National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for liquefaction project cameron

  1. EA-1845: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project, Cameron County, LA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE participated as a cooperating agency with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in preparing an EA for the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with applications submitted by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., to FERC and to DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy (FE) seeking authorization to site, construct, and operate liquefaction and export facilities at the existing Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. DOE adopted FERC’s EA and issued a finding of no significant impact on August 7, 2012.

  2. EIS-0488: Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared an EIS for a proposal to expand the existing Cameron Pipeline by 21 miles (from Calcasieu to Beauregard Parishes, Louisiana, with modifications in Cameron Parish), and expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export LNG. DOE, a cooperating agency, adopted the EIS. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest. Additional information is available at http://energy.gov/fe/services/natural-gas-regulation.

  3. EA-1983: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Expansion Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EA for a proposal to expand the existing Sabine Pass Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal in Cameron Parish, and to extend an associated existing pipeline system in Cameron, Calcasieu, Beauregard, Allen, and Evangeline Parishes in Louisiana. DOE is a cooperating agency in preparing the EA. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  4. EA-2036: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project (design optimization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project (design optimization); Cameron Parish, Louisiana EA-2036: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project (design optimization); Cameron Parish, Louisiana ...

  5. EIS-0517: Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Counties, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana EIS-0517: Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline Project; Jefferson and Orange Counties, Texas, and Cameron ...

  6. EA-2036: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project (design optimization); Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2014, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with an application to amend FERC’s April 2012 authorization of the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project in order to optimize its design and operation. In April 2015, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine Pass LNG, L.P., applied to DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy (FE) seeking authorization to increase the amount of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to be exported from the facility above the level that FE authorized in August 2012. DOE adopted FERC’s EA for the optimization and issued a finding of no significant impact on March 11, 2016.

  7. EIS-0520: Texas LNG Project; Cameron County, Texas | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    proposal to construct and operate a natural gas liquefaction and export terminal at the Port of Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, Texas. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has...

  8. EIS-0510: Calcasieu Pass Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    environmental impacts of the Calcasieu Pass Project, a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. DOE is a cooperating agency in preparing...

  9. EIS-0520: Texas LNG Project; Cameron County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a natural gas liquefaction and export terminal at the Port of Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, Texas. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the export of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas, unless it finds that the export is not consistent with the public interest.

  10. Order 3638: Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE PROPOSED CORPUS CHRISTI LIQUEFACTION PROJECT IN CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a...

  11. EIS-0510: Calcasieu Pass Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the Calcasieu Pass Project, a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. DOE is a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  12. EA-1983: Sabine Pass Liquefaction Expansion Project, Cameron...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    programsgasregulationauthorizations2013applicationssabinepassdocket13-30-lng.html http:www.fossil.energy.govprogramsgasregulationauthorizations2013applications...

  13. Order 3638: Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    38: Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project Order 3638: Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project ORDER GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE PROPOSED CORPUS CHRISTI LIQUEFACTION PROJECT IN CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set forth below, DOE/FE has concluded that the opponents of the Corpus Christi Project Application have not demonstrated that the requested

  14. Energy Department Authorizes Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project to Export

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liquefied Natural Gas | Department of Energy Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project to Export Liquefied Natural Gas May 12, 2015 - 5:00pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON - The Energy Department announced today that it has issued a final authorization for the Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project (Corpus Christi) to export domestically produced liquefied natural

  15. EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities. EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project Public Comment Opportunities No public ...

  16. Lake Charles Liquefaction Project Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lake Charles Liquefaction Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Trunkline Gas Company, LLC, Lake Charles LNG Company, LLC, and Lake Charles LNG Export Company, LLC FERC Docket Nos. CP14-119-000, CP14-120-000, and CP14-122-000 DOE Docket Nos. 11-59-LNG and 13-04-LNG FERC/EIS-0258F, DOE/EIS-0491 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Coast Guard U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Transportation Lake Charles Liquefaction Project Final Environmental Impact Statement FERC/EIS-0258F Docket Nos.

  17. EA-1963: Elba Liquefaction Project, Savannah, Georgia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to add natural gas liquefaction and export capabilities at the existing Elba Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal near Savannah, Georgia. Additional information is available at FERCs eLibrary website, elibrary.ferc.gov/idmws/docket_search.asp; search for docket number PF13-3.

  18. EIS-0487: Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Freeport Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Liquefaction Project, which would expand an existing LNG import terminal and associated facilities in Brazoria County, Texas, to enable the terminal to liquefy and export LNG. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy – a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS – has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  19. Cameron Terminal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cameron Terminal Cameron Terminal Cameron LNG Terminal Long-Term Contract Information and Registrations at U.S. LNG Export Facilities Filing Date Type (1) Description 061013 C ...

  20. EIS-0517: Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline Project; Jefferson and Orange Counties, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas marine terminal along the Sabine-Neches ship channel (Jefferson County, Texas), about 35 miles of new pipeline, and associated facilities. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the export of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas, unless it finds that the export is not consistent with the public interest.

  1. EIS-0519: Rio Grande LNG Project and Rio Bravo Pipeline Project; Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy, and Cameron Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal and marine facilities on the Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, Texas, and two parallel 140-mile-long natural gas pipelines from Kleberg County, Texas, to the planned terminal. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the export is not consistent with the public interest.

  2. EIS-0491: Lake Charles Liquefaction Project; Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, by constructing and operating natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities.DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  3. EA-1942: Cove Point Liquefaction Project, Lusby, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared an EA that examined the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to add natural gas liquefaction and exportation capabilities to the existing Cove Point LNG Terminal. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, was a cooperating agency because it had an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it found that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest. DOE adopted FERC’s EA and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  4. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION EXPANSION PROJECT REGARDING

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EXPANSION PROJECT REGARDING SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC, APPLICATIONS SEEKING DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FROM SABINE PASS LNG TERMINAL TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 1501.6 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), 40 CFR 1501.6, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) participated as a cooperating

  5. EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR)...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Connector Pipeline Projects, respectively a proposed new liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal and associated facilities in Coos County, Oregon, and a natural gas ...

  6. Order 3669: Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    69: Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC Order 3669: Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC FINAL OPINION AND ORDER GRANTING LONG-TERM, MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE SABINE PASS LNG TERMINAL LOCATED IN THE CAMERON PARISH, LOUISIANA, TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set forth below, DOE/FE has concluded that the opponents of Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC's applications to export LNG from its

  7. Coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

  8. Advanced Hydrogen Liquefaction Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Kromer, Brian; Neu, Ben; Jankowiak, Jerome; Barrett, Philip; Drnevich, Raymond

    2011-09-28

    The project identified and quantified ways to reduce the cost of hydrogen liquefaction, and reduce the cost of hydrogen distribution. The goal was to reduce the power consumption by 20% and then to reduce the capital cost. Optimizing the process, improving process equipment, and improving ortho-para conversion significantly reduced the power consumption of liquefaction, but by less than 20%. Because the efficiency improvement was less than the target, the program was stopped before the capital cost was addressed. These efficiency improvements could provide a benefit to the public to improve the design of future hydrogen liquefiers. The project increased the understanding of hydrogen liquefaction by modeling different processes and thoroughly examining ortho-para separation and conversion. The process modeling provided a benefit to the public because the project incorporated para hydrogen into the process modeling software, so liquefaction processes can be modeled more accurately than using only normal hydrogen. Adding catalyst to the first heat exchanger, a simple method to reduce liquefaction power, was identified, analyzed, and quantified. The demonstrated performance of ortho-para separation is sufficient for at least one identified process concept to show reduced power cost when compared to hydrogen liquefaction processes using conventional ortho-para conversion. The impact of improved ortho-para conversion can be significant because ortho para conversion uses about 20-25% of the total liquefaction power, but performance improvement is necessary to realize a substantial benefit. Most of the energy used in liquefaction is for gas compression. Improvements in hydrogen compression will have a significant impact on overall liquefier efficiency. Improvements to turbines, heat exchangers, and other process equipment will have less impact.

  9. EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal consisting of two floating liquefaction, storage and offloading units and a 29-mile pipeline header system to transport natural gas from existing pipeline systems to the LNG terminal facilities.

  10. Cameron County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cameron County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4261564, -78.1564432 Show Map Loading map......

  11. Cameron LNG LLC - 14-001-CIC | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cameron LNG LLC - 14-001-CIC Cameron LNG LLC - 14-001-CIC Application of Cameron LNG, LLC to Transfer Control of Long-term Authorization to Export LNG to Free Trade Agreement...

  12. Energy Department Conditionally Authorizes Cameron LNG to Export...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cameron LNG to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Conditionally Authorizes Cameron LNG to Export Liquefied Natural Gas February 11, 2014 - 11:15am Addthis WASHINGTON -...

  13. From: Cameron Foreman To: Congestion Study Comments Subject:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cameron Foreman To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Nietc Date: Tuesday, September 23, ... Interest Energy Transmission Corridors. Cameron Foreman 643 church street Rush Hill, mo ...

  14. Energy Department Authorizes Sabine Pass Liquefaction's Expansion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sabine Pass Liquefaction's Expansion Project to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy ... required by the National Environmental Policy Act, and when DOE has sufficient ...

  15. EIS-0489: Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, prepared an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate the Jordan Cove Liquefaction and Pacific Connector Pipeline Projects, respectively a proposed new liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal and associated facilities in Coos County, Oregon, and a natural gas pipeline between the Malin Hub in Klamath County, Oregon, and the Jordan Cove terminal. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  16. Cameron synthetic fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The increasing scarcity of conventional crude oil resources, as well as the sharply higher prices of crude oil, will generate increased interest in heavy oil, tar sands, and oil shale as potential substitutes. For all of these unconventional oil resources, extraction will be much more difficult, time consuming, and costly than for conventional crude oil. Although the inplace resources are vast and exist in many areas including the United States, the USSR, western Europe, Canada, and Latin America, probably only a small fraction of the inplace resources will prove to be economically extractable. These unconventional oil resources are now being developed in several locations around the world, and depending upon the exact definition probably account for less than 1 percent of current world oil supplies. The major current developments include: Canadian tar sands. Heavy oil production at Yarega in the Komi Autonomous Republic in the Soviet Union. The USSR also burns shale for power generation in Estonia. Venezuelan production of heavy oil in the Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt is currently about 15,000 b/d. Oil shale is likely to prove much less important than heavy oil and tar sands over the next 20 years. Further development of these unconventional resources is planned, and many projects are under way or under study. On the basis of current planning, world output of heavy oils and oil from tar sands and shale will be unlikely to exceed 2 million b/d by 1990, roughly five time today's level. However, both of these resources will require the development of new technologies for any large increases in output above what is now planned. The bulk of Canada's tar sands exists at great depths and will require the development of in situ processes for extraction. In the Orinoco, heavy metals contained in the oil make it difficult to refine with existing technology.

  17. Liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorbaty, Martin L. (Westfield, NJ); Stone, John B. (Houston, TX); Poddar, Syamal K. (Houston, TX)

    1982-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a combination of pretreating agents comprising SO.sub.2 and an oxidizing agent. The pretreatment is believed to convert at least a portion of the scale-forming components and particularly calcium, to the corresponding sulfate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment may be accomplished with the combination of pretreating agents either simultaneously by using a mixture comprising SO.sub.2 and an oxidizing agent or sequentially by first treating with SO.sub.2 and then with an oxidizing agent.

  18. ORDER NO. 3391: CAMERON LNG | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    91: CAMERON LNG ORDER NO. 3391: CAMERON LNG ORDER CONDITIONALLY GRANTING LONG-TERM MULTI-CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS BY VESSEL FROM THE CAMERON LNG TERMINAL IN CAMERON PARISH, LOUISIANA, TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set forth below, DOE/FE has concluded that the opponents of the Cameron Application have not demonstrated that the requested authorization will be inconsistent with the public interest and

  19. Cameron LNG LLC- 14-001-CIC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application of Cameron LNG, LLC to Transfer Control of Long-term Authorization to Export LNG to Free Trade Agreement Nations and Conditional Long-term Authorization to Export LNG to Non-free Trade...

  20. EIS-0488: Notice of Adoption of FERC Final Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Adoption of FERC Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0488: Notice of Adoption of FERC Final Environmental Impact Statement Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron ...

  1. Environmental development plan: coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This Environmental Development plan (EDP) examines environmental concerns that are being evaluated for the technologies in DOE's Coal Liquefaction Program. It identifies the actions that are planned or underway to resolve these concerns while the technologies are being developed. Research is scheduled on the evaluation and mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This EDP updates the FY 1977 Coal Liquefaction Program EDP. Chapter II describes the DOE Coal Liquefaction Program and focuses on the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC), H-Coal, and Exxon donor solvent (EDS) processes because of their relatively advanced R and D stages. The major unresolved environmental concerns associated with the coal liquefaction subactivities and projects are summarized. The concerns were identified in the 1977 EDP's and research was scheduled to lead to the resolution of the concerns. Much of this research is currently underway. The status of ongoing and planned research is shown in Table 4-1.

  2. Liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poddar, Syamal K. (Baytown, TX)

    1981-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a combination of pretreating agents comprising SO.sub.2 and an oxidizing agent. It is essential to effective operation that the moisture content of the solid carbonaceous material be within the range from about 10 to about 25 wt %, based on dry solid carbonaceous material, during the pretreatment. The pretreatment is believed to convert at least a portion of the scale-forming components and particularly calcium, to the corresponding sulfate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment may be accomplished with the combination of pretreating agents either simultaneously by using a mixture comprising SO.sub.2 and a gaseous oxidizing agent or sequentially by first treating with SO.sub.2 and then with an oxidizing agent.

  3. Cameron LNG LLC Final Order | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Final Opinion and Order Granting Long-term Multi-contract Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by Vessel from the Cameron LNG Terminal in Cameron Parish, ...

  4. Cameron LNG, LLC- FE Dkt. No. 15-90-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed May 28, 2015, by Cameron LNG, LLC (Cameron), seeking a long-term multi-contract authorization to export domestically...

  5. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION PROJECT REGARDING

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PROJECT REGARDING APPLICATION TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TO INCREASE AUTHORIZED VOLUMES OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FOR EXPORT FROM SABINE PASS LNG TERMINAL TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 1508.9 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), 40 CFR 1508.9, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that

  6. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Fletcher, Jerald 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT The project currently is composed of six specific tasks - three...

  7. EA-1963: Elba Liquefaction Project; Chatham, Hart, Jefferson, and Effingham Counties, Georgia, and Jasper County, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to add natural gas liquefaction and export capabilities at the existing Elba Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal near Savannah, Georgia. Additional information is available at FERC’s eLibrary website, elibrary.ferc.gov/idmws/docket_search.asp; search for docket numbers CP14-103-000 and CP14-115-000.

  8. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

  9. Environmental Assessment for Central Power and Light Company`s proposed Military Highway-CFE tie 138/69-kV transmission line project Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Central Power and Light Company (CPL) intends to upgrade its existing transmission line ties with the Commision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) system in Mexico. CPL currently has a single 69-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Brownsville area which connects CPL`s system with the system of CFE. This existing line runs between the Brownsville Switching Station, located on Laredo Road in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, and an existing CFE 69-kV line at the Rusteberg Bend of the Rio Grande in Cameron County. Under current conditions of need, the existing 69-kV line does not possess sufficient capability to engage in appropriate power exchanges. Therefore, CPL is proposing to build a new line to link up with CFE. This proposed line would be a double-circuit line, which would (1) continue (on a slightly relocated route) the existing 69-kV tie from CPL`s Brownsville Switching Station to CFE`s facilities, and (2) add a 138-kV tie from the Military Highway Substation, located on Military Highway (US Highway 281), to CFE`s facilities. The proposed 138/69-kV line, which will be constructed and operated by CPL, will be built primarily on steel single-pole structures within an average 60-foot (ft) wide right-of-way (ROW). It will be approximately 6900--9200 ft (1.3--1.7 miles) in length, depending on the alternative route constructed.

