrated a significant intracolumn diffusion. Further cooling resulted in another first-order transition whereby the column structure became periodically ordered in three dimensions transforming the liquid-crystal phase into a crystal. This result is the first observation of a liquid crystal formation in a simple one-component system of particles. Its conceptual significance is in that it demonstrated that liquid crystals that have so far only been produced in systems of anisometric molecules, can also be formed by mesoscopic soft-matter and colloidal systems of spherical particles with appropriately tuned interatomic potential.

  11. Laser initiated thermal tuning of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natarajan, Lalgudi V.; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; Sutherland, Richard L.; Siwecki, Stephen A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Science Applications International Corporation, Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States); White, Timothy J.; Wofford, Jeremy M.; Bunning, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the large wavelength range and light-initiated thermal tuning of the reflection of a liquid crystal (LC) formulation (S811/ZLI-2806) near a smectic (SmA) to cholesteric (CLC) phase transition enabled by the use of a high order parameter heat transfer dye (anthraquinone, AQ). Upon irradiation with a 647 nm Krypton ion (Kr{sup +}) laser line, absorption by AQ generates heat that is transferred to the surrounding LC host. In the S811/ZLI-2806 formulation examined here, the optically generated increase in temperature serves to transition the phase from SmA to CLC. As has been documented, the SmA->CLC transition is typified by a pitch contraction that blueshifts the position of the CLC reflection, in this case a shift from 2500 to 700 nm that can occur in less than 100 s. The tuning range and speed are dependent on the laser power and the amount of dye in the cell.

  12. Direction controllable linearly polarized laser from a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    laser based on a free- standing film of photo polymerized cholesteric liquid crystal," Appl. Phys. Lett as an optic fiber-based temperature sensor," Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2691-2693 (2004). 12. Y. Huang, Y. Zhou

  13. Stabilization of liquid crystal photoaligning layers by reactive mesogens O. Yaroshchuk,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabilization of liquid crystal photoaligning layers by reactive mesogens O. Yaroshchuk,1 V photoaligning layers by thin layers of reactive mesogens, strong enhancement in LC alignment stability layer, the photoalignment technique minimizes me- chanical damage and electric charging, provides

  14. Computational studies of the phase behavior and dynamics of rodlike liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Micah James

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the unusual physics of rodlike liquid crystals are explored through simulations of rigid-rod kinetic theory discretized by the finite element method. As their name suggests. these substances retain crystalline. ...

  15. CARS polarized microscopy of three-dimensional director structures in liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Kachynski; A. N. Kuzmin; P. N. Prasad; I. I. Smalyukh

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate three-dimensional vibrational imaging of director structures in liquid crystals using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) polarized microscopy. Spatial mapping of the structures is based on sensitivity of a polarized CARS signal to orientation of anisotropic molecules in liquid crystals. As an example, we study structures in a smectic material and demonstrate that single-scan CARS and two-photon fluorescence images of molecular orientation patterns are consistent with each other and with the structure model.

  16. Stamping colloidal photonic crystals: a facile way towards complex pixel colour patterns for sensing and displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Tao; Smoukov, Stoyan K.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    , the infiltration efficiency can be further improved and easily read out from changes in reflection intensity and spectral peak shifts. Integrating these nano-architectures into devices can thus yield function as image displays and as sensors for solvents... years for sensing and image displays.1015 This integrated colour patterning system has unique advan- tages over competitive organic colour systems (as CPCs are non-toxic, environmentally friendly and non-photo-bleaching) and can be actively tuned...

  17. Sound attenuation and dispersion near the nematic-smectic A phase transition of a liquid crystal (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-287 Sound attenuation and dispersion near the nematic- smectic A phase transition of a liquid anomalous attenuation of sound. The coupling also gives a contri- bution to the speed of sound near on the pro- pagation of longitudinal sound waves near the nema- tic-smectic A transition of liquid crystals

  18. Observation of crystallization slowdown in supercooled para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium quantum liquid mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Khnel; Jos M. Fernndez; Filippo Tramonto; Guzmn Tejeda; Elena Moreno; Anton Kalinin; Marco Nava; Davide E. Galli; Salvador Montero; Robert E. Grisenti

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a quantitative experimental study of the crystallization kinetics of supercooled quantum liquid mixtures of para-hydrogen (pH$_2$) and ortho-deuterium (oD$_2$) by high spatial resolution Raman spectroscopy of liquid microjets. We show that in a wide range of compositions the crystallization rate of the isotopic mixtures is significantly reduced with respect to that of the pure substances. To clarify this behavior we have performed path-integral simulations of the non-equilibrium pH$_2$-oD$_2$ liquid mixtures, revealing that differences in quantum delocalization between the two isotopic species translate into different effective particle sizes. Our results provide first experimental evidence for crystallization slowdown of quantum origin, offering a benchmark for theoretical studies of quantum behavior in supercooled liquids.

  19. Observation of Optical Solitons and Abnormal Modulation Instability in Liquid Crystals with Negative Dielectric Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Junzhu; Liu, Jinlong; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yiheng; Guo, Qi; Hu, Wei; Xuan, Li

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the optical beam propagation in the nematic liquid crystal with negative dielectric anisotropy, which is aligned homeotropically in a $80\\mu m$-thickness planar cell in the presence of an externally voltage. It is predicted that the nonlocal nonlinearity of liquid crystal undergo an oscillatory response function with a negative nonlinear refractive index coefficient. We found that the oscillatory nonlocal nonlinearity can support stable bright solitons, which are observed in experiment. We also found that abnormal modulation instability occurs with infinity gain coefficient at a fixed spatial frequency, which is no depend on the beam intensity. We observed the modulation instability in the liquid crystal at a very low intensity ($0.26W/cm^2$), and the maximum gain frequency were found kept unchange when beam power changes over 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  20. Operation of a high purity germanium crystal in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John L. Orrell; Craig E. Aalseth; John F. Amsbaugh; Peter J. Doe; Todd W. Hossbach

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A high purity germanium crystal was operated in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer. Spectroscopic quality resolution of less than 1% of the full-width half maximum of full energy deposition peaks was demonstrated. The construction of the small apparatus used to obtain these results is reported. The design concept is to use the liquid argon bath to both cool the germanium crystal to operating temperatures and act as a scintillating veto. The scintillation light from the liquid argon can veto cosmic-rays, external primordial radiation, and gamma radiation that does not fully deposit within the germanium crystal. This technique was investigated for its potential impact on ultra-low background gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work is based on a concept initially developed for future germanium-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments.

  1. Optofluidic-Tunable Color Filters And Spectroscopy Based On Liquid-Crystal Microflows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuennet, J. G.; Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of color filters with microfluidics has attracted substantial attention in recent years, for on-chip absorption, fluorescence, or Raman analysis. We describe such tunable filters based on the micro-flow of liquid crystals. The filter operation is based on the wavelength dependent liquid crystal birefringence that can be tuned by modifying the flow velocity field in the microchannel. The latter is possible both temporally and spatially by varying the inlet pressure and the channel geometry respectively. We explored the use of these optofluidic filters for on-chip absorption spectroscopy; by integrating the distance dependent color filter with a dye-filled micro-channel, the absorption spectrum of a dye could be measured. Liquid crystal microflows simplify substantially the optofluidic integration, actuation and tuning of color filters for lab-on-a-chip spectroscopic applications.

  2. Optical Manipulation of Shape-Morphing Elastomeric Liquid Crystal Microparticles Doped with Gold Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Y. R.; Evans, J. S.; Lee, T.; Senyuk, B.; Keller, P.; He, S. L.; Smalyukh, I. I.

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate facile optical manipulation of shape of birefringent colloidal microparticles made from liquid crystal elastomers. Using soft lithography and polymerization, we fabricate elastomeric microcylinders with weakly undulating director oriented on average along their long axes. These particles are infiltrated with gold nanospheres acting as heat transducers that allow for an efficient localized transfer of heat from a focused infrared laser beam to a submicrometer region within a microparticle. Photothermal control of ordering in the liquid crystal elastomer using scanned beams allows for a robust control of colloidal particles, enabling both reversible and irreversible changes of shape. Possible applications include optomechanics, microfluidics, and reconfigurable colloidal composites with shape-dependent self-assembly.

  3. Surface-Enhanced Plasmon Splitting in a Liquid-Crystal-Coated Gold Nanoparticle Sung Yong Park1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud, David

    Surface-Enhanced Plasmon Splitting in a Liquid-Crystal-Coated Gold Nanoparticle Sung Yong Park1 June 2005) We show that, when a gold nanoparticle is coated by a thin layer of nematic liquid crystal wavelength [5]. The authors observed the surface plasmon splitting of a gold nanoparticle coated with a thin

  4. A triage approach to streamline environmental footprinting : a case study for liquid crystal displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zgola, Melissa Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative environmental performance evaluation methods are desired given the growing certification and labeling landscape for consumer goods. Challenges associated with existing methods, such as life cycle assessment ...

  5. Thin cell fringe-field-switching liquid crystal display with a chiral dopant Zhibing Ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    viewing angle, high transmittance, and low driving voltage are also crucial. Presently, optical film and gap leads to a significantly increased driving voltage.10 Thus, there is an urgent need to develop structure using a positive dielectric anisotropic 0 LC material, calculated equal potential lines dashed

  6. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Horizontal Micro-Tube Using Liquid Crystal Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    62 TC02-007 Heat Transfer Measurements for a Horizontal Micro-Tube Using Liquid Crystal thermography (LCT) method was developed for surface temperature measurements on a horizontal 2000m macro-tube and 1000m micro-tube. In the single-phase heat transfer experiments, the fully-developed flow heat transfer

  7. Characterization of a liquid-crystal ultrafast pulse shaper for ultra-broadband applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of a liquid-crystal ultrafast pulse shaper for ultra-broadband applications pulse shaping Spatial light modulators Ultrafast optics Femtosecond pulses a b s t r a c t By combining in revised form 22 January 2014 Accepted 28 January 2014 Available online 6 February 2014 Keywords: Ultrafast

  8. A liquid-crystal model for friction C.H. A. Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shkoller, Steve

    for sliding friction. Dry friction between two sliding surfaces gen- erates granulation, resultingA liquid-crystal model for friction C.H. A. Cheng , L. H. Kellogg , S. Shkoller , and D. L, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 Contributed by D. L. Turcotte, November 19, 2007 Rate-and-state-friction

  9. Theory of universal fast orientational dynamics in the isotropic phase of liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    is also capable of examining the short distance scale and short time scale dynamics, and yields universal dynamical behavior in the isotropic phase of liquid crystals on ultrafast time scales and short distance scales. The theoretical development generates a temperature independent power law for the short

  10. Vortex Liquid Crystals in Anisotropic Type II Superconductors E.W. Carlson,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Erica

    Vortex Liquid Crystals in Anisotropic Type II Superconductors E.W. Carlson,1,2 A. H. Castro Neto,1 September 2002; published 25 February 2003) In an isotropic type II superconductor in a moderate magnetic been much interest in high tem- perature superconductors in a magnetic field. Various ex- periments

  11. New Insight into Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals on Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shaw H.

    and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UniVersity of Rochester, 240 East RiVer Road, Rochester, New York 14623New Insight into Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals on Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films Chunki Kim order predicted by the kinetic model, and the energetics of molecular interaction. Introduction

  12. Phase Separation and Liquid Crystal Self-Assembly in Surfactant-Inorganic-Solvent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siperstein, Flor R.

    on the formation of surfactant-silica liquid crystals and the synthesis of MCM-41 type materials. The effects the introduction of MCM-41 type materials,1 the synthesis of surfactant-templated nanostructured materials has surfactant concentration in the initial surfactant solution. The synthesis of ordered nanoporous materials

  13. Photoalignment of nematic liquid crystal on polyamic-acid-based soluble polyimide with no side fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reznikov, Yuri

    Photoalignment of nematic liquid crystal on polyamic-acid-based soluble polyimide with no side of newly synthesized UV-sensitive polyimide without side fragments is reported. The photoaligning polymer, are not worse than those of rubbed polyimides. At the same time, the new material possesses all the advantages

  14. Optical anisotropy and liquid-crystal alignment properties of rubbed polyimide layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Optical anisotropy and liquid-crystal alignment properties of rubbed polyimide layers FUZI YANG polyimide layers and the rubbing process is investigated using the recently developed polarization-conversion guided mode technique. Results indicate that the effective optical anisotropy of the polyimide layers may

  15. Liquid Crystal Pretilt and Azimuth Angle Study of Stacked Alignment Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    angles for the liquid crystal. It is based on stacking both photo- aligned polymer and rubbed polyimide comprise of both photo-aligned horizontal polymer and rubbed vertical polyimide. The advantage alignment polyimide JALS2021 form JSR Corporation is spin coated on the substrate. Then it is baked inside

  16. Light-induced Anchoring Evolution in Nematic Phase of Liquid Crystal Doped with Azo-dye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reznikov, Yuri

    Light-induced Anchoring Evolution in Nematic Phase of Liquid Crystal Doped with Azo-dye D of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine We report an experimental study of light-induced anchoring evolution of azo results we considered the gliding effect as a result of light-induced anisotropic adsorption

  17. Structural response of nematic liquid crystals to weak transient shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    dynamic director response of nematics to oscillatory shearand step shear strain. In oscillation, the ratioStructural response of nematic liquid crystals to weak transient shear flows P. T. Matherajpb is presentedfor director field relaxationfollowing distortion induced by a step strain. Step strainexperimentson 5

  18. Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won, Chang-Hee

    Characterization of Lung Tissues using Liquid-Crystal Tunable Filter and Hyperspectral Imaging to characterize lung tissue for detecting emphysematous tissues in lung volume reduction surgery. The system, the spectral signature of healthy lung tissue and simulated smokers lung tissue is obtained and compared

  19. Partition coefficients of chalcophile elements between sulfide and silicate melts and the early crystallization history of sulfide liquid: LA-ICP-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the crystallization history of the sulfide liquid is ignored in most studies. Here we present laser ablation

  20. Neutron scattering as a probe of liquid crystal polymer-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjelm, R.P.; Douglas, E.P.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Langlois, D.A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This research project sought to obtain nanoscale and molecular level information on the mechanism of reinforcement in liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-reinforced composites, to realize molecular-reinforced LCP composites, and to test the validity of the concept of molecular reinforcement. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to study the structures in the ternary phase diagram of LCP with liquid crystal thermosets and solvent on length scales ranging from 1-100 nm. The goal of the scattering measurements is to understand the phase morphology and degree of segregation of the reinforcing and matrix components. This information helps elucidate the physics of self assembly in these systems. This work provides an experimental basis for a microengineering approach to composites of vastly improved properties.

  1. Influence of the backward propagating waves on the threshold in planar nematic liquid crystal films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry O. Krimer; Andrey E. Miroshnichenko; Etienne Brasselet

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze theoretically the influence of backward propagating waves on the primary threshold when a linearly polarized light impinges at normal incidence on a planarly aligned nematic liquid crystal films. We show, that the primary threshold, as a function of the phase delay induced by the nematic layer, exhibits oscillations. The amplitude of oscillations depends strongly on the drop of the refractivity indices of the nematic and outer media at the boundaries.

  2. Instabilities induced by Light in Liquid Crystal Cells with a Photo-Responsive Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Tth-Katona; K. Fodor-Csorba; A. Vajda; I. Jnossy

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Instabilities are discussed which take place when a nematic liquid crystal (LC) layer, enclosed between a planar reference plate and a photosensitive substrate, is illuminated with polarized light from the reference side ({\\it reverse} geometry). The dependence of the observed effects on the wavelength, polarization direction of the light, and on the thickness of the LC layer is explained by a model based on photoinduced surface torque. The application possibilities of the phenomena are also explored.

  3. Application of multispectral data processing techniques to cholesteric liquid crystal tracer particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Neal Allen

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coordinates was derived. This model has a functionally accurate form based on a reasonable set of assumptions. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ln TABLE OF CONTENTS 1V LIST OF TABLES . LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION LITERATURE REVIEW V1 V11 Color Measurement... 165 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Nominal calibration of liquid crystals. 2 Description of the calibration frames. 29 37 3 Interference filter set. 4 Unit spectral integral densities for Ektachrome VNF 7250. 55 5 Variables and parameter...

  4. High-resolution calorimetric study of the nematic to smectic- A transition in aligned liquid crystalaerosil gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland, Carl W.

    High-resolution ac calorimetry has been used to study the nematic to smectic-A (N-SmA) phase transition in the liquid crystal octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) confined in aligned colloidal aerosil gels. A stable and robust nematic ...

  5. Orientations of side chains and adsorbed liquid crystal molecules on a rubbed polyimide surface studied by optical second harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Xiaowei

    Orientations of side chains and adsorbed liquid crystal molecules on a rubbed polyimide surface on a rubbed side-chain polyimide surface. Both the side chains and the LC molecules appear to be well aligned

  6. Phase transition in liquid crystal elastomer - a Monte Carlo study employing non-Boltzmann sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Jayasri; N. Satyavathi; V. S. S. Sastry; K. P. N. Murthy

    2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate Isotropic - Nematic transition in liquid crystal elastomers employing non-Boltzmann Monte Carlo techniques. We consider a lattice model of a liquid elastomer and Selinger-Jeon-Ratna Hamiltonian which accounts for homogeneous/inhomogeneous interactions among liquid crystalline units, interaction of local nematics with global strain, and with inhomogeneous external fields and stress. We find that when the local director is coupled strongly to the global strain the transition is strongly first order; the transition softens when the coupling becomes weaker. Also the transition temperature decreases with decrease of coupling strength. Besides we find that the nematic order scales nonlinearly with global strain especially for strong coupling and at low temperatures.

  7. Polarisation independent phase modulation using a blue phase liquid crystal over silicon device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, Rachel M.; Lorenz, Alexander; Morris, Stephen M.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    , Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0FA, UK 2Department of Engineering Science University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PJ, UK *Corresponding author: rmh61@cam.ac.uk Liquid crystal over silicon... together using 6 ?m spacer bead doped glue. The cell thickness was then measured using the Fabry-Perot interference technique with a spectrometer connected to the microscope (Ocean Optics USB 2000). The cell gap thickness was measured to be 6.4 0.1 ?m...

  8. Generation of Multiple Circular Walls on a Thin Film of Nematic Liquid Crystal by Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kojima; J. Yamamoto; K. Sadakane; K. Yoshikawa

    2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We found that multiple circular walls (MCW) can be generated on a thin film of a nematic liquid crystal through a spiral scanning of a focused IR laser. The ratios between radii of adjacent rings of MCW were almost constant. These constant ratios can be explained theoretically by minimization of the Frank elastic free energy of nematic medium. The director field on a MCW exhibits chiral symmetry-breaking although the elastic free energies of both chiral MCWs are degenerated, i.e., the director on a MCW can rotate clockwise or counterclockwise along the radial direction.

  9. Effects of graphene on electro-optic switching and spontaneous polarization of a ferroelectric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rajratan, E-mail: basu@usna.edu [Department of Physics, Soft-matter and Nanomaterials Laboratory, The United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A small quantity of graphene flakes was doped in a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC), and the field-induced ferroelectric electro-optic switching was found to be significantly faster in the FLC + graphene hybrid than that of the pure FLC. Further studies revealed that the suspended graphene flakes enhanced the FLC's spontaneous polarization by improving smectic-C ordering resulting from the ?? electron stacking, and reduced rotation viscosity by trapping some of the free ions of the FLC media. These effects coherently impacted the FLC-switching phenomenon, enabling the FLC molecules to switch faster on reversing an external electric field.

  10. Liquid Crystal Polarimetry for Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping of 3He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James D. Maxwell; Charles S. Epstein; Richard G. Milner

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We detail the design and operation of a compact, discharge light polarimeter for metastability exchange optical pumping of 3He gas near 1 torr under a low magnetic field. The nuclear polarization of 3He can be discerned from its electron polarization, measured via the circular polarization of 668 nm discharge light from an RF excitation. This apparatus measures the circular polarization of this very dim discharge light using a nematic liquid crystal wave retarder (LCR) and a high-gain, transimpedance amplified Si photodiode. We outline corrections required in such a measurement, and discuss contributions to its systematic error.

  11. Theory of the dielectric susceptibility of liquid crystals with polar nonuniaxial molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kapanowski; T. Wietecha

    2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical theory of the dielectric susceptibility of polar liquid crystals is proposed. The molecules are not uniaxial but similar to cones. It is assumed that the permanent dipole moment of a molecule is parallel to the axis of the rotational symmetry. The ordering of the phase is described by means of the mean field theory based on the Maier-Saupe approach. The theory was used to calculate the temperature dependence of the order parameters and the susceptibilities. Predictions of the model for different sets of parameters are investigated.

  12. Theory of the dielectric susceptibility of liquid crystals with bent-core molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kapanowski

    2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical theory of the dielectric susceptibility of polar liquid crystals is proposed. The molecules are calamitic or bent-core but the permanent dipole moment is perpendicular to the molecule long axis. The ordering of the phase is described by means of the mean-field theory based on the Maier-Saupe approach. The theory is used to calculate the temperature dependence of the order parameters and the susceptibilities. The phase diagram with four phases is obtained: isotropic, uniaxial nematic, uniaxial ferroelectric, and biaxial ferroelectric. Four critical points are predicted.

  13. Liquid crystal films as on-demand, variable thickness (505000?nm) targets for intense lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole, P. L., E-mail: poole.134@osu.edu; Andereck, C. D.; Schumacher, D. W.; Daskalova, R. L.; Feister, S.; George, K. M.; Willis, C.; Akli, K. U.; Chowdhury, E. A. [Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new type of target for intense laser-matter experiments that offers significant advantages over those currently in use. The targets consist of a liquid crystal film freely suspended within a metal frame. They can be formed rapidly on-demand with thicknesses ranging from nanometers to micrometers, where the particular value is determined by the liquid crystal temperature and initial volume as well as by the frame geometry. The liquid crystal used for this work, 8CB (4?-octyl-4-cyanobiphenyl), has a vapor pressure below 10{sup ?6}?Torr, so films made at atmospheric pressure maintain their initial thickness after pumping to high vacuum. Additionally, the volume per film is such that each target costs significantly less than one cent to produce. The mechanism of film formation and relevant physics of liquid crystals are described, as well as ion acceleration data from the first shots on liquid crystal film targets at the Ohio State University Scarlet laser facility.

  14. Rupture mechanism of liquid crystal thin films realized by large-scale molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Trung D [ORNL] [ORNL; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Brown, W Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Matheson, Michael A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of liquid crystal (LC) molecules to respond to changes in their environment makes them an interesting candidate for thin film applications, particularly in bio-sensing, bio-mimicking devices, and optics. Yet the understanding of the (in)stability of this family of thin films has been limited by the inherent challenges encountered by experiment and continuum models. Using unprecedented largescale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we address the rupture origin of LC thin films wetting a solid substrate at length scales similar to those in experiment. Our simulations show the key signatures of spinodal instability in isotropic and nematic films on top of thermal nucleation, and importantly, for the first time, evidence of a common rupture mechanism independent of initial thickness and LC orientational ordering. We further demonstrate that the primary driving force for rupture is closely related to the tendency of the LC mesogens to recover their local environment in the bulk state. Our study not only provides new insights into the rupture mechanism of liquid crystal films, but also sets the stage for future investigations of thin film systems using peta-scale molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Crystal growth kinetics in Lennard-Jones and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen systems along the solid-liquid coexistence line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ronald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of crystal-growth is investigated along the solid-liquid coexistence line for the (100), (110) and (111) orientations of the Lennard-Jones and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fcc crystal-liquid interface, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. A slowing down of the growth kinetics along the coexistence line is observed, which is mostly a temperature effect, with other quantities such as the melting pressure and liquid self-diffusion coefficient having a negligible impact. The growth kinetics of the two potentials become similar at large values of the melting temperature and pressure, when both resemble a purely repulsive soft-sphere potential. Classical models of crystallization from the melt are in reasonable qualitative agreement with our simulation data. Finally, several one-phase empirical melting/freezing rules are studied with respect to their validity along the coexistence line.

