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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Natural gas plays a vital role in the U.S. energy supply and in achieving the nation's economic and environmental goals. One of several supply options involves increasing imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to ensure that American consumers have adequate supplies of natural gas for the future. Natural gas consumption in the United States is expected to increase slightly from about 24.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2011 to 26.6 Tcf by 2035. Currently, most of the demand for natural gas in the United States is met with domestic production and imports via pipeline from Canada. A small percentage of gas supplies are imported and received as liquefied natural gas. A significant portion of the world's natural gas resources are

2

Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier  

SciTech Connect

In collaboration with Cryenco Inc. and NIST-Boulder, we intend to develop a natural gas-powered natural-gas liquefier which has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It will have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. Progress on the liquefier to be constructed at Cryenco continues satisfactorily. The thermoacoustic driver is still ahead of the pulse tube refrigerator, because of NIST`s schedule. We completed the thermoacoustics design in the fall of 1994, with Los Alamos providing physics input and checks of all aspects, and Cryenco providing engineering to ASME code, drafting, etc. Completion of this design represents a significant amount of work, especially in view of the many unexpected problems encountered. Meanwhile, Cryenco and NIST have almost completed the design of the pulse tube refrigerator. At Los Alamos, we have assembled a half-size scale model of the thermoacoustic portion of the 500 gal/day TANGL. This scale model will enable easy experimentation in harmonic suppression techniques, new stack geometries, new heat-exchanger geometries, resonator coiling, and other areas. As of March 1995, the scale model is complete and we are performing routine debugging tests and modifications.

Swift, G.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Liquefied Petroleum Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other products includes pentanes plus, other hydrocarbons, oxygenates, hydrogen, unfinished oils, gasoline, special naphthas, jet fuel, lubricants, asphalt and road ...

5

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Gas Tax to Liquefied Gas Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Liquefied Gas Tax A use tax of $0.14 per gallon is imposed on liquefied gas used for operating motor vehicles on public highways in addition to a pre-paid annual vehicle tax according to the following: Maximum Gross Vehicle Weight Rating Tax

6

Liquefied Natural Gas Safety Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| May 2012 | May 2012 Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety Research | Page 1 Liquefied Natural Gas Safety Research Report to Congress May 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | May 2012 Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety Research | Page i Message from the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy The Explanatory Statement accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008 1 and the House Report on the House of Representatives version of the related bill 2 requested the Department of Energy to submit a report to Congress addressing several key liquefied natural gas (LNG) research priorities. These issues are identified in the February 2007 Government Accountability Office Report (GAO Report 07-316), Public Safety Consequences of a Terrorist

7

Liquefied Natural Gas: Understanding the Basic Facts | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas: Understanding the Basic Facts Liquefied Natural Gas: Understanding the Basic Facts Liquefied Natural Gas: Understanding the Basic Facts More Documents &...

8

Safety audit of refrigerated liquefied gas facilities  

SciTech Connect

An Exxon Research and Engineering Co. comprehensive review of engineering practices and application of safety requirements at Exxon's world-wide refrigerated liquefied hydrocarbon gas storage and handling installations, which included a field audit of about 90 tanks at 30 locations, showed that catastrophic tank failure was not a credible event with properly operated and maintained tanks designed, constructed, and tested in accordance with API Standard 620, Design and Construction of Large Welded Low-Pressure Storage Tanks, although supplemental requirements were suggested to further enhance safety. The review also showed that any meaningful safety audit should be comprehensive and must include all facilities with careful attention to detail. The review embraces products of -1 to -167C and included LNG, ethylene, LPG, and LPG olefins. Recent and proposed LNG safety legislation; some field audit results; and recommendations as to design, construction, and operation of LNG and LPG storage facilities, marine terminals, and tankers, are also discussed.

Feely, F.J.; Sommer, E.C.; Marshall, B.T.; Palmer, A.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Propane, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Propane: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Propane: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Ford F-150 (Dual-Fuel LPG) Propane or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is a clean-burning fossil fuel that can be used to power internal combustion engines. LPG-fueled vehicles can produce significantly lower amounts of some harmful emissions and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2). LPG is usually less expensive than gasoline, it can be used without degrading vehicle performance, and most LPG used in U.S. comes from domestic sources. The availability of LPG-fueled light-duty passenger vehicles is currently limited. A few light-duty vehicles-mostly larger trucks and vans-can be ordered from a dealer with a prep-ready engine package and converted to use propane. Existing conventional vehicles can also be converted for LPG use.

10

Measuring Devices: Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied Petroleum Gas Liquid-Measuring Devices. Intro about it. EPOs, Field Manual, Training Materials & Presentaions, Newsletter Articles, Other ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Environmental Environmental Science Enviro Express Kenworth LNG tractor. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project Case Study - Liquefied Natural Gas As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's broad effort to develop cleaner transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, this study examines advanced 2011 natural gas fueled trucks using liquefied natural gas (LNG) replacing older diesel fueled trucks. The trucks are used 6 days per week in regional city-to-landfill long hauls of incinerator waste with two fills per day. This is a workable fit for the limited range LNG trucks. Reduction of fuel costs and harmful emissions relative to the replaced trucks are significant. Introduction The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act legislation

12

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Petroleum Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) License

13

Liquefied natural gas. [177 Citations  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography on liquefied natural gas contains 177 citations under the following headings: thermodynamic and other properties of methane; phase equilibria of methane; other properties of methane mixtures; liquefaction, separation, and regasification; peak shaving and terminal storage plants; liquid storage; importation of LNG; ground and sea transportation; liquid pipelines; heat and mass transport; safety; sorption; instrumentation; gas fields and cavern storage; transportation and other applications; general references; economic factors; patents; energy, and SNG.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Modernizing helium liquefier G-3  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the process for modernizing the existing liquefier with minimum alteration of its cooling block, that liquefier being helium expansion-type liquefier G-3, made at the Institute of Physical Problems, Academy of Sciences of the USSR, which operates at a stable output of 40 liters/h. A nitrogen tank and a pistontype expander in the preliminary cooling stages and a throttle in the liquefaction stages are used in G-3. Improving the efficiency of such a cooling cycle is limited by the fact that the optimal parameters of throttle stage of liquefaction do not match with the optimal parameters of the expander in the preliminary cooling stages. Thus, for improving cycle efficiency the pressure in the preliminary stages must be increased but reduced in the liquefaction stage. This paper also presents the solution to this problem. It is further demonstrated that the use of vapor-liquid expander in the liquefaction stage of helium cooling cycle helps increase the output of the unit by 40% in a relatively simple way.

Golikov, G.E.; Danilov, I.B.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Outlook  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Mark RodekohrPresented to: 14th International Conference on Liquefied Natural GasDoha, QatarMarch 23, 2004

Information Center

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

Port Nikiski, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nikiski, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Port Nikiski, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)...

17

San Diego, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Diego, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) San Diego, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)...

18

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

19

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

20

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

22

Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

23

Price of Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

24

Price of Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)...

25

Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas May 20, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis...

26

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

27

DOE Initiates Series of Liquefied Natural Gas Public Education...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Initiates Series of Liquefied Natural Gas Public Education Forums DOE Initiates Series of Liquefied Natural Gas Public Education Forums February 15, 2006 - 11:52am Addthis...

28

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

29

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

30

Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas May 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis...

31

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Russia (Dollars per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Russia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Russia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade...

32

Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade...

33

Price Liquefied Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Exports Price ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Price Liquefied Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Exports Price to Brazil (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

34

Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa) Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa) Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Public Safety This document adopts the standards promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association as rules for the transportation, storage, handling,

35

liquefied natural gas LNG | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied natural gas LNG Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, Source Alternative Fuels Data Center Date Released December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords alt fuel alternative fuels alternative fuels stations biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol hydrogen liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied petroleum gas LPG propane station locations Data text/csv icon alt_fuel_stations_apr_4_2012.csv (csv, 2.3 MiB) Quality Metrics

36

Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

1995-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Measurement LNG is taxed based on the gasoline gallon equivalent, or 6.6 pounds of LNG

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut on AddThis.com... June 4, 2011 Liquefied Natural Gas Powers Trucks in Connecticut

39

Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL), in conjunction with 24 satellite refrigerators, supplies refrigeration for the Fermilab superconducting accelerator. Liquid from the CHL is transported in a six kilometer circular transfer line and each satellite withdraws the amount required to boost its refrigeration capacity to the necessary level. Unused liquid is presently returned to compressor suction through a 250 kW calorimeter-heater. A helium gas flow of 1.1 kg/s is supplied to the cold box at 15 bars pressure. The gas flows through a demister and an oil adsorgber before it enters the cold box. In the cold box, manufactured by Koch Process Systems and Sulzer Brothers, Ltd., the gas is first cooled by liquid nitrogen and then the flow is split. Three quarters of the flow is further cooled by a series/parallel combination of three oil bearing turbines and then returned to the low pressure side of the heat exchangers. The return gas is used to cool the remaining high pressure gas which is then expanded to 3.5 bars in a 900 L receiver. From there the fluid is transferred into a distribution box, and then routed to either a collection dewar, directly to the ring, or to a heater. The liquid helium, which is utilized by the satellites to increase their cooling capacity, is warmed to near ambient temperature in the satellite heat exchangers. The satellite compressors return the excess inventory to the CHL via a 20 bar gas header. This gas is injected into the high pressure supply to the cold box. The system is shown.

Hodge, G.A.; Rihel, R.K.; Stone, M.E.; Walker, R.J.; /Fermilab

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

EPA's Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Regulatory Roadmap July 2006 EPA230-B-06-001 About this Roadmap Natural gas continues to play an important role in meeting our nation's growing energy needs. In 2005, natural gas accounted for 23% of our nation's total energy consumption. 1 The Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that domestic consumption of natural gas will continue to increase and that imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) will meet much of the increased demand. 2 LNG, created when natural gas is converted into a liquid state by cooling it to a temperature close to negative 260°F, presents an efficient way to transport natural gas via ship from foreign production areas to the United States. The cooling process reduces the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Japan Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Japan Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Japan Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

42

Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct...

43

Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Portugal Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Portugal Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Portugal Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov...

44

Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Spain Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Spain Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Spain Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

45

Sabine Pass, LA Exports to United kingdom Liquefied Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United kingdom Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Exports to United kingdom Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

46

Freeport, TX Exports to India Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports to India Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Exports to India Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct...

47

Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

48

Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

49

Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

50

Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

51

Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

52

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 1:45:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103ID2" "Date","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From...

53

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 1:45:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103ID2" "Date","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From...

54

Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Brazil Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Brazil Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Brazil Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

55

3 , LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) -165oC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C / . Natural Gas Hydrate (NGH) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Modes of Transport and Storage , , . . . , . , LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) -165oC , . (Piped Natural Gas, PNG) , , . PNG, LNG ( 2-3 ), . (Natural Gas Hydrate, NGH) / . -20o

Hong, Deog Ki

56

Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Korea Liquefied Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Korea Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Exports to Korea Liquefied Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

57

,"Alaska Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 2:06:59 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ENGSAK-NCHMMCF" "Date","Alaska Liquefied...

58

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

59

Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

60

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Petroleum Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and Natural Gas Liability Immunity to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and Natural Gas Liability Immunity on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and Natural Gas Liability Immunity on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and Natural Gas Liability Immunity on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and Natural Gas Liability Immunity on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and Natural Gas Liability Immunity on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) and Natural Gas Liability Immunity on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The safe use of low temperature liquefied gases 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(5-10%) but the others are odourless. Liquefied gases ­ oxygen, nitrogen, argon, helium and carbonCare with cryogenics The safe use of low temperature liquefied gases #12;Index 1. Introduction 1.1 Objective 1.2 Gases considered and typical uses 2. Properties of low temperature liquefied atmospheric gases

Martin, Ralph R.

62

Dynamic Simulation of a Helium Liquefier  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic behavior of a helium liquefier has been studied in detail with a Cryogenic Process REal-time SimulaTor (C-PREST) at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The C-PREST is being developed to integrate large-scale helium cryogenic plant design, operation and maintenance for optimum process establishment. As a first step of simulations of cooldown to 4.5 K with the helium liquefier model is conducted, which provides a plant-process validation platform. The helium liquefier consists of seven heat exchangers, a liquid-nitrogen (LN2) precooler, two expansion turbines and a liquid-helium (LHe) reservoir. Process simulations are fulfilled with sequence programs, which were implemented with C-PREST based on an existing liquefier operation. The interactions of a JT valve, a JT-bypass valve and a reservoir-return valve have been dynamically simulated. The paper discusses various aspects of refrigeration process simulation, including its difficulties such as a balance between complexity of the adopted models and CPU time.

Maekawa, R.; Ooba, K.; Mito, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Nobutoki, M. [Nippon Sanso Co., Kawasaki, Kanagawa, 210-0861 (Japan)

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

System and method for converting wellhead gas to liquefied petroleum gases (LPG)  

SciTech Connect

A method of converting natural wellhead gas to liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) may comprise the steps of: separating natural gas from petroleum fluids exiting a well-head; compressing the natural gas; refrigerating the natural gas, liquefying at least a portion thereof; and separating LPG from gas vapors of the refrigerated natural gas. A system for performing the method may comprise: a two-stage gas compressor connected to the wellhead; a refrigeration unit downstream of the gas compressor for cooling the compressed gases therefrom; and a product separator downstream of the refrigeration unit for receiving cooled and compressed gases discharged from the refrigeration unit and separating LPG therein from gases remaining in vapor form.

May, R.L.; Snow, N.J. Jr.

1983-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

Vertical Structures in the Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the last decade, the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market altered substantially. Significant investments have been realized, traded volumes increased and contracting structures gained (more)

Rster, Sophia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Allows for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

its entire diesel refuse-hauler fleet to clean-burning liquefied natural gas (LNG). The fleet worked with Sacramento Clean Cities, the local air district, and other...

67

Australia world's largest coal exporter, fourth-largest liquefied ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In addition to coal, Australia is one of the world's leading exporters of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Australia produced 1.6 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) ...

68

Kuwait, a leading oil exporter, relies on imports of liquefied ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kuwait, a leading oil exporter, relies on imports of liquefied natural gas. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration Note: 2010 data estimated.

69

Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to United...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United Kingdom (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to United Kingdom (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

70

Liquefied natural gas meets a quarter of New England's average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: Canada demand imports LNG (liquefied natural gas) natural gas New England states. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

71

Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) from Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade...

72

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

73

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

74

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Brunei (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Brunei (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

75

Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) from Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

76

NETL: News Release - Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 22, 2003 Storing Liquefied Natural Gas in Underground Salt Caverns Could Boost Global LNG Trade Novel Process May be Half the Cost of Conventional Liquid Tank Terminals...

77

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Australia (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Australia (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013"...

78

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

79

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

80

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Algeria (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Algeria (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

82

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Equatorial Guinea ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Equatorial Guinea (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","1212...

83

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","42011" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

84

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Qatar (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Qatar (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

85

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

86

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013" ,"Next...

87

Conceptual Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminal design for Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research study investigated a new conceptual design for a modular structural configuration incorporating storage for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) within the base of the platform structure. The structure, referred to as a modified gravity base concrete structure (MGBCS), was envisioned specifically to be constructed at a suitable site off the coast of Kuwait. Coastal offshore bathometric information, environmental data and existing data on onshore facilities were examined in the site selection portion of the study. A finite element model of the MGBCS was developed using an industry standard finite element code that allows preliminary sizes of structural models to meet appropriate design codes. A variety of parametric and design load scenarios were investigated. This research tackles some preliminary issues that are adequate for an initial evaluation of the proposed design concept. The proposed design concept needs a lot more scrutiny in order to be sufficiently developed as a concept where it can be confirmed as a truly viable concept and investment. It was confirmed that quartering sea conditions, waves approaching at a 45 degree angle, are the most critical scenarios for the terminal based on maximum values and ranges of shears and moments. In addition, there are several interesting issues in this concept that should be further looked at for this design to be further developed. The limitations of our study must be mitigated in future designs if the proposed design concept is to be carried to the implementation stage.

Aljeeran, Fares

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Simulation program for central helium liquefier  

SciTech Connect

The computer program described here analyzes the performance of Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) and predicts the values of the plant thermodynamic variables at all process points in the plant. To simulate CHL, this program is modified from the prototype program which was developed by Hitachi Ltd. a couple of years ago. This program takes care of only the steady state simulation and takes account of the change of the turbine efficiency, the pressure drops and the UA values of the heat exchangers. How to use the program is shown.

Kawamura, S.

1984-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Nogales, AZ Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

250 282 2006-2012 Pipeline Prices 6.79 7.88 4.04 4.86 4.47 3.31 2006-2012 Liquefied Natural Gas Volumes 16 0 0 0 0 34 1998-2012 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices 15.27 -- -- -- --...

91

The Department of Energy's Role in Liquefied Natural Gas Export  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Role in Liquefied Natural Gas Export The Department of Energy's Role in Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications The Department of Energy's Role in Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications November 8, 2011 - 11:34am Addthis Statement of Christopher Smith, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Fossil Energy before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on DOE's Role in Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications. Thank you Chairman Bingaman, Ranking Member Murkowski, and members of the Committee; I appreciate the opportunity to be here today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) program regulating the export of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). DOE's Statutory Authority DOE's authority to regulate the export of natural gas arises under

92

Clean Cities Moving Fleets Forward with Liquefied Natural Gas | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Cities Moving Fleets Forward with Liquefied Natural Gas Clean Cities Moving Fleets Forward with Liquefied Natural Gas Clean Cities Moving Fleets Forward with Liquefied Natural Gas May 30, 2013 - 2:52pm Addthis Waste hauler Enviro Express converted its fleet of heavy-duty trucks to run on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and built the first LNG station east of the Mississippi River with help from the Energy Department's Clean Cities initiative. | Photo courtesy of New Haven Clean Cities Coalition. Waste hauler Enviro Express converted its fleet of heavy-duty trucks to run on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and built the first LNG station east of the Mississippi River with help from the Energy Department's Clean Cities initiative. | Photo courtesy of New Haven Clean Cities Coalition. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program

93

DOE Initiates Series of Liquefied Natural Gas Public Education Forums |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Series of Liquefied Natural Gas Public Education Series of Liquefied Natural Gas Public Education Forums DOE Initiates Series of Liquefied Natural Gas Public Education Forums February 15, 2006 - 11:52am Addthis First Forum Set in Boston, Massachusetts WASHINGTON, D.C. - The first in a series of Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored public education forums on liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been scheduled for Friday, March 10, 2006, at the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center in Boston, Massachusetts. This series of forums aims to maintain open lines of communication between government officials and interested citizens, and is scheduled in compliance with the National Energy Policy Act of 2005, enacted by President Bush in August 2005. "The Department of Energy's Liquefied Natural Gas forums will initiate

94

Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

System and method for converting wellhead gas to liquefied petroleum gases (LPG)  

SciTech Connect

A method of converting natural wellhead gas to liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) may comprise the steps of: separating natural gas from petroleum fluids exiting a wellhead; compressing the natural gas; refrigerating the natural gas, liquefying at least a portion thereof; separating LPG from gas vapors of the refrigerated natural gas; storing the separated LPG in a storage tank with a vapor space therein; and recirculating a portion of the LPG vapors in the storage tank with the natural gas exiting the wellhead to enhance recovery of LPG. A system for performing the method may comprise: a two-stage gas compressor connected to the wellhead; a refrigeration unit downstream of the gas compressor for refrigerating the compressed gases therefrom; at least one product separator downstream of the refrigerator unit for receiving refrigerated and compressed gases discharged from the refrigerator unit and separating LPG therein from gases remaining in vapor form; and a storage tank for receiving and storing the separated LPG therein, the storage tank having a vapor space therein connected upstream of the gas compressor through a pressure regulator allowing recirculation of some LPG vapors with the natural gases through said system.

May, R.L.; Sinclair, B.W.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydrocarbon adsorption apparatus and process  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering hydrocarbons from natural gas by the use of solid adsorbents consists of 3 steps. The main flow stream of natural gas is passed through a first and only bed of solid adsorbent so that at least a portion of the hydrocarbons present is adsorbed in the bed. A heated regeneration gas is next passed through a second bed of solid adsorbent so that at least a portion of the hydrocarbons is desorbed from the bed. The main flow of natural gas is passed through the second and only bed when in a heated condition after regeneration and the flow of heated regeneration gas is passed through the first bed. The hydrocarbons desorbed from the first and second beds from the regeneration gas are recovered while the previous 3 steps are repeated. (6 claims)

Humphries, C.L.

1966-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Evolution of the Standard Helium Liquefier and Refrigerator Range designed by Air Liquide DTA, France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of the Standard Helium Liquefier and Refrigerator Range designed by Air Liquide DTA, France

Crispel, S; Caillaud, A; Delcayre, F; Grabie, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Yield Refinery Yield (Percent) Product: Liquefied Refinery Gases Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 PADD 1 4.4 5.1 4.9 4.9 4.6 2.1 1993-2013 East Coast 4.4 5.3 5.1 5.1 4.9 2.2 1993-2013

99

liquefied petroleum gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288523 Varnish cache server liquefied petroleum gas Dataset Summary Description Alternative fueling stations are located throughout the United States and their availability continues to grow. The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) maintains a website where you can find alternative fuels stations near you or on a route, obtain counts of alternative fuels stations by state, Source Alternative Fuels Data Center Date Released December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated December 13th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords alt fuel alternative fuels alternative fuels stations biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol

100

Hydrocarbon adsorption system  

SciTech Connect

In a solid adsorbent hydrocarbon recovery system for processing natural gas, towers adapted for performing adsorbing, cooling, and regenerating functions are used. It is recommended that a regeneration gas be used of substantially uniform richness in hydrocarbons in the closed-cycle regeneration system. The natural gas stream is flowed through an adsorbent bed to remove liquid hydrocarbons. A portion of the stripped gas stream is flowed through a second adsorbent bed for cooling purposes. A heated, rich, regeneration gas is circulated through a closed-cycle regeneration system that includes a third adsorbent bed. This rich regeneration gas is combined with the stripped gas stream. These steps are repeated in a cyclic operation. (10 claims)

Humphries, C.L.