  10. Cameron, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Cameron is a town in Steuben County, New York.1 References US Census Bureau...

  11. Energy Department Authorizes Cameron LNG and Carib Energy to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Cameron) and Carib Energy LLC (Carib) to export domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that ... required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). ...

  12. Cameron County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Island, Texas South Point, Texas Tierra Bonita, Texas Villa Pancho, Texas Villa del Sol, Texas Yznaga, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCameronCou...

  13. City of Cameron, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    index.aspx? Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Cameron-MO179143034398?refsearch&sid17003869.3524488275..1 Outage Hotline: (816) 632-2177 References: EIA Form...

  14. Cameron Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cameron Parish is a county in Louisiana. Its FIPS County Code is 023. It is classified as...

  15. Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Spain (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Spain (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Spain (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,911 - No Data ...

  16. Cameron, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cameron is a town in Moore County, North Carolina. It falls under North Carolina's 6th congressional...

  17. Cameron LNG, LLC- FE Dkt. No. 15-67-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed on April 3, 2015, by Cameron LNG, LLC seeking long-term, multi-contract authorization to export domestically produced...

  18. DOE indirect liquefaction program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schehl, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Processes for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide have had commercial importance since about 1920, when the commercial production of methanol and higher alcohols on oxide catalysts began. Soon thereafter Fischer and Tropsch discovered that liquid hydrocarbons could be synthesized from carbon monoxide and hydrogen over Group VIII metal catalysts. Following extensive catalyst and process development efforts, this technology provided Germany with a source of liquid fuels during World War II. The period following the war saw an acceleration in research and development on the Fischer-Tropsch process, but the only commercial application that was to emerge was the SASOL process in the Union of South Africa. The oil crises of the 1970s have rekindled worldwide interest in indirect liquefaction technologies for the production of clean, high-quality motor fuels from coal. The development of more efficient coal gasification processes and the advent of molecular sieve catalysts that allow tailoring of product distributions have set the stage for revolutionary improvements in process designs over state-of-the-art technology. This paper reviews, in brief, the research and development projects that the Department of Energy is sponsoring in the area of synthesis gas conversion to liquid fuels. These projects range from pilot-plant-scale operations, such as the fluidized-bed MTG plant in Wesseling, FRG, to basic research into reaction mechanisms at universities and government laboratories. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Coal liquefaction quenching process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, Robert M.; Yeh, Chung-Liang; Donath, Ernest E.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

  20. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  1. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schindler, Harvey D.; Chen, James M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

  2. Integrated coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Effron, Edward

    1978-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of coal in which coal liquids containing phenols and other oxygenated compounds are produced during the liquefaction step and later hydrogenated, oxygenated compounds are removed from at least part of the coal liquids in the naphtha and gas oil boiling range prior to the hydrogenation step and employed as a feed stream for the manufacture of a synthesis gas or for other purposes.

  3. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    The coal liquefaction process disclosed uses three stages. The first stage is a liquefaction. The second and third stages are hydrogenation stages at different temperatures and in parallel or in series. One stage is within 650.degree.-795.degree. F. and optimizes solvent production. The other stage is within 800.degree.-840.degree. F. and optimizes the C.sub.5 -850.degree. F. product.

  4. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1993--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Progress in a number of laboratory projects supporting direct liquefaction are described. There are too many different topics to be accommodated in a single abstract.

  5. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    Accomplishments for the past year are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts some of the highlights are: very promising results have been obtained from the liquefaction of plastics, rubber tires, paper and other wastes, and the coliquefaction of wastes with coal; a number of water soluble coal liquefaction catalysts, iron, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum, have been comparatively tested; mossbauer spectroscopy, XAFS spectroscopy, TEM and XPS have been used to characterize a variety of catalysts and other samples from numerous consortium and DOE liquefaction projects and in situ ESR measurements of the free radical density have been conducted at temperatures from 100 to 600{degrees}C and H{sub 2} pressures up to 600 psi.

  6. LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT DOE SITES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites M. Lewis, M. McHood, R. Williams, B. Gutierrez October 25, 2011

  7. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR CAMERON LNG LLC - DKT. NO. 11-162-LNG...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 April 2015 October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI ANNUAL REPORTS - CAMERON LNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 14-204-LNG - ORDER NO. 3620 Semi-annual Reports for Cameron LNG LLC -...

  8. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR Cameron LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 15-36...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cameron LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 15-36-LNG - ORDER 3680 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR Cameron LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 15-36-LNG - ORDER 3680 NO REPORTS RECEIVED More Documents &...

  9. Semi-annual Reports for Cameron LNG LLC - Dk. No. 11-145-LNG...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Semi-annual Reports for Cameron LNG LLC - Dk. No. 11-145-LNG - Order 3059 Semi-annual Reports for Cameron LNG LLC - Dk. No. 11-145-LNG - Order 3059 PDF icon April 2012 PDF icon ...

  10. SEMI ANNUAL REPORTS - CAMERON LNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 14-204-LNG...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEMI ANNUAL REPORTS - CAMERON LNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 14-204-LNG - ORDER NO. 3620 SEMI ANNUAL REPORTS - CAMERON LNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 14-204-LNG - ORDER NO. 3620 PDF icon October ...

  11. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR CAMERON LNG LLC - DKT. NO. 11-162-LNG...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR Cameron LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 15-36-LNG - ORDER 3680 SEMI ANNUAL REPORTS - CAMERON LNG, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 14-204-LNG - ORDER NO. 3620 Semi-annual Reports ...

  12. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR Cameron LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 15-36...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cameron LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 15-36-LNG - ORDER 3680 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR Cameron LNG, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 15-36-LNG - ORDER 3680 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & ...

  13. CAMERON LNG, LLC- FE DKT. NO. 15-36-LNG (FTA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed February 23, 2015, by Cameron LNG, LLC (Cameron), seeking a long-term multi-contract authorization to export domestically...

  14. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weller, Sol W. (Williamsville, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  15. Which route to coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nene, R.G.

    1981-11-01

    Two main methods for producing liquid fuels from coal are currently undergoing intensive evaluation. One, direct liquefaction (e.g., SRC-II, Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), and H-Coal) produces liquid fuels directly from coal; the other, indirect liquefaction (e.g., Lurgi gasifier followed by Fischer-Tropsch, and Shell-Koppers gasifier followed by methanol synthesis and Mobil's MTG process) first gasifies coal and then converts the gaseous material into liquid products. This paper compares both routes basing its assessment on yields, thermal efficiencies, elemental balances, investment, complexity, and state of development. It is shown that direct liquefaction is more efficient and produces more product per investment dollar. Higher efficiency for direct liquefaction is verified bY stoichiometric and thermodynamic analysis. All approaches require about the same capital investment per unit of feed. Indirect liquefaction can be either more or less complex than direct liquefaction, depending upon the process. Direct liquefaction is least developed. 8 refs.

  16. Highly dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction. Phase 1 final report, August 23--November 22, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B.; Ghaly, O.

    1995-03-22

    The ultimate goal of this project is to develop novel processes for making the conversion of coal into distillable liquids competitive to that of petroleum products in the range of $25/bbl. The objectives of Phase 1 were to determine the utility of new precursors to highly dispersed catalysts for use of syngas atmospheres in coal liquefaction, and to estimate the effect of such implementation on the cost of the final product. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Tasks 1 and 2 are the analyses and liquefaction experiments, respectively, and Task 3 deals with the economic effects of using these methods during coal liquefaction. Results are presented on the following: Analytical Support--screening tests and second-stage conversions; Laboratory-Scale Operations--catalysts, coal conversion in synthetic solvents, Black Thunder screening studies, and two-stage liquefaction experiments; and Technical and economic Assessment--commercial liquefaction plant description, liquefaction plant cost; and economic analysis.

  17. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liquefaction Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Process Design and Economics for Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction, a paper from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. PDF icon pnnl_whole_algae_liquefaction.pdf More Documents & Publications Pathways for Algal Biofuels Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Algae

  18. Method for coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiser, Wendell H.; Oblad, Alex G.; Shabtai, Joseph S.

    1994-01-01

    A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400.degree. C. at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1.

  19. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  20. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Norman L.; Moon, William G.; Prudich, Michael E.

    1983-01-01

    A C.sub.5 -900.degree. F. (C.sub.5 -482.degree. C.) liquid yield greater than 50 weight percent MAF feed coal is obtained in a coal liquefaction process wherein a selected combination of higher hydrogen partial pressure, longer slurry residence time and increased recycle ash content of the feed slurry are controlled within defined ranges.

  1. EIS-0488: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0488: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana EPA announces the availability of the Draft EIS for the Cameron Liquefaction Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) proposes to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal to enable it to liquefy and

  2. EA-1983: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1983: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment Sabine Pass Liquefaction Expansion Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory...

  3. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation TRI Technology Update & IDL R&D ... ClearFuels-Rentech Pilot-Scale Biorefinery Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation ...

  4. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway This ...

  5. Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013 This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, ...

  6. Corpus Christi Liquefaction Terminal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terminal Corpus Christi Liquefaction Terminal Corpus Christi Liquefaction Terminal Long-Term Contract Information and Registrations at U.S. LNG Export Facilities Filing Date Type...

  7. Coal Liquefaction desulfurization process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA)

    1983-01-01

    In a solvent refined coal liquefaction process, more effective desulfurization of the high boiling point components is effected by first stripping the solvent-coal reacted slurry of lower boiling point components, particularly including hydrogen sulfide and low molecular weight sulfur compounds, and then reacting the slurry with a solid sulfur getter material, such as iron. The sulfur getter compound, with reacted sulfur included, is then removed with other solids in the slurry.

  8. Method for coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.; Shabtai, J.S.

    1994-05-03

    A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400 C at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1. 1 figures.

  9. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karr, Jr., Clarence

    1977-04-19

    An improved coal liquefaction process is provided which enables conversion of a coal-oil slurry to a synthetic crude refinable to produce larger yields of gasoline and diesel oil. The process is characterized by a two-step operation applied to the slurry prior to catalytic desulfurization and hydrogenation in which the slurry undergoes partial hydrogenation to crack and hydrogenate asphaltenes and the partially hydrogenated slurry is filtered to remove minerals prior to subsequent catalytic hydrogenation.

  10. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maa, Peter S.

    1978-01-01

    A process for liquefying a particulate coal feed to produce useful petroleum-like liquid products which comprises contacting; in a series of two or more coal liquefaction zones, or stages, graded with respect to temperature, an admixture of a polar compound; or compounds, a hydrogen donor solvent and particulate coal, the total effluent being passed in each instance from a low temperature zone, or stage to the next succeeding higher temperature zone, or stage, of the series. The temperature within the initial zone, or stage, of the series is maintained about 70.degree. F and 750.degree. F and the temperature within the final zone, or stage, is maintained between about 750.degree. F and 950.degree. F. The residence time within the first zone, or stage, ranges, generally, from about 20 to about 150 minutes and residence time within each of the remaining zones, or stages, of the series ranges, generally, from about 10 minutes to about 70 minutes. Further steps of the process include: separating the product from the liquefaction zone into fractions inclusive of a liquid solvent fraction; hydrotreating said liquid solvent fraction in a hydrogenation zone; and recycling the hydrogenated liquid solvent mixture to said coal liquefaction zones.

  11. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A. (eds.)

    1991-05-28

    Significant progress was made in the May 1990--May 1991 contract period in three primary coal liquefaction research areas: catalysis, structure-reactivity studies, and novel liquefaction processes. A brief summary of the accomplishments in the past year in each of these areas is given.

  12. 10 CFR 850, Request for Information- Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP- Cameron Anderson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commenter: Cameron Anderson 10 CFR 850 - Request for Information Docket Number: HS-RM-10-CBDPP Comment Close Date: 2/22/2011

  13. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, C.H.

    1986-02-11

    A process is described for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range. 1 fig.

  14. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Charles H.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range.

  15. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China The project currently is composed of six specific tasks - three research tasks, two outreach and training tasks, and one project management and communications task. Task 1 addresses project management and communication. Research activities focused on Task 2 (Describe

  16. EIS-0518: Annova LNG Brownsville Project; Cameron County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas (LNG) production, storage, and export facility on the southern bank of the Brownsville Ship Channel. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the export is not consistent with the public interest.

  17. Two stage liquefaction of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuworth, Martin B.

    1981-01-01

    A two stage coal liquefaction process and apparatus comprising hydrogen donor solvent extracting, solvent deashing, and catalytic hydrocracking. Preferrably, the catalytic hydrocracking is performed in an ebullating bed hydrocracker.

  18. Coal liquefaction and gasification technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangold, E.C.; Muradaz, M.A.; Ouellette, R.P.; Farah, O.G.; Cheremisinoff, P.N.

    1982-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of selected coal liquefaction and gasification processes developed with support from the United States are reviewed. The Exxon Donor Solvent, H-Coal, SRC-I, SRC-II, Mobile Gasoline Synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, and Zinc Halide Hydrocracking liquefaction processes and the Slagging Lurgi, Texaco, Combustion Engineering, COGAS, and Shell-Koppers gasification processes are covered. Separate abstracts were prepared for 5 chapters.

  19. Direct coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rindt, John R. (Grand Forks, ND); Hetland, Melanie D. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1993-01-01

    An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300.degree. C. to 400.degree. C. for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

  20. Direct coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.

    1993-10-26

    An improved multistep liquefaction process for organic carbonaceous mater which produces a virtually completely solvent-soluble carbonaceous liquid product. The solubilized product may be more amenable to further processing than liquid products produced by current methods. In the initial processing step, the finely divided organic carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrocarbonaceous pasting solvent containing from 10% and 100% by weight process-derived phenolic species at a temperature within the range of 300 C to 400 C for typically from 2 minutes to 120 minutes in the presence of a carbon monoxide reductant and an optional hydrogen sulfide reaction promoter in an amount ranging from 0 to 10% by weight of the moisture- and ash-free organic carbonaceous material fed to the system. As a result, hydrogen is generated via the water/gas shift reaction at a rate necessary to prevent condensation reactions. In a second step, the reaction product of the first step is hydrogenated.

  1. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    The status of coal liquefaction pilot plants supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, history and progress during the July-September 1979 quarter. Supporting projects such as test facilities, refining and upgrading coal liquids, catalyst development, and gasification of residues from coal gasification plants are discussed similarly. (LTN)

  2. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.; Huang, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-04-01

    This work is a fundamental study of catalytic pretreatments as a potential preconversion step to low-severity liquefaction. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for the design of an improved liquefaction process and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. The main objectives of this project are to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on the subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank and influence of solvent will be examined. We have made significant progress in the following four aspects during this quarterly period: (1) influence of drying and oxidation of coal on the conversion and product distribution in catalytic liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal using a dispersed catalyst; (2) spectroscopic characterization of dried and oxidized Wyodak coal and the insoluble residues from catalytic and thermal liquefaction; (3) the structural alteration of low-rank coal in low-severity liquefaction with the emphasis on the oxygen-containing functional groups; and (4) effects of solvents and catalyst dispersion methods in temperature-programmed and non-programmed liquefaction of three low-rank coals.