  16. JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 5, NO. 8, AUGUST 2009 319 A Simple Transflective LCD for Mobile Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 5, NO. 8, AUGUST 2009 319 A Simple Transflective LCD for Mobile well. Its fabrication process is fairly simple and it is suit- able for mobile applications. Index-LCD). I. INTRODUCTION TRANSFLECTIVE liquid crystal displays (TR-LCDs) have been widely used in mobile

  17. Nonlinear light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystals with a helical Bragg microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yikun; Zhu, Xing; Xie, Xiangsheng; Feng, Mingneng; Zhou, Jianying; Li, Yongyao; Xiang, Ying; Malomed, Boris A; Kurizki, Gershon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear optical propagation in cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC) with a spatially periodic helical molecular structure is studied experimentally and modeled numerically. This periodic structure can be seen as a Bragg grating with a propagation stopband for circularly polarized light. The CLC nonlinearity can be strengthened by adding absorption dye, thus reducing the nonlinear intensity threshold and the necessary propagation length. As the input power increases, a blue shift of the stopband is induced by the self-defocusing nonlinearity, leading to a substantial enhancement of the transmission and spreading of the beam. With further increase of the input power, the self-defocusing nonlinearity saturates, and the beam propagates as in the linear-diffraction regime. A system of nonlinear couple-mode equations is used to describe the propagation of the beam. Numerical results agree well with the experiment findings, suggesting that modulation of intensity and spatial profile of the beam can be achieved simult...

  18. Two-step electrical percolation in nematic liquid crystal filled by multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serhiy Tomylko; Oleg Yaroshchuk; Nikolai Lebovka

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Percolation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in liquid crystals (LCs) opens way for a unique class of anisotropic hybrid materials with a complex dielectric constant widely controlled by CNT concentration. Percolation in such systems is commonly described as a one-step process starting at a very low loading of CNTs. In the present study the two-step percolation was observed in the samples of thickness 250 $\\mu$m obtained by pressing the suspension between two substrates. The percolation concentrations for the first and second percolation processes were $C_n^{p_1}\\approx 0.0002$ wt. \\% and $C_n^{p_2}\\approx 0.5$ wt. \\%, respectively. The two-stage nature of percolation was explained on a base of mean field theory assuming core-shell structure of CNTs.

  19. Visualization of effect of turbulators on local heat transfer distribution in a 180 degree turn with liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajesh, Gopal

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal experiments have been conducted to study the turbulent heat transfer for fully developed flow of air in a two-pass square channel with two opposite walls roughened with parallel and cross arrays of full ribs and with V-shaped ribs...

  20. Control of Polymer Structures in Phase-Separated Liquid Crystal-Polymer Composite Systems Qingbing WANG, Jung O. PARK1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasarao, Mohan

    Control of Polymer Structures in Phase-Separated Liquid Crystal-Polymer Composite Systems Qingbing, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, USA 1 School of Polymer, Textile and Fiber Engineering and diffusion of small molecules, play important roles in determining a specific PSCOF polymer structure

  1. Nanosecond electro-optics of nematic liquid crystal with negative dielectric anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volodymyr Borshch; Sergij V. Shiyanovskii; Bing-Xiang Li; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a nanosecond electro-optic response of a nematic liquid crystal in a geometry where an applied electric field $\\textbf{E}$ modifies the tensor order parameter but does not change the orientation of the optic axis (director $\\hat{\\textbf{N}}$). We use a nematic with negative dielectric anisotropy with the electric field applied perpendicularly to $\\hat{\\textbf{N}}$. The field changes the dielectric tensor at optical frequencies (optic tensor) due to the following mechanisms: (a) nanosecond creation of the biaxial orientational order; (b) uniaxial modification of the orientational order that occurs over timescales of tens of nanoseconds, and (c) the quenching of director fluctuations with a wide range of characteristic times up to milliseconds. We develop a model to describe the dynamics of all three mechanisms. We design the experimental conditions to selectively suppress the contributions from fluctuations quenching (c) and from the biaxial order effect (a) and thus, separate the contributions of the three mechanisms in the electro-optic response. As a result, the experimental data can be well fitted with the model. The analysis provides a detailed physical picture of how the liquid crystal responds to a strong electric field on a timescale of nanoseconds. This work provides a useful guide in the current search of the biaxial nematic phase. Namely, the temperature dependence of the biaxial susceptibility allows one to estimate the temperature of the potential uniaxial-to-biaxial phase transition. An analysis of the fluctuations quenching indicates that on a timescale of nanoseconds, the classic model with constant viscoelastic material parameters might reach its limit of validity. The effect of nanosecond electric modification of the order parameter (NEMOP) can be used in applications in which one needs to achieve ultrafast (nanosecond) changes of optical characteristics.

  2. Collective Diffusion of Colloidal Hard Rods in Smectic Liquid Crystals: Effect of Particle Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Patti; Djamel El Masri; Ren van Roij; Marjolein Dijkstra

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the layer-to-layer diffusion in smectic-A liquid crystals of colloidal hard rods with different length-to-diameter ratios using computer simulations. The layered arrangement of the smectic phase yields a hopping-type diffusion due to the presence of permanent barriers and transient cages. Remarkably, we detect stringlike clusters composed of inter-layer rods moving cooperatively along the nematic director. Furthermore, we find that the structural relaxation in equilibrium smectic phases shows interesting similarities with that of out-of-equilibrium supercooled liquids, although there the particles are kinetically trapped in transient rather than permanent cages. Additionally, at fixed packing fraction we find that the barrier height increases with increasing particle anisotropy, and hence the dynamics is more heterogeneous and non-Gaussian for longer rods, yielding a lower diffusion coefficient along the nematic director and smaller clusters of inter-layer particles that move less cooperatively. At fixed barrier height, the dynamics becomes more non-Gaussian and heterogeneous for longer rods that move more collectively giving rise to a higher diffusion coefficient along the nematic director.

  3. Thermodynamic Relationships for Bulk Crystalline and Liquid Phases in the Phase-Field Crystal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor W. L. Chan; Nirand Pisutha-Arnond; Katsuyo Thornton

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present thermodynamic relationships between the free energy of the phase-field crystal (PFC) model and thermodynamic state variables for bulk phases under hydrostatic pressure. This relationship is derived based on the thermodynamic formalism for crystalline solids of Larch\\'e and Cahn [Larch\\'e and Cahn, Acta Metallurgica, Vol. 21, 1051 (1973)]. We apply the relationship to examine the thermodynamic processes associated with varying the input parameters of the PFC model: temperature, lattice spacing, and the average value of the PFC order parameter, $\\bar{n}$. The equilibrium conditions between bulk crystalline solid and liquid phases are imposed on the thermodynamic relationships for the PFC model to obtain a procedure for determining solid-liquid phase coexistence. The resulting procedure is found to be in agreement with the method commonly used in the PFC community, justifying the use of the common-tangent construction to determine solid-liquid phase coexistence in the PFC model. Finally, we apply the procedure to an eighth-order-fit (EOF) PFC model that has been parameterized to body-centered-cubic ($bcc$) Fe [Jaatinen et al., Physical Review E 80, 031602 (2009)] to demonstrate the procedure as well as to develop physical intuition about the PFC input parameters. We demonstrate that the EOF-PFC model parameterization does not predict stable $bcc$ structures with positive vacancy densities. This result suggests an alternative parameterization of the PFC model, which requires the primary peak position of the two-body direct correlation function to shift as a function of $\\bar{n}$.

  4. Inhomogeneous Relaxation Dynamics and Phase Behaviour of a Liquid Crystal Confined in a Nanoporous Solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylwia Calus; Andriy V. Kityk; Manfred Eich; Patrick Huber

    2015-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report filling-fraction dependent dielectric spectroscopy measurements on the relaxation dynamics of the rod-like nematogen 7CB condensed in 13 nm silica nanochannels. In the film-condensed regime, a slow interface relaxation dominates the dielectric spectra, whereas from the capillary-condensed state up to complete filling an additional, fast relaxation in the core of the channels is found. The temperature-dependence of the static capacitance, representative of the averaged, collective molecular orientational ordering, indicates a continuous, paranematic-to-nematic (P-N) transition, in contrast to the discontinuous bulk behaviour. It is well described by a Landau-de-Gennes free energy model for a phase transition in cylindrical confinement. The large tensile pressure of 10 MPa in the capillary-condensed state, resulting from the Young-Laplace pressure at highly curved liquid menisci, quantitatively accounts for a downward-shift of the P-N transition and an increased molecular mobility in comparison to the unstretched liquid state of the complete filling. The strengths of the slow and fast relaxations provide local information on the orientational order: The thermotropic behaviour in the core region is bulk-like, i.e. it is characterized by an abrupt onset of the nematic order at the P-N transition. By contrast, the interface ordering exhibits a continuous evolution at the P-N transition. Thus, the phase behaviour of the entirely filled liquid crystal-silica nanocomposite can be quantitatively described by a linear superposition of these distinct nematic order contributions.

  5. Touch sensors based on planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Jooyeok; Lee, Chulyeon; Han, Hyemi; Lee, Sooyong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Youngkyoo, E-mail: ykimm@knu.ac.kr [Organic Nanoelectronics Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hwajeong [Organic Nanoelectronics Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Priority Research Center, Research Institute of Advanced Energy Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon-Hyung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering and Graduate School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a tactile touch sensor based on a planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistor (LC-g-OFET) structure. The LC-g-OFET touch sensors were fabricated by forming the 10 ?m thick LC layer (4-cyano-4{sup ?}-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on top of the 50 nm thick channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) - P3HT) that is coated on the in-plane aligned drain/source/gate electrodes (indium-tin oxide - ITO). As an external physical stimulation to examine the tactile touch performance, a weak nitrogen flow (83.3 ?l/s) was employed to stimulate the LC layer of the touch device. The LC-g-OFET device exhibited p-type transistor characteristics with a hole mobility of 1.5 cm{sup 2}/Vs, but no sensing current by the nitrogen flow touch was measured at sufficiently high drain (V{sub D}) and gate (V{sub G}) voltages. However, a clear sensing current signal was detected at lower voltages, which was quite sensitive to the combination of V{sub D} and V{sub G}. The best voltage combination was V{sub D} = ?0.2 V and V{sub G} = ?1 V for the highest ratio of signal currents to base currents (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). The change in the LC alignment upon the nitrogen flow touch was assigned as the mechanism for the present LC-g-OFET touch sensors.

  6. Robustness of the periodic and chaotic orientational behavior of tumbling nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Technical University Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, D-10623 (Germany); Ilg, Patrick [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Technical University Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, D-10623 (Germany); Universite Lyon1, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee et Nanostructures, CNRS, UMR5586, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical behavior of molecular alignment strongly affects physical properties of nematic liquid crystals. A theoretical description can be made by a nonlinear relaxation equation of the order parameter and leads to the prediction that rather complex even chaotic orientational behavior occur. Here the influence of fluctuating shear rates on the orientational dynamics especially on chaotic solutions is discussed. With the help of phase portraits and time evolution diagrams, we investigated the influence of different fluctuation strengths on the flow aligned, isotropic, and periodic solutions. To explore the effect of fluctuations on the chaotic behavior, we calculated the largest Lyapunov exponent for different fluctuation strengths. We found in all cases that small fluctuations of the shear rate do not affect the basic features of the dynamics of tumbling nematics. Furthermore, we present an amended potential modeling the isotropic to nematic transition and discuss the equivalence and difference to the commonly used Landau-de Gennes potential. In contrast to the Landau-de Gennes potential, our potential has the advantage to restrict the order parameter to physically admissible values. In the case of extensional flow, we show that the amended potential leads for increasing extensional rate to a better agreement with experimental results.

  7. Use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive liquid crystals for hypersonic boundary-layer transition detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Croll, R.H.; Kuntz, D.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive (SSS/TI) liquid crystals (LCs) has been evaluated as a boundary-layer transition detection technique for hypersonic flows. Experiments were conducted at Mach 8 in the Sandia National Laboratories Hypersonic Wind Tunnel using a flat plate model at near zero-degree angle of attack over the freestream unit Reynolds number range 1.2-5.8x10{sup 6}/ft. Standard 35mm color photography and Super VHS color video were used to record LC color changes due to varying surface shear stress during the transition process for a range of commercial SSS liquid crystals. Visual transition data were compared to an established method using calorimetric surface heat-transfer measurements to evaluate the LC technique. It is concluded that the use of SSS/TI LCs can be an inexpensive, safe, and easy to use boundary-layer transition detection method for hypersonic flows. However, a valid interpretation of the visual records requires careful attention to illumination intensity levels and uniformity, lighting and viewing angles, some prior understanding of the general character of the flow, and the selection of the appropriate liquid crystal for the particular flow conditions.

  8. Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal with a negative Kerr constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    : a review," Proc. SPIE 7232, 723205 (2009). 3. J. Yan and S. T. Wu, "Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid

  9. Highly tunable large-core single-mode liquid-crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    the possibility of infusing liquids into the fiber and this has opened up the possibility of creating tunable

  10. Low Loss Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fiber in the Near-Infrared Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    ) The presence of air-holes in the microstructure gives the possibility to infuse liquids and therefore, create

  11. Structure of smectic defect cores: an X-ray study of 8CB liquid crystal ultra-thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Philippe Michel; Emmanuelle Lacaze; Michel Goldmann; Marc Gailhanou; Marc De Boissieu; Michel Alba

    2005-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the structure of very thin liquid crystal films frustrated by antagonistic anchorings in the smectic phase. In a cylindrical geometry, the structure is dominated by the defects for film thicknesses smaller than 150 nm and the detailed topology of the defects cores can be revealed by x-ray diffraction. They appear to be split in half tube-shaped Rotating Grain Boundaries (RGB). We determine the RGB spatial extension and evaluate its energy per unit line. Both are significantly larger than the ones usually proposed in the literature

  12. (Fundamental electron transfer processes at the single crystal semiconductor/liquid interface)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, N.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last year's work has focused on several aspects of the fundamental chemistry and physics semiconductor/liquid junction behavior. These projects have been directed primarily towards GaAs/liquid contacts, because GaAs/liquid systems provide high energy conversion efficiencies and offer an opportunity to gain mechanistic understanding of the factors that are important to control in an efficient photoelectrochemical energy conversion system.

  13. [Fundamental electron transfer processes at the single crystal semiconductor/liquid interface]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, N.S.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The last year`s work has focused on several aspects of the fundamental chemistry and physics semiconductor/liquid junction behavior. These projects have been directed primarily towards GaAs/liquid contacts, because GaAs/liquid systems provide high energy conversion efficiencies and offer an opportunity to gain mechanistic understanding of the factors that are important to control in an efficient photoelectrochemical energy conversion system.

  14. Crystal growth from a supersaturated melt: relaxation of the solid-liquid dynamic stiffness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Turci; Tanja Schilling

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the growth process of a crystalline phase out of a metastable over-compressed liquid that is brought into contact with a crystalline substrate. The process is modeled by means of molecular dynamics. The particles interact via the Lennard-Jones potential and their motion is locally thermalized by Langevin dynamics. We characterize the relaxation process of the solid-liquid interface, showing that the growth speed is maximal for liquid densities above the solid coexistence density, and that the structural properties of the interface rapidly converge to equilibrium-like properties. In particular, we show that the off-equilibrium dynamic stiffness can be extracted using capillary wave theory arguments, even if the growth front moves fast compared to the typical diffusion time of the compressed liquid, and that the dynamic stiffness converges to the equilibrium stiffness in times much shorter than the diffusion time.

  15. Strong pressure-energy correlations in liquids as a configuration space property: Simulations of temperature down jumps and crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Schroder; Ulf R. Pedersen; Nicoletta Gnan; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations recently revealed that several liquids exhibit strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble [U. R. Pedersen {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 100}, 015701 (2008)]. In order to investigate whether these correlations are present also far from equilibrium constant-volume aging following a temperature down jump from equilibrium was simulated for two strongly correlating liquids, an asymmetric dumbbell model and Lewis-Wahnstr{\\"o}m OTP, as well as for SPC water that is not strongly correlating. For the two strongly correlating liquids virial and potential energy follow each other closely during the aging towards equilibrium. For SPC water, on the other hand, virial and potential energy vary with little correlation as the system ages towards equilibrium. Further proof that strong pressure-energy correlations express a configuration space property comes from monitoring pressure and energy during the crystallization (reported here for the first time) of supercooled Lewis-Wahnstr{\\"o}m OTP at constant temperature.

  16. Electrically switchable polymer liquid crystal and polymer birefringent flake in fluid host systems and optical devices utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Faris, Sadeg M.; Li, Le

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Flakes or platelets of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) or other birefringent polymers (BP) suspended in a fluid host medium constitute a system that can function as the active element in an electrically switchable optical device when the suspension is either contained between a pair of rigid substrates bearing transparent conductive coatings or dispersed as microcapsules within the body of a flexible host polymer. Optical properties of these flake materials include large effective optical path length, different polarization states and high angular sensitivity in their selective reflection or birefringence. The flakes or platelets of these devices need only a 3-20.degree. rotation about the normal to the cell surface to achieve switching characteristics obtainable with prior devices using particle rotation or translation.

  17. Domain Walls and Anchoring Transitions Mimicking Nematic Biaxiality in the Oxadiazole Bent-Core Liquid Crystal C7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-ki; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignme...

  18. Tunable Fresnel lens using nanoscale polymer-dispersed liquid crystals Hongwen Ren, Yun-Hsing Fan, and Shin-Tson Wua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Tunable Fresnel lens using nanoscale polymer-dispersed liquid crystals Hongwen Ren, Yun-Hsing Fan May 2003; accepted 27 June 2003 An electrically tunable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using by voltage. The major advantages of such a Fresnel lens are simple fabrication, large aperture size

  19. Anion-driven mesogenicity: ionic liquid crystals based on the [closo-1-Bryan Ringstrand,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaszynski, Piotr

    for their potential applications as electrolytes for e.g. lithium ion batteries. The closest examples of such ILCs been investigated as counterions in ionic liquids29 and for applications as lithium-ion battery interest in developing ion-conduc- tive materials26 for applications in batteries7 and dye

  20. Synthesis of a New Side-Chain Type Liquid Crystal Polymer Poly[dicyclohexyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Xin-hua

    been proven by many experiments and becomes a useful guide for molecular design of side-chain liquid layer was dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate and chloroform was removed by vacuum distillation. The residue was purified using column chromatography on silica gel with chloroform as eluant to obtain

  1. Terminal polydispersity in the crystallization of polydisperse Lennard-Jones liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmistha Sarkar; Mantu Santra; Biman Bagchi

    2011-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We find through computer simulations that the fractional volume change on freezing of polydisperse Lennard-Jones liquid decreases with increasing polydispersity and approaches zero near a terminal polydispersity of 0.11, independent of temperature. The transition however remains first order at terminal polydispersity. Average inherent structure (IS) energy of the crystalline phase increases nearly quadratically with polydispersity indices ({\\delta}) and marked by a crossover to nearly constant IS energy in the amorphous phase.

  2. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moreover, the heat capacity of that liquid is also higherthe intensive heat capacities of the liquid and the crystal,

  3. Quenched crystal-field disorder and magnetic liquid ground states in Tb?Sn2-xTixO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaulin, B. D.; Kermarrec, E.; Dahlberg, M. L.; Matthews, M. J.; Bert, F.; Zhang, J.; Mendels, P.; Fritsch, K.; Granroth, G. E.; Jiramongkolchai, P.; et al

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid solutions of the soft quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnets Tb?B?O? with B = Ti and Sn display a novel magnetic ground state in the presence of strong B-site disorder, characterized by a low susceptibility and strong spin fluctuations to temperatures below 0.1 K. These materials have been studied using ac susceptibility and ?SR techniques to very low temperatures, and time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering techniques to 1.5 K. Remarkably, neutron spectroscopy of the Tb? crystal-field levels appropriate to high B-site mixing (0.5 2-xTixO?) reveal that the doublet ground and first excited states present as continuamorein energy, while transitions to singlet excited states at higher energies simply interpolate between those of the end members of the solid solution. The resulting ground state suggests an extreme version of a random-anisotropy magnet, with many local moments and anisotropies, depending on the precise local configuration of the six B sites neighboring each magnetic Tb? ion.less

  4. Quenched crystal-field disorder and magnetic liquid ground states in Tb?Sn2-xTixO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaulin, B. D.; Kermarrec, E.; Dahlberg, M. L.; Matthews, M. J.; Bert, F.; Zhang, J.; Mendels, P.; Fritsch, K.; Granroth, G. E.; Jiramongkolchai, P.; Amato, A.; Baines, C.; Cava, R. J.; Schiffer, P.

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid solutions of the soft quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnets Tb?B?O? with B = Ti and Sn display a novel magnetic ground state in the presence of strong B-site disorder, characterized by a low susceptibility and strong spin fluctuations to temperatures below 0.1 K. These materials have been studied using ac susceptibility and ?SR techniques to very low temperatures, and time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering techniques to 1.5 K. Remarkably, neutron spectroscopy of the Tb? crystal-field levels appropriate to high B-site mixing (0.5 2-xTixO?) reveal that the doublet ground and first excited states present as continua in energy, while transitions to singlet excited states at higher energies simply interpolate between those of the end members of the solid solution. The resulting ground state suggests an extreme version of a random-anisotropy magnet, with many local moments and anisotropies, depending on the precise local configuration of the six B sites neighboring each magnetic Tb? ion.

  5. Atomic Level Green-Kubo Stress Correlation Function for a Model Crystal: An Insight into Molecular Dynamics Results on a Model Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Levashov

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to get insight into the connection between the vibrational dynamics and the atomic level Green-Kubo stress correlation function in liquids we consider this connection in a model crystal instead. Of course, vibrational dynamics in liquids and crystals are quite different and it is not expected that the results obtained on a model crystal should be valid for liquids. However, these considerations provide a benchmark to which the results of the previous molecular dynamics simulations can be compared. Thus, assuming that vibrations are plane waves, we derive analytical expressions for the atomic level stress correlation functions in the classical limit and analyze them. These results provide, in particular, a recipe for analysis of the atomic level stress correlation functions in Fourier space and extraction of the wavevector and frequency dependent information. We also evaluate the energies of the atomic level stresses. Obtained energies are significantly smaller than the energies that were obtained in MD simulations of liquids previously. This result suggests that the average energies of the atomic level stresses in liquids and glasses are largely determined by the structural disorder. We discuss this result in the context of equipartition of the atomic level stress energies. Analysis of the previously published data suggests that it is possible to speak about configurational and vibrational contributions to the average energies of the atomic level stresses in a glass state. However, this separation in a liquid state is problematic. We also consider peak broadening in the pair distribution function with increase of distance. We find that peak broadening (by ~40%) occurs due to the transverse vibrational modes, while contribution from the longitudinal modes does not change with distance. Finally, we introduce and consider atomic level transverse current correlation function.

  6. Order-parameter-aided temperature-accelerated sampling for the exploration of crystal polymorphism and solid-liquid phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Tang-Qing, E-mail: tangqing.yu@nyu.edu; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric, E-mail: eve2@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States); Chen, Pei-Yang; Chen, Ming [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Samanta, Amit [Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Tuckerman, Mark, E-mail: mark.tuckerman@nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States); Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); NYU-ECNU Center for Computational Chemistry at NYU Shanghai, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of predicting polymorphism in atomic and molecular crystals constitutes a significant challenge both experimentally and theoretically. From the theoretical viewpoint, polymorphism prediction falls into the general class of problems characterized by an underlying rough energy landscape, and consequently, free energy based enhanced sampling approaches can be brought to bear on the problem. In this paper, we build on a scheme previously introduced by two of the authors in which the lengths and angles of the supercell are targeted for enhanced sampling via temperature accelerated adiabatic free energy dynamics [T. Q. Yu and M. E. Tuckerman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 015701 (2011)]. Here, that framework is expanded to include general order parameters that distinguish different crystalline arrangements as target collective variables for enhanced sampling. The resulting free energy surface, being of quite high dimension, is nontrivial to reconstruct, and we discuss one particular strategy for performing the free energy analysis. The method is applied to the study of polymorphism in xenon crystals at high pressure and temperature using the Steinhardt order parameters without and with the supercell included in the set of collective variables. The expected fcc and bcc structures are obtained, and when the supercell parameters are included as collective variables, we also find several new structures, including fcc states with hcp stacking faults. We also apply the new method to the solid-liquid phase transition in copper at 1300 K using the same Steinhardt order parameters. Our method is able to melt and refreeze the system repeatedly, and the free energy profile can be obtained with high efficiency.