1966-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Spain (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Spain (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Spain (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,911 - No Data...

102

Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to India (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

India (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to India (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,477 3,072 - No...

103

Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

data. Release Date: 7312013 Next Release Date: 8302013 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Exports to...

104

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011...

105

Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Chile (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chile (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Chile (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,910 - No Data...

106

Otay Mesa, CA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 7312013 Next Release Date: 8302013 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Otay Mesa, CA Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

107

Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Japan (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,741 - No Data...

108

DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications March 19, 2013 - 2:52pm Addthis Statement of Christopher Smith, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Health Care, and Entitlements View the archived Congressional Hearing on YouTube Thank you Chairman Lankford, Ranking Member Speier, and members of the Committee; I appreciate the opportunity to be here today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) program regulating the export of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). Recent Developments in LNG Exports The boom in domestic shale gas provides unprecedented opportunities for the

109

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission This statute declares underground storage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas to be in the public interest if it promotes the conservation

110

Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas May 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a conditional authorization approving an application to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Louisiana, paving the way for thousands of new construction and domestic natural gas production jobs in Louisiana, Texas, and several other states. Subject to final environmental and regulatory approval, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC will retrofit an existing LNG import terminal in Louisiana so that it can also be used for exports. This is the first long-term authorization to export natural gas from the lower 48 states as LNG to all U.S. trading partners.

111

DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications DOE's Program Regulating Liquefied Natural Gas Export Applications June 18, 2013 - 10:15am Addthis Statement of Christopher Smith, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittees on Energy and Power. Thank you Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush, and members of the Subcommittee; I appreciate the opportunity to be here today to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) program regulating the export of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). Recent Developments in LNG Exports The boom in domestic shale gas provides unprecedented opportunities for the United States. Over the last several years, domestic natural gas production

112

Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,954 - ...

113

Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep...

114

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

115

Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,971 - No Data...

116

Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,115 3,122 3,106...

117

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

118

Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,556 2012...

119

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Norway (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011...

120

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Yemen (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,869 3,108...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

From Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,175 3,338 3,262...

122

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011...

123

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,969 -...

124

Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

125

Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 5,780...

126

Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Peru (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,477 3,368 - No Data...

127

Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

128

Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to Japan...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price Liquefied Freeport, TX Natural Gas Exports Price to Japan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

129

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to Brazil (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,581 2012 2,601...

130

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports To Brazil "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

To Brazil " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas...

131

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,127 - No Data...

132

Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

China (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to China (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,354 2,848 - No...

133

Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to South Korea (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Korea (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to South Korea (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,157...

134

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Malaysia (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Malaysia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

135

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oman (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Oman (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

136

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

137

Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

138

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Algeria...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

139

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

140

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Equatorial Guinea (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 23,659: ...

142

Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

143

Northeast Gateway Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

144

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

145

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Brunei (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Brunei (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

146

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

147

Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

148

Northeast Gateway Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

149

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

150

Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Malaysia (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Malaysia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

151

Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Equatorial Guinea (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Equatorial Guinea (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

152

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Algeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

153

Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

154

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indonesia (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Indonesia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

155

Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

156

Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

157

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United Arab Emirates (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from United Arab Emirates (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

158

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

159

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Countries (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Other Countries (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

160

Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Australia (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Australia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

162

Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

163

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

164

Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

165

Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

166

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Australia...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Australia (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Australia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

167

Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 2 2013 3 5 4 6 9...

168

Texas Bi-Fuel Liquefied Petroleum Gas Pickup Study: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alternative fuels may be an effective means for decreasing America's dependence on imported oil; creating new jobs; and reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, exhaust toxics, and ozone-forming hydrocarbons. However, data regarding in-use fuel economy and maintenance characteristics of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) have been limited in availability. This study was undertaken to compare the operating and maintenance characteristics of bi-fuel vehicles (which use liquefied petroleum gas, or propane, as the primary fuel) to those of nominally identical gasoline vehicles. In Texas, liquefied petroleum gas is one of the most widely used alternative fuels. The largest fleet in Texas, operated by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), has hundred of bi-fuel (LPG and gasoline) vehicles operating in normal daily service. The project was conducted over a 2-year period, including 18 months (April 1997-September 1998) of data collection on operations, maintenance, and fuel consumption of the vehicles under study. This report summarizes the project and its results.

Huang, Y.; Matthews, R. D.; Popova, E. T.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development of a thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier.  

SciTech Connect

Praxair, in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is developing a new technology, thermoacoustic heat engines and refrigerators, for liquefaction of natural gas. This is the only technology capable of producing refrigeration power at cryogenic temperatures with no moving parts. A prototype, with a projected natural gas liquefaction capacity of 500 gallons/day, has been built and tested. The power source is a natural gas burner. Systems will be developed with liquefaction capacities up to 10,000 to 20,000 gallons per day. The technology, the development project, accomplishments and applications are discussed. In February 2001 Praxair, Inc. purchased the acoustic heat engine and refrigeration development program from Chart Industries. Chart (formerly Cryenco, which Chart purchased in 1997) and Los Alamos had been working on the technology development program since 1994. The purchase included assets and intellectual property rights for thermoacoustically driven orifice pulse tube refrigerators (TADOPTR), a new and revolutionary Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) technology, aspects of Orifice Pulse Tube Refrigeration (OPTR) and linear motor compressors as OPTR drivers. Praxair, in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the licensor of the TADOPTR and TASHE patents, is continuing the development of TASHE-OPTR natural gas powered, natural gas liquefiers. The liquefaction of natural gas, which occurs at -161 C (-259 F) at atmospheric pressure, has previously required rather sophisticated refrigeration machinery. The 1990 TADOPTR invention by Drs. Greg Swift (LANL) and Ray Radebaugh (NIST) demonstrated the first technology to produce cryogenic refrigeration with no moving parts. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators use acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat. The basic driver and refrigerator consist of nothing more than helium-filled heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. The liquefier development program is divided into two components: Thermoacoustically driven refrigerators and linear motor driven refrigerators (LOPTRs). LOPTR technology will, for the foreseeable future, be limited to natural gas liquefaction capacities on the order of hundreds of gallons per day. TASHE-OPTR technology is expected to achieve liquefaction capacities of tens of thousands of gallons per day. This paper will focus on the TASHE-OPTR technology because its natural gas liquefaction capacity has greater market opportunity. LOPTR development will be mentioned briefly. The thermoacoustically driven refrigerator development program is now in the process of demonstrating the technology at a capacity of about 500 gallon/day (gpd) i.e., approximately 42,000 standard cubic feet/day, which requires about 7 kW of refrigeration power. This capacity is big enough to illuminate the issues of large-scale acoustic liquefaction at reasonable cost and to demonstrate the liquefaction of about 70% of an input gas stream, while burning about 30%. Subsequent to this demonstration a system with a capacity of approximately 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet/day (scfd) = 10,000 gpd with a projected liquefaction rate of about 85% of the input gas stream will be developed. When commercialized, the TASHE-OPTRs will be a totally new type of heat-driven cryogenic refrigerator, with projected low manufacturing cost, high reliability, long life, and low maintenance. A TASHE-OPTR will be able to liquefy a broad range of gases, one of the most important being natural gas (NG). Potential NG applications range from distributed liquefaction of pipeline gas as fuel for heavy-duty fleet and long haul vehicles to large-scale liquefaction at on-shore and offshore gas wellheads. An alternative to the thermoacoustic driver, but with many similar technical and market advantages, is the linear motor compressor. Linear motors convert electrical power directly into oscillating linear, or axial, motion. Attachment of a piston to the oscillator results in a direct drive compressor. Such a compressor

Wollan, J. J. (John J.); Swift, G. W. (Gregory W.); Backhaus, S. N. (Scott N.); Gardner, D. L. (David L.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of a thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Praxair, in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is developing a new technology, thermoacoustic heat engines and refrigerators, for liquefaction of natural gas. This is the only technology capable of producing refrigeration power at cryogenic temperatures with no moving parts. A prototype, with a projected natural gas liquefaction capacity of 500 gallons/day, has been built and tested. The power source is a natural gas burner. Systems will be developed with liquefaction capacities up to 10,000 to 20,000 gallons per day. The technology, the development project, accomplishments and applications are discussed. In February 2001 Praxair, Inc. purchased the acoustic heat engine and refrigeration development program from Chart Industries. Chart (formerly Cryenco, which Chart purchased in 1997) and Los Alamos had been working on the technology development program since 1994. The purchase included assets and intellectual property rights for thermoacoustically driven orifice pulse tube refrigerators (TADOPTR), a new and revolutionary Thermoacoustic Stirling Heat Engine (TASHE) technology, aspects of Orifice Pulse Tube Refrigeration (OPTR) and linear motor compressors as OPTR drivers. Praxair, in cooperation with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the licensor of the TADOPTR and TASHE patents, is continuing the development of TASHE-OPTR natural gas powered, natural gas liquefiers. The liquefaction of natural gas, which occurs at -161 C (-259 F) at atmospheric pressure, has previously required rather sophisticated refrigeration machinery. The 1990 TADOPTR invention by Drs. Greg Swift (LANL) and Ray Radebaugh (NIST) demonstrated the first technology to produce cryogenic refrigeration with no moving parts. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators use acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat. The basic driver and refrigerator consist of nothing more than helium-filled heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. The liquefier development program is divided into two components: Thermoacoustically driven refrigerators and linear motor driven refrigerators (LOPTRs). LOPTR technology will, for the foreseeable future, be limited to natural gas liquefaction capacities on the order of hundreds of gallons per day. TASHE-OPTR technology is expected to achieve liquefaction capacities of tens of thousands of gallons per day. This paper will focus on the TASHE-OPTR technology because its natural gas liquefaction capacity has greater market opportunity. LOPTR development will be mentioned briefly. The thermoacoustically driven refrigerator development program is now in the process of demonstrating the technology at a capacity of about 500 gallon/day (gpd) i.e., approximately 42,000 standard cubic feet/day, which requires about 7 kW of refrigeration power. This capacity is big enough to illuminate the issues of large-scale acoustic liquefaction at reasonable cost and to demonstrate the liquefaction of about 70% of an input gas stream, while burning about 30%. Subsequent to this demonstration a system with a capacity of approximately 10{sup 6} standard cubic feet/day (scfd) = 10,000 gpd with a projected liquefaction rate of about 85% of the input gas stream will be developed. When commercialized, the TASHE-OPTRs will be a totally new type of heat-driven cryogenic refrigerator, with projected low manufacturing cost, high reliability, long life, and low maintenance. A TASHE-OPTR will be able to liquefy a broad range of gases, one of the most important being natural gas (NG). Potential NG applications range from distributed liquefaction of pipeline gas as fuel for heavy-duty fleet and long haul vehicles to large-scale liquefaction at on-shore and offshore gas wellheads. An alternative to the thermoacoustic driver, but with many similar technical and market advantages, is the linear motor compressor. Linear motors convert electrical power directly into oscillating linear, or axial, motion. Attachment of a piston to the oscillator results in a direct drive compressor. Such a compressor

Wollan, J. J. (John J.); Swift, G. W. (Gregory W.); Backhaus, S. N. (Scott N.); Gardner, D. L. (David L.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Levels of financial responsibility for liquefied-natural-gas and liquefied-petroleum-gas facilities  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to Section 7(a) of the Pipeline Safety Act of 1979, a study was conducted of the risks associated with liquefied natural gas (LNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) facilities, and of methods of assuring adequate levels of financial responsibility for those who own and/or operate facilities. The main purpose of the study is to provide a basis for determining general levels of financial responsibility for LNG and LPG facilities, as measured by the risk they represent to the public. It must be emphasized that the quantification of risk is a complicated subject. As used in this study, risk is defined as the occurrence of a maximum credible accident and the consequences that would result from such an accident. Part I of the study describes in detail the methodology used in the report to estimate the magnitude of the financial responsibility requirements associated with nine major facility types - e.g., tankships, pipelines, barges, rail tank car, tank truck, etc. - used to store and transport LNG and LPG under 48 separate operational and storage containment modes. Parts II and III of the study, in addition to providing estimates of the risks and corresponding levels of financial responsibility, contain information on the historical safety record and structure of the LNG facilities and LPG facilities.

1981-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

Energy Department Authorizes Third Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Proposed Facility to Export Third Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Third Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas August 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized Lake Charles Exports, LLC (Lake Charles) to export domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States from the Lake Charles Terminal in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Lake Charles previously received approval to export LNG from this facility to FTA countries on July 22, 2011. Subject to environmental review and final regulatory approval, the facility is conditionally authorized to export at a rate of up to 2.0

173

Energy Department Authorizes Second Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second Proposed Facility to Export Second Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Second Proposed Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas May 17, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has conditionally authorized Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC (Freeport) to export domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States from the Freeport LNG Terminal on Quintana Island, Texas. Freeport previously received approval to export LNG from this facility to FTA countries on February 10, 2011. Subject to environmental review and final regulatory approval, the facility is conditionally authorized to export at a rate of up to 1.4 billion cubic

174

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Million Cubic...

175

Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Download Data (XLS File) Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From...

176

Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Dollars...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan...

177

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov...

178

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax and User Permit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax and User Permit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax and User Permit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax and User Permit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax and User Permit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax and User Permit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Propane Tax and User Permit on AddThis.com...

179

Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Kenai, AK Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,856 1,908 1,915 1,913 1,915...

180

Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1997: 5,604: 5,596: 5,675: 5,660: 3,812: 3,786: 3,756 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nogales, AZ Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million Cubic Feet) Nogales, AZ Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 8.938 8.916 5.241 3.570 4.280...

182

Effect of parasitic refrigeration on the efficiency of magnetic liquefiers  

SciTech Connect

Our studies have shown that magnetic refrigerators have the potential to liquefy cryogens very efficiently. High efficiency is especially important for liquid hydrogen and natural gas applications where the liquefaction costs are a significant fraction of the total liquid cost. One of the characteristics of magnetic refrigerators is the requirement for a high-field superconducting magnet. Providing a 4.2-K bath for this magnet will require a small amount of parasitic refrigeration at 4.2 K even though the rest of the liquefier may be at 110 K (liquid natural gas) or higher. For several different refrigeration power levels at 4.2 K, we have calculated the efficiency of the magnetic liquefier as a function of power, temperature and the 4.2-K refrigerator efficiency. The results show that if the ratio of the thermal load at 4.2 K to the main refrigerator power is 0.001 or less, the effect on the efficiency of the liquefier is negligible at all temperatures below room temperature provided the 4.2-K refrigerator efficiency is high.

Barclay, J.A.; Stewart, W.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1997: 9,977: 7,667: 2,530: 2,557: 5,007: 5,059: 5,026 ...

184

Valuation of Storage at a Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of the real option to store liquefied natural gas (LNG) at the downstream terminal of an LNG value chain is an important problem in practice. Because the exact valuation of this real option is computationally intractable, we develop a novel ... Keywords: Markov, asset pricing, dynamic programming, finance, heuristics, industries, petroleum/natural gas, real options, storage valuation, upper bounds

Guoming Lai; Mulan X. Wang; Sunder Kekre; Alan Scheller-Wolf; Nicola Secomandi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel TRANSPORTATION ENERGY alternative fuel, and purified landfill gas could provide a renewable domestic source of it. Landfills from landfills and use it in natural gas applications such as fueling motor vehicles. Project

186

Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visual Simulation of Offshore Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Terminals in a Decision-Making Context1, Berkeley. 3/ Liquified Natural Gas Act Stats, 1977, Chap. 855, Page 2506 (effective Sept. 17, 1977 potential offshore Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) sites and the types of terminals that might occupy those

Standiford, Richard B.

187

Process for Photochemical Chlorination of Hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for chlorination of a major portion of the hydrogen atoms of paraffinic hydrocarbons of five or more carbon atoms may be replaced by subjecting the hydrocarbon to the action of chlorine under active light. The initial chlorination is begun at 25 to 30 deg C with the chlorine diluted with HCl. The later stages may be carried out with undiluted chlorine and the temperature gradually raised to about 129 deg C.

Beanblossom, W.S.

1950-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Design features and availability of liquefied gas carriers  

SciTech Connect

A discussion covers the growth of seaborne LPG trade, various designs of liquefied gas carriers (independent tank, of semimembrane, and integral tank) for the transportation of LPG within the framework of the Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) code as well as U.S. Coast Guard regulations including insulation systems, ballast storage between the cargo tank and the hull, and methods by which the cargo tank either supports the weight of the cargo or transfers it to the hull; the development of the world liquefied gas carrier fleet including pressurized ships, combination ships (which can carry cargo either partially or fully pressurized and/or fully refrigerated) and the fully refrigerated ships; new design developments; tanker availability; and their economic impact on the transportation costs of seaborne LPG.

Rasch, J.M.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

: Plasma-Hydrocarbon conversion  

crude oil and hydrocarbon gases like natural gas, into lighter hydrocarbon materials (e.g. synthetic light oil).

190

Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6{degrees}K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6 K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

193

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Apparatus for recovering gaseous hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus, carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, Guy R. B. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Santa Fe, NM); Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Substantially self-powered method and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing solid hydrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for producing gaseous hydrocarbons from formations comprising solid hydrocarbon hydrates located under either a body of land or a body of water. The vast natural resources of such hydrocarbon hydrates can thus now be economically mined. Relatively warm brine or water is brought down from an elevation above that of the hydrates through a portion of the apparatus, and passes in contact with the hydrates, thus melting them. The liquid then continues up another portion of the apparatus carrying entrained hydrocarbon vapors in the form of bubbles, which can easily be separated from the liquid. After a short startup procedure, the process and apparatus are substantially self-powered.

Elliott, G.R.B.; Barraclough, B.L.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1981-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation of Fire Dynamics Simulator for Liquefied Natural Gas Vapor Dispersion Hazards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Pipeline and Hazardous Material Administration (PHMSA) require vapor dispersion modeling as part of a siting analysis for liquefied (more)

Kohout, Andrew Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

198

Numerical simulation on dense gas dispersion and fire characteristics after liquefied natural gas release.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This PhD dissertation mainly studies the prediction, simulation and mitigation methods of the two main hazards in LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) industry, LNG vapor dense (more)

Sun, Biao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release...

200

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Trinidad and Tobago...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Trinidad and Tobago (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","1212...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Other Countries (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Other Countries (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92013" ,"Release Date:","12122013"...

202

Vessel routing and scheduling under uncertainty in the liquefied natural gas business  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is natural gas transformed into liquid state for the purpose of transportation mainly by specially built LNG vessels. This paper considers a real-life LNG ship routing and scheduling problem where a producer is responsible ... Keywords: Liquefied natural gas, Maritime transportation, Ship routing and scheduling, Simulation, Uncertainty

Elin E. Halvorsen-Weare; Kjetil Fagerholt; Mikael RNnqvist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 NA NA 2001 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2003 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2004 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2005 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2006 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2007 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2008 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2009 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2010 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2011 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2012 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

204

Solution mining and heating by oxidation for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation. A second fluid is produced from the portion. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. A controlled amount of oxidant is provided to the portion of the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

205

Removing the Hydrocarbon from Hydrocarbon Flow ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas and petroleum products. Therefore is important to have primary calibration standards with low uncertainty. NIST has several hydrocarbon liquid ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Harvester ants utilize cuticular hydrocarbons in nestmate recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractCuticular hydrocarbons appear to play a role in ant nestmate recognition, but few studies have tested this hypothesis experimentally with purified hydrocarbon extracts. We exposed captive colonies of the harvester ant Pogonomyrmex barbatus to small glass blocks coated with whole cuticular lipid extracts and the purified hydrocarbon portion of extracts from nestmate and nonnestmate workers. As an estimate of agonistic behavior, we measured the proportion of ants in contact with blocks that flared their mandibles. Blocks coated with cuticular extracts from nonnestmates were contacted by more workers in one of two experiments and elicited higher levels of aggression in both experiments than blocks bearing extracts from nestmates. The cuticular hydrocarbon fraction of extracts alone was sufficient to elicit agonistic behavior toward nonnestmates. The results demonstrate that harvester ants can perceive differences in cuticular hydrocarbon composition, and can use those differences in nestmate recognition. Key WordsCuticular hydrocarbons, Formicidae, Nestmate recognition, Pogonomyrmex barbatus.

Diane Wagner; Madeleine Tissot; William Cuevas; Deborah M. Gordon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Legal nature of LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) regulation  

SciTech Connect

The commercial exploitation of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) in New Zealand has occurred without a particular and comprehensive concern for any legal implications. The paper in Part I examines definitional questions, assesses in Part II the ability of courts and quasi-courts to evaluate risks associated with the product, examines in Part III the utility of common law remedies for injuries or associated with or arising from LPG, analyzes in Part IV the statutory regulation of LPG, concentrating particularly on the Dangerous Goods (Class 2 - Gases) Regulations 1980, discusses in Part V recent planning case-law concerning LPG development, and concludes that some reform is necessary to produce a more-coherent and precise regulatory regime that takes into account both the needs of developers and those affected by the development of LPG.