  3. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P.

    1997-11-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  4. Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Japan (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,741 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 04/29/2016 Next Release Date: 05/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan

  5. Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,971 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cameron, LA LNG Imports from Egypt

  6. Subtask 3.3 - Feasibility of Direct Coal Liquefaction in the Modern Economic Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Oster; Joshua Strege; Marc Kurz; Anthony Snyder; Melanie Jensen

    2009-06-15

    Coal liquefaction provides an alternative to petroleum for the production of liquid hydrocarbon-based fuels. There are two main processes to liquefy coal: direct coal liquefaction (DCL) and indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Because ICL has been demonstrated to a greater extent than DCL, ICL may be viewed as the lower-risk option when it comes to building a coal liquefaction facility. However, a closer look, based on conversion efficiencies and economics, is necessary to determine the optimal technology. This report summarizes historical DCL efforts in the United States, describes the technical challenges facing DCL, overviews Shenhua's current DCL project in China, provides a DCL conceptual cost estimate based on a literature review, and compares the carbon dioxide emissions from a DCL facility to those from an ICL facility.

  7. Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013 Knorr, D.; Lukas,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013 Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P. 09 BIOMASS FUELS BIOFUELS CONVERSION;...

  8. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop. PDF icon idl_workshop_summary_report_july_2014 More Documents & Publications 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Gasification Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon

  9. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop To support research and development (R&D) planning efforts within the Thermochemical Conversion Program, the Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted the Biomass Indirect Liquefaction (IDL) Workshop. This workshop discussed and detailed the R&D needs for biomass IDL. Discussions focused on pathways that convert biomass-based syngas (or any carbon monoxide, hydrogen gaseous stream) to liquid intermediates (alcohols

  10. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Whole Algae Hydrothermal...

  11. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategy Workshop: Summary Report Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies ...

  12. Complete liquefaction methods and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2013-10-15

    A method and apparatus are described to provide complete gas utilization in the liquefaction operation from a source of gas without return of natural gas to the source thereof from the process and apparatus. The mass flow rate of gas input into the system and apparatus may be substantially equal to the mass flow rate of liquefied product output from the system, such as for storage or use.

  13. Advanced progress concepts for direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Derbyshire, F.; Givens, E.

    1995-09-01

    Given the low cost of petroleum crude, direct coal liquefaction is still not an economically viable process. The DOE objectives are to further reduce the cost of coal liquefaction to a more competitive level. In this project the primary focus is on the use of low-rank coal feedstocks. A particular strength is the use of process-derived liquids rather than model compound solvents. The original concepts are illustrated in Figure 1, where they are shown on a schematic of the Wilsonville pilot plant operation. Wilsonville operating data have been used to define a base case scenario using run {number_sign}263J, and Wilsonville process materials have been used in experimental work. The CAER has investigated: low severity CO pretreatment of coal for oxygen rejection, increasing coal reactivity and mg inhibiting the propensity for regressive reactions; the application of more active. Low-cost Fe and Mo dispersed catalysts; and the possible use of fluid coking for solids rejection and to generate an overhead product for recycle. CONSOL has investigated: oil agglomeration for coal ash rejection, for the possible rejection of ash in the recycled resid, and for catalyst addition and recovery; and distillate dewaxing to remove naphthenes and paraffins, and to generate an improved quality feed for recycle distillate hydrogenation. At Sandia, research has been concerned with the production of active hydrogen donor distillate solvent fractions produced by the hydrogenation of dewaxed distillates and by fluid coking via low severity reaction with H{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2}O mixtures using hydrous metal oxide and other catalysts.

  14. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  15. Solvent treatment of coal for improved liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appell, Herbert R. (Pitcairn, PA); Narain, Nand K. (Bethel Park, PA); Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-05-06

    Increased liquefaction yield is obtained by pretreating a slurry of solid carbonaceous material and a liquid hydrocarbonaceous solvent at a temperature above 200.degree. C. but below 350.degree. C. for a period of 10 minutes to four hours prior to exposure to liquefaction temperatures.

  16. Hydrogen-donor coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Jr., Edward L.; Mitchell, Willard N.

    1980-01-01

    Improved liquid yields are obtained during the hydrogen-donor solvent liquefaction of coal and similar carbonaceous solids by maintaining a higher concentration of material having hydrogenation catalytic activity in the downstream section of the liquefaction reactor system than in the upstream section of the system.

  17. Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 7.31 -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 04/29/2016 Next Release Date: 05/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural

  18. Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Peru (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Peru (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3,477 3,368 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cameron, LA LNG Imports from Peru

  19. Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Hanford Tour Registration Begins March 9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 March 2, 2015 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Hanford Tour Registration Begins March 9 Visitors Can Register for Choice of Tours Focused on Cleanup or History RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will open online registration for both of its 2015 public tour programs on March 9 at 9 a.m. through the Hanford Site's webpage at www.hanford.gov. The Hanford Site public tours focus on environmental cleanup, while the B Reactor tours focus on Hanford's role

  20. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Robert F.; Miller, Robert N.

    1986-01-01

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  1. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael T. Klein

    1998-10-01

    Major objectives of the present project are to develop a better understanding of the roles of the catalyst and the liquefaction solvent in the coal liquefaction process. An open question concerning the role of the catalyst is whether intimate contact between the catalyst and the coal particles is important or required. To answer this question, it had been planned to coat an active catalyst with a porous silica coating which was found to retain catalyst activity while preventing actual contact between catalyst and coal. Consultation with people in DuPont who coat catalysts for increasing abrasion resistance have indicated that only portions of the catalyst are coated by their process (spray drying) and that sections of uncoated catalyst remain. For that reason, it was decided to suspend the catalyst in a basket separated from the coal in the reactor. The basket walls were to be permeable to the liquefaction solvent but not to the coal particles. Several such baskets were constructed of stainless steel with holes which would not permit passage of coal particles larger than 30 mesh. Liquefactions run with the coal of greater than 30 mesh size gave normal conversion of coal to liquid in the absence of catalyst in the basket, but substantially increased conversion when Ni/Mo on alumina catalyst was in the basket. While this result is interesting and suggestive of some kind of mass transfer of soluble material occurring between the catalyst and the coal, it does not eliminate the possibility of breakdown of the coal particle into particle sizes permeable to the basket. Indeed, a small amount of fine coal has been found inside the basket. To determine whether fine coal from breakdown of the coal particles is responsible for the conversion, a new basket is being prepared with 0.5{micro}m pore size.

  2. Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walchuk, George P.

    1978-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

  3. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  4. Cooperative Research Program in coal liquefaction. Technical report, May 1, 1994--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts.

  5. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefactio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC - 14-005-CIC Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG ...

  6. Energy Department Authorizes Corpus Christi Liquefaction Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The development of U.S. natural gas resources is having a transformative impact on the U.S. energy landscape, helping to ... the National Environmental Policy Act, and when DOE has ...

  7. Advanced coal liquefaction. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-02

    Molecular level liquid phase separation was explored using modified microporous ceramic membranes with pore size reduced from 40{Angstrom} via chemical vapor deposition. At room temperature, membranes with pore sizes <30{Angstrom} were sufficient to achieve >97% rejection of naphthyl-bibenzyl-methane (NBBM) in toluene, likely attributed to the hindrance effect of NBBM through the porous avenue of the membrane. The rejection diminished dramatically as the temperature was increased. The permeance of the mixture was substantially lower than that of the solvent resulted from the interference by the solute through the transport avenue. Also, it was found that the rejection increases along with the transmembrane pressure increase, probably attributed to the pore size distribution of the membrane. The smaller pore sizes become accessible to the solvent while rejecting the solute at the higher pressure. In addition to size-based separation, active transport of molecules through an appropriate pore size at 300-400{degrees}C was observed, as a result of interaction with the surface. Decomposition of NBBM took place at 400{degrees}C in a modified membrane packed with the catalyst synthesized using the similar protocol as membranes. The separation property of this membrane at 400{degrees}C was analyzed indirectly based upon the reaction product distribution.

  8. Corpus Christi Liquefaction Terminal | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corpus Christi Liquefaction Terminal Long-Term Contract Information and Registrations at U.S. LNG Export Facilities Filing Date Type (1) Description 061015 C (LNG) In the Matter ...

  9. Evaluation of liquefaction potential for building code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunziata, C.; De Nisco, G.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    The standard approach for the evaluation of the liquefaction susceptibility is based on the estimation of a safety factor between the cyclic shear resistance to liquefaction and the earthquake induced shear stress. Recently, an updated procedure based on shear-wave velocities (V{sub s}) has been proposed which could be more easily applied.These methods have been applied at La Plaja beach of Catania, that experienced liquefaction because of the 1693 earthquake. The detailed geotechnical and V{sub s} information and the realistic ground motion computed for the 1693 event let us compare the two approaches. The successful application of the V{sub s} procedure, slightly modified to fit historical and safety factor information, even if additional field performances are needed, encourages the development of a guide for liquefaction potential analysis, based on well defined V{sub s} profiles to be included in the italian seismic code.

  10. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  11. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: AR-Coal Liquefaction; Gas to Liquids; and Direct Liquefaction. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 PDF icon ...

  13. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR - CORPUS CHRISTI LIQUEFACTION, LLC -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CHENIERE MARKETING, LLC AND CORPUS CHRISTI LIQUEFACTION, LLC (NFTA) - FE DKT. NO. 12-97-LNG - ORDER 3638 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, ...

  14. Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC- 14-005-CIC; 10-160-LNG; 10-161-LNG, 11-161-LNG and 12-06-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application of Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefaction 2, LLC and FLNG Liquefaction 3, LLC to Transfer Control of Long-term Authorization to Export LNG to Free Trade...

  16. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Liquefaction Technology Pathway Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. PDF icon Whole Algae Hydrothermal

  17. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway (Technical Report)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-,

  18. DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The eighth bench scale test of POC program, Run PB-08, was successfully completed from August 8 to August 26, 1997. A total of five operating conditions were tested aiming at evaluating the reactivity of different pyrolysis oils in liquefaction of a Wyoming sub-bituminous coal (Black Thunder coal). For the first time, water soluble promoters were incorporated into the iron-based GelCat to improve the dispersion of the promoter metals in the feed blend. The concentration of the active metals, Mo and Fe, was 100 and 1000 ppm of moisture-free coal, respectively. Black Thunder coal used in this run was the same batch as tested in HTI?s Run POC-02. Similar to Runs PB-01 through 7, this run employed two back mixed slurry reactors, an interstage gas/slurry separator and a direct-coupled hydrotreater. In addition to the hot vapor from the second stage separator, the first stage separator overhead liquid was also fed to the hydrotreater, which was packed with Criterion C-411 hydrotreating catalyst. Pyrolysis oil was produced off-line from a pyrolysis unit acquired from University of Wyoming. Solids rejection was achieved by purging out pressure filter solid. The recycle solvents consisted of O-6 separator bottoms and pressure filter liquid (PFL). The Run PB-08 proceeded very smoothly without any interruptions. Coal conversion consistently above 90W% was achieved. High resid conversion and distillate yield have been obtained from co-processing of coal and 343C+ (650F+) pyrolysis oil. Light gas (C1-C3 ) yield was minimized and hydrogen consumption was reduced due to the introduction of pyrolysis oil, compared with conventional coal-derived solvent. Catalytic activity was improved by incorporating a promoter metal into the iron-based GelCat. It seemed that lowering the first stage temperature to 435C might increase the hydrogenation function of the promoter metal. In comparison with previous coal-waste coprocessing run (PB-06), significant improvements in the process performance were achieved due to catalyst modification and integration of pyrolysis technique into liquefaction.

  19. BIOMASS TO BIO-OIL BY LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-10

    Significant efforts have been devoted to develop processes for the conversion of biomass, an abundant and sustainable source of energy, to liquid fuels and chemicals, in order to replace diminishing fossil fuels and mitigate global warming. Thermochemical and biochemical methods have attracted the most attention. Among the thermochemical processes, pyrolysis and liquefaction are the two major technologies for the direct conversion of biomass to produce a liquid product, often called bio-oil. This chapter focuses on the liquefaction, a medium-temperature and high-pressure thermochemical process for the conversion of biomass to bio-oil. Water has been most commonly used as a solvent and the process is known as hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Fundamentals of HTL process, key factors determining HTL behavior, role of catalyst in HTL, properties of produced bio-oil, and the current status of the technology are summarized. The liquefaction of biomass by using organic solvents, a process called solvolysis, is also discussed. A wide range of biomass feedstocks have been tested for liquefaction including wood, crop residues, algae, food processing waste, and animal manure.

  20. Process development for biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The biomass liquefaction processes (Bureau of Mines and LBL) in use at DOE's experimental facility in Albany, Oregon are described. The chemical composition of the distillate fractions is given. An economic analysis of the 2 processes showed that the LBL process requires less capital investment but the operational costs are very similar. When considered for use as a substitute fuel oil, wood oil as produced at Albany by the LBL process appears qualitatively to fall somewhere between petroleum derived number 6 Fuel Oil and the synthetic oil derived from the Occidental Flash Pyrolysis process. Wood oil falls nearly half way between the other two oils in nearly all categories except that wood oil is very low in sulfur content. This comparison is valid on a chemical basis, however, the use of wood oil purely as a substitute fuel is not currently economically attractive. Despite the large amount of resources already expended on research of this process, it remains in a developmental stage and new technology could have a significant impact on the process economics. The alternate use of wood oil as a chemical feedstock is also being studied.

  1. Order 3669: Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FROM THE SABINE PASS LNG TERMINAL LOCATED IN THE CAMERON PARISH, LOUISIANA, TO NON-FREE TRADE AGREEMENT NATIONS Based on a review of the complete record and for the reasons set...

  2. Quantification of progress in indirect coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, D.; ElSawy, A.; Tomlinson, G.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the economic and technical impact of incorporating various advanced technologies into the indirect coal liquefaction system. These advanced technologies include entrained flow Shell gasification and slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. This objective was accomplished by substituting the Shell entrained goal gasifier system for the Lurgi and the advanced slurry F-T reactor for the Synthol and ARGE F-T systems in a SASOL-type indirect liquefaction facility. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-07-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop. The workshop, held March 20–21, 2014, in Golden, Colorado, discussed and detailed the research and development needs for biomass indirect liquefaction. Discussions focused on pathways that convert biomass-based syngas (or any carbon monoxide, hydrogen gaseous stream) to liquid intermediates (alcohols or acids) and further synthesize those intermediates to liquid hydrocarbons that are compatible as either a refinery feed or neat fuel.

  4. Two-stage coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skinner, Ronald W.; Tao, John C.; Znaimer, Samuel

    1985-01-01

    An improved SRC-I two-stage coal liquefaction process which improves the product slate is provided. Substantially all of the net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate from the LC-Finer is combined with the SRC process solvent, substantially all of the net 400.degree.-650.degree. F. middle distillate from the SRC section is combined with the hydrocracker solvent in the LC-Finer, and the initial boiling point of the SRC process solvent is increased sufficiently high to produce a net yield of 650.degree.-850.degree. F. heavy distillate of zero for the two-stage liquefaction process.