  7. Ferroelectric domain formation in discotic liquid crystals : Monte Carlo study on the influence of boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Tushar Kanti

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The realization of a spontaneous macroscopic ferroelectric order in fluids of anisotropic mesogens is a topic of both fundamental and technological interest. Recently, we demonstrated that a system of dipolar achiral disklike ellipsoids can exhibit long-searched ferroelectric liquid crystalline phases of dipolar origin. In the present work, extensive off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the phase behavior of the system under the influences of the electrostatic boundary conditions that restrict any global polarization. We find that the system develops strongly ferroelectric slablike domains periodically arranged in an antiferroelectric fashion. Exploring the phase behavior at different dipole strengths, we find existence of the ferroelectric nematic and ferroelectric columnar order inside the domains. For higher dipole strengths, a biaxial phase is also obtained with a similar periodic array of ferroelectric slabs of antiparallel polarizations. We have studied the depolarizing effects by...

  8. Use of Quadratic Differentials for Description of Defects and Textures in Liquid Crystals and 2+1 Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkady L. Kholodenko

    1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of measured foliations which is discussed in PartI(hep-th/9901040) in connection with train tracks and meanders is shown to be related to the theory of Jenkins-Strebel quadratic differentials by Hubbard and Masur (Acta Math.Vol.142,221(1979)). Use of quadratic differentials not only provides an adequate description of defects and textures in liquid crystals but also is ideally suited for study of 2+1 classical gravity which was initiated in the seminal paper by Deser, Jackiw and 't Hooft (Ann.Phys.Vol.152,220(1984)). In this paper not only their results are reproduced but, in addition, many new results are obtained. In particular, using the results of Rivin (Ann.Math.Vol.139,553(1994)) the restriction on the total mass of the 2+1 Universe is removed. It is shown that the masses can have only discrete values and, moreover, the theoretically obtained sum rules forbid the existence of some of these values. The dynamics of 2+1 gravity which is associated with the dynamics of train tracks is being reinterpreted in terms of the emerging hyperbolic 3-manifolds. The existence of knots and links associated with complements of these 3-manifolds is highly nontrivial and requires careful proofs. The paper provides a concise introduction into this topic. A brief discussion of connections with related physical problems, e.g.string theory, classical and quantum billiards, dynamics of fracture, protein folding, etc. is also provided.

  9. Domain Walls and Anchoring Transitions Mimicking Nematic Biaxiality in the Oxadiazole Bent-Core Liquid Crystal C7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-ki Kim; Greta Cukrov; Jie Xiang; Sung-Tae Shin; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the origin of secondary disclinations that were recently described as a new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. With an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in an uniaxial nematic during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bonding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a modest electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangential-tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. The study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrate yet another mechanism (formation of secondary disclinations) by which a uniaxial nematic can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  10. Photovoltaic properties and morphology of organic solar cells based on liquid-crystal semiconducting polymer with additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Zushi, Masahito; Suzuki, Hisato; Ogahara, Shinichi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Oku, Takeo [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

    2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on liquid crystal semiconducting polymers of poly[9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bithiophene] (F8T2) as p-type semiconductors and fullerenes (C{sub 60}) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as electron donor and acceptor has been fabricated and characterized for improving photovoltaic and optical properties. The photovoltaic performance including current voltage curves in the dark and illumination of the F8T2/C{sub 60} conventional and inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells were investigated. Relationship between the photovoltaic properties and morphological behavior was focused on tuning for optimization of photo-voltaic performance under annealing condition near glass transition temperature. Additive-effect of diiodooctane (DIO) and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) on the photovoltaic performance and optical properties was investigated. Mechanism of the photovoltaic properties of the conventional and inverted solar cells will be discussed by the experimental results.

  11. Inhomogeneous Relaxation Dynamics and Phase Behaviour of a Liquid Crystal Confined in a Nanoporous Solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calus, Sylwia; Eich, Manfred; Huber, Patrick

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report filling-fraction dependent dielectric spectroscopy measurements on the relaxation dynamics of the rod-like nematogen 7CB condensed in 13 nm silica nanochannels. In the film-condensed regime, a slow interface relaxation dominates the dielectric spectra, whereas from the capillary-condensed state up to complete filling an additional, fast relaxation in the core of the channels is found. The temperature-dependence of the static capacitance, representative of the averaged, collective molecular orientational ordering, indicates a continuous, paranematic-to-nematic (P-N) transition, in contrast to the discontinuous bulk behaviour. It is well described by a Landau-de-Gennes free energy model for a phase transition in cylindrical confinement. The large tensile pressure of 10 MPa in the capillary-condensed state, resulting from the Young-Laplace pressure at highly curved liquid menisci, quantitatively accounts for a downward-shift of the P-N transition and an increased molecular mobility in comparison to the...

  12. Ferroelectric domain formation in discotic liquid crystals : Monte Carlo study on the influence of boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tushar Kanti Bose; Jayashree Saha

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The realization of a spontaneous macroscopic ferroelectric order in fluids of anisotropic mesogens is a topic of both fundamental and technological interest. Recently, we demonstrated that a system of dipolar achiral disklike ellipsoids can exhibit long-searched ferroelectric liquid crystalline phases of dipolar origin. In the present work, extensive off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the phase behavior of the system under the influences of the electrostatic boundary conditions that restrict any global polarization. We find that the system develops strongly ferroelectric slablike domains periodically arranged in an antiferroelectric fashion. Exploring the phase behavior at different dipole strengths, we find existence of the ferroelectric nematic and ferroelectric columnar order inside the domains. For higher dipole strengths, a biaxial phase is also obtained with a similar periodic array of ferroelectric slabs of antiparallel polarizations. We have studied the depolarizing effects by using both the Ewald summation and the spherical cut-off techniques. We present and compare the results of the two different approaches of considering the depolarizing effects in this anisotropic system. It is explicitly shown that the domain size increases with the system size as a result of considering longer range of dipolar interactions. The system exhibits pronounced system size effects for stronger dipolar interactions. The results provide strong evidence to the novel understanding that the dipolar interactions are indeed sufficient to produce long range ferroelectric order in anisotropic fluids.

  13. Electronic and vibronic properties of a discotic liquid-crystal and its charge transfer complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haverkate, Lucas A.; Mulder, Fokko M. [Reactor Institute Delft, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)] [Reactor Institute Delft, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Zbiri, Mohamed, E-mail: zbiri@ill.fr; Johnson, Mark R. [Institut Laue Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Institut Laue Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Carter, Elizabeth [Vibrational Spectroscopy Facility, School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2008 (Australia)] [Vibrational Spectroscopy Facility, School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, NSW 2008 (Australia); Kotlewski, Arek; Picken, S. [ChemE-NSM, Faculty of Chemistry, Delft University of Technology, 2628BL/136 Delft (Netherlands)] [ChemE-NSM, Faculty of Chemistry, Delft University of Technology, 2628BL/136 Delft (Netherlands); Kearley, Gordon J. [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)] [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Discotic liquid crystalline (DLC) charge transfer (CT) complexes combine visible light absorption and rapid charge transfer characteristics, being favorable properties for photovoltaic (PV) applications. We present a detailed study of the electronic and vibrational properties of the prototypic 1:1 mixture of discotic 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexakishexyloxytriphenylene (HAT6) and 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone (TNF). It is shown that intermolecular charge transfer occurs in the ground state of the complex: a charge delocalization of about 10{sup ?2} electron from the HAT6 core to TNF is deduced from both Raman and our previous NMR measurements [L. A. Haverkate, M. Zbiri, M. R. Johnson, B. Deme, H. J. M. de Groot, F. Lefeber, A. Kotlewski, S. J. Picken, F. M. Mulder, and G. J. Kearley, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13098 (2012)], implying the presence of permanent dipoles at the donor-acceptor interface. A combined analysis of density functional theory calculations, resonant Raman and UV-VIS absorption measurements indicate that fast relaxation occurs in the UV region due to intramolecular vibronic coupling of HAT6 quinoidal modes with lower lying electronic states. Relatively slower relaxation in the visible region the excited CT-band of the complex is also indicated, which likely involves motions of the TNF nitro groups. The fast quinoidal relaxation process in the hot UV band of HAT6 relates to pseudo-Jahn-Teller interactions in a single benzene unit, suggesting that the underlying vibronic coupling mechanism can be generic for polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Both the presence of ground state CT dipoles and relatively slow relaxation processes in the excited CT band can be relevant concerning the design of DLC based organic PV systems.

  14. 44.3 / S. Valyukh 44.3: A Liquid Crystal Lens with Non-uniform Anchoring Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and eyeglasses applications. Due to the property to be controlled with an external electrical field, liquid

  15. The crystalliquid interface of a body?centered?cubic?forming substance: Computer simulations of the r ? 6 potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laird, Brian Bostian; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interfaces between a bcc crystal and its melt are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Three distinct crystal/melt interfaces, (100), (111), and (110) are studied. For all interfaces the variation with z, the coordinate perpendicular...

  16. Behavior of the drain leakage current in metal-induced laterally crystallized thin lm transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - sistors on the same glass panel for active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Although solid phase 0 3 2 8 - 7 #12;low temperature oxide (LTO) gate insulator and 200 nm thick a-Si gate electrode were and drain regions. About 2 nm of Ni was deposited in an ultra-high vacuum evaporation system. For those TFTs

  17. 78 JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2013 Submillisecond-Response Vertical-Aligned Liquid Crystal for Color Sequential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    ) [15]. Due to thermal effect from the employed arc or LED lamp, the LCOS panel is usually operated conjugation length. In an LCOS projector, the arc lamp is relatively bright. Although filters are used to block the unwanted UV and infrared lights from the lamp, residual UV contents could still decompose

  18. P-127: Stabilization of Azodye Alignment Layer for Liquid Crystal Display Lishuang Yao, Tao Du, Vladimir Chigrinov, and Hoi Sing Kwok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LED light (450nm, 70mW/ cm2 ) and UV lamp (oriel 6925NS, 365nm, 9mW/ cm2 ) for two steps with 1 minute is injected. Cell with half twisted mode and half parallel mode was fabricated. Strong blue LED light

  19. IEEE/OSA JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 1, NO. 1, SEPTEMBER 2005 41 New Developments in Liquid Crystal Photo-Aligning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using cinnamoyl side-chain polymers [4], [5] and polyimide aligning agents [6]. More recently, a new polyimide (PI). Finally the ultraviolet

  20. Liquid crystal reorientation induced by completely unpolarized light L. Marrucci, P. Maddalena, G. Arnone, L. Sirleto, and E. Santamato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    crystal film acts as a sort of Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlator for the light polarization, rather than for the light intensity. As in the Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiment, the response is quadratic in the light

  1. Vertical alignment of liquid crystal through ion beam exposure on oxygen-doped SiC films deposited at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, Phil Kook; Park, Jeung Hun; Kim, Jae Chang; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Rho, Soon Joon; Jeon, Back Kyun; Shin, Sung Tae; Kim, Jang Sub; Lim, Soon Kwon [School of Electrical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); LC/OLED Research Team, LCD R and D Center, LCD Business, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Process Development Team, LCD R and D Center, LCD Business, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report the vertical alignment of liquid crystal (LC) through the ion beam exposure on amorphous oxygen-doped SiC (SiOC) film surfaces deposited at room temperature. The optical transmittance of these films was similar to that of polyimide layers, but much higher than that of SiO{sub x} films. The light leakage of a LC cell aligned vertically on SiOC films was much lower than those of a LC cell aligned on polyimide layers or other inorganic films. They found that LC molecules align vertically on ion beam treated SiOC film when the roughness of the electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) data is high on the SiOC film surface, while they align homogeneously when the roughness of the EFM data is low.

  2. Quantitative photoacoustic depth profilometry of magnetic field-induced thermal diffusivity inhomogeneity in the liquid crystal octylcyanobiphenyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    be present in these liquid crys- tals and the variation in the nematic value of the heat capacity may of the static Quantities enthalpy and heat capacity have been carried out by adiabatic scanning calorimetry-*0 namely the thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity, especially across the region

  3. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  4. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studier, F. William (Stony Brook, NY); Rosenberg, Alan H. (Setauket, NY)

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  5. Display blocks : cubic displays for multi-perspective visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pla i Conesa, Pol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the design, execution and evaluation of a new type of display technology, known as Display Blocks. Display Blocks are a response to two major limitations of current displays: visualization and interaction. ...

  6. Crystallization Behavior of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber Measured Using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis with Liquid Nitrogen Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Two dynamic temperature sweep tests, 25 to -100 C and 25 to -70 to 0 C (ramp rate = 1 C/min), were conducted at a frequency of 6.28 rad/s (1 Hz) using a torsion rectangular test geometry. A strain of 0.1% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on an initial dynamic strain sweep test. Storage (G{prime}) and loss (G{double_prime}) moduli, the ratio G{double_prime}/G{prime} (tan {delta}), and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion ({alpha}) were determined as a function of temperature. Crystallization occurred between -40 and -60 C, with G{prime} increasing from {approx}6 x 10{sup 6} to {approx}4 x 10{sup 8} Pa. The value of {alpha} was fairly constant before ({approx}4 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) and after ({approx}3 x 10{sup -4} mm/mm- C) the transition, and peaked during the transition ({approx}3 x 10{sup -3} mm/mm- C). Melting occurred around -30 C upon heating.

  7. Method of fabrication of display pixels driven by silicon thin film transistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Display pixels driven by silicon thin film transistors are fabricated on plastic substrates for use in active matrix displays, such as flat panel displays. The process for forming the pixels involves a prior method for forming individual silicon thin film transistors on low-temperature plastic substrates. Low-temperature substrates are generally considered as being incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures greater than about 200.degree. C. The pixel formation process results in a complete pixel and active matrix pixel array. A pixel (or picture element) in an active matrix display consists of a silicon thin film transistor (TFT) and a large electrode, which may control a liquid crystal light valve, an emissive material (such as a light emitting diode or LED), or some other light emitting or attenuating material. The pixels can be connected in arrays wherein rows of pixels contain common gate electrodes and columns of pixels contain common drain electrodes. The source electrode of each pixel TFT is connected to its pixel electrode, and is electrically isolated from every other circuit element in the pixel array.

  8. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  9. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  10. Computational immersive displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novy, Daniel E. (Daniel Edward)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immersion is an oft-quoted but ill-defined term used to describe a viewer or participant's sense of engagement with a visual display system or participatory media. Traditionally, advances in immersive quality came at the ...

  11. Solar display kiosk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, R.A.W.

    1984-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar display kiosk particularly to a display kiosk that during day time conditions is illuminated by the sun. It provides, in its preferred embodiment, a closed cylindrical member placed in the vertical position with an open or a closed but light transmissive upper end, which acts as a receiver for solar or ambient light. A circumferential band at the top of the kiosk acts a shading member to place regions immediately beneath such band into shade either totally or in part (umbra and penumbra). Translucent display materials are mounted in the walls of the cylinder in the zones of umbra or penumbra. To the viewer they appear to be highly illuminated, the illumination coming from the solar light entering into the center of the cylinder.

  12. Energy Landscape Diversity and Supercooled Liquid Properties Frank H. Stillingera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillinger, Frank

    typically exhibit little difference between liquid and crystal heat capacities Cp , and tend to have of the latter have liquid heat capacities that are significantly larger than the corresponding crystal values of the so-called "Kauzmann paradox". 5 The supercooled-liquid versus crystal heat capacity discrepancy, when

  13. Integrated display scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  14. Covered Product Category: Displays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including displays, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  15. Constancy of built-in luminance meter measurements in diagnostic displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silosky, M., E-mail: michael.silosky@ucdenver.edu; Marsh, R. M. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado, School of Medicine Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado, School of Medicine Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Liquid crystal displays used to interpret medical images are often equipped with built-in luminance meters to evaluate luminance response and Grayscale Standard Display Function conformance. This work evaluates agreement between luminance reported by the built-in meters and external measurements. Methods: The white level luminance was measured using a built-in meter and an external meter for 93 primary review workstations (Models MFGD 3420 and MDCG 3120-CB) with between 117 and 49?336 backlight hours (BLH). Measured luminance values were compared viat-test for displays with less than 25?000 BLH and those with more than 25?000 BLH. Bias between meters was also evaluated. Changes in luminance uniformity with increasing backlight hours were explored by determining the maximum luminance deviation (MLD) for subsets of these displays with less than 800 BLH and greater than 35?000 BLH. Results: The mean difference between built-in and external luminance measurements was 5.84% and 38.92% for displays with less than 25?000 and greater than 25?000 BLH, respectively, with a statistically significant difference in the means (p < 0.001). For displays with low BLH, a statistically significant bias was observed (p < 0.001) between built-in and external measurements. A high degree of correlation was observed between measurements made with two separate external meters (r = 0.999). The mean MLD was 9.5% and 11.2% for MDCG 3120-CB displays with less than 800 and greater than 35?000 BLH, respectively. The difference in the mean values was not statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Disagreement between the white level luminance measured using the built-in and external meter increased with BLH. Consequently, reliance on values reported by the built-in luminance meter may result in a reduction in image contrast with time. Recommendations have been proposed regarding luminance response testing and corrective action for failing displays.

  16. Display blocks: cubic displays for multi-perspective visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pla i Conesa, Pol

    We propose the design, implementation and evaluation of a set of tangible cubic displays. This novel approach to display technology consists of arranging six organic light emitting diode screens in a cubic form factor. We ...

  17. Black optic display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

  18. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

  19. This journal is c the Owner Societies 2010 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. A novel lyotropic liquid crystal formed by triphilic star-polyphiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyde, Stephen

    , hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon chains linked to a common centre. They form a number of liquid crystalline the hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon chains are in fact demixed in these star-polyphile systems, or whether both hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon chains are miscible, leading to a single hydrophobic domain, making the star

  20. INTERACTIVE DISPLAY OF POLYGONAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Peter M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. SEEDIS Workbook III, Interactive Polygon Mapping. LBL-August, 1974. Wood, P.M. Interactive Thematic ~mpping -- Aprivatelyownedrights. LBL-6490 INTERACTIVE DISPLAY OF

  1. Dynamic Response of Quartz Crystal Microbalances in contact with Silicone Oil Droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Han

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) in contact with liquid droplets have been used to investigate the rheological properties of liquids and the diverse solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. In this article, we first report ...

  2. Optofluidic-Tunable Color Filters And Spectroscopy Based On Liquid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Based On Liquid-Crystal Microflows. Abstract: The integration of color filters with microfluidics has attracted substantial attention in recent years, for on-chip absorption,...

  3. Collimated light from a waveguide for a display Adrian Travis,1,2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    between this light-guide and a liquid crystal panel guides light from color light-emitting diodes by light emitting diodes but these are point #116996 - $15.00 USD Received 9 Sep 2009; revised 9 Oct 2009

  4. Segmented nanowires displaying locally controllable properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires is tailored to achieve complex one-dimensional material geometries using phase diagrams determined for nanoscale materials. Segmented one-dimensional nanowires having constant composition display locally variable electronic band structures that are determined by the diameter of the nanowires. The unique electrical and optical properties of the segmented nanowires are exploited to form electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using gold-germanium as a model system, in situ transmission electron microscopy establishes, for nanometer-sized Au--Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs), the parts of the phase diagram that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition. The nanoscale phase diagram is then used to determine the exchange of material between the NW and the drop. The phase diagram for the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy.

  5. Plumpton College Horse riding displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontcheva, Kalina

    Plumpton College · Horse riding displays · Forestry demonstrations · Small animals · Tractor: enquiries@plumpton.ac.uk Tel: 01273 890454 www.plumpton.ac.uk Advice on all courses and career opportunities

  6. DISPLAY SCREEN EQUIPMENT REGULATIONS 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , charts or computer-generated graphics are included. Screens whose main use is to show television or film the standards required by the Regulations. 4 RISKS FROM USING DISPLAY SCREENS The principal risk associated when

  7. INTERACTIVE ANALYSIS AND DISPLAY OF TABULAR DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, W.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 1976. Kitous,B. Interactive matrix displays andSS98{~ tA(!. -3.2 . I INTERACTIVE ANALYSIS AND DISPLAY OF owned rights. ~j 6 U I INTERACTIVE ANALYSIS AND DISPLAY OF

  8. Condensation of Self-assembled Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystal Sunset Yellow in Aqueous Solutions Crowded with Polyethylene glycol and Doped with Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heung-Shik Park; Shin-Woong Kang; Luana Tortora; Satyendra Kumar; Oleg D. Lavrentovich

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We use optical and fluorescence microscopy, densitometry, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray scattering, to study the phase behavior of the reversible self-assembled chromonic aggregates of an anionic dye Sunset Yellow (SSY) in aqueous solutions crowded with an electrically neutral polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) and doped with the salt NaCl. PEG causes the isotropic SSY solutions to condense into a liquid-crystalline region with a high concentration of SSY aggregates, coexisting with a PEG-rich isotropic (I) region. PEG added to the homogeneous nematic (N) phase causes separation into the coexisting N and I domains; the SSY concentration in the N domains is higher than the original concentration of PEG-free N phase. Finally, addition of PEG to the highly concentrated homogeneous N phase causes separation into the coexisting columnar hexagonal (C) phase and I phase. This behavior can be qualitatively explained by the depletion (excluded volume) effects that act at two different levels: at the level of aggregate assembly from monomers and short aggregates and at the level of inter-aggregate packing. We also show a strong effect of a monovalent salt NaCl on phase diagrams that is different for high and low concentrations of SSY. Upon the addition of salt, dilute I solutions of SSY show appearance of the condensed N domains, but the highly concentrated C phase transforms into a coexisting I and N domains. We suggest that the salt-induced screening of electric charges at the surface of chromonic aggregates leads to two different effects: (a) increase of the scission energy and the contour length of aggregates, and (b) decrease of the persistence length of SSY aggregates.

  9. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  10. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATA STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, D.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAINTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATAtem. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL

  11. Dynamics in Organic Ionic Liquids in Distinct Regions Using Charged and Uncharged Orientational Relaxation Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Dynamics in Organic Ionic Liquids in Distinct Regions Using Charged and Uncharged Orientational probe molecules display markedly different rotational dynamics when analyzed using Stokes increasingly subslip as the length of ionic liquid alkyl chain is increased. The dynamics approach those

  12. Changes in mobility of plastic crystal ethanol during its transformation into the monoclinic crystal state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanz, Alejandro, E-mail: alejandro.sanz@csic.es; Nogales, Aurora; Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Puente-Orench, Ins [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France) [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragn, ICMA-CSIC, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Jimnez-Ruiz, Mnica [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Transformation of deuterated ethanol from the plastic crystal phase into the monoclinic one is investigated by means of a singular setup combining simultaneously dielectric spectroscopy with neutron diffraction. We postulate that a dynamic transition from plastic crystal to supercooled liquid-like configuration through a deep reorganization of the hydrogen-bonding network must take place as a previous step of the crystallization process. Once these precursor regions are formed, subsequent crystalline nucleation and growth develop with time.

  13. A view-sequential 3D display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossairt, Oliver S. (Oliver Strider), 1978-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines the various techniques for creating electronic 3D displays and analyzes their commercial potential. The thesis argues for the use of view-sequential techniques in the design of 3D displays based on ...