Liddell, G.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas as alternative fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of alternative fuels in the transportation industry has gained a strong support in recent years. In this paper an attempt was made to evaluate the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and compressed natural gas (NG) by 25 LPG-bifuel and 14 NG-bifuel vehicles that are operated by 33 transit systems throughout Nebraska. A set of performance measures such as average fuel efficiency in kilometers per liter, average fuel cost per kilometer, average oil consumption, and average operation and maintenance cost for alternatively fueled vehicles were calculated and compared with similar performance measures of gasoline powered vehicles. The results of the study showed that the average fuel efficiency of gasoline is greater than those of LPG and NG, and the average fuel costs (dollars per kilometer) for LPG and NG are smaller than those for gasoline for most of the vehicles under this study.

Moussavi, M.; Al-Turk, M. (Univ. of Nebraska, Omaha, NE (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ruling on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Tax Rate Sparks Debate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

IRS Ruling IRS Ruling On August 7, 1995, the Federal Register reported the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) ruling that liquefied natural gas (LNG) is a liquid fuel and will thus be taxed as a "special motor fuel," effective October 1, 1995. This definition covers all liquids that substitute for gasoline and diesel. The ruling refuted the claim of petitioners, such as the Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Coalition, that LNG is the same as compressed natural gas (CNG) and should be taxed at the equivalent excise tax rate. The IRS also rejected the Coalition's proposal that the NGV tax rate be expressed as gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) rather than in thousand cubic feet (mcf) as provided in the Internal Revenue Code, but stated that no restrictions exist on taxpayers engaged in fuel sales based on

210

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Qatar (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 0: 0: 19,697 ...

211

Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 7/31/2013: Next Release Date: 8/30/2013: Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Country; U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit

212

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4: Modeling Emissions from Natural Gas-Related Sources 4.1Penetration of Liquefied Natural Gas Table ES2: Impacts ontypical summer demand of natural gas in the South Coast Air

Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2-1 U.S. Natural Gas Imports, 20062030. 2 Net Importsliquefied natural gas (LNG) imports. The imported gas willdemands for natural gas , net imports of liquefied natural

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:23:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Peru (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

215

Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

216

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Algeria (Dollars...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:21:44 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

217

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103ID3" "Date","Price of U.S....

218

Method and apparatus for transfer of liquefied gas. [hydrogen, LPG, or LNG  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for transferring a liquefied gas (hydrogen, LPG, or LNG) from a first container into a second container without removal of vapor from the second container is disclosed.

Gee, D.E.; Worboys, R.V.

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 7/31/2013: Next Release Date: 8/30/2013: Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Country; U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit

220

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 0: 0: 0 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to China (Dollars per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to China (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2011-----10.61-----11.98 ...

222

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Trinidad and Tobago ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

223

Hydrocarbon-enhanced particulate filter regeneration via microwave ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regeneration method for a particulate filter includes estimating a quantity of particulate matter trapped within the particulate filter, comparing the quantity of particulate matter to a predetermined quantity, heating at least a portion of the particulate filter to a combustion temperature of the particulate matter, and introducing hydrocarbon fuel to the particulate filter. The hydrocarbon fuel facilitates combustion of the particulate matter to regenerate the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Brown, David B. (Brighton, MI)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Assistant Secretary for Environment has responsibility for identifying, characterizing, and ameliorating the environmental, health, and safety issues and public concerns associated with commercial operation of specific energy systems. The need for developing a safety and environmental control assessment for liquefied gaseous fuels was identified by the Environmental and Safety Engineering Division as a result of discussions with various governmental, industry, and academic persons having expertise with respect to the particular materials involved: liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, hydrogen, and anhydrous ammonia. This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in Fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 1 (Executive Summary) describes the background, purpose and organization of the LGF Program and contains summaries of the 25 reports presented in Volumes 2 and 3. Annotated bibliographies on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Safety and Environmental Control Research and on Fire Safety and Hazards of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) are included in Volume 1.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques.

Gray, H.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamic processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.

Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Control method for mixed refrigerant based natural gas liquefier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a natural gas liquefaction system having a refrigerant storage circuit, a refrigerant circulation circuit in fluid communication with the refrigerant storage circuit, and a natural gas liquefaction circuit in thermal communication with the refrigerant circulation circuit, a method for liquefaction of natural gas in which pressure in the refrigerant circulation circuit is adjusted to below about 175 psig by exchange of refrigerant with the refrigerant storage circuit. A variable speed motor is started whereby operation of a compressor is initiated. The compressor is operated at full discharge capacity. Operation of an expansion valve is initiated whereby suction pressure at the suction pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 30 psig and discharge pressure at the discharge pressure port of the compressor is maintained below about 350 psig. Refrigerant vapor is introduced from the refrigerant holding tank into the refrigerant circulation circuit until the suction pressure is reduced to below about 15 psig, after which flow of the refrigerant vapor from the refrigerant holding tank is terminated. Natural gas is then introduced into a natural gas liquefier, resulting in liquefaction of the natural gas.

Kountz, Kenneth J. (Palatine, IL); Bishop, Patrick M. (Chicago, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heating hydrocarbon containing formations in a line drive staged process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation are described herein. Methods may include providing heat to a first section of the formation with one or more first heaters in the first section. First hydrocarbons may be heated in the first section such that at least some of the first hydrocarbons are mobilized. At least some of the mobilized first hydrocarbons may be produced through a production well located in a second section of the formation. The second section may be located substantially adjacent to the first section. A portion of the second section may be provided some heat from the mobilized first hydrocarbons, but is not conductively heated by heat from the first heaters. Heat may be provided to the second section with one or more second heaters in the second section to further heat the second section.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in this report).

Hays, C.B.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hydrocarbon processing symposium - 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a symposium which investigated the processes and equipment used in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Topics considered at the symposium included recirculation is centrifugal pumps, safety and security audits of LNG/LPG export facilities, flames in prestressed concrete LNG storage tanks, refrigerated liquefied gas storage, hydrogen-assisted failure in petroleum equipment, refinery off-gases, cryogenics, refrigerants, computer-aided plant design, and pipe vibration reducers.

Arnoni, Y.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Confined boiling rates of liquefied petroleum gas on water  

SciTech Connect

Results of a program to measure the rate of boiling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water surface and to develop an analytical model to describe the phenomena involved are reported. Primary emphasis was placed on liquid propane or LPG mixtures containing small quantities of ethane or butane or both. A few exploratory tests were, however, made with pure liquid ethane, ethylene, and n-butane. The investigation was conducted to provide quantitative data and analytical models to delineate the rate of vaporization, the spread rate and the degree of fractionation, should an LPG tanker suffer an accident leading to a major spill on water. For propane or LPG spills on water, immediately following the contact, violent boiling commenced. Ice quickly formed; in most cases, ice was even thrown onto the sidewalls of the vessel. In some instances sprays of water/ice and propane were ejected from the calorimeter. Within a few seconds, however, the interaction quieted and the surface was covered by a rough ice sheet. The LPG boiled on the surface of this ice, but large gas bubbles occasionally appeared under the ice shield and were trapped. The boiling rate decreased with time with a concomitant increase in the thickness of the ice shield. In the first second or two, very high boiling heat fluxes were experienced. The mass of LPG lost was approximately half that spilled originally. It is estimated that only 5 to 15% could have been ejected as liquid if the water loss is used as a reference. However, since the water surface is very agitated during this period, it is not possible to obtain reliable quantitative values of the boiling flux. Also, as noted, the mass lost in the very early time period was approximately proportional to the original mass of LPG used. It may be inferred that larger spills lead to more mixing and boiling before the ice shield prevents a direct contact between the LPG and the water.

Reid, R.C.; Smith, K.A.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Cellular glass insulation keeps liquefied gas from vaporizing  

SciTech Connect

The North West Shelf Project, located on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia, supplies much of that vast state with natural gas for domestic and industrial applications. Some of the gas is also exported to Japan as liquefied natural gas (LNG). While awaiting shipment to Japan, the LNG is stored at {minus}322 F in four storage tanks, each with a capacity of 2.5 million ft{sup 3}. When Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty Ltd., operator of the LNG facility, selected insulation material for the storage tanks, it went in search of a material with more than just insulating value. Since the insulation is installed inside the tanks, it must be able to resist wicking or absorbing the LNG. Also, it had to have sufficient strength to withstand the weight of the 2.5 million ft{sup 3} of LNG without being crushed or losing its insulting properties. And, as a safety precaution, the selected materials should neither burn nor support combustion. Ultimately, Woodside selected a cellular glass insulation called Foamglas, from Pittsburgh Corning Corp., that met all the performance criteria and was cost competitive with the lesser-performing alternatives. Foamglas is produced from strong, inert borosilicate glass. Its insulating capability is provided by the tiny, closed cells of air encapsulated within the foam-like structure of the glass. Since the cells are closed,neither liquid nor vapor can enter the structure of the insulation. The inert glass itself will not absorb or react with LNG, nor will it burn or support a fire. The cellular structure provides effective insulation in both not and cold applications, and offers a fire barrier.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Simulation and integration of liquefied natural gas (lng) processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global use of natural gas is growing quickly. This is primarily attributed to its favorable characteristics and to the environmental advantages it enjoys over other fossil fuels such as oil and coal. One of the key challenges in supplying natural gas is the form (phase) at which it should be delivered. Natural gas may be supplied to the consumers as a compressed gas through pipelines. Another common form is to be compressed, refrigerated and supplied as a liquid known as liquefied natural gas (LNG). When there is a considerable distance involved in transporting natural gas, LNG is becoming the preferred method of supply because of technical, economic, and political reasons. Thus, LNG is expected to play a major role in meeting the global energy demands. This work addresses the simulation and optimization of an LNG plant. First, the process flowsheet is constructed based on a common process configuration. Then, the key units are simulated using ASPEN Plus to determine the characteristics of the various pieces of equipment and streams in the plant. Next, process integration techniques are used to optimize the process. Particular emphasis is given to energy objectives through three activities. First, the synthesis and retrofitting of a heat-exchange network are considered to reduce heating and cooling utilities. Second, the turbo-expander system is analyzed to reduce the refrigeration consumption in the process. Third, the process cogeneration is introduced to optimize the combined heat and power of the plant. These activities are carried out using a combination of graphical, computeraided, and mathematical programming techniques. A case study on typical LNG facilities is solved to examine the benefits of simulation and integration of the process. The technical, economic, and environmental impact of the process modifications are also discussed.

Al-Sobhi, Saad Ali

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Liquefaction process wherein solvents derived from the material liquefied and containing increased concentrations of donor species are employed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein a solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material being liquefied is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the solvent or diluent comprises from about 65 to about 85 wt. % hydroaromatic components. The solvent is prepared by first separating a solvent or diluent distillate fraction from the liquefaction product, subjecting this distillate fraction to hydrogenation and then extracting the naphthenic components from the hydrogenated product. The extracted naphthenic components are then dehydrogenated and hydrotreated to produce additional hydroaromatic components. These components are combined with the solvent or diluent distillate fraction. The solvent may also contain hydroaromatic constituents prepared by extracting naphthenic components from a heavy naphtha, dehydrogenating the same and then hydrotreating the dehydrogenated product. When the amount of solvent produced in this manner exceeds that required for steady state operation of the liquefaction process a portion of the solvent or diluent distillated fraction will be withdrawn as product.

Fant, B. T. (Kingwood, TX); Miller, John D. (Baytown, TX); Ryan, D. F. (Friendswood, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Natural gas liquefier for vehicle fuel. Interim report, January-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project was a continuation and refinement of a feasibility prototype natural gas liquefier that had been designed, fabricated, and tested under a U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. Extensive performance testing was conducted to characterize the natural gas liquefier refrigeration capability and to collect data for diagnostic purposes. Analysis of the effectiveness of the regenerator concluded that the current design would require substantial empirical iterations. The final prototype with a design target of 1,000 Watts (W) refrigeration was able to achieve only 400 W of refrigeration, projected to 550 W at a higher charge pressure. Recommendations are made for further testing, analysis, and correlation to achieve a better optimized regenerator design for a second generation prototype natural gas liquefier.

Owens, E.C.; Kohuth, K.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program: second status report  

SciTech Connect

This document is arranged in three volumes and reports on progress in the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LGF) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program made in fiscal Year (FY)-1979 and early FY-1980. Volume 3 contains reports from 6 government contractors on LPG, anhydrous ammonia, and hydrogen energy systems. Report subjects include: simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water; LPG safety research; state-of-the-art of release prevention and control technology in the LPG industry; ammonia: an introductory assessment of safety and environmental control information; ammonia as a fuel, and hydrogen safety and environmental control assessment.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2005 portion) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(2005 portion) (2005 portion) Jump to: navigation, search Name Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2005 portion) Facility Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2005 portion) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner 'PPM Energy/Horizon Wind Energy Developer 'PPM Energy/Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser NYSERDA/Market Location Lewis County NY Coordinates 43.775565°, -75.584614° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.775565,"lon":-75.584614,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Windy Flats(3Q09 portion) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Windy Flats(3Q09 portion) Windy Flats(3Q09 portion) Jump to: navigation, search Name Windy Flats(3Q09 portion) Facility Windy Flats(3Q09 portion) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Cannon Power Group Developer Cannon Power Group Location North shore of Columbia River Coordinates 45.699622°, -120.774622° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.699622,"lon":-120.774622,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2006 portion) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

portion) portion) Jump to: navigation, search Name Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2006 portion) Facility Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2006 portion) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner 'PPM Energy/Horizon Wind Energy Developer PPM Energy/Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser NYSERDA/Market Location Lewis County NY Coordinates 43.775565°, -75.584614° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.775565,"lon":-75.584614,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Experience  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Experience N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Compressed Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas Conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Experience N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Robert C. Motta Kenneth J. Kelly William W. Warnock Executive Summary The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with conversion companies in six states to convert approximately 900 light-duty Federal fleet vehicles to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The contracts were initiated in order to help the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) during a period of limited

242

A construction and improvement heuristic for a liquefied natural gas inventory routing problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a large scale ship routing and inventory management problem for a producer and distributor of liquefied natural gas (LNG). The problem contains multiple products, inventory and berth capacity at the loading port and a heterogeneous fleet of ... Keywords: Heuristics, Inventory routing, Maritime transportation

Magnus Stlhane; Jrgen Glomvik Rakke; Christian Rrholt Moe; Henrik Andersson; Marielle Christiansen; Kjetil Fagerholt

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fault-tree analysis for liquefied natural gas terminal emergency shutdown system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas, one of the cleanest, most efficient and useful of all energy sources, is a vital component of the world's supply of energy. To make natural gas more convenient for storage and transportation, it is refined and condensed into a liquid called ... Keywords: Emergency shutdown system, Fault-tree analysis, Intuitionistic fuzzy sets theory, Liquefied natural gas, Probability

Shuen-Ren Cheng; Binshan Lin; Bi-Min Hsu; Ming-Hung Shu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Branch-and-Price Method for a Liquefied Natural Gas Inventory Routing Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a maritime inventory routing problem in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) business, called the LNG inventory routing problem (LNG-IRP). Here, an actor is responsible for the routing of the fleet of special purpose ships, and the inventories ... Keywords: branch-and-price, column generation, maritime transportation

Roar Grnhaug; Marielle Christiansen; Guy Desaulniers; Jacques Desrosiers

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 10,240 11,488 7,086 8,271 8,126 8,150 7,731 7,870 5,199 5,520 9,264 4,691 2012 9,482 8,458 7,661 1,447 4,940 5,465 6,646 10,377 5,634 4,748 2,553 2,581 2013 5,126 5,003 4,629 5,171 5,626 5,173 8,023 5,961 2,995 2,674 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Everett, MA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago

246

Analysis and Optimization of the Power Cycle Based on the Cold Energy of Liquefied Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid natural gas (LNG) delivered by sea-ships contains considerable cryogenic energy which can be used for power generation before its evaporation and introduction into the system of pipe line. Electric power generation utilizing LNG cold energy is ... Keywords: liquefied natural gast, cold energy recovery, pinch analysis, exergy, optimization

Lu Yuanwei; Yang Hongchang; Ma Chongfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Impact of Liquefied Natural Gas usage and payload size on Hybrid Wing Body aircraft fuel efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work assessed Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft in the context of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel usage and payload/range scalability at three scales: H1 (B737), H2 (B787) and H3 (B777). The aircraft were optimized for ...

Mody, Pritesh (Pritesh Chetan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A new methodology for analyzing and predicting U.S. liquefied natural gas imports using neural networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is becoming an increasing factor in the U.S. natural gas market. For 30 years LNG imports into the U.S. have remained (more)

Bolen, Matthew Scott

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY LANDFILL - LANDFILL GAS (LFG) TO LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS (LNG) - PROJECT January/February 2005 Prepared for: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Table of Contents Page BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................1 SUMMARY OF EFFORT PERFORMED ......................................................................................2 Task 2B.1 - Literature Search and Contacts Made...................................................................2 Task 2B.2 - LFG Resource/Resource Collection System - Project Phase One.......................3 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................5

252

Risk assessment of storage and transport of liquefied natural gas and LP-gas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A method for assessing the societal risk of transporting liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) is described, and is illustrated by application to the transport of LPG by tank truck and LNG by tanker ship in the U.S. Data on past experience and projected future handling of these liquefied gases are used with analysis of flammable plume formation and ignition, and population distributions, to estimate the risks of fatalities from tank truck and tanker ship accidents. From an estimated 52 significant accidents per year with LPG tank trucks at the present truck-associated transportation rate of 20 billion gallons of LPG per year, a fatality rate of 1.2 per year is calculated. For the projected 1980 importation of 33 billion gallons by tanker ship, a fatality rate of 0.4 per year is calculated, using a conservatively high one chance in 20,000 of a significant accident per trip. Comparison with fires and explosions from all causes in the U.S. and Canada leading to 10 or more fatalities shows that these are 100 times more frequent than the predicted frequency of comparable LPG and LNG accidents. Tabulations of experience with spills of flammable volatile liquids are included. (GRA)

Simmons, J.A.

1974-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Hydrocarbon/Total Combustibles Sensor  

the invention is an electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor that is more reliable and reproducible than any other hydrocarbon sensor on the market today. The patented method for producing the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for ...

254

Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

Gorin, Everett (San Rafael, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

International LNG trade : the emergence of a short-term market; International liquefied natural gas trade : the emergence of a short-term market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas is estimated to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply chain is a way of (more)

Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Methods of producing alkylated hydrocarbons from an in situ heat treatment process liquid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Muylle, Michel Serge Marie (Houston, TX); Mandema, Remco Hugo (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Catalysts for hydrocarbon conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalyst, particularly useful in catalytic reforming and for producing highly pure aromatic hydrocarbons, comprising an alumina carrier and containing, expressed in proportion of the weight of the alumina carrier: 005 to 1% of platinum 01 to 4% of gallium, indium or thallium 01 to 2% of tungsten, and 1 to 10% of halogen.

Le P. J.; Malmaison, R.; Marcilly, C.; Martino, G.; Miquel, J.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

Process for removal of polynuclear aromatics from a hydrocarbon in an endothermic reformer reaction system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for reforming a hydrocarbon in a multi-stage endothermic reforming series of catalytic reforming reactors where the hydrocarbon is passed through the series of catalytic reforming reactors to form a reformate. The hydrocarbon is heated prior to entry to the next catalytic reforming reactor in the series, which process comprises contact of the hydrocarbon intermediate from the series of catalytic reforming reactors containing reforming catalyst with a polynuclear aromatic adsorbent to adsorb at least a portion of the polynuclear aromatic content from the hydrocarbon prior to entry to each of the next catalytic reforming reactor in the series and recovering a reformate from the last catalytic reforming reactor in the series, the recovered reformate having a reduced content of polynuclear aromatics.

Ngan, D.Y.

1989-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

260

Breach and safety analysis of spills over water from large liquefied natural gas carriers.  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, at the request of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) prepared a report, ''Guidance on the Risk and Safety Analysis of Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spills Over Water''. That report provided framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. The report also presented the general scale of possible hazards from a spill from 125,000 m3 o 150,000 m3 class LNG carriers, at the time the most common LNG carrier capacity.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Attaway, Stephen W.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Ermak, Donald (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Clean air program: Liquefied natural gas safety in transit operations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report examines the safety issues relating to the use of Liquefied natural Gas (LNG) in transit service. The surveys consisted of: (1) extensive interviews; (2) review of recrods, procedures, and plans relating to safety; (3) examination of facilities and equipment; (4) observations of operations including fueling, maintenance, morning start-up, and revenue service; (5) measurement of methane concentrations in the air where the buses are being fueled or stored. Interviews included all job categories associated with management, operations, safety, maintenance, acquisition, and support. The surveys also included an examination of the occupational hygiene aspects of LNG use.

Friedman, D.M.; Malcosky, N.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pressurized release of liquefied fuel gases (LNG and LPG). Topical report, May 1993-February 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report is an important contribution to the behavior of pressurized liquefied gases when accidentally released into the atmosphere. LNG vehicle fueling stations and LPG storage facilities operate at elevated pressures. Accidental releases could result in rainout and the formation of an aerosol in the vapor cloud. These factors must be considered when estimating the extent of the hazard zone of the vapor cloud using a heavier-than-air gas dispersion model such as DEGADIS (or its Windows equivalent DEGATEC). The DOS program PREL has been incorporated in the Windows program LFGRISK.