  5. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Technical progress report, December 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, C.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.; Huang, L.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-04-01

    This work is a fundamental study of catalytic pretreatments as a potential preconversion step to low-severity liquefaction. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide the basis for the design of an improved liquefaction process and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. The main objectives of this project are to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on the subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank and influence of solvent will be examined. We have made significant progress in the following four aspects during this quarterly period: (1) influence of drying and oxidation of coal on the conversion and product distribution in catalytic liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal using a dispersed catalyst; (2) spectroscopic characterization of dried and oxidized Wyodak coal and the insoluble residues from catalytic and thermal liquefaction; (3) the structural alteration of low-rank coal in low-severity liquefaction with the emphasis on the oxygen-containing functional groups; and (4) effects of solvents and catalyst dispersion methods in temperature-programmed and non-programmed liquefaction of three low-rank coals.

  6. Methods of natural gas liquefaction and natural gas liquefaction plants utilizing multiple and varying gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M; Turner, Terry D

    2014-12-02

    A method of natural gas liquefaction may include cooling a gaseous NG process stream to form a liquid NG process stream. The method may further include directing the first tail gas stream out of a plant at a first pressure and directing a second tail gas stream out of the plant at a second pressure. An additional method of natural gas liquefaction may include separating CO.sub.2 from a liquid NG process stream and processing the CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 product stream. Another method of natural gas liquefaction may include combining a marginal gaseous NG process stream with a secondary substantially pure NG stream to provide an improved gaseous NG process stream. Additionally, a NG liquefaction plant may include a first tail gas outlet, and at least a second tail gas outlet, the at least a second tail gas outlet separate from the first tail gas outlet.

  7. Catalyst for coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huibers, Derk T. A.; Kang, Chia-Chen C.

    1984-01-01

    An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

  8. Subtask 3.9 - Direct Coal Liquefaction Process Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aulich, Ted; Sharma, Ramesh

    2012-07-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from ExxonMobil, undertook Subtask 3.9 to design, build, and preliminarily operate a bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. Fabrication and installation of the DCL system and an accompanying distillation system for off-line fractionation of raw coal liquids into 1) a naphtha�middle distillate stream for upgrading and 2) a recycle stream was completed in May 2012. Shakedown of the system was initiated in July 2012. In addition to completing fabrication of the DCL system, the project also produced a 500-milliliter sample of jet fuel derived in part from direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal, and submitted the sample to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright� Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with all U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria.

  9. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N.; Kang, Dohee

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  10. Liquefaction of sub-bituminous coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schindler, Harvey D.; Chen, James M.

    1986-01-01

    Sub-bituminous coal is directly liquefied in two stages by use of a liquefaction solvent containing insoluble material as well as 850.degree. F.+ material and 850.degree. F.- material derived from the second stage, and controlled temperature and conversion in the second stage. The process is in hydrogen balance.

  11. Fired heater for coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is constructed with a heat transfer tube having U-bends at regular intervals along the length thereof to increase the slug frequency of the multi-phase mixture flowing therethrough to thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency.

  12. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wood to green gasoline using Carbona gasification and Topsoe TIGAS processes - DOE Project DE-EE0002874

  13. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Concepts for Direct Coal Liquefaction program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1991 to develop technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by the direct liquefaction of coal. The advanced 2-stage liquefaction technology that was developed at Wilsonville over the past 10 years has contributed significantly toward decreasing the cost of producing liquids from coal to about $33/bbl. It remains, however, the objective of DOE to further reduce this cost to a level more competitive with petroleum based products. This project, among others, was initiated to investigate various alternative approaches to develop technologies that might ultimately lead to a 25 % reduction in cost of product. In this project a number of novel concepts were investigated, either individually or in a coupled configuration that had the potential to contribute toward meeting the DOE goal. The concepts included mature technologies or ones closely related to them, such as coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, fluid coking and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. Other approaches that were either embryonic or less developed were chemical pretreatment of coal to remove oxygen, and dispersed catalyst development for application in the 2-stage liquefaction process. This report presents the results of this project. It is arranged in four sections which were prepared by participating organizations responsible for that phase of the project. A summary of the overall project and the principal results are given in this section. First, however, an overview of the process economics and the process concepts that were developed during the course of this program is presented.

  14. Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,845 2012 2,825 2,891 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S.

  15. Price of Cameron, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports (Nominal Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cameron, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 4.78 2010's 5.78 8.13 10.54 -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas

  16. Price of Cameron, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Qatar (Nominal Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) from Qatar (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Cameron, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Qatar (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 4.51 2010's 5.97 -- -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S.

  17. Low-Cost Methane Liquefaction Plant and Vehicle Refueling Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wilding; D. Bramwell

    1999-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently negotiating a collaborative effort with Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) that will advance the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a vehicle fuel. We plan to develop and demonstrate a small-scale methane liquefaction plant (production of 5,000 to 10,000 gallons per day) and a low-cost ($150,000) LNG refueling station to supply fuel to LNG-powered transit buses and other heavy-duty vehicles. INEEL will perform the research and development work. PG&E will deploy the new facilities commercially in two demonstration projects, one in northern California, and one in southern California.

  18. Two-stage coal liquefaction without gas-phase hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stephens, H.P.

    1986-06-05

    A process is provided for the production of a hydrogen-donor solvent useful in the liquefaction of coal, wherein the water-gas shift reaction is used to produce hydrogen while simultaneously hydrogenating a donor solvent. A process for the liquefaction of coal using said solvent is also provided. The process enables avoiding the use of a separate water-gas shift reactor as well as high pressure equipment for liquefaction. 3 tabs.

  19. liquefaction applications Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G. 01 COAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reactor costs for indirect liquefaction applications Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G. 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; CHEMICAL REACTORS; COST; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; METHANOL;...

  20. Process development studies of two-stage liquefaction at Wilsonville

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, C.W.; Nalitham, R.V.; Johnson, T.W.

    1986-09-01

    The Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, has been in operation for over 12 years. It is the largest direct coal liquefaction pilot plant still in operation in the United States. Process investigations have evolved from the original study of the Solvent Refined Coal Process for making a clean solid fuel to the recent investigation of two-stage liquefaction processes for making clean distillate fuels. This paper presents results from the current study of various processing schemes designed to reduce the cost of fuels produced by two-stage liquefaction plants.

  1. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  2. Fired heater for coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ying, David H. S.; McDermott, Wayne T.; Givens, Edwin N.

    1985-01-01

    A fired heater for a coal liquefaction process is operated under conditions to maximize the slurry slug frequency and thereby improve the heat transfer efficiency. The operating conditions controlled are (1) the pipe diameter and pipe arrangement, (2) the minimum coal/solvent slurry velocity, (3) the maximum gas superficial velocity, and (4) the range of the volumetric flow velocity ratio of gas to coal/solvent slurry.

  3. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  4. EXPLORATORY RESEARCH ON NOVEL COAL LIQUEFACTION CONCEPT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

    1998-11-30

    The report presents a summary the work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-95PC95050. Investigations performed under Task 4--Integrated Flow Sheet Testing are detailed. In this program, a novel direct coal liquefaction technology was investigated by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates. The process concept explored consists of a first-stage coal dissolution step in which the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second stage, the products are catalytically upgraded to refinery feedstocks. Integrated first-stage and solids-separation steps were used to prepare feedstocks for second-stage catalytic upgrading. An engineering and economic evaluation was conducted concurrently with experimental work throughout the program. Approaches to reduce costs for a conceptual commercial plant were recommended at the conclusion of Task 3. These approaches were investigated in Task 4. The economic analysis of the process as it was defined at the conclusion of Task 4, indicates that the production of refined product (gasoline) via this novel direct liquefaction technology is higher than the cost associated with conventional two-stage liquefaction technologies.

  5. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Daniel F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  6. A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. A. Robbins; R. A. Winschel; S. D. Brandes

    1998-06-09

    CONSOL characterized 38 process strea m samples from HTI Run PB- 04, in which Black Thunder Mine Coal, Hondo vacuum resid, autom obile shredder residue (ASR), and virgin plastics were used as liquefaction feedstocks with dispersed catalyst. A paper on kinetic modeling of resid reactivity was presented at the DOE Coal Lique -faction and Solid Fuels Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, i n Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "The Reactivity of Direct Coal Liquefaction Resids", i s appended (Appendix 1). Three papers on characterization of samples from coal/ resid/ waste p lastics co- liquefaction were presented or submitted for presen tation at conferences. Because of their similarity, only one of the papers is appended to this report. The paper, "Characterization o f Process Samples From Co- Liquefaction of Coal and Waste Polymers", (Appendix 2) was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuels C ontractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper, "Characterization of Process Stream Samples From Bench- Scale Co -Liquefaction Runs That Utilized Waste Polymers as Feedstocks" was presented at the 214th National Meeting of the Ameri can Chemical Society, September 7- 11, 1997, in Las Vegas, NV. The paper, "Characterization of Process Oils from Coal/ Waste Co- Liquefaction" wa s submitted for presentation at the 14th Japan/ U. S. Joint Technical Meeting on Coa l Liquefaction and Materials for Coal Liquefaction on October 28, 1997, in Tokyo, Japan. A joint Burns and Roe Services Corp. and CONSOL pap er on crude oil assays of product oils from HTI Run PB- 03 was presented at the DOE Coal Liquefaction and Solid Fuel s Contractors Review Conference, September 3- 4, 1997, in Pittsburgh, PA. The paper , "Characterization of Liquid Products from All- Slurry Mode Liquefaction", is appende d (Appendix 3).

  7. EA-2036: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2036: Finding of No Significant Impact Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project (design optimization); Cameron Parish, Louisiana In January 2014, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with an application to amend FERC's April 2012 authorization of the Sabine Pass Liquefaction Project in order to optimize its design and operation. In April 2015, Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC, and Sabine

  8. Prevention of deleterious deposits in a coal liquefaction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Norman L.; Prudich, Michael E.; King, Jr., William E.; Moon, William G.

    1984-07-03

    A process for preventing the formation of deleterious coke deposits on the walls of coal liquefaction reactor vessels involves passing hydrogen and a feed slurry comprising feed coal and recycle liquid solvent to a coal liquefaction reaction zone while imparting a critical mixing energy of at least 3500 ergs per cubic centimeter of reaction zone volume per second to the reacting slurry.

  9. Highly Dispersed Pseudo-Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts Synthesized via Inverse Micelle Solutions for the Liquefaction of Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampden-Smith, M.; Kawola, J.S.; Martino, A.; Sault, A.G.; Yamanaka, S.A.

    1999-01-05

    The mission of this project was to use inverse micelle solutions to synthesize nanometer sized metal particles and test the particles as catalysts in the liquefaction of coal and other related reactions. The initial focus of the project was the synthesis of iron based materials in pseudo-homogeneous form. The frost three chapters discuss the synthesis, characterization, and catalyst testing in coal liquefaction and model coal liquefaction reactions of iron based pseudo-homogeneous materials. Later, we became interested in highly dispersed catalysts for coprocessing of coal and plastic waste. Bifunctional catalysts . to hydrogenate the coal and depolymerize the plastic waste are ideal. We began studying, based on our previously devised synthesis strategies, the synthesis of heterogeneous catalysts with a bifunctional nature. In chapter 4, we discuss the fundamental principles in heterogeneous catalysis synthesis with inverse micelle solutions. In chapter 5, we extend the synthesis of chapter 4 to practical systems and use the materials in catalyst testing. Finally in chapter 6, we return to iron and coal liquefaction now studied with the heterogeneous catalysts.

  10. Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

  11. Process for coal liquefaction using electrodeposited catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA)

    1978-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of solid hydrocarbonaceous materials is disclosed. Particles of such materials are electroplated with a metal catalyst and are then suspended in a hydrocarbon oil and subjected to hydrogenolysis to liquefy the solid hydrocarbonaceous material. A liquid product oil is separated from residue solid material containing char and the catalyst metal. The catalyst is recovered from the solid material by electrolysis for reuse. A portion of the product oil can be employed as the hydrocarbon oil for suspending additional particles of catalyst coated solid carbonaceous material for hydrogenolysis.

  12. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  13. Cameron LNG, LLC- FE Dkt. No. 16-34-LNG- Application for Blanket Authority to Export LNG on a Short-Term Basis to FTA and NFTA Countries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an application (Application), filed on February 19, 2016, by  Cameron LNG, LLC, seeking blanket...

  14. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. During this quarter, analyses were completed on 65 process samples from representative periods of HRI Run POC-2 in which coal, coal/plastics, and coal/rubber were the feedstocks. A sample of the oil phase of the oil/water separator from HRI Run POC-1 was analyzed to determine the types and concentrations of phenolic compounds. Chemical analyses and microautoclave tests were performed to monitor the oxidation and measure the reactivity of the standard coal (Old Ben Mine No. 1) which has been used for the last six years to determine solvent quality of process oils analyzed in this and previous DOE contracts.

  15. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred G. Comolli; Peizheng Zhou; HTI Staff

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the U.S. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, is to ensure the US a secure energy supply at an affordable price. An integral part of this program was the demonstration of fully developed coal liquefaction processes that could be implemented if market and supply considerations so required, Demonstration of the technology, even if not commercialized, provides a security factor for the country if it is known that the coal to liquid processes are proven and readily available. Direct liquefaction breaks down and rearranges complex hydrocarbon molecules from coal, adds hydrogen, and cracks the large molecules to those in the fuel range, removes hetero-atoms and gives the liquids characteristics comparable to petroleum derived fuels. The current processes being scaled and demonstrated are based on two reactor stages that increase conversion efficiency and improve quality by providing the flexibility to adjust process conditions to accommodate favorable reactions. The first stage conditions promote hydrogenation and some oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen removal. The second stage hydrocracks and speeds the conversion to liquids while removing the remaining sulfur and nitrogen. A third hydrotreatment stage can be used to upgrade the liquids to clean specification fuels.

  16. Recent two-stage coal liquefaction results from Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.K.; Udani, L.H.; Nalitham, R.V.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents results from two recent runs conducted at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D facility of Wilsonville, Alabama. The first run was an extended demonstration of sub-bituminous coal liquefaction using an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) process. The second run employed a bituminous coal in a reconfigured two-stage process (RITLS) wherein the undeashed products from the first stage were hydrotreated prior to separation of coal ash. Good operability and satisfactory yield structure were demonstrated in both the runs.

  17. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  18. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR EXCELERATE LIQUEFACTION SOLUTIONS I,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    I, LLC - DK. NO. 12-61-LNG - ORDER 3128 (Vacated by Order 3128-A) SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR EXCELERATE LIQUEFACTION SOLUTIONS I, LLC - DK. NO. 12-61-LNG - ORDER 3128 (Vacated by ...

  19. Mild Biomass Liquefaction Process for Economic Production of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Approach - Solvent liquefaction using MeOHH 2 O for stable bio-oil production - Bio-oil upgrading via mild HDO for refinery insertion Process development in concert ...

  20. Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC- Dkt. No 15-63-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed on April 20, 2015, by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC (SPL), seeking long-term multi-contract authorization to export...

  1. Integrated coal cleaning, liquefaction, and gasification process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chervenak, Michael C.

    1980-01-01

    Coal is finely ground and cleaned so as to preferentially remove denser ash-containing particles along with some coal. The resulting cleaned coal portion having reduced ash content is then fed to a coal hydrogenation system for the production of desirable hydrocarbon gases and liquid products. The remaining ash-enriched coal portion is gasified to produce a synthesis gas, the ash is removed from the gasifier usually as slag, and the synthesis gas is shift converted with steam and purified to produce the high purity hydrogen needed in the coal hydrogenation system. This overall process increases the utilization of as-mined coal, reduces the problems associated with ash in the liquefaction-hydrogenation system, and permits a desirable simplification of a liquids-solids separation step otherwise required in the coal hydrogenation system.