  14. Communications Counterion Effects in Liquid Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    . In the methodology used here and in our previous work, H2S gas diffuses into the gellike mesophase leading composite was washed repeatedly with diethyl ether/ethanol (50/50) to remove byproducts and unbound- separated copolymers,6 which would not exist in ordered arrays after the block copolymer template is removed

  15. Anisotropy and relaxation in nematic liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    in collaboration with Antonio di Carlo - Universit`a di Roma Tre Stefano Turzi - Politecnico di Milano Paolo their equilibrium values Paolo Biscari Pavia, Mar 2014 9/25 #12;Monte-Carlo simulations of intermolecular distance

  16. Properties of Liquid Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schwartz, Daniel S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Unalloyed polycrystalline Pu displays extreme thermal expansion behavior, i.e., {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} {gamma} {yields} {delta} increases by 25% in volume and {delta} {yields} {var_epsilon} {yields} liquid decreases by 4.5% in volume. Thus, making it difficult to measure density into the liquid state. Dilatometer outfitted with CaF molten metal cell offers a proven capability to measure thermal expansion in molten metals, but has yet to be proven for Pu. Historic data from the liquid nuclear fuels program will prove extremely useful as a guide to future measurements. 3.3at% Ga changes Pu molten metal properties: 50% increase in viscosity and {approx}3% decrease in density. Fe may decrease the density by a small amount assuming an averaging of densities for Pu-Ga and Pu-Fe liquids. More recent Boivineau (2009) work needs some interpretation, but technique is being employed in (U,Pu)O{sub 2} nuclear fuels program (Pu Futures, 2012).

  17. Multibrowsing: Moving Web Content across Multiple Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    is a framework for exploiting multiple heterogeneous displays, whether fixed or on mobile computing devices displays in a ubiquitous computing environment. The dis- plays may be "public" (e.g. wall-sized fixed for multi- display environments. Since it uses Web standards, it accommodates any device or platform already

  18. REVIEW/SYNTHSE Threat display in birds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Peter L.

    REVIEW/SYNTHSE Threat display in birds Peter L. Hurd and Magnus Enquist Abstract: The study of threat displays has long been an area in which theory and empirical work have each spurred the other. A great deal that classical ethologists have accurately described about threat displays still lacks

  19. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo, E-mail: mijg@mail.buct.edu.cn; Zhong, Chongli [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid?liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  20. DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY...

  1. Critical function and success path summary display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of and hierarchical access to three levels of display pages containing information on critical function monitoring and success path monitoring.

  2. Real time speech formant analyzer and display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, George E. (Ames, IA); Struve, Walter S. (Ames, IA); Homer, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A speech analyzer for interpretation of sound includes a sound input which converts the sound into a signal representing the sound. The signal is passed through a plurality of frequency pass filters to derive a plurality of frequency formants. These formants are converted to voltage signals by frequency-to-voltage converters and then are prepared for visual display in continuous real time. Parameters from the inputted sound are also derived and displayed. The display may then be interpreted by the user. The preferred embodiment includes a microprocessor which is interfaced with a television set for displaying of the sound formants. The microprocessor software enables the sound analyzer to present a variety of display modes for interpretive and therapeutic used by the user.

  3. Real time speech formant analyzer and display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, G.E.; Struve, W.S.; Homer, J.F.

    1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A speech analyzer for interpretation of sound includes a sound input which converts the sound into a signal representing the sound. The signal is passed through a plurality of frequency pass filters to derive a plurality of frequency formants. These formants are converted to voltage signals by frequency-to-voltage converters and then are prepared for visual display in continuous real time. Parameters from the inputted sound are also derived and displayed. The display may then be interpreted by the user. The preferred embodiment includes a microprocessor which is interfaced with a television set for displaying of the sound formants. The microprocessor software enables the sound analyzer to present a variety of display modes for interpretive and therapeutic used by the user. 19 figs.

  4. NMR STUDIES OF LIQUID CRYSTALS AND MOLECULES DISSOLVED IN LIQUID CRYSTAL SOLVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drobny, G.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    input. COM OPl OP2 The command line format is: Currently Xthe command task. Once the command line has been received,the echo is off, all command lines must begin with contro1-B

  5. Optomechanical Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichenfield, Matt; Camacho, Ryan M; Vahala, Kerry J; Painter, Oskar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structured, periodic optical materials can be used to form photonic crystals capable of dispersing, routing, and trapping light. A similar phenomena in periodic elastic structures can be used to manipulate mechanical vibrations. Here we present the design and experimental realization of strongly coupled optical and mechanical modes in a planar, periodic nanostructure on a silicon chip. 200-Terahertz photons are co-localized with mechanical modes of Gigahertz frequency and 100-femtogram mass. The effective coupling length, which describes the strength of the photon-phonon interaction, is as small as 2.9 microns, which, together with minute oscillator mass, allows all-optical actuation and transduction of nanomechanical motion with near quantum-limited sensitivity. Optomechanical crystals have many potential applications, from RF-over-optical communication to the study of quantum effects in mesoscopic mechanical systems.

  6. High power laser having a trivalent liquid host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser having a lasing chamber and a semiconductor pumping device with trivalent titanium ions dissolved in a liquid host within the lasing chamber. Since the host is a liquid, it can be removed from the optical cavity when it becomes heated avoiding the inevitable optical distortion and birefringence common to glass and crystal hosts.

  7. Stable and metastable nanowires displaying locally controllable properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires is tailored to achieve complex one-dimensional material geometries using phase diagrams determined for nanoscale materials. Segmented one-dimensional nanowires having constant composition display locally variable electronic band structures that are determined by the diameter of the nanowires. The unique electrical and optical properties of the segmented nanowires are exploited to form electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using gold-germanium as a model system, in situ transmission electron microscopy establishes, for nanometer-sized Au--Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs), the parts of the phase diagram that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition. The nanoscale phase diagram is then used to determine the exchange of material between the NW and the drop. The phase diagram for the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy.

  8. A CMOS-compatible compact display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Andrew R. (Andrew Raymond)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portable information devices demand displays with high resolution and high image quality that are increasingly compact and energy-efficient. Microdisplays consisting of a silicon CMOS backplane integrated with light ...

  9. Image fusion for a nighttime driving display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrington, William Frederick

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into image fusion for a nighttime driving display application was performed. Most of the image fusion techniques being investigated in this application were developed for other purposes. When comparing the ...

  10. Beacon data acquisition and display system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.G.; Black, B.D.

    1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for transmitting aircraft beacon information received by a secondary surveillance radar through telephone lines to a remote display includes a digitizer connected to the radar for preparing a serial file of data records containing position and identification information of the beacons detected by each sweep of the radar. This information is transmitted through the telephone lines to a remote computer where it is displayed. 6 figures.

  11. Liquid phase deposition synthesis of hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deki, Shigehito; Beleke, Alexis Bienvenu; Kotani, Yuki [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokko, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Mizuhata, Minoru, E-mail: mizuhata@kobe-u.ac.j [Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokko, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexagonal molybdenum trioxide thin films with good crystallinity and high purity have been fabricated by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique using molybdic acid (H{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) dissolved in 2.82% hydrofluoric acid (HF) and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} as precursors. The crystal was found to belong to a hexagonal hydrate system MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (napprox0.56). The unit cell lattice parameters are a=10.651 A, c=3.725 A and V=365.997 A{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the as-deposited samples showed well-shaped hexagonal rods nuclei that grew and where the amount increased with increase in reaction time. X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra showed a Gaussian shape of the doublet of Mo 3d core level, indicating the presence of Mo{sup 6+} oxidation state in the deposited films. The deposited films exhibited an electrochromic behavior by lithium intercalation and deintercalation, which resulted in coloration and bleaching of the film. Upon dehydration at about 450 deg. C, the hexagonal MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O was transformed into the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic phase. - Abstract: SEM photograph of typical h-MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O thin film nuclei obtained after 36 h at 40 deg. C by the LPD method. Display Omitted

  12. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  13. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D. (Richmond, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  14. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  15. A high brightness field emission display

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palevsky, A. [Raytheon Co., Quincy, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The military requirement for avionics display performance requires that displays be legible with 10,000 foot-candles (fc) bright light shining into the pilot`s eyes, or 10,000 fc shining directly on the display. The contrast ratio under these conditions must be at least 4.66:1. In addition, instant-on operation is sought for temperatures as low as {minus}54 C. Currently these specifications can barely be met by monochrome CRTs whose use is counter-indicated by other factors. No color display can achieve optimum performance in the areas mentioned, nor do any current contenders, primarily AMLCD`s, have any prospects of achieving full compliance. The FED being developed by Raytheon shows strong promise of being able to achieve the brightness and contrast ratios desired. The FED is also inherently able to provide instant-on functionality at any terrestrial temperature and does not require any heating at low temperatures. The technical objective of the Raytheon development program is to develop a high performance, full color, FED Panel that meets the performance and environmental operating condition requirements specified for military and other high performance display applications.

  16. The TV Turtle: A Logo Graphics System for Raster Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Henry

    1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, most computer graphics systems have been oriented toward the display of line drawins, continually refreshing the screen from a display list of vectors. Developments such as plasma panel displays and ...

  17. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  18. Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SSRL's Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library allows users to view glitch spectra online, list specific crystal orientations, and download PDF files of the glitch spectra. (Specialized Interface)

  19. New Refrigerant Boosts Energy Efficiency of Supermarket Display...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Refrigerant Boosts Energy Efficiency of Supermarket Display Cases New Refrigerant Boosts Energy Efficiency of Supermarket Display Cases February 20, 2015 - 4:55pm Addthis New...

  20. alternative graphical displays: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graphical User Interfaces on OLED Displays CiteSeer Summary: Emerging organic light-emitting diode (OLED)-based displays obviate external lighting; and consume drastically...

  1. Image display device in digital TV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Seung Jong (Seoul, KR)

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an image display device in a digital TV that is capable of carrying out the conversion into various kinds of resolution by using single bit map data in the digital TV. The image display device includes: a data processing part for executing bit map conversion, compression, restoration and format-conversion for text data; a memory for storing the bit map data obtained according to the bit map conversion and compression in the data processing part and image data inputted from an arbitrary receiving part, the receiving part receiving one of digital image data and analog image data; an image outputting part for reading the image data from the memory; and a display processing part for mixing the image data read from the image outputting part and the bit map data converted in format from the a data processing part. Therefore, the image display device according to the present invention can convert text data in such a manner as to correspond with various resolution, carry out the compression for bit map data, thereby reducing the memory space, and support text data of an HTML format, thereby providing the image with the text data of various shapes.

  2. LED Light Sources for Projection Display Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    LED Light Sources for Projection Display Applications By Chenhui Peng 04-13-2012 #12;Outline 1. The first practical LED is in red color and it is made with gallium arsenide (GaAs). 4http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light with holes and release energy in the form of photons. 5http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode #12

  3. Liquid electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  4. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 87, 064105 (2013) Complex crystallization dynamics in amorphous germanium observed with dynamic transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Tmc). This fact has been exploited for the fabrication of solar cells, flat panel displays, and IR or electron beam heating is a remarkably complex process that involves several distinct modes of crystal detectors where thin amorphous films are rapidly crystallized by appropriate laser or electron beam heating

  5. Zinc Doping in Cosubstituted In2-2xSnxZnxO3-A. Ambrosini, S. Malo, and K. R. Poeppelmeier*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    applications such as solar cells and flat panel and liquid crystal displays. Sn-doped indium oxide (ITO

  6. VOLUME 86, NUMBER 24 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 11 JUNE 2001 Acoustic Crystallization and Heterogeneous Nucleation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caupin, Frédéric

    ever observed that a high- intensity sound wave traveling in a liquid can crystallize this liquid to the speed of sound). We believe that it is the ability of helium crystals to grow at very high speed which pressure, the sound velocity is 366.3 m s in the liquid phase [9], so that the acoustic wavelength is 360

  7. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  8. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Chae Un (Ithaca, NY); Gruner, Sol M. (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  9. Antireflection and Enhanced Absorption in Tapered Silicon Photonic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coldren, Larry A.

    as applying this structure for solar energy conversion. (a) (b) (c) Figure 1 (a) SEM picture and photograph Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (050.5298) Photonic crystals; (160.4760) Optical properties ; (220 studied as the building blocks to realize functional devices for optical networking, image display, bio

  10. Intelligent head-down display design for the smart cockpit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branham, Paul Anthony

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Display Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Moving Map Symbology Set. 14 Automatic Scaling Flowchart 15 Check Lists (CHCK LSTS) Display Mode 16 Training (TRNG) Display Mode. 17 Built-in Self Test (BIT) Display Mode. 18 GAPATS Executive...), and other NavAids, with the plane's current location represented on the screen by an icon. ~ Flight Planning - A standardized display format is used which permits the pilot to quickly enter data in a logical order, generally corresponding with an FAA...

  11. Eyeglasses-free display: towards correcting visual aberrations with computational light field displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Fu-Chung

    Millions of people worldwide need glasses or contact lenses to see or read properly. We introduce a computational display technology that predistorts the presented content for an observer, so that the target image is ...

  12. Eyeglasses-free Display: Towards Correcting Visual Aberrations with Computational Light Field Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    Eyeglasses-free Display: Towards Correcting Visual Aberrations with Computational Light Field of the population in some Asia countries [Wong et al. 2000] suffer from myopia. Eyeglasses have been the pri- mary

  13. Micro-valve pump light valve display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeechun Lee.

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat panel display incorporates a plurality of micro-pump light valves (MLV's) to form pixels for recreating an image. Each MLV consists of a dielectric drop sandwiched between substrates, at least one of which is transparent, a holding electrode for maintaining the drop outside a viewing area, and a switching electrode from accelerating the drop from a location within the holding electrode to a location within the viewing area. The sustrates may further define non-wetting surface areas to create potential energy barriers to assist in controlling movement of the drop. The forces acting on the drop are quadratic in nature to provide a nonlinear response for increased image contrast. A crossed electrode structure can be used to activate the pixels whereby a large flat panel display is formed without active driver components at each pixel.

  14. Liquid foams of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcazar Jorba, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid foams are dispersions of bubbles in a liquid. Bubbles are stabilized by foaming agents that position at the interface between the gas and the liquid. Most foaming agents, such as the commonly used sodium dodecylsulfate, ...

  15. Reducing Leaking Electricity to 1 Watt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, A.K.; Huber, Wolfgang; Rosen, Karen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flash Register Input/Output Emitters Light emitting diode (LED) Light emitting diode (LED) Liquid crystal display (LCD)displays are light emitting diodes (LEDs) and vacuum

  16. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  17. Security alarm communication and display systems development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddoups, I.G.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a variety of alarm communication and display systems for a broad spectrum of users. This paper will briefly describe the latest systems developed for the Department of Energy (DOE), the Department of Defense (DoD), and the Department of State (DOS) applications. Applications covered will vary from relatively small facilities to large complex sites. Ongoing system developments will also be discussed. The concluding section will summarize the practical, implementable state-of-the-art features available in new systems. 6 figs.

  18. Non-intrusive ultrasonic liquid-in-line detector for small diameter tubes. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piper, T.C.

    1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement for detecting liquids in a line, using non-intrusive ultrasonic techniques is disclosed. In this arrangement, four piezoelectric crystals are arranged in pairs about a 0.078 inch o.d. pipe. An ultrasonic tone burst is transmitted along the pipe, between crystal pairs, and the amplitude of the received tone burst indicates the absence/presence of liquid in the pipe.

  19. Non-intrusive ultrasonic liquid-in-line detector for small diameter tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piper, Thomas C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement for deleting liquid in a line, using non-intrusive ultrasonic techniques is disclosed. In this arrangement, four piezoelectric crystals are arranged in pairs about a 0.072 inch o.d. pipe. An ultrasonic tone burst is transmitted along the pipe, between crystal pairs, and the amplitude of the received tone burst indicates the absence/presence of liquid in the pipe.

  20. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  1. Assessment of SEAD Global Efficiency Medals for Televisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Park, Won

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LCD liquid crystal display LED light emitting diode OLEDorganic light emitting diode p progressive scan PC personalwinning models are light emitting diode (LED) backlit liquid

  2. Growing intermetallic single crystals using in situ decanting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrovic, Cedomir; Canfield, Paul; Mellen, Jonathan

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature metallic solution growth is one of the most successful and versatile methods for single crystal growth, and is particularly suited for exploratory synthesis. The method commonly utilizes a centrifuge at room temperature and is very successful for the synthesis of single crystal phases that can be decanted from the liquid below the melting point of the silica ampoule. In this paper, we demonstrate the extension of this method that enables single crystal growth and flux decanting inside the furnace at temperatures above 1200C. This not only extends the number of available metallic solvents that can be used in exploratory crystal growth but also can be particularly well suited for crystals that have a rather narrow exposed solidification surface in the equilibrium alloy phase diagram.

  3. Commercial assessment of roll to roll manufacturing of electronic displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randolph, Michael Aaron

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of manufacturing electronic displays currently limits the range of applications and markets into which it is currently economically feasible to adopt displays. Roll-to-roll manufacturing has been identified by the ...

  4. Hermetically sealed encasements for historic document display and preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Keith (Keith V.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis was to develop designs and methods for the preservation and display of historic documents. The results were applied via the design, manufacture, and installation of five hermetic display encasements ...

  5. Home Energy Displays: Consumer Adoption and Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMarche, J.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.; Sachs, O.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this project was to investigate the factors influencing consumer adoption of Home Energy Displays (HEDs) and to evaluate electricity consumption in households with basic HEDs versus enhanced feedback methods - web portals or alerts. We hypothesized that providing flexible and relatable information to users, in addition to a basic HED, would make feedback more effective and achieve persistent energy savings. In Phase I, we conducted three user research studies and found preferences for aesthetically pleasing, easy to understand feedback that is accessible through multiple media and offered free of charge. The deployment of HEDs in 150 households planned for Phase II encountered major recruitment and HED field deployment problems. First, after extensive outreach campaigns to apartment complexes with 760 units, only 8% of building's tenants elected to receive a free HED in their homes as part of the field study. Second, the HED used, a leading market model, had a spectrum of problems, including gateway miscommunications, failure to post to a data-hosting third party, and display malfunctions. In light of these challenges, we are pursuing a modified study investigating the energy savings of a web portal versus alert-based energy feedback instead of a physical HED.

  6. Human factors evaluation of electroluminescent display. number sign. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auflick, J.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of an an electroluminescent display, done by scientists and researchers in the Human Factors Research Unit at EG G, Idaho, Inc. The purpose of this evaluation was to examine the Sunlight Readability'' of one electroluminescent (EL) display; a display which may be incorporated into a new generation of US Army diesel generators. The basic finding of this evaluation is that this particular EL display is not sunlight readable. 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Peacocks orient their courtship displays towards the sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomerie, Bob

    ORIGINAL PAPER Peacocks orient their courtship displays towards the sun Roslyn Dakin & Robert on male orientation relative to the position of the sun. During the "wing-shaking" display, females were generally behind the displaying male, and male orientation with respect to the position of the sun

  8. TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Grantham

    1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

  9. Thermocapillary instabilities in a laterally heated liquid bridge with end wall rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witkowski, Laurent Martin

    Thermocapillary instabilities in a laterally heated liquid bridge with end wall rotation L in a laterally heated liquid bridge is studied numerically using the full-zone model of the floating-zone crystal growth technique. A small Prandtl number (0.02) fluid, relevant for semiconductor melts, is studied

  10. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  11. Liquid pair correlations in four spatial dimensions: Theory versus simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Heinen; J. Horbach; H. Lwen

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using liquid integral equation theory, we calculate the pair correlations of particles that interact via a smooth repulsive pair potential in d = 4 spatial dimensions. We discuss the performance of different closures for the Ornstein-Zernike equation, by comparing the results to computer simulation data. Our results are of relevance to understand crystal and glass formation in high-dimensional systems.

  12. Novel Fluctuations at a Constrained Liquid-Solid Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chaudhuri; Debasish Chaudhuri; Surajit Sengupta

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the interface between a solid trapped within a bath of liquid by a suitably shaped non-uniform external potential. Such a potential may be constructed using lasers, external electric or magnetic fields or a surface template. We study a two dimensional case where a thin strip of solid, created in this way, is surrounded on either side by a bath of liquid with which it can easily exchange particles. Since height fluctuations of the interface cost energy, this interface is constrained to remain flat at all length scales. However, when such a solid is stressed by altering the depth of the potential; beyond a certain limit, it responds by relieving stress by novel interfacial fluctuations which involve addition or deletion of entire lattice layers of the crystal. This ``layering'' transition is a generic feature of the system regardless of the details of the interaction potential. We show how such interfacial fluctuations influence mass, momentum and energy transport across the interface. Tiny momentum impulses produce weak shock waves which travel through the interface and cause the spallation of crystal layers into the liquid. Kinetic and energetic constraints prevent spallation of partial layers from the crystal, a fact which may be of some practical use. We also study heat transport through the liquid-solid interface and obtain the resistances in liquid, solid and interfacial regions (Kapitza resistance) as the solid undergoes such layering transitions. Heat conduction, which shows strong signatures of the structural transformations, can be understood using a free volume calculation.

  13. Equation for liquid density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Yang, H.C.; Hopper, J.R.; Cawley, W.A. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturated liquid densities for organic chemicals are given as functions of temperature using a modified Rackett equation.

  14. Ion Coulomb Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Thompson

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Coulomb crystals (ICC), formed by atomic ions at low temperatures in radiofrequency and Penning ion traps, are structures that have remarkable properties and many applications. Images of Coulomb crystals are striking and reveal the crystal structure, which arises from a balance between the trapping forces acting on the ions and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. Applications of these structures range from frequency standards and quantum simulation through to measurement of the cross sections of chemical reactions of ions.

  15. Liquid detection circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Regan, Thomas O. (North Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  16. Breaking symmetries in ordered materials : spin polarized light transport in magnetized noncentrosymmetric 1D photonic crystals, and photonic gaps and fabrication of quasiperiodic structured materials from interference lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bita, Ion

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of breaking various symmetries on optical properties in ordered materials have been studied. Photonic crystals lacking space-inversion and time-reversal symmetries were shown to display nonreciprocal dispersion ...

  17. Phononic crystal devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  18. DNA adsorption at liquid/solid interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carine Douarche; Robert Corts; Steven J. Roser; Jean-Louis Sikorav; Alan Braslau

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA adsorption on solid or liquid surfaces is a topic of broad fundamental and applied interest. Here we study by x-ray reflectivity the adsorption of monodisperse double-stranded DNA molecules a positively-charged surface, obtained through chemical grafting of a homogeneous organicmonomolecular layer of N-(2-aminoethyl) dodecanamide on an oxide-free monocrystalline Si(111) wafer. The adsorbed dsDNA is found to embed into the soft monolayer which is deformed in the process. The surface coverage is very high and this adsorbed layer is expected to display 2D nematic ordering.

  19. Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Tonazzi, Juan C. L. (Tucson, AZ); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF3SO3-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3SO2)2N-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3CF2SO2)2N-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF3SO2)3C-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes.

  20. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  1. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  2. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to create an angular profile plot which was compared to what was produced by Yazynin's code for a beam with no multiple scattering. The results were comparable, with volume reflection and channeling effects observed and the range of crystal orientations at which volume reflection is seen was about 1 mrad in both simulations.

  3. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  4. INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS DISPLAYS FOR HIERARCHICAL DATA STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, D.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pittsburgh, 1980 LBL-10247 INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICSOF THIS DKiir.KHT IS UMLIMITEO INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICSBerkeley, CA 94720 An interactive computer graphical display

  5. ascorbate peroxidase display: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This novel approach to display technology consists of arranging six organic light emitting diode screens in a cubic form factor. We ... Pla i Conesa, Pol 35 Tradeoffs in...

  6. acinetobacter baumannii displays: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This novel approach to display technology consists of arranging six organic light emitting diode screens in a cubic form factor. We ... Pla i Conesa, Pol 29 Tradeoffs in...