Atallah, S.; Janardhan, A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development of a Small-Scale Natural Gas Liquefier. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the progress during the contract period March 1, 1998 through April 30, 2003, on the design, development, and testing of a novel mixed-refrigerant-based 1000 gal/day natural gas liquefier, together with the associated gas cleanup equipment. Based on the work, it is concluded that a cost-effective 1000 gal/day liquefaction system is technically and economically feasible. A unit based on the same developed technology, with 5000 gal/day capacity, would have much improved economics.

Kountz, K.; Kriha, K.; Liss, W.; Perry, M.; Richards, M.; Zuckerman, D.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Characterization and analysis of Devonian shales as related to release of gaseous hydrocarbons. Well R-109, Washington County, Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coring of Well R-109 (Washington County, Ohio) was accomplished in August 1976. A total of 25 samples were collected. Hydrocarbon gas analyses indicate that higher chain hydrocarbon gases (C/sub 2/-C/sub 5/) make up a significant portion of total hydrocarbons in the shales, but methane is still the dominant single gas. Distinct relationships exist between the carbon and hydrocarbon gas contents, showing increase in hydrocarbon gas contents with increasing carbon. Similar relationships between hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas contents exist, though they are not as pronounced. Gas contents appear not to be related to the bulk densities in any quantitative manner, though organic contents (carbon and hydrogen) seem to be related to bulk density values much more clearly. R-109 shales are virtually impermeable to gases and other fluids, as attempted helium gas permeability measurements indicated extremely small (< 10/sup -12/ Darcy) permeability values.

Kalyoncu, R.S.; Boyer, J.P.; Snyder, M.J.

1979-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable for use in the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

Coste, A.C.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hydrocarbon reclaimer system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a filtering process for filtering sludge from a finished product oil storage tank and thereby separating solids from oil and hydrocarbon. The process requires no added water, solvents or diluents. It comprises: pumping a volume sludge from a finished product oil storage tank to a mixing tank; mixing the sludge; sampling the sludge to determine solid content; adding filter aid comprising diatomaceous earth to the mixing tank; mixing the filter aid with the sludge in the mixing tank; enclosing and sealing a plurality of filter plates inside a horizontal plate filter; pressurizing the horizontal plate filter by operation of pump means; pumping the sludge from the mixing tank through the horizontal plate filter to filter out solids; recirculating the sludge from the horizontal plate filter back through the mixing tank; and pumping a purified hydrocarbon and water filtrate from the horizontal plate filter.

Uremovich, M.J.

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

268

FROZEN HYDROCARBONS IN COMETS  

SciTech Connect

Recent investigations of the luminescence of frozen hydrocarbon particles of icy cometary halos have been carried out. The process of luminescence of organic icy particles in a short-wavelength solar radiation field is considered. A comparative analysis of observed and laboratory data leads to 72 luminescent emission lines in the spectrum of the comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. The concept of cometary relict matter is presented, and the creation of a database of unidentified cometary emission lines is proposed.

Simonia, Irakli, E-mail: irakli.simonia@jcu.edu.au [School of Graduate Studies, Ilia State University, 3/5 Cholokashvili Street, Tbilisi, 0162 (Georgia); Center for Astronomy, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811 (Australia)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

270

Method for production of hydrocarbon diluent from heavy crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of producing a hydrocarbon diluent from a heavy crude oil extracted from an underground petroleum formation via a production well. It comprises: preheating a quantity of heavy crude oil extracted from the production well to yield a heated crude oil; separating in a separator vessel by flashing the heated crude oil to produce a first vapor fraction and a first liquid fraction; thermally cracking in a cracking unit at least a portion of the first liquid fraction to produce a first liquid effluent; quenching the first liquid effluent; introducing at least a portion of the quenched fist liquid effluent into a separator; condensing the first vapor fraction; separating in a separator vessel the condensed vapor fraction to produce a liquid hydrocarbon diluent middle fraction characterized in having a boiling range between about 400{degrees}-700{degrees}F. and a gas; and, directing the liquid hydrocarbon diluent into the formation via an injection well for enhancing production of petroleum from the formation via the production well.

McCants, M.F.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

271

HYDROCARBON LIQUID FLOW CALIBRATION SERVICE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and is the cross correlation coefficient ... a NIST Hydrocarbon Liquid Flow Calibration Facility ... FED2004-56790, 2004 Heat Transfer/Fluids Engineering ...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review  

SciTech Connect

An increasing share of natural gas supplies distributed to residential appliances in the U.S. may come from liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports. The imported gas will be of a higher Wobbe number than domestic gas, and there is concern that it could produce more pollutant emissions at the point of use. This report will review recently undertaken studies, some of which have observed substantial effects on various appliances when operated on different mixtures of imported LNG. While we will summarize findings of major studies, we will not try to characterize broad effects of LNG, but describe how different components of the appliance itself will be affected by imported LNG. This paper considers how the operation of each major component of the gas appliances may be impacted by a switch to LNG, and how this local impact may affect overall safety, performance and pollutant emissions.

Lekov, Alex; Sturges, Andy; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

273

Characterization of liquefied natural gas tanker steel from cryogenic to fire temperatures.  

SciTech Connect

The increased demand for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as a fuel source in the U.S. has prompted a study to improve our capability to predict cascading damage to LNG tankers from cryogenic spills and subsequent fire. To support this large modeling and simulation effort, a suite of experiments were conducted on two tanker steels, ABS Grade A steel and ABS Grade EH steel. A thorough and complete understanding of the mechanical behavior of the tanker steels was developed that was heretofore unavailable for the span of temperatures of interest encompassing cryogenic to fire temperatures. This was accomplished by conducting several types of experiments, including tension, notched tension and Charpy impact tests at fourteen temperatures over the range of -191 C to 800 C. Several custom fixtures and special techniques were developed for testing at the various temperatures. The experimental techniques developed and the resulting data will be presented, along with a complete description of the material behavior over the temperature span.

Dempsey, J. Franklin (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wellman, Gerald William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Kalan, Robert J. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Upgrading Fischer-Tropsch LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) with the Cyclar process  

SciTech Connect

The use of the UOP/BP Cyclar{reg sign} process for upgrading Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was studied at UOP{reg sign}. The Cyclar process converts LPG into aromatics. The LPG derived from F-T is highly olefinic. Two routes for upgrading F-T LPG were investigated. In one route, olefinic LPG was fed directly to a Cyclar unit (Direct Cyclar). The alternative flow scheme used the Huels CSP process to saturate LPG olefins upstream of the Cyclar unit (Indirect Cyclar). An 18-run pilot plant study verified that each route is technically feasible. An economic evaluation procedure was designed to choose between the Direct and Indirect Cyclar options for upgrading LPG. Four situations involving three different F-T reactor technologies were defined. The main distinction between the cases was the degree of olefinicity, which ranged between 32 and 84 wt % of the fresh feed. 8 refs., 80 figs., 44 tabs.

Gregor, J.H.; Gosling, C.D.; Fullerton, H.E.

1989-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Ford Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Powered F-700 May Set Sales Records  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

he introduction in 1992 of an he introduction in 1992 of an American-made truck with a fully factory-installed/war- ranted liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) engine represents another "Ford first" in the alternative fuel arena. Now the company has introduced an LPG- powered F-700, a medium/heavy- duty truck. According to Tom Steckel, Ford's medium-duty marketing man- ager, Ford's latest sales figures already prove the alternative fuel F-700's popularity. With a little more than 10 months of the model year finished, Ford has produced 1600 units and ordered 600 more, for a total of 2200 units. That's triple the number of LPG units produced and ordered at the same time last year. In addition, the possibility of applying federal and state tax credits is being investigated. Cummins B 5.9G Natural Gas

277

Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel. Final report, July 1995-April 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has initiated the development of `Design Guidelines for Bus Transit Systems Using Alternative Fuels.` This report provides design guidelines for the safe uses of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). It forms a part of the series of individual monographs being published by the FTA on (the guidelines for the safe use of) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and alcohol fuels (Methanol and Ethanol). Each report in this series describes for the subject fuel the important fuel properties, guidelines for the design and operation of bus fueling, storage and maintenance facilities, issues on personnel training and emergency preparedness.

Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre (Rijswijk, NL); Schoeling, Lanny Gene (Katy, TX)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hydrocarbons in the deep earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

composed of the elements hydrogen and carbon) are the main building block of crude oil and natural gas. Hydrocarbons contribute to the global carbon cycle (one of the most...

280

Compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas conversions: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with conversion companies in six states to convert approximately 900 light-duty Federal fleet vehicles to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The contracts were initiated in order to help the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) during a period of limited original equipment manufacturer (OEM) model availability. Approximately 90% of all conversions were performed on compact of full-size vans and pickups, and 90% of the conversions were to bi-fuel operation. With a positive response from the fleet managers, this program helped the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of EPACT for fiscal years 1993 and 1994, despite limited OEM model availability. The conversions also helped to establish the infrastructure needed to support further growth in the use of alternative fuel vehicles. In conclusion, the program has been successful in helping the Federal government meet the vehicle acquisition requirements of EPACT, establishing infrastructure, increasing the displacement of imported oil, and evaluating the emissions performance of converted vehicles. With the relatively widespread availability of OEM vehicles in the 1996 model year, the program is now being phased out.

Motta, R.C.; Kelly, K.J.; Warnock, W.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

New concept: deepwater NGL/LPG plant. [Natural gas liquids and liquefied petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

Floating platforms for processing natural gas liquids and liquefied petroleum gas (NGL/LPG) need to be stable for the processing and transfer of the products. Floating platforms are economically more attractive for producing marginal fields in deeper waters. Most of the proposed designs for crude oil and natural gas production have been tension-leg platforms, but 3 Norwegian companies are offering a converted ship as an alternative. The 3 companies will used a ship fitted with pontoons that can be raised and lowered to increase the vessel's stability. The NGL/LPG system was designed for a North Sea oil field. The feasibility study which the 3 companies completed was for a liquefaction and storage ship with a capacity of 75,000 cu m. The joint venture feels a ship has several advantages: large payload capacity; large storage capacity; ample deck space for equipment; easy to maintain; can be drydocked if necessary; and has a lower building cost. The 2 key elements to the system are the stabilization system and the turret platform.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon-222 which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances. Radon-222 decays to alpha-emitting daughter products which are associated with increased lung cancer when inhaled and deposited in the respiratory system. The average dose equivalents to the bronchial epithelium from the use of LPG in unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters are estimated to be about 0.9 and 4.0 mrem/year, respectively. When extrapolated to the United States population at risk, the estimated tracheobronchial dose equivalents are about 20,000 and 10,000 person-rems/year for these appliances, or a total of about 30,000 person-rems/year. These doses are very small compared to other natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation. It is estimated that these low doses would result in less than one lung cancer a year for the total U.S. population. Consequently, the use of LPG containing radon-222 does not contribute significantly to the incidence of lung cancer in the United States.

Gesell, T.F.; Johnson, R.H. Jr; Bernhardt, D.E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Implications of the US-Algerian liquefied natural gas price dispute and LNG imports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In early 1980 Algeria demanded a 200% increase in the price of its liquefied natural gas. When the US company involved refused to pay this price, Algeria stopped LNG deliveries. The Energy Department, which is now the primary US negotiator with Algeria, says it will not agree to the price demand. If it did Canada and Mexico, at least in the long run, would probably request equivalent prices for their gas. If their price requests were met, US natural gas import bills, at present import levels, would increase by about 79%, or $3.5 billion. However, as the prices increased, demand for imported gas would probably drop substantially. GAO does not believe importing large amounts of LNG from OPEC countries is in the national interest. LNG imports generally trade oil dependence for gas dependence. It makes little sense to increase US dependence on gas at a time when extraordinary steps are being taken to reduce dependence on oil. Current indications are, however, that not many more proposals for LNG from OPEC countries will be forthcoming in the next few years.

Staats, E.B.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of 576 line-mi (927 line-km) was completed over a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA in September 1977. The survey has defined a pronounced magnetic low that could help delineate the geothermal system. The magnetic low has an areal extent of approximately 10 sq mi (26 sq km). Direct and indirect evidence indicates that this anomaly is due, in part, to magnetite destruction by hydrothermal solutions associated with the geothermal system. The anomaly

285

Process for forming a chromium diffusion portion and articles made therefrom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In one embodiment, a method for forming an article with a diffusion portion comprises: forming a slurry comprising chromium and silicon, applying the slurry to the article, and heating the article to a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient period of time to diffuse chromium and silicon into the article and form a diffusion portion comprising silicon and a microstructure comprising .alpha.-chromium. In one embodiment, a gas turbine component comprises: a superalloy and a diffusion portion having a depth of less than or equal to 60 .mu.m measured from the superalloy surface into the gas turbine component. The diffusion portion has a diffusion surface having a microstructure comprising greater than or equal to 40% by volume .alpha.-chromium.

Helmick, David Andrew; Cavanaugh, Dennis William; Feng, Ganjiang; Bucci, David Vincent

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cleanup of hydrocarbon conversion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for the catalytic reforming of a substantially contaminant-free second hydrocarbon feed using a second reforming catalyst, in a catalytic-reforming system having equipment contaminated through contact with a contaminant-containing prior feed. It comprises: contacting the first hydrocarbon feed in the catalytic-reforming system at first reforming conditions with a first reforming catalyst until contaminant removal from the conversion system is substantially completed and the system is contaminant-free; thereafter replacing the first reforming catalyst in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with a second reforming catalyst; and thereafter contacting the second hydrocarbon feed in the contaminant-free catalytic-reforming system with the second reforming catalyst at second reforming conditions.

Peer, R.L.; Russ, M.B.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang, Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

Yang; Dali (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David (Santa Fe, NM); Barbero, Robert S. (Santa Cruz, NM); Carrera, Martin E. (Naperville, IL); Colling, Craig W. (Warrenville, IL)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction  

SciTech Connect

A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Berry, Christopher J. (Aiken, SC)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

290

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons ...  

Conventional biomass to hydrocarbon conversion is generally not commercially feasible, due to costs of the conversion process.

292

Hydrocarbons from plants and trees  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The way energy was used in the US in 1980 was examined. A diagram shows the development of energy from its source to its end use. The following are described: the carbon dioxide problem - the greenhouse effect, sugar cane as an energy source, hydrocarbon-producing plants and trees, and isoprenoids from plants and trees. (MHR)

Calvin, M.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dipole-dipole resistivity survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dipole resistivity survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, dipole resistivity survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Dipole-dipole resistivity survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed electrical resistivity survey of 54 line-km was completed at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA in September 1977. This survey has defined a bedrock resistivity low at least 4 sq mi (10 sq km) in extent associated with the geothermal system at Coso. The boundaries of this low are generally well defined to the north and west but not as well to the south where an approximate southern limit has been determined. The bedrock resistivity low merges with an observed resistivity low over gravel fill

294

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product in a plural stage absorption zone to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable, for example, the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

O'brien, D.E.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Indonesia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103id3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103id3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

296

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Egypt (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Egypt (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103eg3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103eg3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

297

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ng3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103ng3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

298

Commissioning and Operational Experience with 1 kW Class Helium Refrigerator/Liquefier for SST?1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The helium refrigerator/liquefier (R/L) for the Steady State Super conducting Tokamak (SST?1) has been developed with very stringent specifications for the different operational modes. The total refrigeration capacity is 650 W at 4.5 K and liquefaction capacity of 200 l/h. A cold circulation pump is used for the forced flow cooling of 300 g/s supercritical helium (SHe) for the magnet system (SCMS). The R/L has been designed also to absorb a 200 W transient heat load of the SCMS. The plant consists of a compressor station

C. P. Dhard; B. Sarkar; Ruchi Misra; A. K. Sahu; V. L. Tanna; J. Tank; P. Panchal; J. C. Patel; G. D. Phadke; Y. C. Saxena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Malaysia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Malaysia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Malaysia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103my3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103my3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

300

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Australia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Australia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Australia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Australia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103au3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103au3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103qr3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103qr3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

302

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Brunei (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Brunei (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Brunei (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Brunei (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103bx3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103bx3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

303

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Oman (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103mu3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103mu3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

304

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Preservation and Dissemination of the Hardcopy Documentation Portion of the NCSP Nuclear Criticality Bibliographic Database  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy supports a nuclear criticality safety bibliographic internet database that contains approximately 15,000 records. We are working to ensure that a substantial portion of the corresponding hardcopy documents are preserved, digitized, and made available to criticality safety practitioners via the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program web site.

Koponen, B L; Heinrichs, D

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

Semiconductor structures having electrically insulating and conducting portions formed from an AlSb-alloy layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure comprises a plurality of semiconductor layers formed on a substrate including at least one layer of a III-V compound semiconductor alloy comprising aluminum (Al) and antimony (Sb), with at least a part of the AlSb-alloy layer being chemically converted by an oxidation process to form superposed electrically insulating and electrically conducting portions. The electrically insulating portion formed from the AlSb-alloy layer comprises an oxide of aluminum (e.g. Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), while the electrically conducting portion comprises Sb. A lateral oxidation process allows formation of the superposed insulating and conducting portions below monocrystalline semiconductor layers for forming many different types of semiconductor structures having particular utility for optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, edge-emitting lasers, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, photodetectors and optical modulators (waveguide and surface normal), and for electronic devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors, field-effect transistors and quantum-effect devices. The invention is expected to be particularly useful for forming light-emitting devices for use in the 1.3-1.6 .mu.m wavelength range, with the AlSb-alloy layer acting to define an active region of the device and to effectively channel an electrical current therein for efficient light generation.

Spahn, Olga B. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Subsurface structure of the southern portion of the Salton Sea geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsurface correlation of sedimentary strata was attempted among ten geothermal wells in the southern portion of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The spontaneous potential (SP) log was the principal tool used for correlation purposes. The structure that emerges from the correlation diagrams is a shallow plunging syncline with an east-west axis perpendicular to the axis of the Salton Trough.

Chan, M.A.; Tewhey, J.D.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

de Lijser, Peter

309

GEOLOGY, May 2009 387 Potential field data along the Texas portion of the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOLOGY, May 2009 387 ABSTRACT Potential field data along the Texas portion of the Gulf of Mexico formed during the opening of the Gulf of Mexico, differs in origin from the transform boundary OF THE GULF OF MEXICO Breakup of Pangea often exploited the suture between Laurasia and Gondwana (Ouachita

Stern, Robert J.

310

Application of landfill gas as a liquefied natural gas fuel for refuse trucks in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy consumption throughout the world has increased substantially over the past few years and the trend is projected to continue indefinitely. The primary sources of energy are conventional fuels such as oil, natural gas and coal. The most apparent negative impacts of these conventional fuels are global warming, poor air-quality, and adverse health effects. Considering these negative impacts, it is necessary to develop and use non-conventional sources of energy. Landfill gas (LFG) generated at landfills can serve as a source of cleaner energy. LFG has substantial energy generation potential and, if cleaned of certain impurities, can be used for several applications such as electricity generation and conversion to high Btu gas. This thesis considers another application of LFG, which consists of using it as a vehicular fuel for refuse trucks. Currently, limited research has been performed on the development of such a methodology to evaluate the application of LFG as a vehicular fuel for refuse truck operations. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a methodology that can be used to evaluate the use of LFG generated at landfills as a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) fuel source for refuse trucks in Texas. The methodology simulates the gas generation process at a landfill by using standard models developed by the Environmental Protection Agency. The operations of a refuse truck fleet are replicated by using generic drive cycles developed as part of this research. The economic feasibility is evaluated by estimating the costs required for cleaning the LFG and converting the truck fleet from diesel to LNG as well as quantifying the benefits obtained due to change in fuel consumption and emission generation by the refuse trucks. The methodology was applied to a potential landfill in Texas. The results show that the methodology offers an innovative tool that allows the stakeholders to evaluate the economic feasibility of using LFG for refuse truck operations. The methodology also provides a flexible framework wherein each component can be changed or tailored to meet the specific needs of the stakeholders.

Gokhale, Bhushan

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Control of Vapor Dispersion and Pool Fire of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) with Expansion Foam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is flammable when it forms a 5 15 percent volumetric concentration mixture with air at atmospheric conditions. When the LNG vapor comes in contact with an ignition source, it may result in fire and/or explosion. Because of flammable characteristics and dense gas behaviors, expansion foam has been recommended as one of the safety provisions for mitigating accidental LNG releases. However, the effectiveness of foam in achieving this objective has not been sufficiently reported in outdoor field tests. Thus, this research focused on experimental determination of the effect of expansion foam application on LNG vapor dispersion and pool fire. Specifically, for evaluating the use of foam to control the vapor hazard from spilled LNG, this study aimed to obtain key parameters, such as the temperature changes of methane and foam and the extent reduction of vapor concentration. This study also focused on identifying the effectiveness of foam and thermal exclusion zone by investigating temperature changes of foam and fire, profiles of radiant heat flux, and fire height changes by foam. Additionally, a schematic model of LNG-foam system for theoretical modeling and better understanding of underlying mechanism of foam was developed. Results showed that expansion foam was effective in increasing the buoyancy of LNG vapor by raising the temperature of the vapor permeated through the foam layer and ultimately decreasing the methane concentrations in the downwind direction. It was also found that expansion foam has positive effects on reducing fire height and radiant heat fluxes by decreasing fire heat feedback to the LNG pool, thus resulting in reduction in the safe separation distance. Through the extensive data analysis, several key parameters, such as minimum effective foam depth and mass evaporation rate of LNG with foam, were identified. However, caution must be taken to ensure that foam application can result in initial adverse effects on vapor and fire control. Finally, based on these findings, several recommendations were made for improving foam delivery methods which can be used for controlling the hazard of spilled LNG.