  2. Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, George W.; Givens, Edwin N.; Skinner, Ronald W.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

  3. Design of slurry reactor for indirect liquefaction applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, A.; Bendale, P.G.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to design and model a conceptual slurry reactor for two indirect liquefaction applications; (1) production of methanol and (2) production of hydrocarbon fuels via Fischer-Tropsch route. A slurry reactor is defined here as a three-phase bubble column reactor using a fine catalyst particle suspension in a high molecular weight liquid. The feed gas is introduced through spargers. It then bubbles through the column providing the agitation necessary for catalyst suspension and mass transfer. The reactor models for the two processes have been formulated using computer simulation. Process data, kinetic and thermodynamic data, heat and mass transfer data and hydrodynamic data have been used in the mathematical models to describe the slurry reactor for each of the two processes. Available data from process development units and demonstration units were used to test and validate the models. Commercial size slurry reactors for methanol and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were sized using reactor models developed in this report.

  4. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. 10-161-LNG - ORDER 3282 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT....

  5. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG On November 15, ...

  6. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. 10-161-LNG - ORDER 3282 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. ...

  7. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG On May 17, 2013, ...

  8. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-85-LNG; 10-111-LNG; ... More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE ...

  9. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, U.S. Department of Energy: Award No. DE-EE0002855 "Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field - Cameron Parish, Louisiana"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayle, Phillip A., Jr.

    2012-01-13

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of geopressured-geothermal power development by exploiting the extraordinarily high pressured hot brines know to exist at depth near the Sweet Lake oil and gas field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The existence of a geopressured-geothermal system at Sweet Lake was confirmed in the 1970's and 1980's as part of DOE's Geopressured-Geothermal Program. That program showed that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and the job creation it would entail, provided the justification necessary to reevaluate the commercial feasibility of power generation from this vast resource.

  10. Coal liquefaction technology. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technologies and processes for converting coal to liquid chemicals and fuels. Topics include materials characterization of liquefaction processes, catalysis, pyrolysis, depolymerization, coprocessing, and integrated liquefaction. Also discussed are liquid fuel use in automobiles and power generation, low-temperature carbonization technology, multi-stage liquefaction, cost benefit analysis, and commercialization of liquefaction technology. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Co-liquefaction of the Elbistan Lignite and Poplar Sawdust. Part I: The Effect of the Liquefaction Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karaca, H.; Acar, M.; Yilmaz, M.; Keklik, I.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust, and the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and the poplar sawdust in an inert atmosphere and in non-catalytic conditions have been examined. Also, the effects of solvent/coal ratio and stirring speed on the total conversion derived as the result of the liquefaction process was attempted to be determined. Based on the results, although the effects of the solvent/coal ratio and the stirring speed on total conversion are similar for both the Elbistan lignite and the poplar sawdust, it was also noted that, under similar conditions, the conversion for the poplar sawdust was higher, as compared to the conversion of the Elbistan lignite. As the result of the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust under inert atmospheric conditions, the total conversion was increased partially, depending on both solvent/coal ratio and the speed of stirring. However, it was also noted that the total conversion did not change to a significant extent in high solvent/coal ratios and in stirring speed. As the result of the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust under inert atmospheric conditions, total conversion was increased, based on the solvent/coal ratio. However, as in the case of the liquefaction of Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust, it was noted that the high solvent/coal ratios (i.e., solvent/coal ratios of higher than 2/1) did not have a significant effect on the total conversion that was derived as the result of the co-liquefaction of the Elbistan lignite and poplar sawdust.

  12. A technical economic analysis of direct biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Baker, E.G.; Oestman, A.; Gevert, S.B.; Beckman, D.; Solantausta, Y.; Hoernell, C.; Kjellstroem, B.

    1989-02-01

    This paper is based on the results of a technoeconomic assessment of direct biomass liquefaction processes converting wood and peat to gasoline and diesel fuels. The assessment was carried out by the Working Group of the International Energy Agency, Direct Biomass Liquefaction Activity, in which Canada, Finland, Sweden, and the United States participated. The processes chosen for detailed analysis were Atmospheric Flash Pyrolysis (AFP) and Liquefaction In Pressurized Solvent (LIPS). The assessment covered three steps for each process from feed to final product: primary liquefaction to a crude oil product; catalytic hydrotreating to upgrade the crude product to a deoxygenated product oil; and refining the deoxygenated product to gasoline and diesel fuel. Present technology cases and potential future technology cases were evaluated. A consistent analytical basis was used throughout to allow comparison of the processes. This assessment shows that AFP is more economical than LIPS both for the production of boiler fuel oil as the primary liquefaction product and for the production of gasoline and diesel fuel products. The potential for future cost reduction through research and development is also clearly demonstrated. 23 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to calibrate'' the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850[degrees]F[sup +] , 1050[degrees]F[sup +], and 850 [times] 1050[degrees]F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  14. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction (CMSL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Ganguli, P.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, T.L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Popper, G.; Smith, T.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1996-11-01

    Reported herein are the details and the results of laboratory and bench scale experiments that were conducted at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92147 during the period of October 1, 1992, to December 31, 1995. The program results described herein build on the previous technology base and investigating additional methods to improve the economics of producing transportation fuels from coal. This included purely physical parameters, coal treatment and variation in solvent to coal ratio, the use of syngas to replace part of the hydrogen as the reducing gas, the use of dispersed catalyst in addition to and replacing the supported catalyst, and the co-processing of coal with plastic waste material. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from direct coal liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. The report includes the results of an economic assessment of the various process strategies that were evaluated during this program. A summary of the technical/economic evaluations is given in Volume I, Section II of this report. The experimental details of the eleven run of the program are given in Volume I, Section III and Volume II of this report. The details of the technical evaluations are given in the Volume III of the report.

  15. Donor solvent coal liquefaction with bottoms recycle at elevated pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Richard F.; Taunton, John W.; Anderson, George H.; Trachte, Ken L.; Hsia, Steve J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein increased naphtha yields are achieved by effecting the liquefaction at a pressure within the range from about 1750 to about 2800 psig in the presence of recycled bottoms and a hydrogen-donor solvent containing at least 0.8 wt % donatable hydrogen. The liquefaction is accomplished at a temperature within the range from about 700.degree. to about 950.degree. F. The coal:bottoms ratio in the feed to liquefaction will be within the range from about 1:1 to about 5:1 and the solvent or diluent to total solids ratio will be at least 1.5:1 and preferably within the range from about 1.6:1 to about 3:1. The yield of naphtha boiling range materials increases as the pressure increases but generally reaches a maximum at a pressure within the range from about 2000 to about 2500 psig.

  16. Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epperly, William R.; Deane, Barry C.; Brunson, Roy J.

    1982-01-01

    An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

  17. EIS-0520: Notice of Intent | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    20: Notice of Intent EIS-0520: Notice of Intent Texas LNG Project; Cameron County, Texas The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a natural gas liquefaction and export terminal at the Port of Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, Texas. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the

  18. EA-1963: Elba Liquefaction Project, Savannah, Georgia | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gas Terminal near Savannah, Georgia. Additional information is available at FERC's eLibrary website, elibrary.ferc.govidmwsdocketsearch.asp; search for docket number PF13-3....

  19. EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced its intent to prepare an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Jackson County Mississippi and modify related facilities to enable the terminal to liquefy natural gas for export. DOE is a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest.

  20. EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest. Public Comment Opportunities No events...

  1. EIS-0517: Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    natural gas marine terminal along the Sabine-Neches ship channel (Jefferson County, Texas), about 35 miles of new pipeline, and associated facilities. DOE, Office of Fossil...

  2. Liquefaction of solid carbonaceous material with catalyst recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Avinash; Greene, Marvin I.

    1992-01-01

    In the two stage liquefaction of a carbonaceous solid such as coal wherein coal is liquefied in a first stage in the presence of a liquefaction solvent and the first stage effluent is hydrogenated in the presence of a supported hydrogenation catalyst in a second stage, catalyst which has been previously employed in the second stage and comminuted to a particle size distribution equivalent to 100% passing through U.S. 100 Mesh, is passed to the first stage to improve the overall operation.

  3. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 1, Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1994-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrated coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. Heterofunctional solvents were the most effective in swelling coals. Also solvent blends such as isopropanol/water were more effective than pure solvents alone. Impregnating slurry catalysts simultaneously during coal swelling showed that better uptake was achieved with nonswelling solvent and higher impregnation temperature. Some enhancement in initial coal conversion was seen liquefying SO{sub 2}-treated Black Thunder coal with slurry catalysts, and also when hydrogen donor liquefaction solvents were used. Noncatalytic reactions showed no benefit from SO{sub 2} treatment. Coupling coal swelling and SO{sub 2} treatment with slurry catalysts was also not beneficial, although high conversion was seen with continuous operation and long residence time, however, similar high conversion was observed with untreated coal. SO{sub 2} treatment is not economically attractive unless it provides about 17% increase in coal reactivity. In most cases, the best results were obtained when the coal was untreated and the slurry catalyst was added directly into the reactor. Foster Wheeler`s ASCOT process had better average liquid yields than either Wilsonville`s vacuum tower/ROSE combination or delayed coking process. This liquid product also had good quality.

  4. Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites – An Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites – An Update 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014 Germantown, Maryland Michael R. Lewis, Bechtel Corporation Michael D. Boone, Bechtel Corporation Rucker J. Williams, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Brent Gutierrez, U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Site

  5. The latest developments and outlook for hydrogen liquefaction technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlig, K.; Decker, L.

    2014-01-29

    Liquefied hydrogen is presently mainly used for space applications and the semiconductor industry. While clean energy applications, for e.g. the automotive sector, currently contribute to this demand with a small share only, their demand may see a significant boost in the next years with the need for large scale liquefaction plants exceeding the current plant sizes by far. Hydrogen liquefaction for small scale plants with a maximum capacity of 3 tons per day (tpd) is accomplished with a Brayton refrigeration cycle using helium as refrigerant. This technology is characterized by low investment costs but lower process efficiency and hence higher operating costs. For larger plants, a hydrogen Claude cycle is used, characterized by higher investment but lower operating costs. However, liquefaction plants meeting the potentially high demand in the clean energy sector will need further optimization with regard to energy efficiency and hence operating costs. The present paper gives an overview of the currently applied technologies, including their thermodynamic and technical background. Areas of improvement are identified to derive process concepts for future large scale hydrogen liquefaction plants meeting the needs of clean energy applications with optimized energy efficiency and hence minimized operating costs. Compared to studies in this field, this paper focuses on application of new technology and innovative concepts which are either readily available or will require short qualification procedures. They will hence allow implementation in plants in the close future.

  6. Probability of Liquefaction for H-Area Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.C.

    2000-09-27

    In 1995 WSRC completed the geotechnical assessment for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility and the H-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. As part of that assessment, a probabilistic liquefaction evaluation for the Tobacco Road soils was completed.

  7. Recent developments in two-stage coal liquefaction at Wilsonville

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.M.; Nalitham, R.V.; Lamb, C.W.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents results from the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. The primary sponsors are the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Amoco Corporation became a sponsor in 1984 through an agreement with EPRI. The facility is operated by Catalytic, Inc., under the management of Southern Company Services, Inc.

  8. Economic feasibility study: CFR advanced direct coal liquefaction process. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Preliminary technical and economic data are presented on the CFR Advanced Coal Liquefaction Process. Operating cost estimates and material balances are given.

  9. Liquefaction of Forest Biomass to Drop-inŽ Hydrocarbon Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of key biocrude upgrading stability metrics - Solvent liquefaction studies using a ... ProgressResults * Three year sustainability study nearly complete * Completed by ...

  10. Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Direct coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The direct liquefaction portion of the PETC generic direct coal liquefaction process development unit (PDU) is being designed to provide maximum operating flexibility. The PDU design will permit catalytic and non-catalytic liquefaction concepts to be investigated at their proof-of-the-concept stages before any larger scale operations are attempted. The principal variations from concept to concept are reactor configurations and types. These include thermal reactor, ebullating bed reactor, slurry phase reactor and fixed bed reactor, as well as different types of catalyst. All of these operating modes are necessary to define and identify the optimum process conditions and configurations for determining improved economical liquefaction technology.

  11. LNG projects make progress in Oman and Yemen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-24

    Two LNG projects in the Middle East, one in Oman and the other in Yemen, are due on stream at the turn of the century--each the largest single project ever put together in its country. Officials described their projects at a yearend 1996 conference in Paris by Institut Francais du Petrole and Petrostrategies. The Oman project develops gas reserves, does gas processing, and transports the gas 360 km to a liquefaction plant to be built on the coast. The Yemen project involves a liquefaction plant and an export terminal.

  12. Nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Park, Jae Hoon; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Choe, Kun Hyung

    2014-01-29

    Thermodynamic study is performed on nitrogen expander cycles for large capacity liquefaction of natural gas. In order to substantially increase the capacity, a Brayton refrigeration cycle with nitrogen expander was recently added to the cold end of the reputable propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) process. Similar modifications with a nitrogen expander cycle are extensively investigated on a variety of cycle configurations. The existing and modified cycles are simulated with commercial process software (Aspen HYSYS) based on selected specifications. The results are compared in terms of thermodynamic efficiency, liquefaction capacity, and estimated size of heat exchangers. The combination of C3-MR with partial regeneration and pre-cooling of nitrogen expander cycle is recommended to have a great potential for high efficiency and large capacity.

  13. Process for coal liquefaction employing selective coal feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoover, David S.; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    An improved coal liquefaction process is provided whereby coal conversion is improved and yields of pentane soluble liquefaction products are increased. In this process, selected feed coal is pulverized and slurried with a process derived solvent, passed through a preheater and one or more dissolvers in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures, following which solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. The selected feed coals comprise washed coals having a substantial amount of mineral matter, preferably from about 25-75%, by weight, based upon run-of-mine coal, removed with at least 1.0% by weight of pyritic sulfur remaining and exhibiting vitrinite reflectance of less than about 0.70%.

  14. Cameron to Milford-138kV Transmission Line | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Indicated) for this property. proposed General Provisions: No firearms, air guns, or archery equipment would be allowed on the project sites to prevent shooting of any...

  15. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bruce K. (Englewood, CO); Junkin, James E. (Englewood, CO)

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  16. Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; Wolf, D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-10-01

    As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt% wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3000 psi. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor by the University to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a high pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed and following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. By July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350{degree}C to 430{degree}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt% residual oxygen were produced. 38 refs., 82 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.

    1992-05-01

    The broad range of processing conditions involved in direct biomass liquefaction lead to a variety of product properties. The aqueous byproduct streams have received limited analyses because priority has been placed on analysis of the complex organic liquid product. The range of organic contaminants carried in the aqueous byproducts directly correlates with the quantity and quality of contaminants in the liquid oil product. The data in the literature gives a general indication of the types and amounts of components expected in biomass liquefaction wastewater; however, the data is insufficient to prepare a general model that predicts the wastewater composition from any given liquefaction process. Such a model would be useful in predicting the amount of water that would be soluble in a given oil and the level of dissolved water at which a second aqueous-rich phase would separate from the oil. Both biological and thermochemical processes have proposed for wastewater treatment, but no treatment process has been tested. Aerobic and anaerobic biological systems as well as oxidative and catalytic reforming thermochemical systems should be considered.