  7. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  8. Liquid Crystal Optics and Photonics CPHY Assignment 1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    ) Give an expression for the potential energy density and the kinetic energy density for each wave when the waves are far apart (b) Give an expression for the potential energy density and the kinetic energy of the string? (b) Give an expression for the energy density in the string. (c) Calculate the average energy

  9. Engineered pixels using active plasmonic holograms with liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Calum; Montelongo, Yunuen; Tenorio-Pearl, Jaime Oscar; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan; Milne, William I.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    fabricated holograms encode the Cam- bridge logo (hologram 1) and Kings College Chapel (hologram 2). State (1) is with incident linearly polar- ized light in the direction of hologram (1) antennae, (b) shows this output at a higher magnification in which... 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 fabricated device here is compatible with existing semiconductor fabrication processes, and hence the incorporation...

  10. Synthesis and Liquid Crystal Phase Transitions of Zirconium Phosphate Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuai, Min

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.1 Preparation of ?-ZrP Disks .................................................................... 17 2.3.2 Characterization .................................................................................... 18 2.4 Traditional Hydrothermal Method... products. Mostly with flask shape, the particles made up the clay which is abundant in the earth covering our planet. Like graphene, some inorganic layered compounds, such as MoS2, Niobium layered oxide (Niobates), and ?-Zirconium phosphates (?-Zr...

  11. The Free Energy Landscape of a Multistable Liquid Crystal Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planar bistable device [Tsakonas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 2007, 90, 111913] is known to have two distinct classes of stable equilibria: the diagonal and rotated solutions. We model this device within the two-dimensional Landau-de Gennes theory, with a surface potential and without any external fields. We systematically compute transition pathways between the stable equilibria that provide new information about how the equilibria are connected in the Landau-de Gennes free energy landscape. These transition pathways exhibit an intermediate transition state, which is a saddle point of the Landau-de Gennes energy. We numerically compute the structural details of the transition states, the optimal transition pathways and the energy barriers between the equilibria, as a function of the surface anchoring strength. For strong anchoring, the transition pathways are mediated by defects whereas we get defect-free transition pathways for moderate and weak anchoring. In the weak anchoring limit, we recover a cusp ca...

  12. Supercoiled DNA; plectonemic structure and liquid crystal formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Maarel, J R C; Zakharova, S S; Jesse, W; Backendorf, C; Egelhaaf, Stefan U; Lapp, A

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the phase behaviour of pUC18 plasmid solutions with phase separation experiments and polarized light microscopy. Furthermore, the configuration of the superhelix is monitored with small-angle ...

  13. Analysis and Stability of BentCore Liquid Crystal Fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 21, 2011 ... We show that the relative size of the energy's elasticity con- ... energy to balance the tendency of surface tension to constrict the fiber and.

  14. Analysis of Nematic Liquid Crystals with Disclination Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    May 31, 2011 ... 2,2; B5/8. ? C(M). Elliptic estimates imply that z ? W3,2( .... only on ? and k such that min{|bn ? bl|, dist(bn,??); 1 ? n, l ? k, n = l} = ?. 19...

  15. Polarization independent VOA based on dielectrically stretched liquid crystal droplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    . Micromech. Microeng. 18(7), 075003 (2008). 3. L. Zhu, Y. Huang, and A. Yariv, "Integrated microfluidic, H. Lakner, and H. Kck, "A resonantly excited 2D-micro-scanning-mirror with large deflection," Sens interface," Appl. Phys. Lett. 95(8), 083507 (2009). 5. R. A. Soref and D. H. McMahon, "Total switching

  16. Photorefractivity in polymer-stabilized liquid crystals films.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasielewski, M. R.

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have shown that PSLCs are capable of forming photorefractive gratings that operate in the thick grating regime. Polymer stabilization alters the charge transport and trapping characteristics of LCs, resulting in longer lived gratings, while maintaining the advantages of high orientational birefringence within LCs. Furthermore, very low applied electric fields (800 V/cm) and low optical intensities (100 mW/cm{sup 2}) are required to create large photorefractive effects in these materials. It is expected that optimization of the redox potentials of the chromophores within the PSLCs will continue to improve the performance of these materials.

  17. Fabrication and transmission measurements of liquid crystal cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Dae Won

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LC-cells. 67 to the twisted nematic LC-cells show low TC values (& 10X) up to 500 nm followed by rapid increase. TC maxima occur in 550 to 650 nm wavelength. TC maximum becomes sharper with decreasing cell thickness. For d = 6 pm, TC = 40X, max... d = 9 pm, TC - =35X and for 12 pm, TC =- 25X. max max For wavelengths longer than 700 nm, contrary to twisted nematic LC-cells, TC decreases with increasing wavelength. Gust-host LC-cells with Nx twist show higher TC than those with Npx/2 twist...

  18. Photoalignment of Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals by Azodye Layers Eugene POZHIDAEV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    buffing of thin polyimide films. The impurities and electrostatic charge of polyimide align- ing films surfaces, including rubbed polyimide films47) and photoaligned layers,813) were used. Several types-irradiated polyimide films by the double exposure method.9) A high contrast ratio and a perfectly bistable switching

  19. Stamping Oriented Molecular Monolayers Using Liquid Crystal Inks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, David L.

    stamps were made from mechanically rubbed polyimide (PI) films on glass, grooved Si, or embossed poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) (Figures S1A-C). Polyimide stamps were made by spin coating a polyimide precursor solution (PI by rubbing of the cured film with a soft cloth. Biaxial polyimide stamps were made by masking half the film

  20. TwoPhoton Absorption (TPA) Liquid Crystal Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    , actually results in a larger resolution spot. #12; 3D Microfabrication http://npm.creol.ucf.edu/3DM

  1. Adaptive liquid crystal lens with large focal length tunability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    applications in auto beam steering, mobile phone cameras, eyeglasses, and other machine visions. Various

  2. Asymptotic behavior for a nematic liquid crystal model with different ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Volumes in Mathematics and its Applications, 5, Springer, New York, 1987. .... and Applied Mathematics, 133, Chapman & Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, Florida, 2004

  3. Fabrication and transmission measurements of liquid crystal cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Dae Won

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % RO-CB-5815 3% Black Dye Bll 4% RO-TN-605 Mixture of MBBA and EBBA ACM-72 0. 08% Solution ACM-72 0. 08% Solution ACM-72 0. 08% Solution Npz/2* Npr** Np vr/2 Nrr 6 rrm, 9 rrm, 12 rrm 6 rrm, 9 trm, 12 rrm 6 trm, 9 rrm, 12 rrm 6... I 30 W d=9pm d=12pm 20 10 0 2 6 8 10 ~ 12 14 Applied Voltage (rms Volts) Fig. 28. Transmission-voltage characteristics of Npr/2 twisted guest-host LC cells with polarization of the beam perpendicular to the grooves at 633 nm, 47 60 d~ 6...

  4. FLUCTUATIONS NEAR THE CONVECTIVE INSTABILITY IN A CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . For sufficiently strong heating, it is pos- sible for the buoyancy force to overcome the vis- cous shear forces convective pour une certaine valeur critique. A cause du couplage de modes induit par la force extrieure, la, drives the system into convective instability. It is found that, because of the mode coupling induced

  5. Lyotropic Liquid Crystal (LLC) Nanofiltration Membranes - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, 2014InnovationPatents -Portal

  6. Large single domain 123 material produced by seeding with single crystal rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todt, Volker (Lemont, IL); Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Shi, Donglu (Oak Park, OH); Sengupta, Suvankar (Columbus, OH)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating bulk YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x where compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of Y and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x are heated in the presence of a Nd.sub.1+x Ba.sub.2-x Cu.sub.3 O.sub.y seed crystal to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x while maintaining the seed crystal solid. The materials are slowly cooled to provide a YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x material having a predetermined number of domains between 1 and 5. Crack-free single domain materials can be formed using either plate shaped seed crystals or cube shaped seed crystals with a pedestal of preferential orientation material.

  7. Lighted display devices for producing static or animated visual displays, including animated facial features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heilbron, Valerie J; Clem, Paul G; Cook, Adam Wade

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An illuminated display device with a base member with a plurality of cavities therein. Illumination devices illuminate the cavities and emit light through an opening of the cavities in a pattern, and a speaker can emit sounds in synchronization with the pattern. A panel with translucent portions can overly the base member and the cavities. An animated talking character can have an animated mouth cavity complex with multiple predetermined mouth lighting configurations simulative of human utterances. The cavities can be open, or optical waveguide material or positive members can be disposed therein. Reflective material can enhance internal reflectance and light emission.

  8. Group IVA irons: New constraints on the crystallization and cooling history of an asteroidal core with a complex history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    ele- ments indicate marked, progressive depletions in the IVA system. However, if the IVA core beganGroup IVA irons: New constraints on the crystallization and cooling history of an asteroidal core consistent with progressive crystalliquid fractionation. Attempts to collec- tively model the HSE abundances

  9. Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

  10. GPU rendering for autostereoscopic displays Francois de Sorbier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    GPU rendering for autostereoscopic displays Francois de Sorbier LABINFO-IGM UMR CNRS 8049. In the case of real-time computer graphics images, the standard approach consists in rendering every view displays in a single render- ing pass. Our algorithm is based on the fact that vertices properties remain

  11. A Taxonomy of Real and Virtual World Display Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milgram, Paul

    Chapter 1 A Taxonomy of Real and Virtual World Display Integration Paul Milgram Herman Colquhoun Jr and control- display mapping in Section 1.2. Finally, in Section 1.3, we present a taxonomy which we hope in terms of breadth. Most common appear to be those for which AR refers narrowly to the 1 #12;2 A Taxonomy

  12. The DNA binding activity of p53 displays reactiondiffusion kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinow, Peter

    The DNA binding activity of p53 displays reactiondiffusion kinetics 26th Southeastern 37240 The DNA binding activity of p53 displays reactiondiffusion kinetics p. 1/2 #12;Collaborators, Vanderbilt University Emmanuele DiBenedetto, PhD, Department of Mathematics, Vanderbilt University The DNA

  13. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  14. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlam, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit tight of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  15. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  16. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (Pinole, CA); Schlamp, Michael C. (Plainsboro, NJ); Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  17. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  18. Sequence Logos: A New Way to Display Consensus Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    Sequence Logos: A New Way to Display Consensus Sequences Thomas D. Schneider \\Lambday and R content of the sequences at that position. From these `sequence logos', one can determine not only) at every position in a site or sequence. The logo displays both significant residues and subtle sequence

  19. Sequence Logos: A New Way to Display Consensus Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    Sequence Logos: A New Way to Display Consensus Sequences Thomas D. Schneider y and R. Michael of the sequences at that position. From these `sequence logos', one can determine not only the consensus sequence in a site or sequence. The logo displays both signi cant residues and subtle sequence patterns. INTRODUCTION

  20. Illustrative Display of Hidden Iso-Surface Structures Jan Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartz, Dirk

    Illustrative Display of Hidden Iso-Surface Structures Jan Fischer Visual Computing for Medicine is represented by black silhouettes and hatching. The second layer of the iso-surface is rendered as red is a widespread method for the display of volume datasets. It is based on the extraction of polygonal iso

  1. Adsorptive Drying of Organic Liquids- An Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, S.; Humphrey, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    (which is very heat sensitive and can poly merize in the presence of adsorbents) by freeze drying at -20 0 C and centrifuging the ice crystals. The water oontent was reduced from 700 ppm to 1~0 ppm. Pervaporation One of the recent advances... at The University of Texas at Austin will also be given. INTRODUCTION In the process industries it is often necessary to dry fluids before they can be processed further. For example, if a liquid is to be subjected to cryo genic conditions, its frost point must...

  2. Interactive display system having a digital micromirror imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Brewster, Calvin

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector cooperates with a digital imaging device, e.g. a digital micromirror imaging device, for projecting an image through the panel for display on the outlet face. The imaging device includes an array of mirrors tiltable between opposite display and divert positions. The display positions reflect an image light beam from the projector through the panel for display on the outlet face. The divert positions divert the image light beam away from the panel, and are additionally used for reflecting a probe light beam through the panel toward the outlet face. Covering a spot on the panel, e.g. with a finger, reflects the probe light beam back through the panel toward the inlet face for detection thereat and providing interactive capability.

  3. Electro-optical switching and memory display device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.A.; O'Grady, W.E.; Linkous, C.A.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An electro-optical display device having a housing with wall means including one transparent wall and at least one other wall. Counter electrodes are positioned on the transparent wall and display electrodes are positioned on the other wall with both electrodes in electrically conductive relationship with an electrolyte. Circuits means are connected to the display and counter electrodes to apply different predetermined control potentials between them. The display electrodes are covered with a thin electrically conductive polymer film that is characterized according to the invention by having embedded in it pigment molecules as counter ions. The display device is operable to be switched to a plurality of different visual color states at an exceptionally rapid switching rate while each of the color states is characterized by possessing good color intensity and definition.

  4. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  5. (Ionization in liquids)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes charge transport following ionization of model liquids and how this process may be important in carcinogenesis. 15 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs. (MHB)

  6. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  7. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  8. Gravity-induced reorientation of the interface between two liquids of different densities flowing laminarly through a microchannel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    or membraneless fuel cells;10 and the creation of axisymmetric microscale polymeric struc- tures.11 of mammalian and microbial cells;5 liquid liquid extractions;6 crystallization of proteins7 or inorganic salts in membrane- less fuel cells.9,10 Understanding the interplay of forces that dictates the reorientation

  9. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquidliquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  10. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  11. Confinement Induced Quantum Phase Transition and Polarization Cooling in a Dipolar Crystal of Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Ya Tian; Daw-Wei Wang

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-known that the liquid properties in a strongly confined system can be very different from their ordinary behaviors in an extended system, due to the competition between the thermal energy and the interaction energy. Here we show that, in a low-dimensional self-assembled dipolar crystal, the parabolic optical confinement potential can also strongly affect the quantum many-body properties in the low temperature regime. For example, by changing the confinement aspect ratio, the bulk of the system can undergo a quantum phase transition between a liquid state and a solid state via a nonmonotonic pattern formation of the domain wall. Furthermore, the entropy of a trapped dipolar crystal can be much larger than the liquid state in the weak dipole limit, indicating an intrinsic polarization cooling mechanism via increasing the external field. These highly correlated confinement effects are very important to the experimental preparation of a self-assembled dipolar crystal using ultracold polar molecules.

  12. Considerations of driver preferences and performance for selection of electronic automobile instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harwood, Raymond Scott

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , These include the Cathode Ray Tube (CRT), Light Emitting Diode (LED), Liquid Crystal Display (LCD), and Vacuum Fluorescent (VF) display. A Head- Up Display that would project dashboard readouts onto the windshield has been predicted for the 1990's (Bluestone...

  13. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2] cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  14. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  15. Fragile-to-fragile Liquid Transition at Tg and Stable-Glass Phase Nucleation Rate Maximum at the Kauzmann Temperature TK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Felix Tournier

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Dp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm *Dp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at temperatures smaller than Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atoms, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

  16. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  17. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  18. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  19. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  20. Single crystal growth and heteroepitaxy of polyacene thin films on arbitrary substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Headrick, Randall L.

    in a number of low-cost, large area electronic applications such as flat panel displays. Organic thin film as other substrates.6-12 Recently, significant progress has been made towards fabricating high quality is to prepare single crystal films on arbitrary substrates. Here we describe two significant advances towards

  1. Hard-sphere melting and crystallization with event-chain Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isobe, Masaharu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate crystallization and melting with local Monte Carlo (LMC), event-chain Monte Carlo (ECMC), and with event-driven molecular dynamics (EDMD) in systems with up to one million three-dimensional hard spheres. We illustrate that our implementations of the three algorithms rigorously coincide in their equilibrium properties. We then study nucleation in the NVE ensemble from the fcc crystal into the homogeneous liquid phase and from the liquid into the homogeneous crystal. ECMC and EDMD both approach equilibrium orders of magnitude faster than LMC. ECMC is also notably faster than EDMD, especially for the equilibration into a crystal from a disordered initial condition at high density. ECMC can be trivially implemented for hard-sphere and for soft-sphere potentials, and we suggest possible applications of this algorithm for studying jamming and the physics of glasses, as well as disordered systems.

  2. PAPILLON: Designing Curved Display Surfaces With Printed Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poupyrev, Ivan

    . It is based on 3D printed optics, where the surface of the display is constructed as a bundle of printed light Interfaces - Graphical user interfaces; Input devices and strategies. Keywords: 3D printing, fabrication

  3. Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Training Room Equipment Instructions Projector and TV Display The control panel on the wall are connected to a training room computer and room is equipped with a keyboard, mouse and clicker. Connect USB

  4. Displays take new shape: An agenda for future interactive surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benko, Hrvoje

    This workshop provides a forum for discussing emerging trends in interactive surfaces that leverage alternative display types and form factors to enable more expressive interaction with information. The goal of the workshop ...

  5. Tactual Display of Consonant Voicing to Supplement Lipreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Hanfeng

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is concerned with the development of tactual displays to supplement the information available through lipreading. Because voicing carries a high informational load in speech and is not well transmitted through ...

  6. acrab mutants display: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This novel approach to display technology consists of arranging six organic light emitting diode screens in a cubic form factor. We ... Pla i Conesa, Pol 20 Advances in Brief...

  7. INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS SHALE BADLAND extent exaggerated for display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS SHALE BADLAND R.Rondeau extent exaggerated for display ACHNATHERUM HYMENOIDES HERBACEOUS ALLIANCE Achnatherum hymenoides Shale Barren Herbaceous Vegetation ARTEMISIA BIGELOVII SHRUBLAND ALLIANCE Leymus salinus Shale Sparse Vegetation Overview: This widespread ecological system

  8. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ASPEN FOREST AND WOODLAND extent exaggerated for display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN ASPEN FOREST AND WOODLAND R.Rondeau extent exaggerated for display POPULUS. The herbaceous layers may be lush and diverse. Common graminoids may include Bromus ROCKY MOUNTAIN ASPEN WOODLAND

  9. A programmable pilot oriented display system for GA aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Littlefield, James A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a complete description of a digital flight data processing platform designed to support a range of airborne or flight simulator based experiments requiring the acquisition, processing, and display of ...

  10. Surface effects in the crystallization process of elastic flexible polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Schnabel; Thomas Vogel; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigating thermodynamic properties of liquid-solid transitions of flexible homopolymers with elastic bonds by means of multicanonical Monte Carlo simulations, we find crystalline conformations that resemble ground-state structures of Lennard-Jones clusters. This allows us to set up a structural classification scheme for finite-length flexible polymers and their freezing mechanism in analogy to atomic cluster formation. Crystals of polymers with "magic length" turn out to be perfectly icosahedral.

  11. Phonons in a one-dimensional microfluidic crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsevi Beatus; Tsvi Tlusty; Roy Bar-Ziv

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a general theoretical framework for describing the behaviour of a crystal driven far from equilibrium has proved difficult1. Microfluidic crystals, formed by the introduction of droplets of immiscible fluid into a liquid-filled channel, provide a convenient means to explore and develop models to describe non-equilibrium dynamics2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Owing to the fact that these systems operate at low Reynolds number (Re), in which viscous dissipation of energy dominates inertial effects, vibrations are expected to be over-damped and contribute little to their dynamics12, 13, 14. Against such expectations, we report the emergence of collective normal vibrational modes (equivalent to acoustic 'phonons') in a one-dimensional microfluidic crystal of water-in-oil droplets at Reapprox10-4. These phonons propagate at an ultra-low sound velocity of approx100 mum s-1 and frequencies of a few hertz, exhibit unusual dispersion relations markedly different to those of harmonic crystals, and give rise to a variety of crystal instabilities that could have implications for the design of commercial microfluidic systems. First-principles theory shows that these phonons are an outcome of the symmetry-breaking flow field that induces long-range inter-droplet interactions, similar in nature to those observed in many other systems including dusty plasma crystals15, 16, vortices in superconductors17, 18, active membranes19 and nucleoprotein filaments20.

  12. Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

  13. Multifunctional recombinant phycobiliprotein-based fluorescent constructs and phycobilisome display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides multifunctional fusion constructs which are rapidly incorporated into a macromolecular structure such as a phycobilisome such that the fusion proteins are separated from one another and unable to self-associate. The invention provides methods and compositions for displaying a functional polypeptide domain on an oligomeric phycobiliprotein, including fusion proteins comprising a functional displayed domain and a functional phycobiliprotein domain incorporated in a functional oligomeric phycobiliprotein. The fusion proteins provide novel specific labeling reagents.

  14. Multifunctional recombinant phycobiliprotein-based fluorescent constructs and phycobilisome display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides multifunctional fusion constructs which are rapidly incorporated into a macromolecular structure such as a phycobilisome such that the fusion proteins are separated from one another and unable to self-associate. The invention provides methods and compositions for displaying a functional polypeptide domain on an oligomeric phycobiliprotein. including fusion proteins comprising a functional displayed domain and a functional phycobiliprotein domain incorporated in a functional oligomeric phycobiliprotein. The fusion proteins provide novel specific labeling reagents.

  15. Multifunctional recombinant phycobiliprotein-based fluorescent constructs and phycobilisome display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides multifunctional fusion constructs which are rapidly incorporated into a macromolecular structure such as a phycobilisome such that the fusion proteins are separated from one another and unable to self-associate. The invention provides methods and compositions for displaying a functional polypeptide domain on an oligomeric phycobiliprotein, including fusion proteins comprising a functional displayed domain and a functional phycobiliprotein domain incorporated in a functional oligomeric phycobiliprotein. The fusion proteins provide novel specific labeling reagents.

  16. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  17. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  18. Electrically Deformable Liquid Marbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Tamir Stein; Gene Whyman; Marcelo Schiffer; Doron Aurbach

    2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid marbles, which are droplets coated with a hydrophobic powder, were exposed to a uniform electric field. It was established that a threshold value of the electric field, 15 cgse, should be surmounted for deformation of liquid marbles. The shape of the marbles was described as a prolate spheroid. The semi-quantitative theory describing deformation of liquid marbles in a uniform electric field is presented. The scaling law relating the radius of the contact area of the marble to the applied electric field shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  20. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  1. Morphological investigation of AFR-PEPA-N imide oligomers and their cured polyimides and the remodification of AFR-PEPA-N to achieve liquid-crystalline behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Lindsay Adams

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -PEPA-N by resin transfer molding (RTM) to obtain its optimum properties. The investigation included the identification of a processing window, temperature overlap between the melting of residual crystals and crosslinking reactions, and liquid crystallinity...

  2. Ionic liquids and electrochemistry: from proteins to electrochromic devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keizer, T. S. (Timothy S.); McCleskey, T. M. (Thomas Mark); Baker, G. A. (Gary A.); Burrell, A. K. (Anthony K.); Baker, S. N. (Sheila N.); Warner, B. P. (Benjamin P.); Hall, S. B. (Simon B.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We will report on a wide range of activities within the chemistry division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results on basic and applied research involving electrochemistry will be discussed. Topics will include electrochemistry of proteins, sensors based on electrochemical signals, temperature sensors, electrochromic devices in ionic liquids and the characterization of organic cation radicals. We have recently developed several applications in ionic liquids that include electrochromic devices, temperature sensors and chemical sensors. The electrochromic windows are being marketed as selftinting automotive mirrors. The ionic liquid based temperature sensor is stable and accurate over a wide range and has the potential to provide high-resolution temperature imaging. Chemical sensors have been developed that use electrochemistry to detect low levels of potential chemical agents in air. We have also studied the basic chemistry of charge transfer complexes and proteins in ionic liquids. Charge transfer complexes display unique behavior in ionic liquid compare to traditional solvents. Proteins can be solubilized at high levels that make it possible to probe electrochemistry in the proper ionic liquid.

  3. Lattice deformation coupling of the electro-optic Kerr effect in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroyuki Yoshida; Shuhei Yabu; Hiroki Tone; Hirotsugu Kikuchi; Masanori Ozaki

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The electro-optic Kerr effect in cholesteric blue phase liquid crystals is known to occur on sub-millisecond time scales, which is much faster than director reorientation in nematic liquid crystals. Using two-beam interference microscopy, we report the presence of a very slow response in the Kerr effect, with a characteristic time of several seconds or more. Using a simplified model for the reorientation dynamics, we attribute the slow response to the coupling between the local director reorientation and field-induced deformation of the lattice. We provide evidence for our argument by showing that the slow response can be removed by inhibiting lattice deformation through polymer stabilization.