Yun, Geun Woong

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vapor Dispersion Modeling with Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal regulation 49 CFR 193 and standard NFPA 59A require the use of validated consequence models to determine the vapor cloud dispersion exclusion zones for accidental liquefied natural gas (LNG) releases. For modeling purposes, the physical process of dispersion of LNG release can be simply divided into two stages: source term and atmospheric dispersion. The former stage occurs immediately following the release where the behavior of fluids (LNG and its vapor) is mainly controlled by release conditions. After this initial stage, the atmosphere would increasingly dominate the vapor dispersion behavior until it completely dissipates. In this work, these two stages are modeled separately by a source term model and a dispersion model due to the different parameters used to describe the physical process at each stage. The principal focus of the source term study was on LNG underwater release, since there has been far less research conducted in developing and testing models for the source of LNG release underwater compared to that for LNG release onto land or water. An underwater LNG release test was carried out to understand the phenomena that occur when LNG is released underwater and to determine the characteristics of pool formation and the vapor cloud generated by the vaporization of LNG underwater. A mathematical model was used and validated against test data to calculate the temperature of the vapor emanating from the water surface. This work used the ANSYS CFX, a general-purpose computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, to model LNG vapor dispersion in the atmosphere. The main advantages of CFD codes are that they have the capability of defining flow physics and allowing for the representation of complex geometry and its effects on vapor dispersion. Discussed are important parameters that are essential inputs to the ANSYS CFX simulations, including the mesh size and shape, atmospheric conditions, turbulence from the source term, ground surface roughness height, and effects of obstacles. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to illustrate the impact of key parameters on the accuracy of simulation results. In addition, a series of medium-scale LNG spill tests have been performed at the Brayton Fire Training Field (BFTF), College Station, TX. The objectives of these tests were to study key parameters of modeling the physical process of LNG vapor dispersion and collect data for validating the ANSYS CFX prediction results. A comparison of test data with simulation results demonstrated that CFX described the physical behavior of LNG vapor dispersion well, and its prediction results of distances to the half lower flammable limit were in good agreement with the test data.

Qi, Ruifeng

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company is investigating the direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels via partial oxidation. This report describes work completed in the first quarter of the two-year project (first quarter FY 1990). Task 1 of the work, preparation of the Project Management Plan, has been completed. Work was started and progress made on three other tasks during this quarter: Task 2. Modification of an existing Amoco pilot plant to handle the conditions of this project. Minor modifications were made to increase the maximum operating pressure to 1500 psig. Other more extensive modifications are being designed, including addition of an oxygen compressor and recycle system. Task 3.1. Evaluation of a Los Alamos National Laboratory methane oxidation kinetic model for suitability in guiding the experimental portions of this project. Task 3.2. Process variable (e.g. temperature, pressure, residence time) studies to determine optimal partial oxidation conditions. 1 fig.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) used by transit agencies in Texas. Research report  

SciTech Connect

This study is a detailed comparative analysis of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG). The study provides data on two alternative fuels used by transit agencies in Texas. First, we examine the `state-of-the- art` in alternative fuels to established a framework for the study. Efforts were made to examine selected characteristics of two types of natural gas demonstrations in terms of the following properties: energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, operations, maintenance, reliability, safety costs, and fuel availability. Where feasible, two alternative fuels were compared with conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Environmental considerations relative to fuel distribution and use are analyzed, with a focus on examining flammability an other safety-related issues. The objectives of the study included: (1) assess the state-of-the-art and document relevant findings pertaining to alternative fuels; (2) analyze and synthesize existing databases on two natural gas alternatives: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG): and (3) compare two alterative fuels used by transit properties in Texas, and address selected aspects of alternative fuels such as energy source characteristics, vehicle performance and emissions, safety, costs, maintenance and operations, environmental and related issues.

Lede, N.W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hydrocarbon Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Technologies Hydrocarbon Technologies Place Lawrenceville, New Jersey Zip 8648 Sector Efficiency Product String representation "Technology-base ... onmental risks." is too long. Coordinates 36.761678°, -77.845048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.761678,"lon":-77.845048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

Song, Chunshan (State College, PA); Ma, Xiaoliang (State College, PA); Sprague, Michael J. (Calgary, CA); Subramani, Velu (State College, PA)

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

Liquefied energy gases. Hearing before the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate, Ninety-Fifth Congress, Second Session, August 21, 1978. Part 1  

SciTech Connect

This hearing was to investigate the problems associated with the storage and transportation of liquefied energy gases, both liquefied petroleum gas, LPG, and liquefied natural gas, LNG. LPG, consisting mainly of propane is especially important in northern New England to heat homes and commercial establishments. Much of New England's LPG is supplied through the Newington, NH, facility near Portsmouth, by truck and railroad deliveries directly to customers. A training film was shown by the National Fire Protection Association, demonstrating the potential hazard of one of the energy gases, LPG. Monte Canfield, Jr., Director, Energy and Minerals Division on Liquefied Energy Gases gave recommendations: for evaluating storage facilities; to enact legislation for proper safeguards. Other witnesses included Captain Lynn Hein, US Coast Guard Marine Safety Office; Senator Edward Kennedy; Representative Edward Markey; John McKenna, vice president, gas planning and supply, Boston Gas Company; George Paul, fire commissioner, Boston Fire Department; Jim Splaine, assistant mayor, Portsmouth, NH; and Christine Sullivan, secretary of consumer affairs, Energy Facilities Siting Council. Senator Durkin presented the opening statement. (DP)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Forced Dispersion of Liquefied Natural Gas Vapor Clouds with Water Spray Curtain Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been, and will continue to be, tremendous growth in the use and distribution of liquefied natural gas (LNG). As LNG poses the hazard of flammable vapor cloud formation from a release, which may result in a massive fire, increased public concerns have been expressed regarding the safety of this fuel. In addition, regulatory authorities in the U.S. as well as all over the world expect the implementation of consequence mitigation measures for LNG spills. For the effective and safer use any safety measure to prevent and mitigate an accidental release of LNG, it is critical to understand thoroughly the action mechanisms. Water spray curtains are generally used by petro-chemical industries to prevent and mitigate heavier-than-air toxic or flammable vapors. It is also used to cool and protect equipment from heat radiation of fuel fires. Currently, water spray curtains are recognized as one of the economic and promising techniques to enhance the dispersion of the LNG vapor cloud formed from a spill. Usually, water curtains are considered to absorb, dilute, disperse and warm a heavier-than-air vapor cloud. Dispersion of cryogenic LNG vapor behaves differently from other dense gases because of low molecular weight and extremely low temperature. So the interaction between water curtain and LNG vapor is different than other heavier vapor clouds. Only two major experimental investigations with water curtains in dispersing LNG vapor clouds were undertaken during the 1970s and 1980s. Studies showed that water spray curtains enhanced LNG vapor dispersion from small spills. However, the dominant phenomena to apply the water curtain most effectively in controlling LNG vapor were not clearly demonstrated. The main objective of this research is to investigate the effectiveness of water spray curtains in controlling the LNG vapor clouds from outdoor experiments. A research methodology has been developed to study the dispersion phenomena of LNG vapor by the action of different water curtains experimentally. This dissertation details the research and experiment development. Small scale outdoor LNG spill experiments have been performed at the Brayton Fire Training Field at Texas A&M University. Field test results regarding important phenomena are presented and discussed. Results have determined that the water curtains are able to reduce the concentration of the LNG vapor cloud, push the vapor cloud upward and transfer heat to the cloud. These are being identified due to the water curtain mechanisms of entrainment of air, dilution of vapor with entrained air, transfer of momentum and heat to the gas cloud. Some of the dominant actions required to control and disperse LNG vapor cloud are also identified from the experimental tests. The gaps are presented as the future work and recommendation on how to improve the experiments in the future. This will benefit LNG industries to enhance its safety system and to make LNG facilities safer.

Rana, Morshed A.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically converting an alcohol ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Chang, Y. Alice (Westmont, IL); Gatsis, John G. (Des Plaines, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons  

ORNL 2011-G00219/jcn UT-B ID 201002414 08.2011 Catalytic Conversion of Bioethanol to Hydrocarbons Technology Summary A method for catalytically ...

323

Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Norway (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Norway (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Norway (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_nus-nno_pml_dmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_nus-nno_pml_dmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

326

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_pml_nus-nye_dmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_pml_nus-nye_dmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

327

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_nus-nca_pml_dmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_nus-nca_pml_dmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

328

Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION USE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS Regulation 1322. CONSUMPTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS IN VEHICLES FUELED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Users who operate motor vehicles powered by liquefied petroleum gas supplied directly to the engine from the cargo tank of the motor vehicle are authorized for the purpose of making tax returns to compute the gallons used on a mileper-gallon basis. The mile-per-gallon basis will be determined by tests. The tests will be made by the user and will be subject to review by the Board. All detail and test data should be retained for inspection by the Board. This method of computing use is authorized only for the purpose of making tax returns. Determinations may be imposed or refunds granted, if the Board upon audit of the users accounts and records, or upon the basis of tests made or other information determines that the return did not disclose the proper amount of tax due. See Regulation 1332 with respect to records on those motor vehicles powered by fuel not supplied directly to the

unknown authors

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A" 917 A" 917 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. - FORMER LOOW SITE Summary Report Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1981 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION. CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES .. .. . .. . . . . . . . ......... iii LIST OF TABLES ......... .. iv INTRODUCTION .. ......... 1 OBJECTIVE .................... 1 SURVEY TECHNIQUES . . ............. ...... 1 RESULTS ..... 2 Gamma-Ray Exposure Rates . . . . . . 2 Beta-Gamma Dose Rate ............. 2 226Ra in Soil ............ 3 CONCLUSIONS .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. 3 REFERENCES . . . . . . . . .

331

Nutrition Guide Station Menu Items Portion Size Calories Protein Total Fat Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol Total Fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutrition Guide #12;Station Menu Items Portion Size Calories Protein Total Fat Carbohydrates Sodium.00 43 70.0 0.0 Turkey Breast 4 oz 172 20 7.00 0.00 520 47.0 0.0 Grilled White Meat Chicken 4 oz 125 28 1.40 0.00 74 66.0 0.0 Fried Boneless Chicken 4 oz 212 38 5.00 0.58 90 103.0 0.0 Ham 4 oz 120 20 4.00 0

Aronov, Boris

332

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

Greenbaum, E.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission...

335

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana)...

336

Biogeochemistry of Isoprenoid Production and Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Biodgeradation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is an exploration of microbial isoprenoid production and destruction by anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation. Isoprenoids are methyl-branched hydrocarbons, and include biomarkers from all three (more)

Dawson, Katherine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Regional well-log correlation in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin  

SciTech Connect

Although well logs provide the most complete record of stratigraphy and structure in the northern Delaware Basin, regional interpretations of these logs generate problems of ambiguous lithologic signatures and on-hole anomalies. Interpretation must therefore be based on log-to-log correlation rather than on inferences from single logs. In this report, logs from 276 wells were used to make stratigraphic picks of Ochoan horizons (the Rustler, Salado, and Castile Formations) in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin. Current log correlation suggests that: (1) the Castile is characterized by lateral thickening and thinning; (2) some Castile thinnings are of Permian age; (3) irregular topography in the Guadalupian Bell Canyon Formation may produce apparent structures in the overlying Ochoan units; and (4) extensive dissolution of the Salado is not apparent in the area of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) site. 13 refs., 37 figs.

Borns, D.J.; Shaffer, S.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Methane is recovered as a gas for discharge to a pipeline from a gas stream containing methane and heavier hydrocarbons, principally ethane and propane. Separation is accomplished by condensing the heavier hydrocarbons and distilling the methane therefrom. A liquid product (LPG) comprising the heavier hydrocarbons is subsequently recovered and transferred to storage. Prior to being discharged to a pipeline, the recovered methane gas is compressed and in undergoing compression the gas is heated. The heat content of the gas is employed to reboil the refrigerant in an absorption refrigeration unit. The refrigeration unit is used to cool the LPG prior to its storage.

Millar, J.F.; Cockshott, J.E.

1978-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

339

Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Berkeley, CA); Sun, Hai (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. and Calvin, M. J. Amer. Oil Chern. Assoc. Science, 208,of the production of oil and alcohol from hydrocarbon-Figure 1 Cumulative U.S. crude oil discoveries as a function

Calvin, Melvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Properties of Acetic Acid + Hydrocarbons Mixtures L. Negadi1,C,S, N. Ainous2, A. Negadi1, I. Mokbel2, A. Kaci3 and J. Jose2 ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae  

SciTech Connect

A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

Tornabene, T.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Clean, economical, underwater (hydrocarbon) storage  

SciTech Connect

A consortium consisting of Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft A.G., Phoenix Gummiwerke A.G., Strabag Bau-A.G., and Bugsier Reederei und Bergungs-A.G. offers a plausible solution to the large-scale underwater storage of hydrocarbons. Up to 20 storage compartments of 8000 cu m capacity can be assembled for a capacity of 160,000 cu m. Each compartment is divided in half by a nylon-reinforced polyurethane diaphragm which isolates oil or other products on one side from sea-water ballast on the other side. As oil is pumped into storage on one side of the diaphragm, the diaphragm moves and ballast on the other side is displaced to the sea. Ballast re-enters the compartment during unloading. The system can enable small offshore platforms to produce more economically. Cargo tankers load at 8000 cu m/hr. The tanks will be used in 200 m or greater water depths. The loading station is installed in a buoy 30 m below the water surface.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation thus preventing fire fighters from approaching and extinguishing the fire. One of the strategies used in the LNG industry and recommended by federal regulation National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 59A is to use expansion foam to suppress LNG vapors and to control LNG fire by reducing the fire size. In its application, expansion foam effectiveness heavily depends on application rate, generator location, and LNG containment pit design. Complicated phenomena involved and previous studies have not completely filled the gaps increases the needs for LNG field experiments involving expansion foam. In addition, alternative LNG vapor dispersion and pool fire suppression methodology, Foamglas pool fire suppression (PFS), is investigated as well. This dissertation details the research and experiment development. Results regarding important phenomena are presented and discussed. Foamglas PFS effectiveness is described. Recommendations for advancing current guidelines in LNG vapor dispersion and pool fire suppression methods are developed. The gaps are presented as the future work and recommendation on how to do the experiment better in the future. This will benefit LNG industries to enhance its safety system and to make LNG facilities safer.

Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas on water. Final report, December 12, 1978-March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the boiling and spreading of liquid nitrogen, liquid methane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water in a one-dimensional configuration. Primary emphasis was placed on the LPG studies. Experimental work involved the design and construction of a spill/spread/boil apparatus which permitted the measurement of spreading and local boil-off rates. With the equations of continuity and momentum transfer, a mathematical model was developed to describe the boiling-spreading phenomena of cryogens spilled on water. The model accounted for a decrease in the density of the cryogenic liquid due to bubble formation. The boiling and spreading rates of LPG were found to be the same as those of pure propane. An LPG spill was characterized by the very rapid and violent boiling initially and highly irregular ice formation on the water surface. The measured local boil-off rates of LPG agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions from a moving boundary heat transfer model. The spreading velocity of an LPG spill was found to be constant and determined by the size of the distributor opening. The maximum spreading distance was found to be unaffected by the spilling rate. These observations can be explained by assuming that the ice formation on the water surface controls the spreading of LPG spills. While the mathematical model did not predict the spreading front adequately, it predicted the maximum spreading distance reasonably well.

Chang, H.R.; Reid, R.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrocarbon pool and vapor fire data analysis  

SciTech Connect

The flame geometry and thermal radiation data from a series of large scale experiments involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and gasoline spills on water were analyzed. The experiments were conducted at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. Two types of fires have been studied; namely, pool fires and vapor fires. The spill quantity varied from 4 m/sup 3/ to approximately 6 m/sup 3/. The LPG pool fire flame height to diameter ratio were between 3.5 and 4.5. The gasoline flame height was about 2. The flame emissive powers for LPG pool fires ranged from 78 kW/m/sup 2/ to 115 kW/m/sup 2/. The average surface emissive power for gasoline pool fire was 40 kW/m/sup 2/. The LPG vapor fire emissive power ranged from 159 to 269 kW/m/sup 2/. 63 figures, 13 tables.

Mudan, K.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Sepik-Ramu area, Ramu basin, Papua New Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements in seismic processing have made new interpretations of the structural and depositional history of the northwestern portion of the Ramu basin possible. Support for a wrench tectonic model for this area is observed in the reprocessed seismic data. Strike-slip movement along major fault zones has allowed compressional forces to be translated laterally and resulted in only minor deformation occurring in the Sepik-Ramu area. The major tectonic event is thought to have occurred during late Miocene-early Pliocene, and not during the middle Miocene, as earlier hypothesized. Consequently, Miocene deposition is postulated to have occurred uninterrupted by periods of erosion. A thick Miocene section is preserved in this region and is postulated to contain slope, reef, and shelf carbonates of early to middle Miocene age. This interpretation has led to the identification of a reef trend over 7 mi wide and at least 42 mi long containing numerous pinnacle reefs. The pinnacle reefs are analogous to those found in the Salawati basin of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The reefs are overlain by deep-water shales, a combination that provides potential reservoirs and seals necessary for the entrapment of hydrocarbons. The presence of oil and gas seeps document the existence of a source. These three factors justify hydrocarbon exploration in this area. The numerous potential drilling targets may lead to the discovery of significant quantities of hydrocarbons.

Donaldson, J.C.; Wilson, J.T. (Anderman/Smith Operating Co., Denver, CO (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Low-temperature geothermal resource and stratigraphy of portions of Yakima County, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low-temperature geothermal resource of portions of Yakima County, south-central Washington, is defined by several least squares linear regression analyses of bottom-hole temperature and depth data. Intra-borehole flow prevents the use of borehole temperature gradients for geothermal resource assessment. Bottom-hole temperature and depth data were separated into fourteen well data groups based on geographic proximity, land slope azimuth, and position within the regional ground-water flow system. The regression analyses of these well data groups indicate that the projected land-surface temperature and geothermal gradient range from 10.6 to 14.0/sup 0/C and from 24.9 to 52.2/sup 0/C/km, respectively. The depth to the 20/sup 0/C isotherm ranges from 142 to 346m. The average projected land-surface temperature and geothermal gradient are approximately 11.3/sup 0/C and 43.0/sup 0/C/km, respectively. The average depth to the 20/sup 0/C isoterm is approximately 202m. The projected land-surface temperature appears to decrease and the depth to the 20/sup 0/C isotherm appears to increase as the land-surface elevation of the well dat group increases. Stratigraphic correlation diagrams developed from borehole geophysical and lithologic logs are given for localities within the lower Yakima, Black Rock, Moxee, Ahtanum, Cowiche, and Naches valleys. These correlation diagrams are combined with their respective borehole temperatue logs and well data group predicted temperature curves to assess the validity of the regression analyses and to determine aquifer locations, temperatures, and directions of intra-borehole flow.

Biggane, J.

1982-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Low-temperature geothermal resource and stratigraphy of portions of Yakima County, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low-temperature geothermal resource of portions of Yakima County, south-central Washington, is defined by several least squares linear regression analyses of bottom-hole temperature and depth data. Bottom-hole temperature and depth data were separated into fourteen well data groups based on geographic proximity, land slope azimuth, and position within the regional ground-water flow system. The depths of these wells range from over 50m to almost 600m. The regression analyses of these well data groups indicate that the projected land-surface temperature and geothermal gradient range from 10.6 to 14.0/sup 0/C and from 24.9 to 52.2/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Stratigraphic correlation diagrams developed from borehole geophysical and lithologic logs are given for localities within the lower Yakima, Black Rock, Moxee, Ahtanum, Cowiche, and Naches valleys. These correlation diagrams are combined with their respective borehole temperature logs and well data group predicted temperature curves to assess the validity of the regression analyses and to determine aquifer locations, temperatures, and directions of intra-borehole flow. A regression analysis of data from wells of south-central Washington with bottom-hole depths of over 700m to almost 3km suggests that the projected land-surface temperature and geothermal gradient of this depth interval are 21.8/sup 0/C and 31.3/sup 0/C/km, respectively. The depth to the 100/sup 0/C isotherm is approximately 2513m.

Biggane, J.