  18. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-85-LNG; 10-111-LNG; 13-121-LNG; 14-31-LNG; 13-30-LNG; 13-42-LNG; 14-92-LNG SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE ...

  19. Liquefaction and storage of thermal treatment off-gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, D.M. . Rocky Flats Plant); Golden, J.O. )

    1992-09-08

    A fluidized bed catalytic oxidation unit is being developed for use in the destruction of mixed waste at the Rocky Flats Plant. Cyclones, filters, in situ neutralization of acid gases, and a catalytic converter are used to meet emission standards. Because there is concern by the public that these measures may not be adequate, two off-gas capture systems were evaluated. Both systems involve liquefaction of carbon dioxide produced in the oxidation process. The carbon dioxide would be released only after analysis proved that all appropriate emission standards are met.

  20. Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C. )

    1992-04-01

    Biomass can provide a substantial energy source. Liquids are preferred for use as transportation fuels because of their high energy density and handling ease and safety. Liquid fuel production from biomass can be accomplished by any of several different processes including hydrolysis and fermentation of the carbohydrates to alcohol fuels, thermal gasification and synthesis of alcohol or hydrocarbon fuels, direct extraction of biologically produced hydrocarbons such as seed oils or algae lipids, or direct thermochemical conversion of the biomass to liquids and catalytic upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels. This report discusses direct thermochemical conversion to achieve biomass liquefaction and the requirements for wastewater treatment inherent in such processing. 21 refs.

  1. Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vermeulen, Theodore (Berkeley, CA); Grens, II, Edward A. (Danville, CA); Holten, Ronald R. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl.sub.2 catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl.sub.2 and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon, selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

  2. Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorbaty, Martin L.; Taunton, John W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

  3. Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the results of Run 261 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on January 12, 1991 and continued until May 31, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Illinois No. 6 seam bituminous coal (from Burning star No. 2 mine). In the first part of Run 261, a new bimodal catalyst, EXP-AO-60, was tested for its performance and attrition characteristics in the catalytic/catalytic mode of the CC-ITSL process. The main objective of this part of the run was to obtain good process performance in the low/high temperature mode of operation along with well-defined distillation product end boiling points. In the second part of Run 261, Criterion (Shell) 324 catalyst was tested. The objective of this test was to evaluate the operational stability and catalyst and process performance while processing the high ash Illinois No. 6 coal. Increasing viscosity and preasphaltenes made it difficult to operate at conditions similar to EXP-AO-60 catalyst operation, especially at lower catalyst replacement rates.

  4. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-07-27

    Low severity coal liquefaction allows for solubilization of coal with reduced gas make. These lower severity conditions may result in some selective bond rupture. Promotion of coal solubilization through hydrogen transfer using highly active and effective hydrogen donors is the objective of this study. The highly effective donors being tested are cyclic olefins. Representative cyclic olefins are isotetralin, which is 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene. These compounds are hydroaromatics without aromatic rings and have been shown to be highly effective donors. The objective of the work performed in this study during this quarter was to evaluate reaction parameters for low severity liquefaction reactions using the cyclic olefin, hexahydroanthracene, and the aromatic, anthracene. These model compounds were reacted under a variety of conditions to evaluate their reactivity without coal. The reactions were performed under both thermal and catalytic conditions. Finely divided catalysts from different molybdenum precursors were used to determine their activity in promoting hydrogenation and hydrogen transfer at low severity conditions. The catalysts used were Molyvan L, sulfurized oxymolybdenum dithiocarbamate, molybdenum naphthenate, and Molyvan 822, organo molybdenum dithiocarbamate.

  5. Coal liquefaction: investigation of reactor performance, role of catalysts, and PCT properties. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, A.; Shah, Y.; Tierney, J.; Wender, I.; Albal, R.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Joseph, S.; Seshadri, K.

    1984-10-01

    This report presents the findings of a research effort directed to three tasks summarized below: Task 1: To develop a computer simulator for a direct coal liquefaction reactor. Task 2: To conduct a comprehensive review of indirect liquefaction for the production of fuels and, to a lesser extent, of chemicals. Task 3: To conduct a literature review and analysis of the physical, chemical, and thermodynamic properties (PCT) of the products from direct coal liquefaction processes. Appendix I-D has been entered individually into EDB and ERA.

  6. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, G.P.

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  7. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 | Department of Energy EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-06-LNG - ORDER 3066 PDF icon April 2013 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT.

  8. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF fOSS IL ENERGY ) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC ) Lake Charles Exports, LLC ) Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP ) Carib Energy (USA) LLC ) Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC ) Cameron LNG, LLC ) Gulf Coast LNG Export, LLC ) Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P ) LNG Development Company, LLC (d/b/a Oregon LNG) ) Cheniere Marketing, LLC ) Southern LNG Company, L.L.C. ) Gulf LNG Liquefaction Company, LLC ) CE FLNG, LLC ) Excelerate

  9. Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds a wide variety of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects in an effort to assist tribes in realizing their energy visions.

  10. V RECEIVED BY TIC OCT 011376 EG-0026 EVALUATION OF SOIL LIQUEFACTION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Initial Liquefaction from Deep to Shallow Strata Fig. 1-4 ... methods for use in engineering design at the present time. ... resulting from the development of high pore water pressures. ...

  11. Development of Highly Reactive Nanometer Fe-Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, James A.; Linehan, John C.; Matson, Dean W.; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Bekhazi, Jacky; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes research involving the liquefaction of coal and the removal of oxygen from coal product constituents. Subbituminous Coal and early stage coal liquefaction products contain a substantial fraction of hydroxy-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons (phenols). An important reaction for upgrading of coal-derived organic materials is to remove oxygen groups. This paper describes the hydro-deoxygenation of naphthols and the liquefaction of subbituminous Wyodak coal using a catalyst prepared by in-situ sulfidation of nanometer scale 6-line iron ferrihydrite. The FeS catalyst enables the conversion of naphthol in substantial yields to tetralin and naphthalene at 400 degrees C in 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene. The kinetics and procedures to observe coal liquefaction and hydro-deoxygenation, and the effects of in-situ sulfidation on conversion kinetics are described.

  12. Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, W. H.

    1980-09-01

    Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  13. Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC – FE Dkt. No. 14-92-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed on July 11, 2014, by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC (SPL), seeking long-term multi-contract authorization to export...

  14. Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC FE Dkt. No 15-171-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of receipt of an application (Application), filed on November 6, 2015, by Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC (Sabine Pass)...

  15. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC, FLNG Liquefactio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liquefaction 3, LLC to Transfer Control of Long-term Authorization to Export LNG to Free Trade Agreement Nations and Non-free Trade Agreement Nations in FE Dkts. 10-160-LNG;...

  16. Corpus Christi Liquefaction, LLC- FE Dkt. No 15-97-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed June 1, 2015, by Corpus Christi Liquefaction, LLC (Corpus Christi), seeking a long-term multi-contract authorization to...

  17. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  18. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 13-131-LNG - ORDER 3384 PDF icon April 2014 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS ...

  19. Hydrothermal pretreatment to prevent scale during liquefaction of certain solid carbonaceous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, John B.; Floyd, Frank M.

    1984-01-01

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by hydrothermal pretreatment. The said pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The said pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1000 to about 4400 psia. Temperature during said pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 500.degree. to about 700.degree. F.

  20. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State's Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in

  1. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State's Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly

  2. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Coal-Liquefaction Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, S.S.

    1980-03-01

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of J.M. Deutch (Under Secretary of DOE), E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has studied and reviewed currently funded coal-liquefaction technologies. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term development of coal-liquefaction technologies. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  3. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass: Developments from batch to continuous process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Biller, Patrick; Ross, Andrew; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2015-02-01

    This review describes the recent results in hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass in continuous-flow processing systems. Although much has been published about batch reactor tests of biomass HTL, there is only limited information yet available on continuous-flow tests, which can provide a more reasonable basis for process design and scale-up for commercialization. High-moisture biomass feedstocks are the most likely to be used in HTL. These materials are described and results of their processing are discussed. Engineered systems for HTL are described however they are of limited size and do not yet approach a demonstration scale of operation. With the results available process models have been developed and mass and energy balances determined. From these models process costs have been calculated and provide some optimism as to the commercial likelihood of the technology.

  4. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  5. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  6. Projecting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Projecting the scale of the pipeline network for CO2-EOR and its implications for CCS infrastructure development Matthew Tanner Office of Petroleum, Gas, & Biofuels Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration October 25, 2010 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions ex- pressed here are those of the author and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Author: Matthew Tanner, matthew.tanner@eia.gov

  7. Coal liquefaction: Investigation of reactor performance, role of catalysts and PCT properties: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Y.; Tierney, J.; Wender, I.; Joseph, S.; Wen, C.

    1987-02-01

    In the first section of this report, a mathematical model for the Wilsonville Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction Process is presented. The first stage is a bubble column slurry reactor and has been modeled previously. The second stage is an ebullated bed catalytic reactor designed to improve product quality, process flexibility, and hydrogen utilization efficiency. The basic equations for the second stage are developed. Supplementary information, a user manual, a sample problem, and a complete computer code in FORTRAN are given in Appendices. The second, third and fourth sections deal with the role of three types of catalysts in direct coal liquefaction. The second section contains an overview of the advantages, limitations, and significance of using homogeneous catalysts such as transition metal complexes for direct coal liquefaction. These catalysts have the potential for hydroliquefaction of coal at relatively mild conditions and with good liquid yields. Emphasis is on review of the large body of published literature and on obtaining a perspective for where future developments using these types of catalysts will occur. The third section is concerned with the conversion of coal to liquids using very strong acids known as superacids as catalysts in direct coal liquefaction. The study of the direct liquefaction of coal with superacids promises to yield new approaches to both coal conversion and to elucidation of the constitution of coal. Background information on the use of liquid clathrates as catalysts for coal liquefaction is presented in Section IV. Liquid clathrates can aid in the liquefaction of coal at or near room temperature and require neither application of heat nor consumption of hydrogen. Unfortunately, yields are low, and further developments are needed to justify commercial exploitation. 120 refs.

  8. Cameron_1977.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  9. Biomass Direct Liquefaction Options. TechnoEconomic and Life Cycle Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tews, Iva J.; Zhu, Yunhua; Drennan, Corinne; Elliott, Douglas C.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Onarheim, Kristin; Solantausta, Yrjo; Beckman, David

    2014-07-31

    The purpose of this work was to assess the competitiveness of two biomass to transportation fuel processing routes, which were under development in Finland, the U.S. and elsewhere. Concepts included fast pyrolysis (FP), and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), both followed by hydrodeoxygenation, and final product refining. This work was carried out as a collaboration between VTT (Finland), and PNNL (USA). The public funding agents for the work were Tekes in Finland and the Bioenergy Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. The effort was proposed as an update of the earlier comparative technoeconomic assessment performed by the IEA Bioenergy Direct Biomass Liquefaction Task in the 1980s. New developments in HTL and the upgrading of the HTL biocrude product triggered the interest in reinvestigating this comparison of these biomass liquefaction processes. In addition, developments in FP bio-oil upgrading had provided additional definition of this process option, which could provide an interesting comparison.

  10. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-07-01

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

  11. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This reports presents the operating results for Run 252 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode (CC-ITSL) using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability in the CC-ITSL mode with catalytic-catalytic reactors and with ash recycle. Run 252 began on 26 November 1986 and continued through 3 February 1987. During this period 214.4 MF tons of Illinois No. 6 coal were fed in 1250 hours of operation. 3 refs., 29 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LLC - FE DKT. NOs. 12-06-LNG, 10-161-LNG and 11-161-LNG (Order Nos. 3066, 3282 and 3357) | Department of Energy EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NOs. 12-06-LNG, 10-161-LNG and 11-161-LNG (Order Nos. 3066, 3282 and 3357) SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR FREEPORT LNG EXPANSION, L.P. & FLNG LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NOs. 12-06-LNG, 10-161-LNG and 11-161-LNG (Order Nos. 3066, 3282 and 3357) PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 PDF

  13. Catalyst system and process for benzyl ether fragmentation and coal liquefaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zoeller, Joseph Robert (Kingsport, TN)

    1998-04-28

    Dibenzyl ether can be readily cleaved to form primarily benzaldehyde and toluene as products, along with minor amounts of bibenzyl and benzyl benzoate, in the presence of a catalyst system comprising a Group 6 metal, preferably molybdenum, a salt, and an organic halide. Although useful synthetically for the cleavage of benzyl ethers, this cleavage also represents a key model reaction for the liquefaction of coal; thus this catalyst system and process should be useful in coal liquefaction with the advantage of operating at significantly lower temperatures and pressures.

  14. EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement (FR) | Department of Energy Statement (FR) EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (FR) Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline Project; Jefferson and Orange Counties, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a notice of intent to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas marine terminal along

  15. EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement | Department of Energy Statement EIS-0517: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Port Arthur Liquefaction Project and Port Arthur Pipeline Project; Jefferson and Orange Counties, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a notice of intent to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas marine terminal along the

  16. Cooperative Research Program in Coal-Waste Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Huffman

    2000-03-31

    The results of a feasibility study for a demonstration plant for the liquefaction of waste plastic and tires and the coprocessing of these waste polymers with coal are presented. The study was conducted by a committee that included nine representatives from the CFFS, six from the U.S. Department of Energy - Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), and four from Burns and Roe, Inc. The study included: (1) An assessment of current recycling practices, particularly feedstock recycling in Germany; (2) A review of pertinent research, and a survey of feedstock availability for various types of waste polymers; and (3) A conceptual design for a demonstration plant was developed and an economic analysis for various feedstock mixes. The base case for feedstock scenarios was chosen to be 200 tons per day of waste plastic and 100 tons per day of waste tires. For this base case with oil priced at $20 per barrel, the return on investment (ROI) was found to range from 9% to 20%, using tipping fees for waste plastic and tires typical of those existing in the U.S. The most profitable feedstock appeared to waste plastic alone, with a plant processing 300 t/d of plastic yielding ROI's from 13 to 27 %, depending on the tipping fees for waste plastic. Feedstock recycling of tires was highly dependent on the price that could be obtained for recovered carbon. Addition of even relatively small amounts (20 t/d) of coal to waste plastic and/or coal feeds lowered the ROI's substantially. It should also be noted that increasing the size of the plant significantly improved all ROI's. For example, increasing plant size from 300 t/d to1200 t/d approximately doubles the estimated ROI's for a waste plastic feedstock.

  17. Revised SRC-I project baseline. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky has contracted with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to design, build and operate a first-of-its-kind plant demonstrating the economic, environmental, socioeconomic and technical feasibility of the direct coal liquefaction process known as SRC-I. ICRC has made a massive commitment of time and expertise to design processes, plan and formulate policy, schedules, costs and technical drawings for all plant systems. These fully integrated plans comprise the Project Baseline and are the basis for all future detailed engineering, plant construction, operation, and other work set forth in the contract between ICRC and the DOE. Volumes I and II of the accompanying documents constitute the updated Project Baseline for the SRC-I two-stage liquefaction plant. International Coal Refining Company believes this versatile plant design incorporates the most advanced coal liquefaction system available in the synthetic fuels field. SRC-I two-stage liquefaction, as developed by ICRC, is the way of the future in coal liquefaction because of its product slate flexibility, high process thermal efficiency, and low consumption of hydrogen. The SRC-I Project Baseline design also has made important state-of-the-art advances in areas such as environmental control systems. Because of a lack of funding, the DOE has curtailed the total project effort without specifying a definite renewal date. This precludes the development of revised accurate and meaningful schedules and, hence, escalated project costs. ICRC has revised and updated the original Design Baseline to include in the technical documentation all of the approved but previously non-incorporated Category B and C and new Post-Baseline Engineering Change Proposals.