  4. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Francis (Danville, CA); Velsko, Stephan P. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  5. Two-stage crystallization of charged colloids at low supersaturations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Kratzer; Axel Arnold

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report simulations on the homogeneous liquid-fcc nucleation of charged colloids for both low and high contact energy values. As a precursor for crystal formation, we observe increased local order at the position where the crystal will form, but no correlations with the local density. Thus, the nucleation is driven by order fluctuations rather than density fluctuations. Our results also show that the transition involves two stages in both cases, first a transition liquid-bcc, followed by a bcc-hcp/fcc transition. Both transitions have to overcome free energy barriers, so that a spherical bcc-like cluster is formed first, in which the final fcc-like structure is nucleated mainly at the surface of the crystallite. This means that the bcc-fcc phase transition is a heterogeneous nucleation, even though we start from a homogeneous bulk liquid. The height of the bcc-hcp/fcc free energy barrier strongly depends on the contact energies of the colloids. For low contact energy this barrier is low, so that the bcc-hcp/fcc transition happens spontaneously. For the higher contact energy, the second barrier is too high to be crossed spontaneously by the colloidal system. However, it was possible to ratchet the system over the second barrier and to transform the bcc nuclei into the stable hcp/fcc phase. The transitions are dominated by the first liquid-bcc transition and can be described by Classical Nucleation Theory using an effective surface tension.

  6. Liquid Phase Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mordt, E. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature Water (HTW) central district heating systems are far superior to steam systems in large, spread out installations such as airports, universities and office complexes. Water, pressurized to keep it in the liquid state, is distributed at 400o...

  7. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicols

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  8. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  9. Liquid mixing device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, R. P.

    1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixing device for mixing at least two liquids to produce a homogenous mixture. The device includes an elongated chamber in which a vertically oriented elongated mixing cavity is located. The cavity is sealed at its lower end and it is open at its upper end and in communication with the interior of the chamber. An elongated conduit extends the length of the cavity and is adapted to receive liquids to be mixed. The conduit includes a plurality of ports located at longitudinally spaced positions therealong and which ports are directed in different directions. The ports create plural streams of liquid which interact and mix with one another within the cavity. The mixed liquids overflow the cavity and out its top end into the chamber 24. The chamber 24 includes an outlet from which the mixed liquids are withdrawn. In accordance with the preferred embodiment gas eductor means are provided in the inlet to the conduit to introduce gas bubbles within the cavity. Gas vent means are also provided in the device to vent any introduced gases from the device so that only the mixed liquids flow out the outlet.

  10. Adsorption of imidazolium and pyridinium ionic liquids onto montmorillonite : characterization and thermodynamic calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Adsorption of imidazolium and pyridinium ionic liquids onto montmorillonite : characterization the adsorption of the RTILs through a cation exchange mechanism. Adsorption isotherms, done at pH = 7 and at 25C, displayed that the maximum adsorption capacity of the substrates was closely linked to the nature

  11. Producing EGS4 shower displays with the Unified Graphics System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, R.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Lab. for Nuclear Science); Nelson, W.R. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The EGS4 Code System has been coupled with the SLAC Unified Graphics System in such a manner as to provide a means for displaying showers on UGS77-supported devices. This is most easily accomplished by attaching an auxiliary subprogram package (SHOWGRAF) to existing EGS4 User Codes and making use of a graphics display or a post-processor code called EGS4PL. SHOWGRAF may be used to create shower displays directly on interactive IBM 5080 color display devices, supporting three-dimensional rotations, translations, and zoom features, and providing illustration of particle types and energies by color and/or intensity. Alternatively, SHOWGRAF may be used to record a two-dimensional projection of the shower in a device-independent graphics file. The EGS4PL post-processor may then be used to convert this file into device-dependent graphics code for any UGS77-supported device. Options exist within EGS4PL that allow for two-dimensional translations and zoom, for creating line structure to indicate particle types and energies, and for optional display of particles by type. All of this is facilitated by means of the command processor EGS4PL EXEC together with new options (5080 and PDEV) with the standard EGS4IN EXEC routine for running EGS4 interactively under VM/SP. 6 refs.

  12. Final Report of Project Nanometer Structures for Fuel Cells and Displays, etc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Qing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    panel displays, optical electronics, and clean energy technologies (solar and fuel cells,panel displays, optical electronics, clean energy technologies (solar and fuel cells,panel displays, optical electronics, clean energy technologies (solar and fuel cells,

  13. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennerly, J.M.; Lindner, G.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1981-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  14. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennerly, John M. (Knoxville, TN); Lindner, Gordon M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rowe, John C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  15. Journal of Crystal Growth ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) at high pressure of CO2 (initial PCO2 55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 1C) was used and the dissolved quantity of CO2 have a significant effect on the average particle size, specific surface areaJournal of Crystal Growth ] (

  16. Gas-Liquid Coexistence in the Primitive Model for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Romano; P. Tartaglia; F. Sciortino

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the location of the gas-liquid coexistence line and of the associated critical point for the primitive model for water (PMW), introduced by Kolafa and Nezbeda [J. Kolafa and I. Nezbeda, Mol. Phys. 61, 161 (1987)]. Besides being a simple model for a molecular network forming liquid, the PMW is representative of patchy proteins and novel colloidal particles interacting with localized directional short-range attractions. We show that the gas-liquid phase separation is metastable, i.e. it takes place in the region of the phase diagram where the crystal phase is thermodynamically favored, as in the case of articles interacting via short-range attractive spherical potentials. Differently from spherical potentials, we do not observe crystallization close to the critical point. The region of gas-liquid instability of this patchy model is significantly reduced as compared to equivalent models of spherically interacting particles, confirming the possibility of observing kinetic arrest in an homogeneous sample driven by bonding as opposed to packing.

  17. Heating-induced glass-glass and glass-liquid transformations in computer simulations of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Janet; Giovambattista, Nicolas [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States); Starr, Francis W. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water exists in at least two families of glassy states, broadly categorized as the low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA). Remarkably, LDA and HDA can be reversibly interconverted via appropriate thermodynamic paths, such as isothermal compression and isobaric heating, exhibiting first-order-like phase transitions. We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of glassy water using the ST2 model to study the evolution of LDA and HDA upon isobaric heating. Depending on pressure, glass-to-glass, glass-to-crystal, glass-to-vapor, as well as glass-to-liquid transformations are found. Specifically, heating LDA results in the following transformations, with increasing heating pressures: (i) LDA-to-vapor (sublimation), (ii) LDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (iii) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid, (iv) LDA-to-HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, and (v) LDA-to-HDA-to-crystal. Similarly, heating HDA results in the following transformations, with decreasing heating pressures: (a) HDA-to-crystal, (b) HDA-to-liquid-to-crystal, (c) HDA-to-liquid (glass transition), (d) HDA-to-LDA-to-liquid, and (e) HDA-to-LDA-to-vapor. A more complex sequence may be possible using lower heating rates. For each of these transformations, we determine the corresponding transformation temperature as function of pressure, and provide a P-T phase diagram for glassy water based on isobaric heating. Our results for isobaric heating dovetail with the LDA-HDA transformations reported for ST2 glassy water based on isothermal compression/decompression processes [Chiu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184504 (2013)]. The resulting phase diagram is consistent with the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the glass phase diagram is sensitive to sample preparation, such as heating or compression rates. Interestingly, at least for the rates explored, our results suggest that the LDA-to-liquid (HDA-to-liquid) and LDA-to-HDA (HDA-to-LDA) transformation lines on heating are related, both being associated with the limit of kinetic stability of LDA (HDA)

  18. Silicon crystal growing by oscillating crucible technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwuttke, G.H.; Kim, K.M.; Smetana, P.

    1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for growing silicon crystals from a molten melt comprising oscillating the container during crystal growth is disclosed.

  19. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  20. DATA ACQUISITION, HANDLING, AND DISPLAY FOR THE HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT STRIPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEvoy, M.B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphics terminal. Displays are defined by Display Controlgraphics software was designed to prompt users by presenting them with lists of options. Users control

  1. Interactive display system having a scaled virtual target zone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector and imaging device cooperate with the panel for projecting a video image thereon. An optical detector bridges at least a portion of the waveguides for detecting a location on the outlet face within a target zone of an inbound light spot. A controller is operatively coupled to the imaging device and detector for displaying a cursor on the outlet face corresponding with the detected location of the spot within the target zone.

  2. Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Cronin; John P. (Tucson, AZ); Tonazzi, Juan C. L. (Tucson, AZ); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes. Some of the electrolyte solutions color to red when devices employing the solutions are powered, leading to red or neutral electrooptic devices.

  3. Durable Electrooptic Devices Comprising Ionic Liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Cronin, John P. (Tucson, AZ); Tonazzi, Juan C. L. (Tucson, AZ); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes. Some of the electrolyte solutions color to red when devices employing the solutions are powered, leading to red or neutral electrooptic devices.

  4. Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes.

  5. Growth and properties of Lithium Salicylate single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hull, G; Saw, C; Carman, L; Cherepy, N; Payne, S

    2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An attractive feature of {sup 6}Li containing fluorescence materials that determines their potential application in radiation detection is the capture reaction with slow ({approx}< 100 keV) neutrons: {sup 6}Li + n = {sup 4}He + {sup 3}H + 4.8MeV. The use of {sup 6}Li-salicylate (LiSal, LiC{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}) for thermal neutron detection was previously studied in liquid and polycrystalline scintillators. The studies showed that both liquid and polycrystalline LiSal scintillators could be utilized in pulse shape discrimination (PSD) techniques that enable separation of neutrons from the background gamma radiation. However, it was found that the efficiency of neutron detection using LiSal in liquid solutions was severely limited by its low solubility in commonly used organic solvents like, for example, toluene or xylene. Better results were obtained with neutron detectors containing the compound in its crystalline form, such as pressed pellets, or microscopic-scale (7-14 micron) crystals dispersed in various media. The expectation drown from these studies was that further improvement of pulse height, PSD, and efficiency characteristics could be reached with larger and more transparent LiSal crystals, growth of which has not been reported so far. In this paper, we present the first results on growth and characterization of relatively large, a cm-scale size, single crystals of LiSal with good optical quality. The crystals were grown both from aqueous and anhydrous (methanol) media, mainly for neutron detection studies. However, the results on growth and structural characterization may be interesting for other fields where LiSal, together with other alkali metal salicylates, is used for biological, medical, and chemical (as catalyst) applications.

  6. Method for simultaneous measurement of mass loading and fluid property changes using a quartz crystal microbalance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granstaff, Victoria E. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, using a quartz crystal microbalance, to obtain simultaneous measurement of solid mass accumulation and changes in liquid density-viscosity product. The simultaneous real-time measurements of electrical parameters yields that changes in surface mass can be differentiated from changes in solution properties. Two methods to obtain the admittance/frequency data are employed.

  7. Method for simultaneous measurement of mass loading and fluid property changes using a quartz crystal microbalance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granstaff, V.E.; Martin, S.J.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described, using a quartz crystal microbalance, to obtain simultaneous measurement of solid mass accumulation and changes in liquid density-viscosity product. The simultaneous real-time measurements of electrical parameters yields that changes in surface mass can be differentiated from changes in solution properties. Two methods to obtain the admittance/frequency data are employed.

  8. FRACTAL DESCRIPTION OF ROUGH SURFACES FOR HAPTIC DISPLAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FRACTAL DESCRIPTION OF ROUGH SURFACES FOR HAPTIC DISPLAY A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT system using fractals. A background on traditional methods for describing surface roughness is given. Fractals are used to characterize one- dimensional surface profiles using two parameters, the amplitude

  9. ON THE IDENTIFICATION AND HAPTIC DISPLAY OF FRICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ON THE IDENTIFICATION AND HAPTIC DISPLAY OF FRICTION A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT by Christopher Richard All Rights Reserved #12;iv Abstract Although friction is an important phenomenon and greatly affects the way in which individ- uals interact with the world, friction is all but absent from

  10. Collaborative 3D Visualization on Large Screen Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Alberto

    reality (VR) system designed to support collaborative visualization of 3D environments, applied in collaborative work. This paper presents a system that uses remotely located wall sized displays, to offer immersive, interactive collaborative visualization and review of 3D CAD models for engineering applications

  11. Microporous Patterned Electrodes for Color-Matched Electrochromic Polymer Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    Microporous Patterned Electrodes for Color-Matched Electrochromic Polymer Displays Pierre of electroactive and conducting polymers offers new opportunities for the design of materials for electrochromic the most promising electrochromic (EC) properties. Here, we report the use of highly porous metallized

  12. THE EFFECT OF FLORAL DISPLAY SIZE ON POLLINATOR VISITATION Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavitt, John F.

    . Hence they achieve higher fitness through the female function (= seed production). Another hypothesis is heritable, and pollinator behavior can drive selection for large display size. Rubber Rabbitbrush inflorescences. The flowers are pollinated by a variety of insects. Flower production exceeds seed production

  13. ESSES 2003 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Display Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Carla

    1 ESSES 2003© 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Display Management: Sensing User Intention and Context (HOTOS 2003) 2ESSES 2003© 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Outline · Motivation and Research Objective · Face · Related Work ­ ACPI ­ Dark Windows #12;2 3ESSES 2003© 2003, Carla Schlatter Ellis Motivation · Current

  14. SMART PodiumTM 500 Interactive pen display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    register your SMART product, we'll notify you of new features and software upgrades. Register online environment. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed or disassemble the interactive pen display. You risk electrical shock from the high voltage inside the casing

  15. PDAs and Shared Public Displays: Making Personal Information Public,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    computers, where each device affords quite different personal and public acts. Norman [1,p53] defines devices containing specialised personal informa- tion, while single display groupware are highlypub- lic these two quite different devices. In essence, the problem is how people move their personal artefacts

  16. Investigation of Energy-Efficient Supermarket Display Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.H.

    2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermarkets represent one of the largest energy-intensive building groups in the commercial sector, consuming 2 to 3 million kWh/yr per store (ES-1). Over half of this energy use is for the refrigeration of food display cases and storage coolers. Display cases are used throughout a supermarket for the merchandising of perishable food products. The cases are maintained at air temperatures ranging from -10 to 35 F, depending upon the type of product stored. The operating characteristics and energy requirements of the refrigeration system are directly related to the refrigeration load. The sources of the display case refrigeration load consist of: (1) Moist and warm air infiltration through the open front of the case--air curtains are employed to inhibit this infiltration, but some ambient air is entrained, which adds a substantial portion to the refrigeration load. (2) Heat conduction through case panels and walls. (3) Thermal radiation from the ambient to the product and display case interior. (4) Internal thermal loads--the use of lights, evaporator fans, periodic defrosts, and antisweat heaters adds to the refrigeration load of the display case as well as directly consuming electric energy. The impact of each of these elements on the refrigeration load is very dependent upon case type (Figure ES-1). For example, air infiltration is the most significant portion of the refrigeration load for open, multi-deck cases, while radiation is the largest part of the load for tub-type cases. The door anti-sweat heaters represent a major share of the refrigeration load for frozen food door reach-in cases. Figure ES-2 shows the distribution of display cases in a typical supermarket (ES-2). Open, multi-deck, medium temperature display cases typically comprise about half of the refrigerated fixtures in a store (ES-3). In addition, medium temperature fixtures and storage coolers account for roughly 70 to 75 percent of the total store refrigeration load with open, multi-deck cases contributing about 3/4 of that fraction. Consequently, the focus of this investigation has tilted toward the open, vertical, multi-deck medium temperature case type. Various technologies and control methods are energy efficiency measures (EEMs) that could be applied to display cases and result in the reduction of the refrigeration load and of the energy consumption of the supermarket refrigeration system. An extensive evaluation of the EEMs was conducted in order to select those that met the following criteria: (1) Near-term implementation--All EEMs considered could be implemented with existing refrigeration hardware and technology. (2) Potential for energy-efficiency improvements--Energy savings and/or refrigeration load reduction must be obtained by the implementation of the EEM. (3) Enhancement of the ability to maintain target product temperature--Proper operation of the display case and maintenance of the stored product temperature could not be compromised by the use of the EEM. The energy impact of a number of viable display case EEMs was quantified by performing whole building hourly simulations. A special version of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE-2.3) program was used to develop a model of a supermarket. The model was then calibrated using available end-use monitored data to increase confidence in simulation results.

  17. Interaction potentials for alumina and molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous and liquid alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Interaction potentials for alumina and molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous and liquid for preventing crystalliza- tion and giving chemical stability and durability to a glaze, for instance. Due been identified.4 A review of these crystal structures and their pre- cursors can be found in the work

  18. liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    liquid nberwp.tex Liquidity Constraints and Precautionary Saving Christopher D. Carroll ccarroll to the optimal consumption/saving problem under uncertainty have long known that there are quantitatively important in- teractions between liquidity constraints and precautionary saving behavior. This paper

  19. Chameleon: Color Transformation on OLED Displays Mian Dong, and Lin Zhong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    system energy consumers in mobile systems. Emerging organic light-emitting diode (OLED)-based displays

  20. A Sliding-Window Approach to Supporting On-Line Interactive Display for Continuous Media1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ye-In

    A Sliding-Window Approach to Supporting On-Line Interactive Display for Continuous Media1 Chien the overhead, in this paper, we will propose a sliding window approach to supporting interactive display subobjects for display in a sliding window. For the way of interactive display described above, in which

  1. Breakup of Liquid Filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , including the dispersion of liquid drugs into res- pirable droplets, microfluidics, crop- and paint-spraying, and ink-jet printing [24]. There are also biological sys- tems in which either long filaments remain intact, or many droplets are formed [5, 6...

  2. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  3. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko; David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  4. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  5. Fabrication technology of heterojunctions in the lattice of a 2D photonic crystal based on macroporous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zharova, Yu. A., E-mail: piliouguina@mail.ioffe.ru; Fedulova, G. V.; Astrova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Baldycheva, A. V. [University of Dublin, Trinity College, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering (Ireland); Tolmachev, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Perova, T. S. [University of Dublin, Trinity College, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering (Ireland)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and fabrication technology of a microcavity structure based on a double heterojunction in macroporous silicon is suggested. The fabrication process of a strip of a 2D photonic crystal constituted by a finite number of lattice periods and the technique for defect formation by local opening of macropores on the substrate side, followed by filling of these macropores with a nematic liquid crystal, are considered.

  6. SHALE: An Efficient Algorithm for Allocation of Guaranteed Display Advertising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharadwaj, Vijay; Ma, Wenjing; Nagarajan, Chandrashekhar; Tomlin, John; Vassilvitskii, Sergei; Vee, Erik; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the problem of optimizing allocation in guaranteed display advertising, we develop an efficient, lightweight method of generating a compact {\\em allocation plan} that can be used to guide ad server decisions. The plan itself uses just O(1) state per guaranteed contract, is robust to noise, and allows us to serve (provably) nearly optimally. The optimization method we develop is scalable, with a small in-memory footprint, and working in linear time per iteration. It is also "stop-anytime", meaning that time-critical applications can stop early and still get a good serving solution. Thus, it is particularly useful for optimizing the large problems arising in the context of display advertising. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm using actual Yahoo! data.

  7. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessol, Daniel E. (Bozeman, MT); Wheeler, Floyd J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cook, Jeremy L. (Greeley, CO)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  8. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C. (Fairfield, OH); Taylor, Larry T. (Blacksburg, VA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  9. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  10. Aerogels: A new material for emissive display applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glauser, S.A.C. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Lee, H.W.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remarkable optical and electronic properties of doped and undoped silica aerogels establish their utility as unique, multifunctional host materials for fluorescent dyes and other luminescent materials for display and imaging applications. We present results on the photoluminescence and absorption of undoped silica aerogels and aerogels doped with Er{sup 3+}, rhodamine 6G (R6G), and fluorescein. We also demonstrate evidence of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling of electrons in aerogels. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  11. SLAC Large Detector (SLD) Image and Event Display Collections

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Perl, Joseph; Cowan, Ray; Johnson, Tony

    The SLD makes use of the unique capabilities of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) to perform studies of polarized Z particles produced in collisions between electrons and positrons. The SLD Event Display Collection shows computer generated pictures of a number of Z particle decays as reconstructed by the SLD detector. More than 90 images, each in several formats, captured from 1991 - 1996 events, are archived here. There are also figures and data plots available.

  12. Tonopah Test Range EGS graphics tracking display system: HP370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.H.; Bauhs, K.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the HP370 component of the Enhanced Graphics System (EGS) used at Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Selected Radar data is fed into the computer systems and the resulting tracking symbols are displayed on high-resolution video monitors in real time. These tracking symbols overlay background maps and are used for monitoring/controlling various flight vehicles. This report discusses both the operational aspects and the internal configuration of the HP370 Workstation portion of the EGS system.

  13. A comparison of nuclear reactor control room display panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Frances Renae

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Evaluation Procedure 14 15 16 17 28 Analysis. 35 III RESULTS. 37 Discussion. 43 IV CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Recommendations REFERENCES 50 51 54 APPENDIX A: REACTOR OPERATOR INFORMATION PACKAGE. . . . . 57 APPENDIX B: AGN-201 STANDARD... related to human factors included poor training, inaccessibility or unavailability of pertinent information, copious amounts of unusable information and obscured displays. Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory...

  14. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  15. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  16. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Abstract:...

  17. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamzadah, Soheila [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Petty, Tom J. [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Biomedical Graduate Studies Genomics and Computational Biology Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); De Almeida, Victor [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Nishimura, Taisuke [Department of Plant Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, CEA-CNRS-University J. Fourier, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 1 (France); Halazonetis, Thanos D., E-mail: thanos.halazonetis@unige.ch [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  18. Characterization of Epitaxial Film Silicon Solar Cells Grown on Seeded Display Glass: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, D. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C.; Stradins, P.; LaSalvia, V.; Chuang, T. K.; Couillard, J. G.; Branz, H. M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report characterizations of epitaxial film crystal silicon (c-Si) solar cells with open-circuit voltages (Voc) above 560 mV. The 2-um absorber cells are grown by low-temperature (<750 degrees C) hot-wire CVD (HWCVD) on Corning EAGLE XG display glass coated with a layer-transferred (LT) Si seed. The high Voc is a result of low-defect epitaxial Si (epi-Si) growth and effective hydrogen passivation of defects. The quality of HWCVD epitaxial growth on seeded glass substrates depends on the crystallographic quality of the seed and the morphology of the epitaxial growth surface. Heterojunction devices consist of glass/c-Si LT seed/ epi n+ Si:P/epi n- Si:P/intrinsic a-Si:H/p+ a-Si:H/ITO. Similar devices grown on electronically 'dead' n+ wafers have given Voc {approx}630 mV and {approx}8% efficiency with no light trapping features. Here we study the effects of the seed surface polish on epi-Si quality, how hydrogenation influences the device character, and the dominant junction transport physics.

  19. Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    Modeling Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium of Ionic Liquid Systems with NRTL, Electrolyte-NRTL, and UNIQUAC different excess Gibbs free energy models are evaluated: the NRTL, UNIQUAC and electrolyte- NRTL (eNRTL) models. In the case of eNRTL, a new formulation of the model is used, based on a symmetric reference

  20. Help cut pollution with vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woinsky, S.G.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are common in chemical process industries plants. In addition to separating phases, these devices can aid in reducing pollution in the plant. Two-phase separators achieve pollution prevention via recycling of intermediates and final products. It is doubtful that most vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators are used specifically for pollution prevention projects. They may have another purpose yet provide pollution prevention as a bonus. The first step in achieving pollution prevention by design is for operating companies to be aware of vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid separators as potential pollution prevention devices. Then, likely applications need to be investigated. Since the quantities of material recovered are relatively small, higher value products are the most likely targets, especially for liquid/liquid separators. However, for vapor/liquid separators, the costs involved are usually relatively low since only the cost of a separator pad is normally involved, and more moderately valued products can be targets.