1982-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

REACTOR FUEL WASTE DISPOSAL PROJECT PRESSURE-TEMPERATURE EFFECT ON SALT CAVITIES AND SURVEY OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

It is deemed feasible to store reactor fuel wastes in a salt dome cavity to a depth where the differential in pressure between the soil over-burden pressure and pressure of the fluid inside the cavity does not exceed 3000 psi, and the temperature is less than 400 deg F. Tests at pressure increments of 1000 psi were conducted on a 2" cylindrical cavity contained in a 6-in. long by 6-in. cylindrical salt core. Tests indicate that the cavity exhibited complete stability under pressures to 3000 psi and temperatures to 300 deg F. At temperatures of 100 to 400 deg F and pressures to 5000 psi continuous deformation of the cavity resulted. Initial movement of the salt was observed at all pressures. This was evidenced by vertical deformation and cavity size reduction. It was noted that a point of structural equilibrium was reached at lower temperatures when the pressure did not exceed 5000 psi. A literature study reveals that the most common type of cavity utilized in liquefied petroleum gas storage is either cylindrical or ellipsoidal. A few are pear or inverted cone shaped. There was no indication of leakage for cavities when pressure tested for as long as 72 hr. This indicates that the salt mass is not permeable under conditions of prevailing underground temperature and pressure. Salt specimens tested under atmospheric Pressure and temperature exhibited permeabilities of 0.1 to 0.2 millidarcys. The cost of completing underground storage cavities in salt masses is expected to be approximately 05 per barrel of storage space. (auth)

Brown, K.E.; Jessen, F.W.; Gloyna, E.F.

1959-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

353

Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrocarbon Inc Hydrocarbon Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc Address 2016 Main St Place Houston, Texas Zip 77002 Sector Biofuels Product Wholesale marketing of biodiesel and ethanol to refiners, blenders and petroleum distributors Website http://www.gulfhydrocarbon.com Coordinates 29.749227°, -95.371693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.749227,"lon":-95.371693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

354

Catalysts for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Method and apparatus (10), including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO.sub.2 aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions (18) are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor (12) having a transparent window (16), by hydrogen and CO, C.sub.2 H.sub.4 or C.sub.2 H.sub.6 gas mixtures (20), and exposed to radiation (34) from a light source (32) external to the reactor (12), to produce the short chain hydrocarbons (36).

Colmenares, Carlos (Alamo, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Biogenic Hydrocarbons in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this ...

J. D. Fuentes; L. Gu; M. Lerdau; R. Atkinson; D. Baldocchi; J. W. Bottenheim; P. Ciccioli; B. Lamb; C. Geron; A. Guenther; T. D. Sharkey; W. Stockwell

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Other Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Other Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Other Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103983m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103983m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

357

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Equatorial Guinea (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_nus-nek_pml_dmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_nus-nek_pml_dmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

358

Co-cultured Synechococcus and Shewanella Produce Hydrocarbons ...  

... microbes has been developed. These hydrocarbons may be further processed into vehicle fuels using traditional oil refining techniques.

359

Propagation of Front Waves in Myelinated Nerve Fibres: New Electrical Transmission Lines Constituted of Linear and Nonlinear Portions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors examine the propagation of wave fronts in myelinated nerve fibres and applications as electrical transmission lines constituted of linear and nonlinear portions. Numerical simulations show that the front introduced in the nonlinear ... Keywords: Demyelination, Electrical Line, Front Wave, Myelinated Fibre, Regenerative, Remyelination

Assatou Mboussi Nkomidio; Paul Woafo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Production of hydrocarbons from hydrates. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An economical and safe method of producing hydrocarbons (or natural gas) from in situ hydrocarbon-containing hydrates is given. Once started, the method will be self-driven and will continue producing hydrocarbons over an extended period of time (i.e., many days).

McGuire, P.L.

1981-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

362

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for recovery of hydrocarbon material from hydrocarbon material-bearing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method is disclosed for heating a hydrocarbon material contained in a recovery zone in an underground hydrocarbon material-bearing formation to reduce the viscosity thereof for facilitating recovery of the hydrocarbon material. A gaseous penetration medium comprising a gaseous working fluid and a carrier gas, is fed into the formation at a penetration pressure sufficient for penetration of the recovery zone, the working fluid being a water soluble gas which generates heat of solution upon absorption in an aqueous medium, and in which the partial pressure of the working fluid in relation to the penetration pressure and the temperature prevailing in the recovery zone is controlled to inhibit working fluid condensation but to provide for absorption of working fluid by water present in the formation to release heat for heating the hydrocarbon material in the recovery zone.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.2 Anthropogenic emissions 28 2.3 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons 30 2.3.1 Sources of PAHs 30 2.3.2 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 2.3.3 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 CHAPTER THREE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Plasma-assisted conversion of solid hydrocarbon to diamond  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing diamond, e.g., diamond fiber, by subjecting a hydrocarbon material, e.g., a hydrocarbon fiber, to a plasma treatment in a gaseous feedstream for a sufficient period of time to form diamond, e.g., a diamond fiber is disclosed. The method generally further involves pretreating the hydrocarbon material prior to treatment with the plasma by heating within an oxygen-containing atmosphere at temperatures sufficient to increase crosslinking within said hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to melt or decompose said hydrocarbon material, followed by heating at temperatures sufficient to promote outgassing of said crosslinked hydrocarbon material, but at temperatures insufficient to convert said hydrocarbon material to carbon.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM); Pattillo, Stevan G. (Los Alamos, NM); Trkula, Mitchell (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Shah, S. Ismat (Wilmington, DE)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

368

Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Copenhaver, Sally C. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of hydrocarbons having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 340 to 360/sup 0/C, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, CH/sub 3/OH is produced in an amount of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture, and comprised 1 mole % of the effluent gas.

Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Chemical kinetic modelling of hydrocarbon ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon ignition is discussed with reference to a range of experimental configurations, including shock tubes, detonations, pulse combustors, static reactors, stirred reactors and internal combustion engines. Important conditions of temperature, pressure or other factors are examined to determine the main chemical reaction sequences responsible for chain branching and ignition, and kinetic factors which can alter the rate of ignition are identified. Hydrocarbon ignition usually involves complex interactions between physical and chemical factors, and it therefore is a suitable and often productive subject for computer simulations. In most of the studies to be discussed below, the focus of the attention is placed on the chemical features of the system. The other physical parts of each application are generally included in the form of initial or boundary conditions to the chemical kinetic parts of the problem, as appropriate for each type of application being addressed.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Marinov, N.M.

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

1988-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

372

HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT  

SciTech Connect

In this report we detail the synthesis catalytic chemistry of polystyrene supported {eta}{sup 5} ~cyclopentadienyl- dicarbonyl cobalt, CpCo(CO){sub 2}. This material is active in the hydrogenation of CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain its "homogeneous", mononuclear character during the course of its catalysis, During the course of our work 18% and 20% crosslinked analogs of polystyrene supported CpCo(CO){sub 2} were shown to exhibit limited catalytic activity and no CO activation.

Benner, Linda S.; Perkins, Patrick; Vollhardt, K.Peter C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A Review of World Hydrocarbon Resource Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reviews assessments of world oil, natural gas, and oil shale resources made between the end of World War II and the end of 1980. Details are provided on the methods used in developing these assessments, geographic coverage, time horizons, and major assumptions (e.g., about discovery rates and recovery factor). Conclusions on the current state of knowledge concerning each of these hydrocarbon resources are presented.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Literature Review of Background Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) continuously move through the environment, often via atmospheric transport. The subsequent deposition of particulates containing PAHs along with other sources of PAHs, such as natural vegetative decay, result in "background" PAHs in surficial soils. Even in pristine areas, surface and near surface soils can contain detectable levels of PAHs. This study provides data on the concentrations and distributions of background PAHs observed in environmental media. Such inf...

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hydrocarbon content of geopressured brines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design Well data (bottomhole pressure minus wellhead pressure, GWR, and hydrocarbon composition) is presented as a function of producing conditions. These are examined in conjunction with the following models to attempt to deduce the reservoir brine saturation level: (1) reservoir contains gas dispersed in the pores and the gas saturation is greater than critical; (2) reservoir brine is gas-saturated; (3) bubble point below hydrostatic pressure; and (4) bubble point between hydrostatic pressure and reservoir pressure. 24 figs., 10 tabs. (ACR)

Osif, T.L.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Getter pump for hydrogen and hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gettering device for hydrogen isotopes and gaseous hydrocarbons based on the interaction of a plasma and graphite used as cathodic material. The plasma is maintained at a current density within the range of about 1 to about 1000 mA/cm.sup.2. The graphite may be heated to a temperature greater than 1000.degree. C. The new device offers high capacity, low noise, and gas species selectivity.

Hsu, Wen L. (Danville, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hydrocarbon Fouling of SCR during PCCI combustion  

SciTech Connect

The combination of advanced combustion with advanced selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst formulations was studied in the work presented here to determine the impact of the unique hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion on SCR performance. Catalyst core samples cut from full size commercial Fe- and Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts were exposed to a slipstream of raw engine exhaust from a 1.9-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operating in conventional and PCCI combustion modes. The zeolites which form the basis of these catalysts are different with the Cu-based catalyst made on a chabazite zeolite which las smaller pore structures relative to the Fe-based catalyst. Subsequent to exposure, bench flow reactor characterization of performance and hydrocarbon release and oxidation enabled evaluation of overall impacts from the engine exhaust. The Fe-zeolite NOX conversion efficiency was significantly degraded, especially at low temperatures (<250 C), after the catalyst was exposed to the raw engine exhaust. The degradation of the Fe-zeolite performance was similar for both combustion modes. The Cu-zeolite showed better tolerance to HC fouling at low temperatures compared to the Fe-zeolite but PCCI exhaust had a more significant impact than the exhaust from conventional combustion on the NOX conversion efficiency. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the hydrocarbons trapped on the SCR cores was conducted to better determine chemistry specific effects.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the technology "Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview This invention discloses a method to reform hydrocarbon fuels using hexa- aluminate catalysts. In general, the method successfully disrupts the forma- tion of carbon that leads to the deactivation of the catalyst, a key element in the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. When researchers are designing catalysts to reform hydrocarbon fuels, one

379

Method for producing hydrocarbon and alcohol mixtures. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide an efficient process for extracting alcohols and ketones from an aqueous solution containing the same into hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, such as gasoline, diesel fuel and fuel oil. Another object of the invention is to provide a mixture consisting of hydrocarbon, alcohols or ketones, polyoxyalkylene polymer and water which can be directly added to fuels or further purified. The above stated objects are achieved in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by contacting an aqueous fermentation liquor with a hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture containing carbon compounds having 5 to 18 carbon atoms, which may include gasoline, diesel fuel or fuel oil. The hydrocarbon-aqueous alcohol solution is mixed in the presence or one or more of a group of polyoxyalkylene polymers described in detail hereinafter; the fermentation alcohol being extracted into the hydrocarbon fuel-polyoxyalkylene polymer mixture.

Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From The United Arab Emirates (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ua3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103ua3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ethanol Distribution, Dispensing, and Use: Analysis of a Portion of the Biomass-to-Biofuels Supply Chain Using System Dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain-represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner's decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer's choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market) requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets) include the need for infrastructure for distribution and dispensing and widespread use of high ethanol blends in flexible-fuel vehicles.

Vimmerstedt, L. J.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

383

Novel catalyst for selective NOx reduction using hydrocarbons ...  

This invention discloses a catalyst and process for removing nitrogen oxides from exhaust streams under lean burn conditions using hydrocarbons as the reductant.

384

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isoprenoid hydrocarbons in crude oils and sediments must beisomers (up to C ) in crude oil and those characterised inarc found ubiqubtously in crude oils and shalt extracts as

McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

386

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene ...  

Recovery of nitrogen and light hydrocarbons from polyalkene purge gas United States Patent. Patent Number: 6,576,043: Issued: June 10, 2003: Official Filing:

387

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Multi-step catalytic hydroprocessing to produce hydrocarbon fuels from biomass pyrolysis bio-oil (PNNL IPID 16665) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

390

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

391

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure in German Coke Oven Workers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed whenever there is incomplete combustion of carbonaceous material. They are ubiquitous in the environment and background levels are found (more)

Thoroman, Jeffrey S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Enhanced solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigation included two similarly-designed experiments. In the first, a biological surfactant produced by Rhodococcus strain H13-A and a commonly-used synthetic surfactant, Tween-80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate), were compared for their effectiveness in enhancing the transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a complex organic phase into aqueous solution. In the batch-reactor experiment, each reactor contained a surfactant solution and West Texas Crude oil, while the control reactors contained distilled-deionized water and the crude oil. Using a temporal-monitoring scheme, the reactors were sacrificially sampled to determine the water-accommodated fraction (WAF). The phenanthrenes, fluorenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes showed significant increases in their aqueous-plus-micellar-phase concentrations in the presence of surfactants; the increase was greater for the biosurfactant compared to the synthetic surfactant. The enhancement in "solubility" was also more significant for the highly-substituted aromatics, when compared to their parent compounds. In the second study, the effects of four biosurfactants on the solubility of petroleum saturated hydrocarbons were compared. Rhodococcus species H13-A (glycolipid-producing), Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 (rhamnolipid-producing), Candida bombicola ATCC 22214 (sophorolipid-producing), and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 21332 (surfactin-producing) were compared to a control of distilled-deionized water. The experimental design was similar that of the first study. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa treatment significantly enhanced the solubility of the lower-weight, higher-weight and branched saturated hydrocarbons. The Rhodococcus treatment significantly enhanced the solubility of the low-molecular-weight compounds, but only moderately increased the solubilities of the other saturates. Neither the Candida nor the Bacillus solutions produced any negligible increase in solubility under these laboratory conditions.

Page, Cheryl Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydrocarbon synthesis catalyst and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants. The catalyst is preferably used in dilute slurry form, which is desirable from a heat transfer standpoint.

Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Sansone, Michael J. (Summit, NJ); Slegeir, William A. R. (Hampton Bays, NY)

1983-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Collisional processes of hydrocarbons in hydrogen plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated the reactions of methane and its derivatives with hydrogen plasmas for use in modelling carbon and hydrocarbon transport in hydrogen plasmas. We provide quantitative information over the temperature range from 0.1 eV to 2 keV for the most significant reactions of methane and methane fragments with electrons and protons. We review the properties of each reaction, present graphs of the cross section and reaction rate coefficient, and give analytical fits for sigma and (sigmav). 34 refs.

Ehrhardt, A.B.; Langer, W.D.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Gas turbine engine adapted for use in combination with an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from compressed air  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine is provided comprising an outer shell, a compressor assembly, at least one combustor assembly, a turbine assembly and duct structure. The outer shell includes a compressor section, a combustor section, an intermediate section and a turbine section. The intermediate section includes at least one first opening and at least one second opening. The compressor assembly is located in the compressor section to define with the compressor section a compressor apparatus to compress air. The at least one combustor assembly is coupled to the combustor section to define with the combustor section a combustor apparatus. The turbine assembly is located in the turbine section to define with the turbine section a turbine apparatus. The duct structure is coupled to the intermediate section to receive at least a portion of the compressed air from the compressor apparatus through the at least one first opening in the intermediate section, pass the compressed air to an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from the compressed air to produced vitiated compressed air and return the vitiated compressed air to the intermediate section via the at least one second opening in the intermediate section.

Bland, Robert J. (Oviedo, FL); Horazak, Dennis A. (Orlando, FL)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the conference.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group 1 Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the confer- ence. #12;Group 3 Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the conference

Kyte, Michael

397

Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources  

SciTech Connect

Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geology and hydrocarbon potentials of Arafura Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arafura Sea is a continental-shelf sea located between Irian Jaya (western New Guinea) and the northern part of the Australian continent. On the south it adjoins the stable Australian craton, and on the north it is bordered by the Tertiary collision zone between the Australian craton and the northern Irian Jaya island arc. On the west and northwest it is bounded by the active Banda arc collision zone, whereas on the east it is bordered by the northern extension of the Gulf of Carpentaria that also forms the western limit of the zone of late Paleozoic granites. Shelf sediments, ranging in age from late Paleozoic to Cenozoic, predominate in the Arafura Sea continental shelf, and are underlain by granitic basement. Gas shows have been reported from Jurassic to Cretaceous fine-grained marine limestones and sandstones, and gas and condensate also are present in Cretaceous sediments and Middle Jurassic fine-grained sandstones. At the north, the most prospective area seems to be the hinge zone of the Aru high, where a combination of traps and reservoir rocks presumably exists. On the south, the Money Shoal area is considered a significant prospect. In the Arafura basin, stratigraphic traps seem to be the most promising target for hydrocarbon exploration as tectonics seems not to have played an important role in the area. The sedimentary area occupied by the eastern extension of the Tarera-Aiduna wrench fault should also be investigated in detail for its hydrocarbon potential.

Katili, J.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Lubricant formulation for lower unburnt hydrocarbon emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engine-out emissions of unburnt hydrocabons from spark ignition engines are attributable to a number of mechanisms, occurring during the engine cycle, by which fuel escapes combustion. These include absorption of fuel components into the bore lubricating oil film during compression, and subsequent desorption into hot combustion gases throughout expansion. A proportion of the hydrocarbons desorbed will then be emitted, either as unburnt or partially oxidised fuel. This mechanism has been studied by a number of workers, and estimates of its importance vary from 10 to 30% of total hydrocarbons being related to the absorption/desorption process. A novel lubricant additive has been formulated for the purpose of reducing the quantity of fuel which is absorbed into the bore lubricant film, and hence the quantity of fuel subsequently desorbed. This paper describes a programme to evaluate the effect that this lubricant additive can have on engine-out emissions from a single cylinder research engine, together with results from current technology, low-emitting US and European vehicles, tested over FTP and ECE drive cycles. 11 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Beckwith, P.; Cooper, J.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for a combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly combined selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for selective thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls is carried out in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts.

Frei, Heinz (Berkeley, CA); Blatter, Fritz (Basel, CH); Sun, Hai (Saint Charles, MO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass-derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot-scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Tan, E.; Tao, L.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Selective thermal and photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for selective thermal oxidation or photooxidation of hydrocarbons adsorbed onto zeolite matrices. A highly selective thermal oxidation and photooxidation of unsubstituted or alkyl substituted alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and cycloalkyls in solvent free zeolites under dark thermal conditions or under irradiation with visible light. The process oxidizes hydrocarbons almost completely selectively without substantial production of byproducts. 19 figs.

Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation, the primary source of petroleum hydrocarbons inPetroleum Geologists, Tulsa Clark JF, Washburn L, Hornafius JS, Luyendyk BP (2000) Natural marine hydrocarbon seep source

Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Spatial Scales, Distribution, and Intensity of Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine hydrocarbon seeps (Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara,marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal Oil Point, California,associated with offshore oil production", Geology, 27(11),

Washburn, Libe; Clark, Jordan F.; Kyriakidis, Phaedon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Spatial Scales, Distribution, and Intensity of Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps near Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine hydrocarbon seeps (Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara,marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal Oil Point, California,source areas such as near Coal Oil Point. Furthermore,

Washburn, Libe; Clark, Jordan F.; Kyriakidis, Phaedon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Stable isotope investigations of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stable isotope ratio measurements for carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) can be used to elucidate the processes affecting transformation and transportation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) in the environment. Methods recently developed in our laboratory for isotopic analysis of CAHs have been applied to laboratory measurements of the kinetic isotope effects associated with aerobic degradation of dichloromethane (DCM) and with both anaerobic and aerobic cometabolic degradation of trichlomethene (TCE) in batch and column microbial cultures. These experimental determinations of fractionation factors are crucial for understanding the behavior of CAHs in complex natural systems, where the extent of biotransformation can be masked by dispersion and volatilization. We have also performed laboratory investigations of kinetic isotope effects accompanying evaporation of CAHs, as well as field investigations of natural attenuation and in situ remediation of CAHs in a number of contaminated shallow aquifers at sites operated by the federal government and the private sector.

Abrajano, T.; Heraty, L. J.; Holt, B. D.; Huang, L.; Sturchio, N. C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Microbial hydrocarbons: back to the future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The defining challenge of energy research in the 21st century is the development and deployment of technologies for large-scale reconfiguration of global energy infrastructure. Modern society is built upon a concentrated yet finite reservoir of diverse hydrocarbons formed through the photosynthetic transformation of several hundred million years of solar energy. In human history, the fossil energy era will be short lived and never repeated. Although the timing of peak oil is extensively debated, it is an eventuality. It is, therefore, imperative that projections for both when it will occur and the degree to which supply will fall short of demand be taken into serious consideration, especially in the sectors of energy technology development, political and economic decision making, and societal energy usage. The requirement for renewable energy systems is no longer a point for discussion, and swift advances on many fronts are vital to counteract current and impending crises in both energy and the environment.

Work, Victoria H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Posewitz, Matthew C.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of aliphatic alcohols having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further optionally includes Na ions present as substitutional cations in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 570 to 630/sup 0/K, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, methanol and isobutanol are the predominant products and are produced in amounts of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture. 6 figs.

Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Preignition oxidation characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results obtained from a static reactor are presented for the oxidation of a variety of fuels. Pressure and temperature histories of the reacting fuel/oxidizer mixtures were obtained. Measurements of the stable reaction intermediate and product species were made using gas chromatographic analysis. One aspect of this work involved detailed studies of the oxidation chemistry of relatively low molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons: propane, propene, and n-butane. The oxidation chemistry of these fuels was examined at temperatures in the range 550-750 K, equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 4.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The main characteristics and features of the oxidation mechanisms were determined for each fuel in each temperature regime. The experimental results from propene and propane were used to develop a low and intermediate temperature kinetic mechanism for these fuels based on a low temperature acetaldehyde mechanism of Kaiser et al. and a high temperature propene/propane mechanism of Westbrook and Pitz. General preignition characteristics of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons and binary mixtures of these fuels were also studied. The low temperature/cool flame ignition characteristics of dodecane were investigated at temperatures in the range 523-623 K, equivalence s ranging from 0.8 to 1.0 and at subatmospheric pressures. The preignition characteristics of binary mixtures of dodecane and the aromatic component tetralin were examined. The addition of the tetralin had the overall effect of decreasing the ignition tendency of the mixture, although this effect was nonlinear with respect to the amount of tetralin added.