  18. Low-rank coal research: Volume 1, Control technology, liquefaction, and gasification: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, G.F.; Collings, M.E.; Schelkoph, G.L.; Steadman, E.N.; Moretti, C.J.; Henke, K.R.; Rindt, J.R.; Hetland, M.D.; Knudson, C.L.; Willson, W.G.

    1987-04-01

    Volume I contains articles on SO/sub x//NO/sub x/ control, waste management, low-rank direct liquefaction, hydrogen production from low-rank coals, and advanced wastewater treatment. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  19. Method for separating liquid and solid products of liquefaction of coal or like carbonaceous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malek, John M.

    1978-04-18

    A method of improving the quality of slurry products taken from coal liquefaction reactors comprising subjecting the slurry to treatment with an alkaline compound such as caustic soda in the presence of steam in order to decompose the phenolic and acidic materials present in the slurry, and to also lower the slurry viscosity to allow separation of solid particles by sedimentation.

  20. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The investigation of various Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process configurations was conducted at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility between July 1982 and September 1986. The facility combines three process units. There are the liquefaction unit, either thermal (TLU) or catalytic, for the dissolution of coal, the Critical Solvent Deashing unit (CSD) for the separation of ash and undissolved coal, and a catalytic hydrogenation unit (HTR) for product upgrading and recycle process solvent replenishment. The various TSL process configurations were created by changing the process sequence of these three units and by recycling hydrotreated solvents between the units. This report presents a description of the TSL configurations investigated and an analysis of the operating and performance data from the period of study. Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal Wyodak Clovis Point Mine coal were processed. Cobalt-molybdenum and disposable iron-oxide catalysts were used to improve coal liquefaction reactions and nickel-molybdenum catalysts were used in the hydrotreater. 28 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Separating liquid and solid products of liquefaction of coal or like carbonaceous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malek, John M.

    1979-06-26

    Slurryform products of coal liquefaction are treated with caustic soda in presence of H.sub.2 O in an inline static mixer and then the treated product is separated into a solids fraction and liquid fractions, including liquid hydrocarbons, by gravity settling preferably effected in a multiplate settling separator with a plurality of settling spacings.

  2. Recovery Act: Demonstrating The Commercial Feasibility Of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Generation At Sweet Lake Field, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Extensive conceptual and numerical modeling of the reservoir to quantify the reservoir characteristics; using a wealth of information from oil & gas wells in the area; including log; core; PVT and flow test data.

  3. Prediction of microalgae hydrothermal liquefaction products from feedstock biochemical composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leow, Shijie; Witter, John R.; Vardon, Derek R.; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2015-05-11

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) uses water under elevated temperatures and pressures (200–350 °C, 5–20 MPa) to convert biomass into liquid “biocrude” oil. Despite extensive reports on factors influencing microalgae cell composition during cultivation and separate reports on HTL products linked to cell composition, the field still lacks a quantitative model to predict HTL conversion product yield and qualities from feedstock biochemical composition; the tailoring of microalgae feedstock for downstream conversion is a unique and critical aspect of microalgae biofuels that must be leveraged upon for optimization of the whole process. This study developed predictive relationships for HTL biocrude yield and other conversion product characteristics based on HTL of Nannochloropsis oculata batches harvested with a wide range of compositions (23–59% dw lipids, 58–17% dw proteins, 12–22% dw carbohydrates) and a defatted batch (0% dw lipids, 75% dw proteins, 19% dw carbohydrates). HTL biocrude yield (33–68% dw) and carbon distribution (49–83%) increased in proportion to the fatty acid (FA) content. A component additivity model (predicting biocrude yield from lipid, protein, and carbohydrates) was more accurate predicting literature yields for diverse microalgae species than previous additivity models derived from model compounds. FA profiling of the biocrude product showed strong links to the initial feedstock FA profile of the lipid component, demonstrating that HTL acts as a water-based extraction process for FAs; the remainder non-FA structural components could be represented using the defatted batch. These findings were used to introduce a new FA-based model that predicts biocrude oil yields along with other critical parameters, and is capable of adjusting for the wide variations in HTL methodology and microalgae species through the defatted batch. Lastly, the FA model was linked to an upstream cultivation model (Phototrophic Process Model), providing for the first time an integrated modeling framework to overcome a critical barrier to microalgae-derived HTL biofuels and enable predictive analysis of the overall microalgal-to-biofuel process.

  4. Prediction of microalgae hydrothermal liquefaction products from feedstock biochemical composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leow, Shijie; Witter, John R.; Vardon, Derek R.; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2015-05-11

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) uses water under elevated temperatures and pressures (200–350 °C, 5–20 MPa) to convert biomass into liquid “biocrude” oil. Despite extensive reports on factors influencing microalgae cell composition during cultivation and separate reports on HTL products linked to cell composition, the field still lacks a quantitative model to predict HTL conversion product yield and qualities from feedstock biochemical composition; the tailoring of microalgae feedstock for downstream conversion is a unique and critical aspect of microalgae biofuels that must be leveraged upon for optimization of the whole process. This study developed predictive relationships for HTL biocrude yield and othermore » conversion product characteristics based on HTL of Nannochloropsis oculata batches harvested with a wide range of compositions (23–59% dw lipids, 58–17% dw proteins, 12–22% dw carbohydrates) and a defatted batch (0% dw lipids, 75% dw proteins, 19% dw carbohydrates). HTL biocrude yield (33–68% dw) and carbon distribution (49–83%) increased in proportion to the fatty acid (FA) content. A component additivity model (predicting biocrude yield from lipid, protein, and carbohydrates) was more accurate predicting literature yields for diverse microalgae species than previous additivity models derived from model compounds. FA profiling of the biocrude product showed strong links to the initial feedstock FA profile of the lipid component, demonstrating that HTL acts as a water-based extraction process for FAs; the remainder non-FA structural components could be represented using the defatted batch. These findings were used to introduce a new FA-based model that predicts biocrude oil yields along with other critical parameters, and is capable of adjusting for the wide variations in HTL methodology and microalgae species through the defatted batch. Lastly, the FA model was linked to an upstream cultivation model (Phototrophic Process Model), providing for the first time an integrated modeling framework to overcome a critical barrier to microalgae-derived HTL biofuels and enable predictive analysis of the overall microalgal-to-biofuel process.« less

  5. Status of health and environmental research relative to direct coal liquefaction: 1976 to the present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.; Cowser, K.E.

    1982-06-01

    This document describes the status of health and environmental research efforts, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to assist in the development of environmentally acceptable coal liquefaction processes. Four major direct coal liquefaction processes are currently in (or have been investigated at) the pilot plant stage of development. Two solvent refined coal processes (SRC-I and -II), H-coal (a catalytic liquefaction process) and Exxon donor solvent (EDS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was assigned responsibility for evaluating SRC process materials and prepared comprehensive health and environmental effects research program plans for SRC-I and -II. A similar program plan was prepared for H-coal process materials by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A program has been developed for EDS process materials by Exxon Research and Engineering Co. The program includes short-term screening of coal-derived materials for potential health and ecological effects. Longer-term assays are used to evaluate materials considered most representative of potential commercial practice and with greatest potential for human exposure or release to the environment. Effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential health and ecological effects are also being evaluated. These assessments are being conducted to assist in formulating cost-effective environmental research programs and to estimate health and environmental risks associated with a large-scale coal liquefaction industry. Significant results of DOE's health and environmental research efforts relative to coal liquefaction include the following: chemical characterization, health effects, ecological fate and effects, amelioration and risk assessment.

  6. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC- FE Dkt. No. 11-161-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 15, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOE/FE) issued Order No. 3357 (FLEX II Conditional Order) to Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P., FLNG Liquefaction, LLC,...

  7. Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC- FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On May 17, 2013, the Office of Fossil Energy of the Department of Energy (DOE/FE) issued Order No. 3282 (FLEX I Conditional Order) to Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC,...

  8. Process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein nitrogen is separated from hydrogen via ammonia synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetka, Steven S.; Nazario, Francisco N.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein bottoms residues are upgraded with a process wherein air is employed, the improvement wherein nitrogen buildup in the system is avoided by ammonia synthesis. In a preferred embodiment hydrogen from other portions of the liquefaction process will be combined with hydrogen produced as a result of the bottoms upgrading to increase the H.sub.2 :N.sub.2 ratio in the ammonia reactor.

  9. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two outreach and training tasks, and one project management and communications task. ... Communication, Collaboration, and Training on Clean Coal Technologies) as well as ...

  10. Status of coal liquefaction in the United States and related research and development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; McNeese, L.E.

    1982-10-05

    We divide coal liquefaction processes into four categories: (1) indirect liquefaction, such as Fischer-Tropsch and methanol synthesis, in which coal is fist gasified to produce a synthesis gas which is then recombined to produce liquids; (2) direct liquefaction processes, typified by H-Coal, Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), and SRC-I and II, in which a slurry of coal and solvent is subjected to high severity liquefaction conditions, either with or without added catalyst; (3) two-stage liquefaction, such as Conoco's CSF process, in which an initial dissolution at mild conditions is followed by a more severe catalytic hydrogenation-hydrocracking step; or the short contact time two-stage liquefaction processes being developed currently by groups which include Chevron, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Department of Energy/Fossil Energy (DOE/FE); and (4) pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis processes, such as COED and Cities Service-Rockewell, in which coal is carbonized to produce liquids, gases, and char. Pilot plant experience with the various processes is reviewed (including equipment problems, corrosion and abrasion, refractory life, heat recovery, coke deposits, reactor kinetics, scale-up problems, health hazards, environmental impacts, upgrading products, economics, etc.). Commercialization possibilities are discussed somewhat pessimistically in the light of reduction of US Oil imports, weakening oil prices, conversion to coal, smaller automobiles, economics and finally, some uncertainty about SFC goals and policies. (LTN)

  11. Low-severity catalytic two-stage liquefaction process: Illinois coal conceptual commercial plant design and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrams, L.M.; Comolli, A.G.; Popper, G.A.; Wang, C.; Wilson, G.

    1988-09-01

    Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) is conducting a program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate a Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. This program which runs through 1987, is a continuation of an earlier DOE sponsored program (1983--1985) at HRI to develop a new technology concept for CTSL. The earlier program included bench-scale testing of improved operating conditions for the CTSL Process on Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal and Wyoming sub-bituminous coal, and engineering screening studies to identify the economic incentive for CTSL over the single-stage H-Coal/reg sign/ Process for Illinois No. 6 coal. In the current program these engineering screening studies are extended to deep-cleaned Illinois coal and use of heavy recycle. The results from this comparison will be used as a guide for future experiments with respect to selection of coal feedstocks and areas for further process optimization. A preliminary design for CTSL of Illinois deep-cleaned coal was developed based on demonstrated bench-scale performance in Run No. 227-47(I-27), and from HRI's design experience on the Breckinridge Project and H-Coal/reg sign/ Process pilot plant operations at Catlettsburg. Complete conceptual commercial plant designs were developed for a grassroots facility using HRI's Process Planning Model. Product costs were calculated and economic sensitivities analyzed. 14 refs., 11 figs., 49 tabs.

  12. Coal liquefaction: investigation of reactor performance, role of catalysts and PCT properties. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, A.J.; Shah, Y.T.; Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Badgujar, M.; Joseph, S.; Kerkar, A.; Ozturk, S.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate areas of science and technology that have been defined as being of prime interest to coal processing technology development. These areas include properties of coal liquids and slurries, reactor design, and performance in relation to reaction mechanisms. The work comprises the following tasks: (1) reaction kinetics and reactor performance in direct coal liquefaction; (2) role of catalysts in indirect liquefaction and direct coal liquefaction; and (3) physical, chemical, and thermodynamic properties of coal liquefaction products. This report summarizes work done during the period October 1, 1984 through December 31, 1984. A detailed description of work in each of the three tasks is presented.

  13. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

  14. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

  15. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO.

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10-85-LNG; 10-111-LNG; 13-121-LNG; 14-31-LNG; 13-30-LNG; 13-42-LNG; 14-92-LNG; 15-171-LNG | Department of Energy SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-85-LNG; 10-111-LNG; 13-121-LNG; 14-31-LNG; 13-30-LNG; 13-42-LNG; 14-92-LNG; 15-171-LNG SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SABINE PASS LIQUEFACTION, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 10-85-LNG; 10-111-LNG; 13-121-LNG; 14-31-LNG; 13-30-LNG; 13-42-LNG; 14-92-LNG; 15-171-LNG PDF icon April 2011 PDF icon October 2011 PDF icon April 2012 PDF icon October 2012 PDF

  16. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  17. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  18. EIS-0519: Notice of Intent

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rio Grande LNG Project and Rio Bravo Pipeline Project; Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy, and Cameron Counties, Texas

  19. Research Summary: Corrosion Considerations for Thermochemical Biomass Liquefaction Process Systems in Biofuel Production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; Leonard, Donovan N; Whitmer, Lysle; Thomson, Jeffery K

    2014-01-01

    Thermochemical liquifaction processing of biomass to produce bio-derived fuels (e.g. gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, home heating oil, etc.) is of great recent interest as a renewable energy source. Approaches under investigation include direct liquefaction, hydrothermal liquefaction, hydropyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, etc. to produce energy dense liquids that can be utilized as produced or further processed to provide products of higher value. An issue with bio-oils is that they tend to contain significant concentrations of organic compounds, which make the bio-oil acidic and a potential source of corrosion issues in in transport, storage, and use. Efforts devoted to modified/further processing of bio-oilsmore » to make them less corrosive are currently being widely pursued. Another aspect that must also be addressed is potential corrosion issues in the bio-oil liquefaction process equipment itself. Depending on the specific process, bio-oil liquefaction production temperatures can reach up to 400-600 C, and involve the presence of aggressive sulfur, and halide species from both the biomass used and/or process additives. Detailed knowledge of the corrosion resistance of candidate process equipment alloys in these bio-oil production environments is currently lacking. This paper summarizes our recent, ongoing efforts to assess the extent to which corrosion of bio-oil process equipment may be an issue, with the ultimate goal of providing the basis to select the lowest cost alloy grades capable of providing the long-term corrosion resistance needed for future bio-oil production plants.« less

  20. Research Summary: Corrosion Considerations for Thermochemical Biomass Liquefaction Process Systems in Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; Leonard, Donovan N; Whitmer, Lysle; Thomson, Jeffery K

    2014-01-01

    Thermochemical liquifaction processing of biomass to produce bio-derived fuels (e.g. gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, home heating oil, etc.) is of great recent interest as a renewable energy source. Approaches under investigation include direct liquefaction, hydrothermal liquefaction, hydropyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, etc. to produce energy dense liquids that can be utilized as produced or further processed to provide products of higher value. An issue with bio-oils is that they tend to contain significant concentrations of organic compounds, which make the bio-oil acidic and a potential source of corrosion issues in in transport, storage, and use. Efforts devoted to modified/further processing of bio-oils to make them less corrosive are currently being widely pursued. Another aspect that must also be addressed is potential corrosion issues in the bio-oil liquefaction process equipment itself. Depending on the specific process, bio-oil liquefaction production temperatures can reach up to 400-600 C, and involve the presence of aggressive sulfur, and halide species from both the biomass used and/or process additives. Detailed knowledge of the corrosion resistance of candidate process equipment alloys in these bio-oil production environments is currently lacking. This paper summarizes our recent, ongoing efforts to assess the extent to which corrosion of bio-oil process equipment may be an issue, with the ultimate goal of providing the basis to select the lowest cost alloy grades capable of providing the long-term corrosion resistance needed for future bio-oil production plants.