  1. Liquid filtration simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corey, I.; Bergman, W.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have a developed a computer code that simulates 3-D filtration of suspended particles in fluids in realistic filter structures. This code, being the most advanced filtration simulation package developed to date, provides LLNL and DOE with new capabilities to address problems in cleaning liquid wastes, medical fluid cleaning, and recycling liquids. The code is an integrated system of commercially available and LLNL-developed software; the most critical are the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and the particle transport program. For the CFD solver, we used a commercial package based on Navier-Stokes equations and a LLNL-developed package based on Boltzman-lattice gas equations. For the particle transport program, we developed a cod based on the 3-D Langevin equation of motion and the DLVO theory of electrical interactions. A number of additional supporting packages were purchased or developed to integrate the simulation tasks and to provide visualization output.

  2. Schrodinger Fermi Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Juven

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a class of strongly interacting many-body fermionic systems in 2+1D non-relativistic conformal field theory via holography. The 5D charged black hole with asymptotic Schrodinger isometry in the bulk gravity side introduces parameters of background density and finite particle number into the boundary field theory. We propose the holographic dictionary, and realize a quantum phase transition of this fermionic liquid with fixed particle number by tuning the background density $\\beta$ at zero temperature. On the larger $\\beta$ side, we find the signal of a sharp quasiparticle pole on the spectral function A(k,w), indicating a well-defined Fermi surface. On the smaller $\\beta$ side, we find only a hump with no sharp peak for A(k,w), indicating the disappearance of Fermi surface. The dynamical exponent $z$ of quasiparticle dispersion goes from being Fermi-liquid-like $z\\simeq1$ scaling at larger $\\beta$ to a non-Fermi-liquid scaling $z\\simeq 3/2$ at smaller $\\beta$. By comparing the structure of Green's fu...

  3. Visualizing kinetic pathways of homogeneous nucleation in colloidal crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Tan; Ning Xu; Lei Xu

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    When a system undergoes a transition from a liquid to a solid phase, it passes through multiple intermediate structures before reaching the final state. However, our knowledge on the exact pathways of this process is limited, mainly due to the difficulty of realizing direct observations. Here, we experimentally study the evolution of symmetry and density for various colloidal systems during liquid-to-solid phase transitions, and visualize kinetic pathways with single-particle resolution. We observe the formation of relatively-ordered precursor structures with different symmetries, which then convert into metastable solids. During this conversion, two major cross-symmetry pathways always occur, regardless of the final state and the interaction potential. In addition, we find a broad decoupling of density variation and symmetry development, and discover that nucleation rarely starts from the densest regions. These findings hold for all our samples, suggesting the possibility of finding a unified picture for the complex crystallization kinetics in colloidal systems.

  4. crystal nickel a hree dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Zhenting 1 Department 2 Departmen ABSTRACT This pape crystal nickel a hree dimension photonic cryst polystyrene op silicon chips, volume fraction can be controlle nickel structure hen sacrificed volume fraction reports microm crystal structur or alumina she nickel microca microstructure further electrop volume

  5. Diffractive optics for compact flat panel displays. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, D.; DeLong, K.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago LLNL developed a practical method to dramatically reduce the chromatic aberration in single element diffractive imaging lenses. High efficiency, achromatic imaging lenses have been fabricated for human vision correction. This LDRD supported research in applying our new methods to develop a unique, diffraction-based optical interface with solid state, microelectronic imaging devices. Advances in microelectronics have led to smaller, more efficient components for optical systems. There have, however, been no equivalent advances in the imaging optics associated with these devices. The goal of this project was to replace the bulky, refractive optics in typical head-mounted displays with micro-thin diffractive optics to directly image flat-panel displays into the eye. To visualize the system think of the lenses of someone`s eyeglasses becoming flat-panel displays. To realize this embodiment, we needed to solve the problems of large chromatic aberrations and low efficiency that are associated with diffraction. We have developed a graceful tradeoff between chromatic aberrations and the diffractive optic thickness. It turns out that by doubling the thickness of a micro-thin diffractive lens we obtain nearly a two-times improvement in chromatic performance. Since the human eye will tolerate one diopter of chromatic aberration, we are able to achieve an achromatic image with a diffractive lens that is only 20 microns thick, versus 3 mm thickness for the comparable refractive lens. Molds for the diffractive lenses are diamond turned with sub-micron accuracy; the final lenses are cast from these molds using various polymers. We thus retain both the micro- thin nature of the diffractive optics and the achromatic image quality of refractive optics. During the first year of funding we successfully extended our earlier technology from 1 cm diameter optics required for vision applications up to the 5 cm diameter optics required for this application. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Liquid class predictor for liquid handling of complex mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seglke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA); Lekin, Timothy P. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of establishing liquid classes of complex mixtures for liquid handling equipment. The mixtures are composed of components and the equipment has equipment parameters. The first step comprises preparing a response curve for the components. The next step comprises using the response curve to prepare a response indicator for the mixtures. The next step comprises deriving a model that relates the components and the mixtures to establish the liquid classes.

  7. Revisiting dynamics near a liquid-liquid phase transition in Si and Ga: The fragile-to-strong transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cajahuaringa, Samuel; Koning, Maurice de, E-mail: dekoning@ifi.unicamp.br; Antonelli, Alex, E-mail: aantone@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Fsica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, So Paulo (Brazil)] [Instituto de Fsica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, So Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we analyze the dynamics of two atomic liquids that display a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT): Si described by the Stillinger-Weber potential and Ga as modeled by the modified embedded-atom model. In particular, our objective is to investigate the extent to which the presence of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function is a manifestation of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies and may be associated with a fragile-to-strong transition (FTST) across the LLPT, as suggested recently. Our results suggest a somewhat different picture. First, in the case of Ga we observe the appearance of an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies, even in the absence of the appearance of a dip in the self-intermediate scattering function across the LLPT. Second, studying the behavior of the shear viscosities traversing the LLPTs we find that both substances are fragile in character above and below their respective LLPT temperatures. Instead of a FTST in an absolute sense these findings are more in line with a view in which the LLPTs are accompanied by a transition from a more fragile to a less fragile liquid. Furthermore, we do not find this transition to correlate with the presence of a dip in the intermediate scattering function.

  8. Photoluminescence polarization anisotropy for studying long-range structural ordering within semiconductor multi-atomic alloys and organic crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prutskij, T.; Percino, J. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, col. San Miguel Huyeotlipan, 72050, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Orlova, T. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Vavilova, L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-range structural ordering within multi-component semiconductor alloys and organic crystals leads to significant optical anisotropy and, in particular, to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PL emission of ternary and quaternary semiconductor alloys is polarized if there is some amount of the atomic ordering within the crystal structure. We analyze the polarization of the PL emission from the quaternary GaInAsP semiconductor alloy grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) and conclude that it could be caused by low degree atomic ordering within the crystal structure together with the thermal biaxial strain due to difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the layer and the substrate. We also study the state of polarization of the PL from organic crystals in order to identify different features of the crystal PL spectrum.

  9. POWERWALL: International Workshop on Interactive, Ultra-High-Resolution Displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rooney, Chris; Endert, Alexander; Fekete, Jean-Daniel; Hornbaek, Kasper; North, Chris

    2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-high-resolution (Powerwall) displays are becoming increasingly popular due to the ever decreasing cost of hardware. As a result they are appearing more frequently in research institutes, and making the jump out of the lab and into industry. Due to the amount of work in this research area that has been published in CHI over the last few years, we felt that this confernece would be the ideal host for the first opportunity for both academics and practitioners in this field to get together.

  10. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  11. Widget:DisplayForGroup | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to:WestwoodCreatePage Jump to: navigation,DisplayForGroup

  12. Widget:FormFieldsDisplayToggle | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to:WestwoodCreatePageFormFieldsDisplayToggle Jump to:

  13. Property:Integrated Display/Graphics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid JumpEligSysSize JumpTechDsc Jump to:IndDisplay/Graphics

  14. Lamella settler crystallizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maimoni, A.

    1990-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystallizer is described which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as well as in other electrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities. 3 figs.

  15. Lamella settler crystallizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maimoni, Arturo (Orinda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystallizer which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as well as in other electrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities.

  16. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Laura E. (Manteca, CA); Webb, Mark (Salida, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  17. Acquisition of Single Crystal Growth and Characterization Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maple, M. Brian; Zocco, Diego A.

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER46178 'Acquisition of Single Crystal Growth and Characterization Equipment'. There is growing concern in the condensed matter community that the need for quality crystal growth and materials preparation laboratories is not being met in the United States. It has been suggested that there are too many researchers performing measurements on too few materials. As a result, many user facilities are not being used optimally. The number of proficient crystal growers is too small. In addition, insufficient attention is being paid to the enterprise of finding new and interesting materials, which is the driving force behind much of condensed matter research and, ultimately, technology. While a detailed assessment of this situation is clearly needed, enough evidence of a problem already exists to compel a general consensus that the situation must be addressed promptly. This final report describes the work carried out during the last four years in our group, in which a state-of-the-art single crystal growth and characterization facility was established for the study of novel oxides and intermetallic compounds of rare earth, actinide and transition metal elements. Research emphasis is on the physics of superconducting (SC), magnetic, heavy fermion (HF), non-Fermi liquid (NFL) and other types of strongly correlated electron phenomena in bulk single crystals. Properties of these materials are being studied as a function of concentration of chemical constituents, temperature, pressure, and magnetic field, which provide information about the electronic, lattice, and magnetic excitations at the root of various strongly correlated electron phenomena. Most importantly, the facility makes possible the investigation of material properties that can only be achieved in high quality bulk single crystals, including magnetic and transport phenomena, studies of the effects of disorder, properties in the clean limit, and spectroscopic and scattering studies through efforts with numerous collaborators. These endeavors will assist the effort to explain various outstanding theoretical problems, such as order parameter symmetries and electron-pairing mechanisms in unconventional superconductors, the relationship between superconductivity and magnetic order in certain correlated electron systems, the role of disorder in non-Fermi liquid behavior and unconventional superconductivity, and the nature of interactions between localized and itinerant electrons in these materials. Understanding the mechanisms behind strongly correlated electron behavior has important technological implications.

  18. Apparatus for measuring the local void fraction in a flowing liquid containing a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Patrick F. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The local void fraction in liquid containing a gas is measured by placing an impedance-variation probe in the liquid, applying a controlled voltage or current to the probe, and measuring the probe current or voltage. A circuit for applying the one electrical parameter and measuring the other includes a feedback amplifier that minimizes the effect of probe capacitance and a digitizer to provide a clean signal. Time integration of the signal provides a measure of the void fraction, and an oscilloscope display also shows bubble size and distribution.

  19. Liquid-phase detection instrument to record and annunciate procedural deviations in sintering runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mee, D. K.; Darby, D. M.; Sims, Jr., T. M.

    1981-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid-phase detection instrument (LPDI) has been developed to aid in making consistently accurate alloy sintering runs. The LPDI displays the furnace temperature, detects the alloy's liquid-phase arrest temperature, calculates the necessary hold temperature from the arrest temperature (i.e., calibrates the system), and provides a digital record for quality assurance purposes. In field tests, the instrument's detected arrest temperature was within +1/sup 0/ to -0/sup 0/C of an operator's assessment of the actual arrest temperature.

  20. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  1. Programmable window : a large-scale transparent electronic display using SPD film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, Martin (Ramos Rizo-Patron)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research demonstrates that Suspended Particle Device (SPD) film is a viable option for the development of large-scale transparent display systems. The thesis analyzes the SPD film from an architectural display application ...

  2. Characterization of the mechanical properties of tactors used in tactile displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Held, David (David A.)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pancake motors used in a tactile display were analyzed to understand the characteristics of their operation, as well as to suggest improvements in the design of the display. The frequencies and forces produced by unencased ...

  3. A color spatial display based on a Raster framebuffer and varifocal mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Kenneth M

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A very simple 30 color display has been constructed. It consists of a 20 display viewed in a rapidly vibrating varifocal mirror. The changing focal length of the mirror is responsible for providing the depth; when the ...

  4. Numerical simulations of the forward problem and compressive digital holographic reconstruction of weak scatterers on a planar substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A., Disi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TFT (Thin-film transistor) - LCD (Liquid-crystal display) is now widely used by the display industry for the reason that LCD is compact and light with very low power consumption; moreover, it has little or no flicker and ...

  5. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  6. Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

  7. Process for preparing liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing radioactive and other hazardous liquid wastes for treatment by the method of vitrification or melting is provided for.

  8. Chameleon: A Color-Adaptive Web Browser for Mobile OLED Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    }@rice.edu ABSTRACT Displays based on organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology are appearing on many mobile

  9. MODERN DISPLAYS: WHY WE SEE DIFFERENT COLORS, AND WHAT IT MEANS? Abhijit Sarkar1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MODERN DISPLAYS: WHY WE SEE DIFFERENT COLORS, AND WHAT IT MEANS? Abhijit Sarkar1,2 , Laurent Blondé

  10. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1995-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This operability test procedure will verify that the 221-B beta/gamma liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the six inch chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. An off-line, skid mounted, beta/gamma radiation monitor and pH monitor was installed near stairwell three in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The skid mounted monitoring system includes two radiation detectors and a pH meter, both with local digital displays. Output signals from each monitor are also received and displayed by the Facility Process Monitor and Control System (FPMCS). Pumps, motors, gauges, valves and transport lines complement the skid monitoring system. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system.

  11. A description and evaluation of light-emitting diode displays for generation of visual stimuli*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massaro, Dominic

    A description and evaluation of light-emitting diode displays for generation of visual stimuli 53706 A description of the design and function of light-emitting diode (LED) display modules is given (Time, April 1972). Light-emitting diodes (L~Ds) are examples of these spin-offs, LED display devices

  12. Eye Contact Communication System between Mobile Robots Using Invisible Code Display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eye Contact Communication System between Mobile Robots Using Invisible Code Display Takeru Furukawa on displays which show an expression of robot's eyes. Keywords: 2D code, polarized invisible code, polarized light control, LCD display 1 Introduction "The eyes are eloquent as the tongue." This proverb means

  13. Fast Constructive-Solid Geometry Display in the Pixel-Powers Graphics System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Fast Constructive-Solid Geometry Display in the Pixel-Powers Graphics System Technical Report 86 for PublieatioD #12;Fast Constructive-Solid Geometry Display In the Pixel-Powers Graphics System Jack Goldfeather Hill ABSTRACT We present two algorithms for the display of CSG-defined objects on Pixel-Powers

  14. Tailored Displays to Compensate for Visual Aberrations Vitor F. Pamplona1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliaga, Daniel G.

    optics are performed. We propose tailored displays for daily tasks where using eyeglasses are unfeasible-order aberrations that eyeglasses are not able to. Keywords: tailored displays, optics, light-field displays Links-standard eyesight. Acuity enhance- ment options range from simple eyeglasses to laser eye surgery. Wearable optical

  15. UNC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution. The Visual Display Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    GI LL UM LUX LIBERTAS The Visual Display Transformation for Virtual Reality Warren Robinett-02170. #12;2 The Visual Display Transformation for Virtual Reality Warren Robinett* Richard Holloway Abstract The visual display transformation for virtual reality (VR) systems is typically much more complex

  16. UNC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution. The Visual Display Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Jonathan

    GI LL UM LUX LIBERTAS The Visual Display Transformation for Virtual Reality Warren Robinett-02170. #12;2 The Visual Display Transformation for Virtual Reality Warren Robinett* Richard Holloway Abstract The visual display transformation for virtual reality (VR) systems is typically much more complex

  17. Development of a test facility for the experimental evaluation of liquid and gaseous automotive engine fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCanlies, John Michael

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for comparison of gaseous fuels. A 2. 3 liter, 4-cylinder engine was instrumented to obtain engine performance in terms of power output, efficiency, and exhaust emissions. Fuel supply systems were constructed to deliver and measure the f'lowrates of both... the liquid and gaseous fuels. Electrical signals proport onal to the ma?'or dependent and independent va, iables (except emissions) were input to a microcomputer based data acquisition system to provide con- tInuous display and recording. Stationary...

  18. Crystal-Like geometric modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landreneau, Eric Benjamin

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    faces, symmetry, and fractal geometry. The techniques have also been implemented in software, as a proof of concept. They are used in an interactive geometric modeling system, in which users can use these techniques to create crystal-like shapes...

  19. Arnold Schwarzenegger SINGLE CRYSTAL SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this report. #12;ENERGY INNOVATIONS SMALL GRANT (EISG) PROGRAM INDEPENDENT ASSESSMENT REPORT (IAR) SINGLEArnold Schwarzenegger Governor SINGLE CRYSTAL SILICON SHEET GROWTH Prepared For: California Energy Commission Energy Innovations Small Grant Program Prepared By: Energy Materials Research

  20. Active materials in photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter (Peter A.)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I analyze new phenomena arising from embedding active materials inside of photonic crystal structures. These structures strongly modify the photonic local density of states (LDOS), leading to quantitative and qualitative ...

  1. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cockroft, Nigel J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  2. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  3. Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin Ahlbrandt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin; In Final Form: April 7, 1998 A new formula is derived for the determination of the potential energy of the central unit cell of a finite crystal; this formula is called the crystal potential formula. The crystal

  4. Improving the diversity of manufacturing electroluminescent flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, T.S.; Samuels, J.A.; Smith, D.C. [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline calcium thiogallate with a cerium dopant has been deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at temperatures below 600{degrees}C on a low cost glass substrate. An EL luminance of 1.05 fL was observed 40 volts above threshold at 60 Hz. This is more than an order of magnitude improvement over earlier crystalline-as-deposited thiogallate materials. These results pave the way for the use of MOCVD as a potential method for processing full color thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) flat panel displays. The formation of the CaGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Ce phosphor requires precise control over a number of deposition parameters including flow rates, substrate temperature, and reactor pressure. The influence of these parameters will be discussed in terms of structure, uniformity, and TFEL device performance.

  5. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  6. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Kesanli, Banu (Mersin, TR); Neal, John S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  7. Versatile microbial surface-display for environmental remediation and biofuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Cindy H.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, wilfred

    2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface display is a powerful technique that utilizes natural microbial functional components to express proteins or peptides on the cell exterior. Since the reporting of the first surface-display system in the mid-1980s, a variety of new systems have been reported for yeast, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Non-conventional display methods are emerging, eliminating the generation of genetically modified microorganisms. Cells with surface display are used as biocatalysts, biosorbents and biostimulants. Microbial cell-surface display has proven to be extremely important for numerous applications ranging from combinatorial library screening and protein engineering to bioremediation and biofuels production.

  8. Method for treating liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katti, K.V.; Volkert, W.A.; Singh, P.; Ketring, A.R.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering {sup 99}Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of {sup 99}Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester {sup 99}Tc from those liquids. 6 figs.

  9. Method for treating liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katti, Kattesh V. (Columbia, MO); Volkert, Wynn A. (Columbia, MO); Singh, Prahlad (Columbia, MO); Ketring, Alan R. (Columbia, MO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of treating liquid waste in a media is accomplished by exposing the media to phosphinimines and sequestering .sup.99 Tc from the media by the phosphinimine (PN) functionalities. The system for treating the liquid waste in the media includes extraction of .sup.99 TcO.sub.4.sup.- from aqueous solutions into organic solvents or mixed organic/polar media, extraction of .sup.99 Tc from solutions on a solid matrix by using a container containing PN functionalities on solid matrices including an inlet and outlet for allowing flow of media through an immobilized phosphinimine ligand system contained within the container. Also, insoluble suspensions of phosphinimine functionalities on solid matrices in liquid solutions or present on supported liquid membranes (SLM) can be used to sequester .sup.99 Tc from those liquids.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid crystalline fluids: active gels and blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Cates; O. Henrich; D. Marenduzzo; K. Stratford

    2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice Boltzmann simulations have become a method of choice to solve the hydrodynamic equations of motion of a number of complex fluids. Here we review some recent applications of lattice Boltzmann to study the hydrodynamics of liquid crystalline materials. In particular, we focus on the study of (a) the exotic blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals, and (b) active gels - a model system for actin plus myosin solutions or bacterial suspensions. In both cases lattice Boltzmann studies have proved useful to provide new insights into these complex materials.

  11. New type of thermoelectric conversion of energy by semiconducting liquid anisotropic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey I. Trashkeev; Alexey N. Kudryavtsev

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes preliminary investigations of a new effect in conducting anisotropic liquids, which leads to thermoelectric conversion of energy. Nematic liquid crystals with semiconducting dopes are used. A thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = 0.2 is obtained in experiments. The effect can be explained by assuming that the thermocurrent in semiconducting nematics, in contrast to the Seebeck effect, is a nonlinear function of the temperature gradient and of the temperature itself. Though the discovered effect has to be further investigated, the data obtained suggest that it can be effectively used in alternative energy engineering.

  12. Ammothermal Growth of Gan Substrates For Leds: High-Pressure Ammonothermal Process for Bulk Gallium Nitride Crystal Growth for Energy Efficient Commercially Competitive Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The new GaN crystal growth method is adapted from that used to grow quartz crystals, which are very inexpensive and represent the second-largest market for single crystals for electronic applications (after silicon). More extreme conditions are required to grow GaN crystals and therefore a new type of chemical growth chamber was invented that is suitable for large-scale manufacturing. A new process was developed that grows GaN crystals at a rate that is more than double that of current processes. The new technology will enable GaN substrates with best-in-world quality at lowest-in-world prices, which in turn will enable new generations of white LEDs, lasers for full-color displays, and high-performance power electronics.

  13. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface...

  14. Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

  15. Charge Transport and Glassy Dynamics in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangoro, Joshua R [ORNL; Kremer, Friedrich [University of Leipzig

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit unique features such as low melting points, low vapor pressures, wide liquidus temperature ranges, high thermal stability, high ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical windows. As a result, they show promise for use in variety of applications: as reaction media, in batteries and supercapacitors, in solar and fuel cells, for electrochemical deposition of metals and semiconductors, for protein extraction and crystallization, and many others. Because of the ease with which they can be supercooled, ionic liquids offer new opportunities to investigate long-standing questions regarding the nature of the dynamic glass transition and its possible link to charge transport. Despite the significant steps achieved from experimental and theoretical studies, no generally accepted quantitative theory of dynamic glass transition to date has been capable of reproducing all the experimentally observed features. In this Account, we discuss recent studies of the interplay between charge transport and glassy dynamics in ionic liquids as investigated by a combination of several experimental techniques including broadband dielectric spectroscopy, pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Based on EinsteinSmoluchowski relations, we use dielectric spectra of ionic liquids to determine diffusion coefficients in quantitative agreement with independent pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, but spanning a broader range of more than 10 orders of magnitude. This approach provides a novel opportunity to determine the electrical mobility and effective number density of charge carriers as well as their types of thermal activation from the measured dc conductivity separately. We also unravel the origin of the remarkable universality of charge transport in different classes of glass-forming ionic liquids.

  16. Visual display of reservoir parameters affecting enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, J.R.

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project consists of two parts. In Part 1, well logs, other well data, drilling, and production data for the Pioneer Field in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California were obtained, assembled, and input to a commercial relational database manager. These data are being used in PC-based geologic mapping, evaluation, and visualization software programs to produce 2-D and 3-D representations of the reservoir geometry, facies and subfacies, stratigraphy, porosity, oil saturation, and other measured and model parameters. Petrographic and petrophysical measurements made on samples from Pioneer Field, including core, cuttings and liquids, are being used to calibrate the log suite. In Part 2, these data sets are being used to develop algorithms to correlate log response to geologic and engineering measurements. Rock alteration due to interactions with hot fluids are being quantitatively modeled and used to predict the reservoir response if the rock were subjected to thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR).

  17. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L., E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan and Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show fast growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing slow growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g}?/?T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g}?/?T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max}?/?T{sub g} = 1.48 0.15.

  18. Solid-Liquid Interfacial Premelting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yang; Asta, Mark; Laird, Brian Bostian

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    liquid-liquid miscibility gap, negligible solubility of Pb in the Al solid phase, and a large melting point separa- tion (600 K for Pb and 933 K for Al). We have previously reported results from MD simulations on this system at 625 K, a temperature just... undergoes a roughening transition about 100 K below the melting point of Al. Simulation details.In our simulations of the Al-Pb solid-liquid interface, we employ a classical many-body potential developed by Landa et al. [42] to model the inter- atomic...