Wilk, R.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons using biosurfactants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low solubility of petroleum hydrocarbons in water is the major factor limiting the degradation rates of these compounds (Zhang and Miller, 1994). The fraction that is more soluble in the aqueous phase is degraded at higher rates, while less soluble or insoluble compounds have lower degradation rates due to limited bioavailability to the microbial community. A recent study in our lab found no significant degradation of weathered petroleum at a Texas petrochemical plant site. It was concluded that bioavailability of the crude oil to the microorganisms limited the degradation rates (Mills, 1994). Preliminary experiments at our laboratories have also indicated enhanced solubilities of petroleum hydrocarbons due to the effects of biosurfactants (Kanga et al., 1994). This research focused on biosurfactants because they have been shown to be as effective as chemical surfactants and, most importantly, they enhance biodegradation. Glycolipid biosurfactants are produced by Rhodococcus species HI 3-A to enhance substrate solubility and promote bioavailability for degradation. The work proceeded in two stages. The initial stage involved production and characterization of extracellular biosurfactants by HI 3-A when grown on minimal salts media with hexadecane as the carbon source. The second stage evaluated the performance of the biosurfactants in enhancing the aqueous solubility of weathered West Texas Crude. Initial results indicated production of the biosurfactants by Rhodococcus species H13-A during the stationary growth stage. Biosurfactants lowered the surface tension from 72 to-30 dynes/cm and interfacial tension to below 5 dynes/cm. The two-, three-, and four-ring aromatic compounds showed substantial increase in their aqueous phase concentrations in the presence of biosurfactants. The enhancement was more dramatic with the larger aromatics and also the highly substituted-compounds. Preliminary experiments on toxicity and biodegradation indicated higher levels of toxicity in the surfactant/aqueous mixtures due to increased PAH partitioning (Lambert, 1995), and increased degradation rates for the target PAH compounds.

Kanga, Shahrukh

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

MODELING TRANSPORT IN THE DOWN GRADIENT PORTION OF THE 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Remedial Investigations are underway for the 200-PO-l Operable Unit (OU) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. To support the baseline risk assessment and evaluation of remedial alternatives, fate and transport modeling is being conducted to predict the future concentration of contaminants of potential concern in the 200-PO-1 OU. This study focuses on modeling the 'down gradient' transport of those contaminants that migrate beyond the 3-D model domain selected for performing detailed 'source area' modeling within the 200-PO-1 OU. The down gradient portion is defined as that region of the 200-PO-1 OU that is generally outside the 200 Area (considered 'source area') of the Hanford Site. A 1-D transport model is developed for performing down gradient contaminant fate and transport modeling. The 1-D transport model is deemed adequate based on the inferred transport pathway of tritium in the past and the observation that most of the contaminant mass remains at or near the water table within the unconfined aquifer of the Hanford Formation and the Cold-Creek/Pre-Missoula Gravel unit. The Pipe Pathway feature of the GoldSim software is used to perform the calculations. The Pipe Pathway uses a Laplace transform approach to provide analytical solutions to a broad range of advection-dominated mass transport systems involving one-dimensional advection, longitudinal dispersion, retardation, decay and ingrowth, and exchanges with immobile storage zones. Based on the historical concentration distribution data for the extensive tritium plume in this area, three Pipe Pathways are deemed adequate for modeling transport of contaminants. Each of these three Pipe Pathways is discretized into several zones, based on the saturated thickness variation in the unconfined aquifer and the location of monitoring wells used for risk assessment calculation. The mass fluxes of contaminants predicted to exit the source area model domain are used as an input to the down gradient model, while the flow velocities applied are based on the present-day hydraulic gradients and estimation of hydraulic conductivity in the unconfined aquifer. The results of the calculation indicate that the future concentrations of contaminants of potential concern in the down gradient portion of the 200-PO-1 OU declines with time and distance.

MEHTA S; ALY AH; MILLER CW; MAYENNA A

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

416

Thermal conversion of oil shale into recoverable hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrocarbons is accomplished by pyrolysis of oil shale with controlled removal of the resulting layer of spent oil-shale residue. A procedure is described for the in situ thermal conversion of oil shale wherein fluidized abrasive particles are employed to foster improved hydrocarbon production, in amount and kind, by a controlled partial removal of the layer of spent oil shale which results from application of flowing fluids to heat exposed surfaces of the oil shale to release hydrocarbons. (5 claims)

Slusser, M.L.; Bramhall, W.E.

1969-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

417

Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of 576 line-mi (927 line-km) was completed over a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA in September 1977. The survey has defined a pronounced magnetic low that could help delineate the geothermal system. The magnetic low has an areal extent of approximately 10 sq mi (26 sq km). Direct and indirect evidence indicates that this anomaly is due, in part, to magnetite destruction by hydrothermal solutions associated with the geothermal system. The anomaly generally coincides with two other geophysical anomalies which are directly associated with the system: 1) a bedrock electrical resistivity low and 2) an area of relatively high near-surface temperatures. The highest measured heat flow, 18 HFU, also occurs within its boundary. The magnetic low occurs at the intersection of two major structural zones which coincide with a complementary set of strike-slip fault zones determined from seismic activity. The intersection of these two zones of active tectonism probably served as the locus for emplacement of a pluton at depth, above which are observed the coincidental geophysical anomalies and surface manifestations related to the geothermal system.

Fox, R.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of 576 line-mi (927 line-km) was completed over a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA in September 1977. The survey has defined a pronounced magnetic low that could help delineate the geothermal system. The magnetic low has an areal extent of approximately 10 sq mi (26 sq km). Direct and indirect evidence indicates that this anomaly is due, in part, to magnetite destruction by hydrothermal solutions associated with the geothermal system. The anomaly generally coincides with two other geophysical anomalies which are directly associated with the system: (1) a bedrock electrical resistivity low; and (2) an area of relatively high near-surface temperatures. The highest measured heat flow, 18 HFU, also occurs within its boundary. The magnetic low occurs at the intersection of two major structural zones which coincide with a complementary set of strike-slip fault zones determined from seismic activity. The intersection of these two zones of active tectonism probably served as the locus for emplacement of a pluton at depth, above which are observed the coincidental geophysical anomalies and surface manifestations related to the geothermal system.

Fox, R.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Process for preparing a liquid fuel composition  

SciTech Connect

A process for preparing a liquid fuel composition which comprises liquefying coal, separating a mixture of phenols from said liquefied coal, converting said phenols to the corresponding mixture of anisoles, subjecting at least a portion of the remainder of said liquefied coal to hydrotreatment, subjecting at least a portion of said hydrotreated liquefied coal to reforming to obtain reformate and then combining at least a portion of said anisoles and at least a portion of said reformate to obtain said liquid fuel composition.

Singerman, Gary M. (Monroeville, PA)

1982-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Analysis of the behavior of ternary hydrocarbon mixture as substitutes of the CFC-12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbons are stratospheric ozone friendly and have good heat transfer properties. The use of hydrocarbons (HCs) or their blend as refrigerant is extending in these days. This paper deals with the search of the best ternary hydrocarbons mixture of ... Keywords: CFC-12, LB-12, cub, hydrocarbon, ozone, refrigerant, ternary mixture

Rafael Quintero Ricardo

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

422

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the storage of natural gas and prior to the exercise of eminent domain by any person, firm, or corporation having such right under laws of the state of Louisiana, the commissioner, shall have found all of the following:

424

Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting lignin into high-quality reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline compositions in high yields is disclosed. The process is a two-stage, catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage, a lignin material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction in the presence of a supercritical alcohol as a reaction medium, to thereby produce a depolymerized lignin product. In the second stage, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to a sequential two-step hydroprocessing reaction to produce a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product. In the first hydroprocessing step, the depolymerized lignin is contacted with a hydrodeoxygenation catalyst to produce a hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product. In the second hydroprocessing step, the hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product is contacted with a hydrocracking/ring hydrogenation catalyst to produce the reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product which includes various desirable naphthenic and paraffinic compounds.

Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chornet, Esteban (Golden, CO)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells using hydrocarbon fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency conversion devices that use hydrogen or light hydrocarbon (HC) fuels in stationary applications to produce quiet and clean power. While successful, HC-fueled SOFCs face ...

Lee, Won Yong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Trend Analysis for Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Partitioning Using Continuous Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partitioning of atmospheric hydrocarbons into vapor and condensed phases when the species count is large is considered using the formalism of continuous thermodynamics. The vapor saturation pressures and condensate species distribution are ...

K. Harstad

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Biodegradation and phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using mushroom compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Soils contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are commonly found in petroleum, gas-work and wood-impregnation sites. Interest in the biodegradation and environmental fate of PAHs (more)

Kodjo-Wayo, Lina Korkor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Assessment of plant-derived hydrocarbons. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of hydrocarbon producing plants are evaluated as possible sources of rubber, liquid fuels, and industrial lubricants. The plants considered are Euphorbia lathyris or gopher plant, milkweeds, guayule, rabbit brush, jojoba, and meadow foam. (ACR)

McFadden, K.; Nelson, S.H.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling--Benedict--Webb--Rubin equation of state was used. A brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine are included.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling-Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state was used. This report contains a brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Conversion of Pentose-Derived Furans into Hydrocarbon Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are interested in the conversion of biomass-derived hemicellulose into hydrocarbon molecules that can be used in the formulation of 'drop-in' fuels such as gasoline (C5-12), diesel (C10-20) and jet fuel (C9-16). Our focus lies on the use of furfuryl alcohol as a starting material since that is already produced commercially from hemicellulose-derived pentoses. The steps required to convert the latter into hydrocarbons are 1) oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol to form dimers (C10) and trimers (C15), and 2) hydrotreatment of the dimers and trimers to produce a mixture of linear hydrocarbons with carbon chain lengths in the range of diesel and jet fuels. However, furfuryl alcohol readily polymerizes to form resins in the presence of an acid catalyst, and the exothermic oligomerization must be carried out under reaction control. This presentation will discuss our progress in the development of this sugar-to-hydrocarbon pathway.

Moens, L.; Johnson, D. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hydrocarbon evaluation proposed southeastern New Mexico radioactive material storage site Eddy County, New Mexico. Volume I. Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The proposed radioactive waste material storage site is located in the northern portion of the Delaware Basin. No hydrocarbon production exists within the current boundaries of the ''site area'', but oil and gas are being produced from 60 wells in a 368 square-mile area around the site. These wells produce from the Delaware, Bone Springs, Wolfcamp, Strawn, Atoka and Morrow zones at a total rate of about 22,682 MCF of gas and 429 barrels of oil per day. This area is considered to be potentially rich in hydrocarbon reserves and the lack of fuller development and exploration drilling is due primarily to low gas prices, lack of sales outlets and/or pipelines and moratoriums on drilling in the potash areas. Proved producing and proved nonproducing reserves are present in two wells in the Los Medanos Field area immediately adjacent to the southwest corner of the ''site area''. In addition, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves exist at six potential drilling locations in the Los Medanos Field. Further, probable and possible reserves were assigned to fifteen other potential drilling locations in the northwest and south-central portions of the ''site area''. Total future economically recoverable reserves projected for these wells are 62,253,244 MCF of gas and 409,628 barrels of oil. The future net undiscounted revenue to the oil operators was determined to be $48,410,821. The discounted future net revenue is $21,216,899, discounted at 10 percent per annum. The fair market value for these projected reserves is $12,730,139, assuming a fair market factor of 0.60.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Cooling and solidification of heavy hydrocarbon liquid streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for cooling and solidifying a stream of heavy hydrocarbon material normally boiling above about 850.degree. F., such as vacuum bottoms material from a coal liquefaction process. The hydrocarbon stream is dropped into a liquid bath, preferably water, which contains a screw conveyor device and the stream is rapidly cooled, solidified and broken therein to form discrete elongated particles. The solid extrudates or prills are then dried separately to remove substantially all surface moisture, and passed to further usage.

Antieri, Salvatore J. (Trenton, NJ); Comolli, Alfred G. (Yardley, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbon fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is the primary candidate as the power source for light-duty transportation systems. On-board conversion of fuels (reforming) to supply the required hydrogen has the potential to provide the driving range that is typical of today's automobiles. Petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline or some distillate similar to it, are attractive because of their existing production, distribution, and retailing infrastructure. The fuel may be either petroleum-derived or other alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas, etc. [1]. The ability to use a variety of fuels is also attractive for stationary distributed power generation [2], such as in buildings, or for portable power in remote locations. Argonne National Laboratory has developed a catalytic reactor based on partial oxidation reforming that is suitable for use in light-duty vehicles powered by fuel cells. The reactor has shown the ability to convert a wide variety of fuels to a hydrogen-rich gas at less than 800 C, temperatures that are several hundreds of degrees lower than alternative noncatalytic processes. The fuel may be methanol, ethanol, natural gas, or petroleum-derived fuels that are blends of various hydrocarbons such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, etc., as in gasoline. This paper will discuss the results obtained from a bench-scale (3-kWe) reactor., where the reforming of gasoline and natural gas generated a product gas that contained 38% and 42% hydrogen on a dry basis at the reformer exit, respectively.

Ahmed, S.

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hydrocarbon pool and vapor fire data analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The flame geometry and thermal radiation data from a series of large scale experiments involving liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and gasoline spills on water were analyzed. The experiments were conducted at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. Two types of fires have been studied; namely, pool fires and vapor fires. The spill quantity varied from 4 m/sup 3/ to approximately 6 m/sup 3/. The LPG pool fire flame height to diameter ratio were between 3.5 and 4.5. The gasoline flame height was about 2. The flame emissive powers for LPG pool fires ranged from 78 kW/m/sup 2/ to 115 kW/m/sup 2/. The average surface emissive power for gasoline pool fire was 40 kW/m/sup 2/. The LPG vapor fire emissive power ranged from 159 to 269 kW/m/sup 2/. 63 figures, 13 tables.

Mudan, K.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X? = Cl?, Br?) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3?n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ?0.05 M X?. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 0.5) 106 M?1 s?1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 0.5) 107 M?1 s?1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

440

Review of current research on hydrocarbon production by plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This review assesses the status of research and development in the area of plants that produce hydrocarbons as a possible replacement for traditional fossil fuels. The information is meant to be used as a basis for determining the scope of a possible R and D program by DOE/FFB. Except in the case of guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray), research on hydrocarbon species generally has not advanced beyond preliminary screening, extraction, and growth studies. Virtually no field studies have been initiated; hydrocarbon component extraction, separation, identification, and characterization have been only timidly approached; the biochemistry of hydrocarbon formation remains virtually untouched; and potential market analysis has been based on insufficient data. Research interest is increasing in this area, however. Industrial interest understandably centers about guayule prospects and is supplemented by NSF and DOE research funds. Additional support for other research topics has been supplied by DOE and USDA and by certain university systems. Due to the infant state of technology in this area of energy research, it is not possible to predict or satisfactorily assess at this time the potential contribution that plant hydrocarbons might make toward decreasing the nation's dependence upon petroleum. However, the general impression received from experts interviewed during this review was that the major thrust of research should be directed toward the manufacture of petrochemical substitutes rather than fuel production.

Benedict, H. M.; Inman, B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

442

Process for coal liquefaction using electrodeposited catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the liquefaction of solid hydrocarbonaceous materials is disclosed. Particles of such materials are electroplated with a metal catalyst and are then suspended in a hydrocarbon oil and subjected to hydrogenolysis to liquefy the solid hydrocarbonaceous material. A liquid product oil is separated from residue solid material containing char and the catalyst metal. The catalyst is recovered from the solid material by electrolysis for reuse. A portion of the product oil can be employed as the hydrocarbon oil for suspending additional particles of catalyst coated solid carbonaceous material for hydrogenolysis.

Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and are generated by many sources. Though the potential of PAH-rich mixtures to cause health effects has been known for almost a century, there are still unanswered questions about the levels of PAHs in the environment, the potential for human exposure to PAHs, the health effects associated with exposure, and how genetic susceptibility influences the extent of health effects in individuals. The first objective of this research was to quantify concentrations of PAHs in samples of settled house dust collected from homes in Azerbaijan, China, and Texas. The trends of PAH surface loadings and percentage of carcinogenic PAHs were China > Azerbaijan > Texas, indicating that the risk of health effects from exposure to PAHs in house dust is highest in the Chinese population and lowest in the Texas population. PAHs in China and Azerbaijan were derived mainly from combustion sources; Texas PAHs were derived from unburned fossil fuels such as petroleum. The second objective of this research was to investigate the effect of pregnane X receptor (PXR) on the genotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). BaP treatment resulted in significantly lower DNA adduct levels in PXR-transfected HepG2 cells than in parental HepG2 cells. Total GST enzymatic activity and mRNA levels of several metabolizing enyzmes were significantly higher in cells overexpressing PXR. These results suggest that PXR protects cells against DNA damage by PAHs such as BaP, possibly through a coordinated regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The third objective of this research was to investigate biomarkers of exposure in house mice (Mus musculus) exposed to PAH mixtures in situ. Mice and soil were collected near homes in Sumgayit and Khizi, Azerbaijan. Mean liver adduct levels were significantly higher in Khizi than in Sumgayit. Mean lung and kidney adduct levels were similar in the two regions. The DNA lesions detected may be a combination of environmentally-induced DNA adducts and naturally-occurring I-compounds. PAHs were present at background levels in soils from both Khizi and Sumgayit. It appears that health risks posed to rodents by soil-borne PAHs are low in these two areas.

Naspinski, Christine S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method and apparatus for producing oxygenates from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical reactor for oxygenating hydrocarbons includes: a) a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell, the plasma cell comprising a pair of electrodes having a dielectric material and void therebetween, the plasma cell comprising a hydrocarbon gas inlet feeding to the void; b) a solid oxide electrochemical cell, the electrochemical cell comprising a solid oxide electrolyte positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, an oxygen containing gas inlet stream feeding to the porous cathode side of the electrochemical cell; c) a first gas passageway feeding from the void to the anode side of the electrochemical cell; and d) a gas outlet feeding from the anode side of the electrochemical cell to expel reaction products from the chemical reactor. A method of oxygenating hydrocarbons is also disclosed.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis for the Production of the Hydrocarbon Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising technique for conversion of biomass into hydrocarbons for use as transportation fuels. For over 30 years this process has been studied and it has been demonstrated that oils can be produced with high concentrations of hydrocarbons and low levels of oxygen. However, the yields from this type of conversion are typically low and the catalysts, which are often zeolites, are quickly deactivated through coking. In addition, the hydrocarbons produced are primarily aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, xylene) that not desirable for petroleum refineries and are not well suited for diesel or jet engines. The goals of our research are to develop new multifunction catalysts for the production of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel range molecules and to improve process conditions for higher yields and low coking rates. We are investigating filtration and the use of hydrogen donor molecules to improve catalyst performance.

Nimlos, M. R.; Robichaud, D. J.; Mukaratate, C.; Donohoe, B. S.; Iisa, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P{sub 450} reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates. 1 fig. 2 tab.

Shelnutt, J.A.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Reclamation and reuse of Freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have successfully demonstrated the use of a solvent recycling system to reclaim spent Freon solvent in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) analyses of radioactive samples. A wide variety of sample types including ground water, organics, laboratory waste, process control, sludge, soils, and others are received by our lab for total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. This paper demonstrates the successful use of a commercially available carbon bed recycle system which we modified to enable the recovery of 95-98 percent of the radioactive contaminated Freon. This system has been used successfully in our lab for the past three years.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Young, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Method and apparatus for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus, including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO{sub 2} aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor having a transparent window, by hydrogen and CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 6} gas mixtures, and exposed to radiation from a light source external to the reactor, to produce the short chain hydrocarbons. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Colmenares, C.

1989-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

Blandford, J.W.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

452

Method for recovering light hydrocarbons from coal agglomerates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing light hydrocarbons, such as heptane, from coal agglomerates includes an enclosed chamber having a substantially horizontal perforate surface therein. The coal agglomerates are introduced into a water bath within the chamber. The agglomerates are advanced over the surface while steam is substantially continuously introduced through the surface into the water bath. Steam heats the water and causes volatilization of the light hydrocarbons, which may be collected from the overhead of the chamber. The resulting agglomerates may be collected at the opposite end from the surface and subjected to final draining processes prior to transportation or use.

Huettenhain, Horst (Benicia, CA); Benz, August D. (Hillsborough, CA); Getsoian, John (Ann Arbor, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Preliminary investigation of the nature of hydrocarbon migration and entrapment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations indicate that hydrocarbon migration and entrapment in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs are mainly affected by the following factors: charge time, faults, pressure and geological structures. The charge time for commercial hydrocarbon accumulation is much longer in oil-water systems than in oil-gas-water systems. Faults are classified into charging faults and 'back doors' faults other than charging faults in stacked fault-bounded reservoirs. The lower the displacement pressure of a fault, the higher its updip oil transportation ability. The downdip oil transportation ability of a fault is usually low and cannot cause commercial downdip oil accumulation. Back doors affect both hydrocarbon percent charge and hydrocarbon migration pathways. Updip back doors improve updip oil charge. The lower the displacement pressure of an updip back door, the more efficient the updip oil charge before 3,000 years. Back doors whose displacement pressure is equal to or higher than 28.76 psi are effective in sealing faults in oil-water systems. On the contrary, only sealing faults result in commercial gas accumulations in stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs. Otherwise gas is found over oil. Downdip back doors generally have few effects on downdip hydrocarbon charge. Geopressure enhances the updip oil transportation of a fault and improves the positive effects of updip back doors during updip oil charge. Geopressure and updip back doors result in more efficient updip oil charge. A physical barrier is not necessarily a barrier to oil migration with the aid of geopressure and updip back doors. The chance for hydrocarbon charge into reservoirs along growth faults is not equal. Any one of the above controlling factors can change the patterns of hydrocarbon charge and distribution in such complex geological structures. Generally, lower reservoirs and updip reservoirs are favored. Reservoirs along low-permeability charging faults may be bypassed. Gas can only charge the updip reservoirs. Both updip and downdip back doors can facilitate oil penetrating a barrier fault to charge reservoirs offset by the barrier fault. Interreservoir migration among stacked fault-compartmentalized reservoirs is an important mechanism for hydrocarbon accumulation and trap identification. The interreservoir migration is a very slow process, even though the displacement pressures of bounding faults may be very low.

Bai, Jianyong

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C.sub.7 -C.sub.17 paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+.

Kuester, James L. (Scottsdale, AZ)

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

455

Process of producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous thermochemical indirect liquefaction process is described to convert various biomass materials into diesel-type transportation fuels which fuels are compatible with current engine designs and distribution systems comprising feeding said biomass into a circulating solid fluidized bed gasification system to produce a synthesis gas containing olefins, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and thereafter introducing the synthesis gas into a catalytic liquefaction system to convert the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuel consisting essentially of C[sub 7]-C[sub 17] paraffinic hydrocarbons having cetane indices of 50+. 1 fig.

Kuester, J.L.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external floatation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the seabed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the seabed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration.

Blandford, Joseph W. (15 Mott La., Houston, TX 77024)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Low-Temperature Catalytic Process To Produce Hydrocarbons From Sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of producing hydrogen from oxygenated hydrocarbon reactants, such as methanol, glycerol, sugars (e.g. glucose and xylose), or sugar alcohols (e.g. sorbitol). The method takes place in the condensed liquid phase. The method includes the steps of reacting water and a water-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon in the presence of a metal-containing catalyst. The catalyst contains a metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIIIB transitional metals, alloys thereof, and mixtures thereof. The disclosed method can be run at lower temperatures than those used in the conventional steam reforming of alkanes.

Cortright, Randy D. (Madison, WI); Dumesic, James A. (Verona, WI)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Development and Technology 008 "Variability of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine hydrocarbon seeps" Jordan

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Hydrocarbon compositions of high elongational viscosity and process for making the same  

SciTech Connect

A hydrocarbon composition is described consisting essentially of a hydrocarbon liquid and an ionic-association or coordination-complex polymer in an amount sufficient to increase and maintain the elongational viscosity of the composition at a level greater than that of the hydrocarbon alone. The polymer is capable of dissociation upon application of the high shear regime to which the hydrocarbon is subjected, and reassociation upon withdrawal of the high shear.

Hamil, H.F.; Weatherford, W.D. Jr.; Fodor, G.E.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

U.S. Product Supplied of Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Product Supplied for Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons ; U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

U.S. Exports of Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates (Thousand Barrels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Supply and Disposition; U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

462

Recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen in a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

463

THERMOCATALYTIC CO2-FREE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM HYDROCARBON FUELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, preferential oxidation) and gas separation stages required by conventional technologies (e.g., steam reforming and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive-situ generation of catalytically active carbon species produced by co-decomposition of methane and unsaturated and

464

Conversion of methane and acetylene into gasoline range hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of methane and acetylene to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons over zeolite catalyst (HZSM-5) was studied The reaction between methane and acetylene successfully produced high molecular weight hydrocarbons, such as naphthalene, benzene, indene, azulene, fluorene, and biphenyl substituted compounds. Also, lighter hydrocarbons, such as ethylene and isobutene were produced. The reaction was conducted at different operating temperatures and different molar feed composition. The results showed that the conversion of both reactants increased with increasing the operating temperature; for example a conversion of 95.1% was achieved for acetylene at 350C and 98.6% at 412C. In addition, the conversion of both reactants decreased with increasing the molar feed ratio of methane to acetylene. A conversion of 96.4% for acetylene was achieved at a molar feed ratio of 6 to 1 (methane to acetylene) and 80.9% at a molar feed ration of 20 to 1 (methane to acetylene). The reaction of methane and ethane over HZSM-5 catalyst also led to the production of high molecular weight hydrocarbons, mainly aromatics, and some lighter products such as propane, and ethylene. Also methane by itself showed the ability to react over HZSM-5 to produce a small amount of aromatics, and ethylene.

Alkhawaldeh, Ammar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a proposed LNG terminal would dictate the number and types of linear facilities, such as roads, electric is a table summarizing the current proposals for LNG terminals on the West Coast. #12;11 Project (Updated selection. Currently, the company or consortium proposing to build a new LNG receiving terminal selects

466

Reclamation and reuse of freon in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses  

SciTech Connect

ADS is using a commercially available solvent reclamation system to recycle 95-97 percent of the Freon used in total petroleum hydrocarbon analyses. ADS has further developed the commercially available solvent reclamation system to accommodate radioactive contaminated Freon. This report establishes the following: validity of the method; success of recycling; and effect of radionuclides in recycling radioactive contaminated Freon. The standard analysis method for determining total petroleum hydrocarbons (commonly known as oil and grease determination) involves solvent extraction of the hydrocarbons using Freon followed by quantitation using infrared detection. This has been the method of choice because it is simple, rugged, inexpensive, and applicable to both solid and liquid samples and to radioactive samples. Due to its deleterious effect on the ozone layer, the use of Freon and other chloro-fluorocarbons (CFCs) has been greatly restricted. Freon has become very expensive (800$/liter) and will soon be unavailable entirely. Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon extraction method. These methods include solid-phase extraction, solvent extraction, and supercritical fluid extraction all of which use gravimetric determination or infrared analysis of the extracted hydrocarbons. These methods are not as precise or as sensitive as the Freon extraction method, and a larger amount of sample is therefore required due to the decreased sensitivity. The solid phase extraction method cannot accommodate solid samples. Supercritical fluid extraction requires expensive instrumentation. ADS opted to keep the existing Freon method and recycle the solvent. An inexpensive solvent reclamation system was procured to reclaim the spent Freon. This reclaimer removes hydrocarbons from the Freon solvent by passage through an activated carbon bed.

Ekechukwu, A.A.; Peterson, S.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the biological conversion of biomass derived sugars to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent literature references and information consistent with recent pilot scale demonstrations at NREL. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the pathway to become competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

Davis, Ryan; Biddy, Mary J.; Tan, Eric; Tao, Ling; Jones, Susanne B.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Plasma-induced conversion of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results are reported for an electrical device for direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A microchannel plate is excited with electrons from a photoemissive source, and electron impact ionization of methane on the inner surfaces of the microchannels creates an ion feedback process. The resulting low-density plasma creates higher hydrocarbons when charged particles impact the surfaces at grazing incidence. The production Of C{sub 2} to C{sub 8}-containing gases was noted, with a selectivity for C{sub 2} of 39% in one case. The proportions of converted products and the conversion rates depend upon the electrical voltage, the microchannel geometry, and the operating pressure. Conversion rates increase with operating pressure.

Sackinger, W.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Plasma-induced conversion of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results are reported for an electrical device for direct conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A microchannel plate is excited with electrons from a photoemissive source, and electron impact ionization of methane on the inner surfaces of the microchannels creates an ion feedback process. The resulting low-density plasma creates higher hydrocarbons when charged particles impact the surfaces at grazing incidence. The production Of C{sub 2} to C{sub 8}-containing gases was noted, with a selectivity for C{sub 2} of 39% in one case. The proportions of converted products and the conversion rates depend upon the electrical voltage, the microchannel geometry, and the operating pressure. Conversion rates increase with operating pressure.

Sackinger, W.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes  

SciTech Connect

Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700 to 900{degrees}C are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025--0.4 mole and about 0.1--0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800 to 850{degrees}C with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C{sub 2} hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

Siriwardane, R.V.

1991-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Environmental Distribution of Petroleum Hydrocarbons at a Utility Service Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field study at a utility service center located in western New York where a petroleum product had leaked into the subsurface over a number of years. The study was a tailored collaboration effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, aimed at delineating the nature and extent of migration of the dissolved hydrocarbons. The information is of interest to many utilities as they develop and implement management prac...

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

Production of valuable hydrocarbons by flash pyrolysis of oil shale  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of gas and liquid hydrocarbons from particulated oil shale by reaction with a pyrolysis gas at a temperature of from about 700/sup 0/C to about 1100/sup 0/C, at a pressure of from about 400 psi to about 600 psi, for a period of about 0.2 second to about 20 seconds. Such a pyrolysis gas includes methane, helium, or hydrogen. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Determining Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Background in Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sediment remediation challenges at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites include defining sediment remedial zones, establishing risk-based remedial goals for specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and determining background conditions in what are often highly industrialized waterways. This technical update describes the various tools and approaches developed over approximately the past decade to determine site-specific background PAH concentrations in sediments attributable to ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

478

Conversion of ethane and of propane to higher olefin hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has become apparent during the past few months that results obtained in the oxidative coupling of methane cannot be extended to ethane and propane. Good selectivities and yields for the oxydehydrogenation to olefins can be obtained but production of higher hydrocarbons is small. The present report summarizes results of experiments using zeolite based catalysts and compares these with basic oxide catalysts. The oxydehydrogenation of ethane over zeolite based catalysts (H[sup [minus plus

Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H.sub.2 O and Co.sub.2 under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Aerobic microorganism for the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism, having American Type Culture Collection accession numbers ATCC 53570 and 53571, in a biologically pure culture aseptically collected from a deep subsurface habitat and enhanced, mineralizes trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene to HCl, H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} under aerobic conditions stimulated by methane, acetate, methanol, tryptone-yeast extract, propane and propane-methane.

Fliermans, C.B.

1988-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "liquefiable hydrocarbon portion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Public comments and Task Force responses regarding the environmental survey of the reprocessing and waste management portions of the LWR fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

This document contains responses by the NRC Task Force to comments received on the report ''Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116). These responses are directed at all comments, inclding those received after the close of the comment period. Additional information on the environmental impacts of reprocessing and waste management which has either become available since the publication of NUREG-0116 or which adds requested clarification to the information in that document.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock in the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).

Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N. (Pertamina Exploration and Production, Jakarta (Indonesia))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall. 5 figs.

Singh, P.; Shockling, L.A.; George, R.A.; Basel, R.A.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

484

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Plub Borough, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Thermocatalytic CO2-Free Production of Hydrogen from Hydrocarbon Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this project is the development of an economically viable thermocatalytic process for production of hydrogen and carbon from natural gas or other hydrocarbon fuels with minimal environmental impact. The three major technical goals of this project are: (1) to accomplish efficient production of hydrogen and carbon via sustainable catalytic decomposition of methane or other hydrocarbons using inexpensive and durable carbon catalysts, (2) to obviate the concurrent production of CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts and drastically reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the process, and (3) to produce valuable carbon products in order to reduce the cost of hydrogen production The important feature of the process is that the reaction is catalyzed by carbon particulates produced in the process, so no external catalyst is required (except for the start-up operation). This results in the following advantages: (1) no CO/CO{sub 2} byproducts are generated during hydrocarbon decomposition stage, (2) no expensive catalysts are used in the process, (3) several valuable forms of carbon can be produced in the process depending on the process conditions (e.g., turbostratic carbon, pyrolytic graphite, spherical carbon particles, carbon filaments etc.), and (4) CO{sub 2} emissions could be drastically reduced (compared to conventional processes).

University of Central Florida

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

Conversion of Biomass-Derived Furans into Hydrocarbon Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most studied chemical transformations of carbohydrates is their thermocatalytic dehydration to form furans. Cellulose-derived glucose is thereby converted into 5-hydroxymethylfurfuraldehyde (5-HMF), while the hemicellulose-derived pentoses (e.g., xylose, arabinose) form furfuraldehyde. Our objective is to identify new pathways to convert furfuryl alcohol into a mixture of aliphatic hydrocarbons that can be used as drop-in fuels for diesel (C10-20) and jet fuel (C9-16) blends. Furfuryl alcohol is produced commercially through hydrogenation of furfuraldehyde that is derived from hemicellulose-derived pentoses via acid-catalyzed dehydration. The steps that we are currently pursuing to convert furfuryl alcohol into hydrocarbons are 1) oligomerization of furfuryl alcohol to form dimers (C10) and trimers (C15), and 2) hydrotreatment of the dimers and trimers to produce a mixture of linear hydrocarbons with carbon chain lengths in the range of diesel and jet fuels. This presentation will discuss our progress in the development of this pathway.

Moens, L.; Johnson, D. K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, December 1, 1992--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The shallow Cretaceous sands of the Schrader Bluff Reservoir occur between depths of 4,000 and 4,800 feet below surface and are estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. Initial production indicated that primary recovery will fall short of earlier estimates and waterflooding will have to be employed much earlier than expected. A large portion of the oil-in-place thus would still be left behind in this reservoir after primary and secondary recovery methods have been applied. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be needed to recover the additional portion of remaining oil in this huge reservoir and to add significant additional reserves. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader Bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Such studies are essential because the API gravity of the crude in Schrader Bluff reservoir varies significantly from well to well. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the oil recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. This report contains the following: reservoir description; slim tube displacement studies; and coreflood experiments.

Sharma, G.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The geologic basis for appraising undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska by the play-appraisal method. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 provided for a Government study to determine the best general procedure for the development, production, transportation, and distribution of the hydrocarbon resources in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA). An essential and distinguishing feature of this study was the development of a resource-appraisal method that would furnish the estimates of undiscovered oil and gas resources in a form compatible with the sophisticated computer model demanded by the economic and policy-analysis portion of the study. This appraisal represents the first use of the newly developed play method and is the latest in a series of hydrocarbon-resource appraisals of the NPRA. As the most recent of the series, it is based on a larger number of data. In the NPRA, the play method was first used by the USGS in November 1979. At intervals averaging 6 months, as new information was gained from the ongoing drilling program, the original assessment was reviewed and updated. The chapter was prepared to document the petroleum geology for each assessed play and thus serve as a basis for further assessments. In addition, it provides information about the assessment personnel, the data base, and analogous formations; for each play, it includes a petroleum geology summary, an outline map, a completed assessment form, and resource estimates. A glossary of terms used in the assessment may be found at the end of this chapter.

Bird, K.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final project period was to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration and transfer this knowledge as clearly and effectively as possible.

Michael Batzle

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

Interaction of the 4S polycyclic hydrocarbon-binding protein with the cytochrome P450c gene  

SciTech Connect

The 4S polycyclic hydrocarbon binding protein has been purified from rat liver and its properties examined. The protein was incubated with subclones from the P450c gene; it specifically interacted with a plasmid that contained the 5'-half of intron 1, exon 1 and 5'-flanking sequences. Exonuclease foot-printing after binding of the 4S protein to portions of the P450c gene showed protection at -200 and -400 bp from exon 1. The region -882 to +2545bp was constructed before a reporter, chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene in a plasmid that contained the SV40 ori, polyA signals, ampicillin resist gene. The P450c region contained promoter and putative regulatory sequences. The construct was transfected into rat hepatocytes, RL-PR-C and into rat hepatoma cells, H-4-11-E. After addition of 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), CAT expression was induced. When the plasmid was constructed with the P450c fragment inverted, no CAT expression was seen. Deletion of -95 to -665 or from -238 to -660 bp eliminated the expression of CAT in response to 3MC. These experiments indicated the importance of this region in the induction of P450c by 3MC.

Houser, W.H.; Cunningham, C.K.; Hines, R.N.; Bresnick, E.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Method for direct production of carbon disulfide and hydrogen from hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide feedstock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for converting hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to carbon disulfide and hydrogen is provided comprising contacting the hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide to a bi-functional catalyst residing in a controlled atmosphere for a time and at a temperature sufficient to produce carbon disulfide and hydrogen. Also provided is a catalyst for converting carbon sulfides and hydrogen sulfides to gasoline range hydrocarbons comprising a mixture containing a zeolite catalyst and a hydrogenating catalyst.

Miao, Frank Q.; Erekson, Erek James

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform  

SciTech Connect

This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU-based rendering solutions when it is appropriate. For example, on remote supercomputers CPU-based rendering can offer a means of viewing data without having to offload the data or geometry onto a CPU-based visualization system. In terms of comparative performance of the CPU and CPU we believe that further optimizations of the performance of both CPU or CPU-based rendering are possible. The simulation community is currently confronting this reality as they work to port their simulations to different hardware architectures. What is interesting about CPU rendering of massive datasets is that for part two decades CPU performance has significantly outperformed CPU-based systems. Based on our advancements, evaluations and explorations we believe that CPU-based rendering has returned as one viable option for the visualization of massive datasets.

Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patchett, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lo, Li - Ta [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mr Marle, David [KITWARE INC.; Brownlee, Carson [UNIV OF UTAH

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

493

Effect of temperature on wave velocities in sands and sandstones with heavy hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of temperature on wave velocities in well cemented Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with heavy hydrocarbons, as well as the dependence of compressional velocities in the hydrocarbons themselves as a function of temperature. The hydrocarbons selected as pore saturants were a commercial paraffin wax, 1-Eicosene, natural heavy crude, and natural tar. The experimental results show that the compressional wave velocities in the hydrocarbons decrease markedly with increasing temperature. In contrast wave velocities in the Massillon and Boise sandstones and unconsolidated Ottawa sand saturated with air or water decrease only little with increasing temperatures. The main reason for the large decreases in rocks with hydrocarbons is the melting of solid hydrocarbons, and high pore pressure. Thermal expansion of the saturants, and possibly thermal cracking of the heavy fractions and vaporization of the light fractions of the hydrocarbons may also contribute. The large decreases of the compressional and shear wave velocities in the hydrocarbon-saturated rocks and sands with temperature, suggest that seismic measurements such as used in seismology or borehole tomography may be very useful in detecting steam fronts in heavy hydrocarbon reservoirs undergoing steam flooding.

Wang, Z.; Nur, A.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Catalytic conversion of C3+ alcohols to hydrocarbon blend-stock  

Catalytic conversion of C3+ alcohols to hydrocarbon blend-stock Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

495

Rare earth elements (REE) as geochemical clues to reconstruct hydrocarbon generation history.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The REE distribution patterns and total concentrations of the organic matter of the Woodford shale reveal a potential avenue to investigate hydrocarbon maturation processes in (more)

Ramirez-Caro, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Hydrocarbon solubility and its migration processes: a look at the present status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study we review the present status of knowledge of solubility of hydrocarbons and its implications on primary migration processes. The intent is to examine the solubility and the transportation mechanisms relevant to geopressured-geothermal reservoirs, although the discussion included here accommodates a wide range of related aspects. Influences of parameters associated with hydrocarbon (especially methane) solubility have been studied. We have sought to evaluate several primary hydrocarbon migration processes and to point out their attractive features as well as their limitations. A brief discussion of hydrocarbon generation processes is also included.

Mamun, C.K.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Two decades of hydrocarbon exploration activity in Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, hydrocarbon exploration activity within Indonesia has been based on the Indonesian Energy Policy, aims of which include intensifying and expanding hydrocarbon exploration programs. Expansion into the offshore regions of the nation has resulted in the discovery of petroliferous basins. The first offshore oil production came on stream in 1971. Since then, significant achievements have been made in developing these resources. Intensified onshore exploration has resulted in additional oil fields being discovered in these more mature areas. Among the significant gas fields discovered during the past 20 years, Arun and Badak both supply major LNG projects. Oil fields have been found in the onshore areas of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Java, and Irian Jaya, and in the offshore areas around West Java, Madura, Natuna, and East Kalimantan. The exploration drilling success during this time has been approximately 32%. In addition, the ratio of oil field development to these discoveries is about 54%. For technical and economic reasons, not all discoveries can be developed into oil fields. Recently, Pertamina's Research and Development Division organized the study of data contributed by Pertamina exploration, foreign contractors, and science institutes. This study reveals that 60 basins are spread throughout the onshore and offshore areas of the nation. Using PAUS (plan and analysis of uncertainty situation), a Monte Carolo simulation program, the hydrocarbon potential of each basin has been estimated. These estimates will be continually revised as more data are made available to the study, as the geology of Indonesia is better understood in terms of plate tectonic theory, and as computing techniques improve.

Suardy, A.; Taruno, J.; Simbolon, P.H.; Simbolon, B.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Novel metalloporphyrin catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work was done for developing biomimetic oxidation catalysts. Two classes of metalloporphyrin catalysts were studied. The first class of catalysts studied were a novel series of highly substituted metalloporphyrins, the fluorinated iron dodecaphenylporphyrins. These homogeneous metalloporphyrin catalysts were screened for activity as catalysts in the oxidation of hydrocarbons by dioxygen. Results are discussed with respect to catalyst structural features. The second type of catalysts studied were heterogeneous catalysts consisting of metalloporphyrins applied to inorganic supports. Preliminary catalytic testing results with these materials are presented.

Showalter, M.C.; Nenoff, T.M.; Shelnutt, J.A.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z