  19. automated crystal screening: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high crystallization rates and the production of diffraction-quality crystals. microfluidics Quake, Stephen R. 5 Data Mining Crystallization Databases: Knowledge-Based...

  20. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  1. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  2. Crystallization during processing of nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glassmaking are reviewed.

  3. Crystal-field effects in fluoride crystals for optical refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids has recently seen an important breakthrough. The cooling of a YLiF{sub 4} (YLF) crystal doped with 5 mol% Yb3+ to 155 K by Seletskiy et al [NPhot] has surpassed the lowest temperatures ({approx}170 K for {approx}100 mW cooling capacity) that are practical with commercial multi-stage thermoelectric coolers (TEC) [Glaister]. This record performance has advanced laser cooling into an application relevant regime and has put first practical optical cryocoolers within reach. The result is also relevant from a material perspective since for the first time, an Yb3+-doped crystal has outperformed an Yb3+-doped glass. The record temperature of 208 K was held by the Yb3+-doped fluorozirconate glass ZBLAN. Advanced purification and glass fabrication methods currently under development are expected to also advance ZBLAN:Yb3+ to sub-TEC temperatures. However, recent achievements with YLF:Yb3+ illustrate that crystalline materials may have two potentially game-changing advantajes over glassy materials. First, the crystalline environment reduces the inhomogeneous broadening of the Yb3+ electronic transitions as compared to a glassy matrix. The respective sharpening of the crystal-field transitions increases the peak absorption cross section at the laser excitation wavelength and allows for more efficient pumping of the Yb3+ ions, particularly at low temperatures. Second, many detrimental impurities present in the starting materials tend to be excluded from the crystal during its slow growth process, in contrast to a glass where all impurities present in the starting materials are included in the glass when it is formed by temperature quenching a melt. The ultra high purity required for laser cooling materials [PRB] therefore may be easier to realize in crystals than in glasses. Laser cooling occurs by laser excitation of a rare-earth ion followed by anti-Stokes luminescence. Each such laser-cooling cycle extracts thermal energy from the solid and carries it away as high-entropy light, thereby cooling the material. In the ideal case, the respective laser-cooling power is given by the pump wavelength ({lambda}{sub p}), the mean fluorescence wavelength ({bar {lambda}}{sub L}), and the absorption coefficient (a{sub r}) of the pumped transition. These quantities are solely determined by crystal field interactions. On one hand, a large crystal-field splitting offers a favorably large difference of {lambda}{sub p} - {bar {lambda}}{sub L} and thus a high cooling efficiency {eta}{sub cool} = ({lambda}{sub p} - {bar {lambda}}{sub L})/{bar {lambda}}{sub L}. On the other hand, a small crystal-field splitting offers a high thermal population (n{sub i}) of the initial state of the pumped transition, giving a high pump absorption coefficient and thus high laser cooling power, particularly at low temperatures. A quantitative description of crystal-field interactions is therefore critical to the understanding and optimization of optical refrigeration. In the case of Yb3+ as the laser cooling ion, however, development of a crystal-field model is met with substantial difficulties. First, Yb3+ has only two 4/multiplets, {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} and {sup 2}F{sub 5/2}, which lead to at most 7 crystal-field levels. This makes it difficult, and in some cases impossible, to evaluate the crystal-field Hamiltonian, which has at least 4 parameters for any Yb3+ point symmety lower than cubic. Second, {sup 2}F{sub 7/2}{leftrightarrow}{sup 2}F{sub 5/2} transitions exhibit an exceptionally strong electron-phonon coupling compared to 4f transitions of other rare earths. This makes it difficult to distinguish electronic from vibronic transitions in the absorption and luminescence spectra and to reliably identify the crystal-field levels. Yb3+ crystal-field splittings reported in the literature should thus generally be viewed with caution. This paper explores the effects of crystal-field interactions on the laser cooling performance of Yb3+-doped fluoride crystals. It is shown that the total crystal-field splitting o

  4. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) WASTES FROM CONCEPT TO PILOT PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GENIESSE, D.J.; NELSON, E.A.; HAMILTON, D.W.; MAJORS, J.H.; NORDAHL, T.K.

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford site has 149 underground single-shell tanks (SST) storing mostly soluble, multi-salt mixed wastes resulting from Cold War era weapons material production. These wastes must be retrieved and the salts immobilized before the tanks can be closed to comply with an overall site-closure consent order entered into by the US Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the State of Washington. Water will be used to retrieve the wastes and the resulting solution will be pumped to a proposed pretreatment process where a high-curie (primarily {sup 137}Cs) waste fraction will be separated from the other waste constituents. The separated waste streams will then be vitrified to allow for safe storage as an immobilized high-level waste, or low-level waste, borosilicate glass. Fractional crystallization, a common unit operation for production of industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals, was proposed as the method to separate the salt wastes; it works by evaporating excess water until the solubilities of various species in the solution are exceeded (the solubility of a particular species depends on its concentration, temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ionic species in the solution). By establishing the proper conditions, selected pure salts can be crystallized and separated from the radioactive liquid phase. The aforementioned parameters, along with evaporation rate, proper agitation, and residence time, determine nucleation and growth kinetics and the resulting habit and size distribution of the product crystals. These crystals properties are important considerations for designing the crystallizer and solid/liquid separation equipment. A structured program was developed to (a) demonstrate that fractional crystallization could be used to pre-treat Hanford tank wastes and (b) provide data to develop a pilot plant design.

  5. Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

  6. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  7. Liquid measurement - Techniques and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, B.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a few liquid measurement techniques and their associated problems. In measuring liquid petroleum gas, the first obstacle to overcome is accomodating some form of volumetric measurement. This is usually accomplished by orifice, positive displacement, or turbine meters. Each of the three established methods is covered extensively by industry standards in the API Manual of Petroleum Standards. If the operator follows these standards, very accurate results can be achieved.

  8. Electrowetting on liquid-infused film (EWOLF): Complete reversibility and controlled droplet oscillation suppression for fast optical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Chonglei; Chen, Xuemei; He, Yuncheng; Li, Qiusheng; Li, K Y; Wang, Zuankai

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) has emerged as a powerful tool to electrically manipulate tiny individual droplets in a controlled manner. Despite tremendous progress over the past two decades, current EWOD operating in ambient conditions has limited functionalities posing challenges for its applications, including electronic display, energy generation, and microfluidic systems. Here, we demonstrate a new paradigm of electrowetting on liquid-infused film (EWOLF) that allows for complete reversibility and tunable transient response simultaneously. We determine that these functionalities in EWOLF are attributed to its novel configuration, which allows for the formation of viscous liquid-liquid interfaces as well as additional wetting ridges, thereby suppressing the contact line pinning and severe droplet oscillation encountered in the conventional EWOD. Finally, by harnessing these functionalities demonstrated in EWOLF, we also explore its application as liquid lens for fast optical focusing.

  9. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  10. Calculate viscosities for 355 liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Lin, Xiaoyan; Li Bu (Lamar Univ., TX (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid viscosities are important factors in process design and operation. The viscosity of a liquid determines its flow properties, such as velocity and pressure drop. In addition, the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of a liquid are affected by its viscosity. An equation can be used to calculate liquid viscosities as a function of temperature. In the accompanying table, regression coefficients are included for 355 compounds with five, six or seven carbon atoms--generally the most-widely used in the chemical and petroleum industries. To calculate the viscosity of a liquid at any temperature between its melting and critical points (T[sub min] and T[sub max]), use the following equation: log[sub 10] [eta][sub liq] = A + B/T + CT + DT[sup 2] where [eta][sub liq] = viscosity, cP, A,B,C and D = regression coefficients, and T = liquid temperature, K. Insert the temperature into the equation along with the corresponding regression coefficients from the table. The chemical formulae are listed by the number of carbon atoms.

  11. Mounting a thermocouple of type E onto a Cu single crystal for use in a magnetically sensitive environment below 77?K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potzuweit, Alexander; Schaffner, Anuschka; Jnsch, Heinz Julius, E-mail: heinz.jaensch@physik.uni-marburg.de [Fachbereich Physik, Philipps-Universitt Marburg, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Type E thermocouples show magnetic effects at liquid nitrogen temperature and below. This may cause trouble in experiments that are sensitive to magnetic stray fields like nuclear magnetic resonance, photoemission or high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Here, a solution for the temperature measurement of a single crystal is presented. The authors weld a copper rod onto the back side of the single crystal, thereby relocating the sensitive sample from the thermocouple attachment position. They show that it is possible to measure the crystal temperature at the end of the rod while significantly reducing the ferromagnetic influence due to the increased distance.

  12. A Mapping Function for Variable-Scale Maps in Small-Display Cartography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrie, Lars

    of presenting geodata for personal navigation using small-display mobile devices. Ideally, the user should have for personal navigation using mobile devices are discussed. #12;

  13. Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dane R Spearing, Gary L Smith, SK Sundaram

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review outlines important aspects of crystallization in HLW glasses, such as equilibrium, nucleation, growth, and dissolution. The impact of crystallization on continuous melters and the chemical durability of high-level waste glass are briefly discussed.

  14. Liquid-metal pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhibi; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used as a heat transfer enhancement method in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This paper investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post design beamline mirror with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in literature about pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information about the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even more sparse. Due to this the authors considered the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry, which is very similar to that of the pin-post, to examine the pressure drop correlation with liquid metals over pin fins. The cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank was studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. Study lead to two major variables to influence the pressure drop: fluid properties, viscosity and density, and the relative length of the posts. Correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the prediction of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  15. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony Keiran (Los Alamos, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooke, David Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Ott, Kevin Curtis (Los Alamos, NM); Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal (Los Alamos, NM); Del Sesto, Rico Emilio (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  16. Potash Crystallization Lynn Batten1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsatsomeros, Michael

    fertilizer and industrial chemical, from saturated brines. Typically, hot brine at about 100 C is cooled, knowledge of the spatial distribution of the chemical supersaturation state of the brine would help to improve the process control objectives: · Define conditions for crystal growth · Minimize occluded brine

  17. Robotic CCD microscope for enhanced crystal recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Segelke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA); Toppani, Dominique (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic CCD microscope and procedures to automate crystal recognition. The robotic CCD microscope and procedures enables more accurate crystal recognition, leading to fewer false negative and fewer false positives, and enable detection of smaller crystals compared to other methods available today.

  18. Liquid Cooling in Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cader, Tahir; Sorell,, Vali; Westra, Levi; Marquez, Andres

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor manufacturers have aggressively attacked the problem of escalating microprocessor power consumption levels. Today, server manufacturers can purchase microprocessors that currently have power consumption levels capped at 100W maximum. However, total server power levels continue to increase, with the increase in power consumption coming from the supportin chipsets, memory, and other components. In turn, full rack heat loads are very aggressivley climbing as well, and this is making it increasingly difficult and cost-prohibitive for facility owners to cool these high power racks. As a result, facilities owners are turning to alternative, and more energy efficient, cooling solutions that deploy liquids in one form or another. The paper discusses the advent of the adoption of liquid-cooling in high performance computing centers. An overview of the following competing rack-based, liquid-cooling, technologies is provided: in-row, above rack, refrigerated/enclosed rack, rear door heat exchanger, and device-level (i.e., chip-level). Preparation for a liquid-cooled data center, retroft and greenfield (new), is discussed, with a focus on the key issues that are common to all liquid-cooling technologies that depend upon the delivery of water to the rack (or in some deployments, a Coolant Distribution Unit). The paper then discusses, in some detail, the actual implementation and deployment of a liquid device-level cooled (spray cooled) supercomputer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Initial results from a successful 30 day compliance test show excellent hardware stability, operating system (OS) and software stack stability, application stability and performance, and an availability level that exceeded expectations at 99.94%. The liquid-cooled supercomputer achieved a peak performance of 9.287 TeraFlops, which placed it at number 101 in the June 2007 Top500 fastest supercomputers worldwide. Long-term performance and energy efficiency testing is currently underway, and detailed results will be reported in upcoming publications.

  19. Liquid membrane purification of biogas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. (Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

  20. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  1. Are polar liquids less simple?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fragiadakis; C. M. Roland

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong correlation between equilibrium fluctuations of the potential energy, U, and the virial, W, is a characteristic of a liquid that implies the presence of certain dynamic properties, such as density scaling of the relaxation times and isochronal superpositioning of the relaxation function. In this work we employ molecular dynamics simulations (mds) on methanol and two variations, lacking hydrogen bonds and a dipole moment, to assess the connection between the correlation of U and W and these dynamic properties. We show, in accord with prior results of others [T.S. Ingebrigtsen, T.B. Schroder, J.C. Dyre, Phys. Rev. X 2, 011011 (2012).], that simple van der Waals liquids exhibit both strong correlations and the expected dynamic behavior. However, for polar liquids this correspondence breaks down - weaker correlation between U and W is not associated with worse conformance to density scaling or isochronal superpositioning. The reason for this is that strong correlation between U and W only requires their proportionality, whereas the expected dynamic behavior depends primarily on constancy of the proportionality constant for all state points. For hydrogen-bonded liquids, neither strong correlation nor adherence to the dynamic properties is observed; however, this nonconformance is not directly related to the concentration of hydrogen bonds, but rather to the greater deviation of the intermolecular potential from an inverse power law (IPL). Only (hypothetical) liquids having interactions governed strictly by an IPL are perfectly correlating and exhibit the consequent dynamic properties over all thermodynamic conditions.

  2. Spheree: A 3D Perspective-Corrected Interactive Spherical Scalable Display Ferreira, F.q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Columbia, University of

    models can be exported or printed on a 3D printer. Other related 3D displays include: 1. pCubee [StavnessSpheree: A 3D Perspective-Corrected Interactive Spherical Scalable Display Ferreira, F.q , Cabral & U of British Columbia (a) (b) (c) (d) Figure 1: (a) A snowglobe; (b) a fish-tank animation; (c) a 3D

  3. DISPLAY OF FRICTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS BASED ON HUMAN FINGER PAD CHARACTERISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollerbach, John M.

    DISPLAY OF FRICTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS BASED ON HUMAN FINGER PAD CHARACTERISTICS A. Nahvi, J City, UT 84112 ABSTRACT A friction display system is proposed for virtual environ- ments. Since a user the frictional properties of the human finger pad on 9 subjects by simultaneously recording force and movement

  4. Multi-view Rendering using GPU for 3-D Displays Francois de Sorbier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Multi-view Rendering using GPU for 3-D Displays Francois de Sorbier Graduate School of Science content for stereoscopic and auto-stereoscopic displays requires to render a scene several times from slightly different viewpoints. In that case, maintaining real-time rendering can be a difficult goal

  5. Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays LEDs Accelerometer Vibration Buttons Laser & LEDs Unlike conventional input devices like mouse and keyboard, laser pointers do that are displayed on large high-resolution screens. The laser pointer technology was developed in cooperation

  6. Energy Displays and Environmental Behavior: The Role of Social Values and Psychological Distance of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuley, Derek

    1 Energy Displays and Environmental Behavior: The Role of Social Values and Psychological Distance environmental behavior and the utility of energy displays. The British government, through energy companies established baseline scores of values. Subsequently, participants were asked to report their home energy use

  7. Building Flexible Displays for Awareness and Interaction Kathryn Elliot and Saul Greenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    prototype physical displays, all constructed using Phidgets [1]. These are: 1. The lamp shade (shown in fig either a red or a green LED. The lights can be lit individually or as part of a group. 3. A set of two states, as well as continuous values. For example, the rotating lamp shade can display five discrete

  8. Control Method for a 3D Form Display with Coil-type Shape Memory Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Control Method for a 3D Form Display with Coil-type Shape Memory Alloy Masashi Nakatani1 , Hiroyuki.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Abstract - We previously proposed a new 3D form display actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA), which of the shape memory alloy with a simple matrix drive circuit. This type of drive circuit can dramatically

  9. Managing the Effect of Delay Jitter on the Display of Live Continuous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Managing the Effect of Delay Jitter on the Display of Live Continuous Media Donald L. Stone of Delay Jitter on the Display of Live Continuous Media (under the direction of Kevin Jeffay). ABSTRACT latency in the presence of delay jitter, where delay jitter is defined as variation in processing

  10. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  11. Fragmentation of suddenly heated liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fragmentation of free liquids in Inertial Confinement Fusion reactors could determine the upper bound on reactor pulse rate. The x-ray ablated materials must cool and recondense to allow driver beam propagation. The increased surface area caused by fragmentation will enhance the cooling and condensation rates. Relaxation from the suddenly heated state will move a liquid into the negative pressure region under the liquid-vapor P-V dome. The lithium equation of state was used to demonstrate that neutron-induced vaporization uses only a minor fraction of the added heat, much less than would be required to drive the expansion. A 77% expansion of the lithium is required before the rapid vaporization process of spinodal decomposition could begin, and nucleation and growth are too slow to contribute to the expansion.

  12. Liquid soap film generates electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed that a rotating liquid soap film generates electricity when placed between two non-contact electrodes with a sufficiently large potential difference. In our experiments suspended liquid film (water + soap film) is formed on the surface of a circular frame, which is forced to rotate in the $x-y$ horizontal plane by a motor. This system is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply an external electric voltage difference in the $x-$direction. The produced electric current is collected from the liquid film using two conducting electrodes that are separated in the $y-$direction. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this paper we report a novel technique, in which a similar device can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to electrical energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed similarly in very small scales like micro scales with different applications. Although the device is comparable to commercial electric motors or electric generators, there is a significant difference in their working principles. Usually in an electric motor or generator the magnetic field causes the driving force, while in a LFM or LFEG the Coulomb force is the driving force. This fact is also interesting from the Bio-science point of view and brings a similarity to bio motors. Here we have investigated the electrical characteristics of such a generator for the first time experimentally and modelled the phenomenon with electroconvection governing equations. A numerical simulation is performed using the local approximation for the charge-potential relation and results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  13. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  14. In situ investigation of explosive crystallization in a-Ge: Experimental determination of the interface response function using dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolova, Liliya; MacLeod, Jennifer M.; Ibrahim, Heide [Centre nergie, Matriaux, Tlcommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stern, Mark J.; Siwick, Bradley J., E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Center for the Physics of Materials, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada); Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; LaGrange, Thomas, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Rosei, Federico, E-mail: rosei@emt.inrs.ca, E-mail: lagrange2@llnl.gov, E-mail: bradley.siwick@mcgill.ca [Centre nergie, Matriaux, Tlcommunications, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1650 Lionel Boulet boulevard, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Centre for Self-Assembled Chemical Structures, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2K6 (Canada)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystallization of amorphous semiconductors is a strongly exothermic process. Once initiated the release of latent heat can be sufficient to drive a self-sustaining crystallization front through the material in a manner that has been described as explosive. Here, we perform a quantitative in situ study of explosive crystallization in amorphous germanium using dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Direct observations of the speed of the explosive crystallization front as it evolves along a laser-imprinted temperature gradient are used to experimentally determine the complete interface response function (i.e., the temperature-dependent front propagation speed) for this process, which reaches a peak of 16?m/s. Fitting to the Frenkel-Wilson kinetic law demonstrates that the diffusivity of the material locally/immediately in advance of the explosive crystallization front is inconsistent with those of a liquid phase. This result suggests a modification to the liquid-mediated mechanism commonly used to describe this process that replaces the phase change at the leading amorphous-liquid interface with a change in bonding character (from covalent to metallic) occurring in the hot amorphous material.

  15. New airport liquid analysis system undergoes testing at Albuquerque...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New airport liquid analysis system New airport liquid analysis system undergoes testing at Albuquerque International Sunport A new tool that distinguishes potential-threat liquids...

  16. THERMODYNAMICS OF SOLID AND LIQUID GROUP III-V ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, T.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a high temperature heat capacity for liquid gallium which isthe molar heat capacity of the stoichiometric liquid and theheat capacity of the supercooled stoichiometric binary liquid

  17. Assessment of display performance for medical imaging systems: Executive summary of AAPM TG18 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samei, Ehsan; Badano, Aldo; Chakraborty, Dev [Duke Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, DUMC 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States) and FDA, CDRH (United States)] [and others

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital imaging provides an effective means to electronically acquire, archive, distribute, and view medical images. Medical imaging display stations are an integral part of these operations. Therefore, it is vitally important to assure that electronic display devices do not compromise image quality and ultimately patient care. The AAPM Task Group 18 (TG18) recently published guidelines and acceptance criteria for acceptance testing and quality control of medical display devices. This paper is an executive summary of the TG18 report. TG18 guidelines include visual, quantitative, and advanced testing methodologies for primary and secondary class display devices. The characteristics, tested in conjunction with specially designed test patterns (i.e., TG18 patterns), include reflection, geometric distortion, luminance, the spatial and angular dependencies of luminance, resolution, noise, glare, chromaticity, and display artifacts. Geometric distortions are evaluated by linear measurements of the TG18-QC test pattern, which should render distortion coefficients less than 2%/5% for primary/secondary displays, respectively. Reflection measurements include specular and diffuse reflection coefficients from which the maximum allowable ambient lighting is determined such that contrast degradation due to display reflection remains below a 20% limit and the level of ambient luminance (L{sub amb}) does not unduly compromise luminance ratio (LR) and contrast at low luminance levels. Luminance evaluation relies on visual assessment of low contrast features in the TG18-CT and TG18-MP test patterns, or quantitative measurements at 18 distinct luminance levels of the TG18-LN test patterns. The major acceptable criteria for primary/secondary displays are maximum luminance of greater than 170/100 cd/m{sup 2}, LR of greater than 250/100, and contrast conformance to that of the grayscale standard display function (GSDF) of better than 10%/20%, respectively. The angular response is tested to ascertain the viewing cone within which contrast conformance to the GSDF is better than 30%/60% and LR is greater than 175/70 for primary/secondary displays, or alternatively, within which the on-axis contrast thresholds of the TG18-CT test pattern remain discernible. The evaluation of luminance spatial uniformity at two distinct luminance levels across the display faceplate using TG18-UNL test patterns should yield nonuniformity coefficients smaller than 30%. The resolution evaluation includes the visual scoring of the CX test target in the TG18-QC or TG18-CX test patterns, which should yield scores greater than 4/6 for primary/secondary displays. Noise evaluation includes visual evaluation of the contrast threshold in the TG18-AFC test pattern, which should yield a minimum of 3/2 targets visible for primary/secondary displays. The guidelines also include methodologies for more quantitative resolution and noise measurements based on MTF and NPS analyses. The display glare test, based on the visibility of the low-contrast targets of the TG18-GV test pattern or the measurement of the glare ratio (GR), is expected to yield scores greater than 3/1 and GRs greater than 400/150 for primary/secondary displays. Chromaticity, measured across a display faceplate or between two display devices, is expected to render a u{sup '},v{sup '} color separation of less than 0.01 for primary displays. The report offers further descriptions of prior standardization efforts, current display technologies, testing prerequisites, streamlined procedures and timelines, and TG18 test patterns.

  18. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universitt Gttingen, Tammannstrae 4, Gttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as a CIF) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  19. Commercial Application of Freeze Crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorgol, R. G.

    COMMERCIAL APPLICATION OF FREEZE CRYSTALLIZATION ROBERT G. GORGOL, MARKETING MANAGER, HPD INCORPORATED, NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS ABSTRACT Industrial usc of frcezing for componcnt purification and separation is well understood, but commercial... of purification, but they did understand the water they obtained from ice was potable. RECENT APPLICATIONS Scientists have understood the basic mechanism of the freezing phase change for many years. ID an effort to harness the power of this phenomena...

  20. Abstract crystals Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Arun

    is a normal crystal define a bijection si : B B by sib = ~f wti(b) i b, if wti(b) 0, ~e -wti(b) i b, if wti, b2 B2} with wti(b1 b2) = wti(b1) + wti(b2), i(b1 b2) = max{i(b1), i(b2) - wt(b1), i }, i(b1 b2