  1. Coal liquefaction: investigation of reactor performance, role of catalysts, and PCT properties. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brainard, A.; Shah, Y.; Tierney, J.; Wender, I.; Joseph, S.; Kerkar, A.; Ozturk, S.; Sayari, A.

    1985-11-01

    This report is divided into two sections plus an appendix. The first section reports on computer simulations which were developed for three important coal liquefaction processes - the Mobil Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) process, the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process, and the synthesis of methanol. The models are designed to be general and information such as new kinetic equations or new physical property information can be readily added. Each of the models also provides for alternate reactor configurations. A comparison of results obtained using the models and results reported in the literature is included to verify the model. Comparisons of alternate processing methods are also included to provide guidance in the selection of a reactor configuration for a specific process. Complete program listings are given in the Appendix, and sample problems with inputs and outputs are provided for the user. The programs are written in the FORTRAN language. It is ultimately desirable to make these models available in a form which can be used in ASPEN, the process simulator developed for DOE. As a first step, the use of ASPEN PLUS to predict thermodynamic and transport properties of systems of interest to coal liquefaction was studied. In the second section, five areas of potential importance to indirect and direct coal liquefaction are reviewed. They are the synthesis of methanol via methyl formate, the role of carbon dioxide in methanol synthesis, the synthesis of methanol using noble metal catalysts, the catalytic synthesis of higher alcohols from a new, high-yield sulfur-tolerant catalyst, and the direct liquefaction of coal mixed with heavy oils - so-called coprocessing. Seven papers in the two sections have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  2. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  3. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation: Processes and equipment. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning methods, processes, and apparatus for coal liquefaction and hydrogenation. Included are patents for catalytic two-stage, catalytic single-step, fixed-bed, hydrogen-donor, internal heat transfer, and multi-phase processes. Topics also include catalyst production, catalyst recovery, desulfurization, pretreatment of coals, energy recovery processes, solvent product separation, hydrogenating gases, and pollution control. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Use of coal liquefaction catalysts for coal/oil coprocessing and heavy oil upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cugini, A.V.; Krastman, D.; Thompson, R.L.; Gardner, T.J.; Ciocco, M.V.

    1997-04-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of coal and model solvents using dispersed or supported catalysts at different pressures has been the focus of several recent studies at PETC. The effectiveness of these catalysts has been studied in coal liquefaction and coal-oil coprocessing. Coal-oil coprocessing involves the co-reaction of coal and petroleum-derived oil or resid. The results of these studies have indicated that both dispersed and supported catalysts are effective in these systems at elevated H{sub 2} pressures ({approximately}2,500 psig). Attempts to reduce pressure indicated that a combination of catalyst concentration and solvent quality could be used to compensate for reductions in H{sub 2} pressure. Comparison of the coal and coprocessing systems reveals many similarities in the catalytic requirements for both systems. Both hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis activities are required and the reactive environments are similar. Also, the use of catalysts in the two systems shares problems with similar types of inhibitors and poisons. The logical extension of this is that it may be reasonable to expect similar trends in catalyst activity for both systems. In fact, many of the catalysts selected for coal liquefaction were selected based on their effectiveness in petroleum systems. This study investigates the use of supported and dispersed coal liquefaction catalysts in coal-oil coprocessing and petroleum-only systems. The focus of the study was delineating the effects of coal concentration, pressure, and catalyst type.

  5. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Application of liquid chromatographic separation methods to THF-soluble portions of integrated two-stage coal liquefaction resids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.B.; Pearson, C.D.; Young, L.L.; Green, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using non-aqueous ion exchange liquid chromatography (NIELC) for the examination of the tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble distillation resids and THF-soluble whole oils derived from direct coal liquefaction. The technique can be used to separate the material into a number of acid, base, and neutral fractions. Each of the fractions obtained by NIELC was analyzed and then further fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The separation and analysis schemes are given in the accompanying report. With this approach, differences can be distinguished among samples obtained from different process streams in the liquefaction plant and among samples obtained at the same sampling location, but produced from different feed coals. HPLC was directly applied to one THF-soluble whole process oil without the NIELC preparation, with limited success. The direct HPLC technique used was directed toward the elution of the acid species into defined classes. The non-retained neutral and basic components of the oil were not analyzable by the direct HPLC method because of solubility limitations. Sample solubility is a major concern in the application of these techniques.

  6. EIS-0519: Rio Grande LNG Project and Rio Bravo Pipeline Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal and marine facilities on the Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, ...

  7. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report II. Breckinridge Project design basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    The Breckinridge Project is a pioneer endeavor involving the engineering, construction, and operation of a commercial facility that will convert 23,000 tons per day of run-of-mine, high-sulfur coal into 50,000 barrels per day of liquid hydrocarbons equivalent to those produced from crude oil. The Initial Effort, now complete, was executed under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-80OR20717 between the Department of Energy and the Participants, Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc., and Airco Energy Company, Inc. The Initial Effort produced a preliminary design, capital estimate, and economic analysis of the commercial plant, as well as a plan for the design, construction, and operation of that plant. The extensive and rigorous attention given to environmental, socioeconomic, safety, and health considerations is indicative of the high priority these issues will continue to receive throughout the life of the project. The Breckinridge Energy Company, a partnership of several major corporations, is being formed to finance, own, and manage the Breckinridge Project. Report II is intended for the reader who is primarily interested in less detailed discussion of the coal liquefaction process and Breckinridge facility than presented in the eleven volumes of Reports IV and V. The overview section describes the project goals and briefly introduces the coal liquefaction process. The report continues with a discussion of the history of the project and the H-COAL process from its concept to the proposed commercialization technology. The report describes the site, the Breckinridge Facility, and concludes with a summary of the eleven reports that contain the deliverable documentation of the Initial Effort or Development Phase of the project.

  8. Coal liquefaction process wherein jet fuel, diesel fuel and/or ASTM No. 2 fuel oil is recovered

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bauman, Richard F.; Ryan, Daniel F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for the liquefaction of coal and similar solid carbonaceous materials wherein a hydrogen donor solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the naphthenic components from the solvent or diluent fraction are separated and used as jet fuel components. The extraction increases the relative concentration of hydroaromatic (hydrogen donor) components and as a result reduces the gas yield during liquefaction and decreases hydrogen consumption during said liquefaction. The hydrogenation severity can be controlled to increase the yield of naphthenic components and hence the yield of jet fuel and in a preferred embodiment jet fuel yield is maximized while at the same time maintaining solvent balance.

  9. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. EDS commercial plant study design update. Illinois coal. Volume 1. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epperly, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    The objectives of the Study Design Update (SDU) were to identify the technical issues facing a potential commercial-size EDS plant design; to provide a reliable basis for estimating the cost of EDS products; and to furnish research guidance to the EDS Project. The SDU consists of two distinct studies in which different processing schemes are used to produce the hydrogen and fuel gas required by the plant. These studies are referred to as the Base Case and the Market Flexibility Sensitivity Case. In the Base Case, hydrogen is generated by steam reforming of the light hydrocarbon gases produced in the plant. Fuel gas is generated by feeding the bottoms stream from the liquefaction section vacuum pipestill to a FLEXICOKING unit. In the FLEXICOKING unit reactor, the bottoms stream is converted to coke; additional liquid product is also recovered. The coke is converted to low-Btu fuel gas in the FLEXICOKING unit gasifier. In the Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case, the bottoms stream from the vacuum pipestill is split, and about half is sent to the FLEXICOKING unit for recovery of additional liquid product and production of fuel gas. The remainder of the bottoms stream is converted to hydrogen in a Partial Oxidation Unit. Hence the MFS Case does not consume light hydrocarbon gases produced and they are available for sale. The study of these two cases has demonstrated the importance of bottoms process selection to the economics and thermal efficiency of an EDS plant. Volume 1 - Main Report has been developed to be a stand-alone document. Both the Base Case and Market Flexibility Sensitivity (MFS) Case are covered. This volume includes an overview and detailed case summaries. It also covers economics, product recovery factors, material and energy balances, cost estimates and enviromental considerations.

  10. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

  11. Catalytic hydrotreating of biomass liquefaction products to produce hydrocarbon fuels: Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Baker, E.G.

    1986-03-01

    Research catalytic hydrotreatment of biomass liquefaction products to a gasoline has been technically demonstrated in a bench-scale continuous processing unit. This report describes the development of the chemistry needed for hydrotreatment of both high pressure and pyrolyzate biomass liquefaction products and outlines the important processing knowledge gained by the research. Catalyst identity is important in hydrotreatment of phenolics. Hydrogenation catalysts such as palladium, copper chromite, cobalt and nickel show activity with nickel being the most active. Major products include benzene, cyclohexane, and cyclohexanone. The hydrotreating catalysts cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-molybdenum and nickel-tungsten exhibit some activity when added to the reactor in the oxide form and show a great specificity for hydrodeoxygenation of phenol without saturation of the benzene product. The sulfide form of these catalysts is much more active than the oxide form and, in the case of the cobalt-molybdenum, much of the specificity for hydrodeoxygenation is retained. Substitution on the phenolic ring has only marginal effects on the hydrotreating reaction. However, the methoxy (OCH/sub 3/) substituent on the phenol ring is thermally unstable relative to other phenolics tested. The pyrolysis products dominate the product distribution when cobalt-molybdenum is used as the hydrotreating catalyst for methoxyphenol. The product from catalytic hydrotreatment of high-pressure biomass liquefaction products confirms the model compounds studies. Catalytic processing at 350 to 400/sup 0/C and 2000 psig with the sulfided cobalt-molybdenum or nickel-molybdenum catalyst produced a gasoline-like product composed of cyclic and aromatic compounds. Oxygen contents in products were in the range of 0 to 0.7 wt % and hydrogen to carbon atomic ratios ranged from 1.5 to 2.0. 46 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  12. Automated apparatus for solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

    1985-01-01

    An automated apparatus for the solvent separation of a coal liquefaction product stream that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In use of the apparatus, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control means. The mixture in the filter is agitated by means of ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

  13. Effect of coal rank and process conditions on temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalitham, R.V.; Moniz, M.

    1986-04-01

    The temperature distribution in a liquefaction reactor in the integrated TSL process is studied. The effects of gas and slurry superficial velocities, process solvent characteristics, reactor length, and catalyst sulfiding agent on the exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are studied. A substantial temperature difference is observed with subbituminous coal as compared with bituminous coal, at comparable reactor conditions. Some of the factors that are believed to have contributed to the large exotherm and temperature difference in the reactor are slow kinetics and high reaction heat for subbituminous coal conversion and pyrrhotite catalysis.

  14. EIS-0501: Golden Pass LNG Export Project; Texas and Louisiana | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 01: Golden Pass LNG Export Project; Texas and Louisiana EIS-0501: Golden Pass LNG Export Project; Texas and Louisiana Summary The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is analyzing the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate natural gas liquefaction and export facilities at the existing Golden Pass liquefied natural gas terminal in Jefferson County, Texas. The proposal includes three new compressor stations in Jefferson and Orange Counties,

  15. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; McKellar, Michael G.; Turner, Terry D.; Raterman, Kevin T.; Palmer, Gary L.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Vranicar, John J.

    2007-05-22

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through a turbo expander creating work output. A compressor is driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream. Additional features and techniques may be integrated with the liquefaction process including a water clean-up cycle and a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) clean-up cycle.

  17. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-07-27

    Low severity coal liquefaction allows for solubilization of coal with reduced gas make. These lower severity conditions may result in some selective bond rupture. Promotion of coal solubilization through hydrogen transfer using highly active and effective hydrogen donors is the objective of this study. The highly effective donors being tested are cyclic olefins. Representative cyclic olefins are isotetralin, which is 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene. These compounds are hydroaromatics without aromatic rings and have been shown to be highly effective donors. The objective of the work performed in this study during this quarter was to evaluate reaction parameters for low severity liquefaction reactions using the cyclic olefin, hexahydroanthracene, and the aromatic, anthracene. These model compounds were reacted under a variety of conditions to evaluate their reactivity without coal. The reactions were performed under both thermal and catalytic conditions. Finely divided catalysts from different molybdenum precursors were used to determine their activity in promoting hydrogenation and hydrogen transfer at low severity conditions. The catalysts used were Molyvan L, sulfurized oxymolybdenum dithiocarbamate, molybdenum naphthenate, and Molyvan 822, organo molybdenum dithiocarbamate.

  18. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  19. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He

    1996-01-26

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) f or coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives.

  20. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Topical report No. 14. Catalyst activity trends in two-stage coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    The Two Stage Coal Liquefaction process became operational at Wilsonville in May 1981, with the inclusion of an H-OIL ebullated-bed catalytic reactor. The two stage process was initially operated in a nonintegrated mode and has recently been reconfigurated to fully integrate the thermal and the catalytic stages. This report focuses on catalyst activity trends observed in both modes of operation. A literature review of relevant catalyst screening studies in bench-scale and PDU units is presented. Existing kinetic and deactivation models were used to analyze process data over an extensive data base. Based on the analysis, three separate, application studies have been conducted. The first study seeks to elucidate the dependence of catalyst deactivation rate on type of coal feedstock used. A second study focuses on the significance of catalyst type and integration mode on SRC hydrotreatment. The third study presents characteristic deactivation trends observed in integrated operation with different first-stage thermal severities. In-depth analytical work was conducted at different research laboratories on aged catalyst samples from Run 242. Model hydrogenation and denitrogenation activity trends are compared with process activity trends and with changes observed in catalyst porosimetric properties. The accumulation of metals and coke deposits with increasing catalyst age, as well as their distribution across a pellet cross-section, are discussed. The effect of catalyst age and reactor temperature on the chemical composition of flashed bottoms product is addressed. Results from regenerating spent catalysts are also presented. 35 references, 31 figures, 18 tables.

  1. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Heunisch, G.W.; Winschel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    Described in this report are the following activities: CONSOL characterized process stream samples from HTI Run ALC-2, in which Black Thunder Mine coal was liquefied using four combinations of dispersed catalyst precursors. Oil assays were completed on the HTI Run PB-05 product blend. Fractional distillation of the net product oil of HTI Run POC-1 was completed. CONSOL completed an evaluation of the potential for producing alkylphenyl ethers from coal liquefaction phenols. At the request of DOE, various coal liquid samples and relevant characterization data were supplied to the University of West Virginia and the Federal Energy Technology Center. The University of Delaware is conducting resid reactivity tests and is completing the resid reaction computer model. The University of Delaware was instructed on the form in which the computer model is to be delivered to CONSOL.

  2. Technical and economic evaluation of selected coal-liquefaction processes. Phase O. Preliminary screening evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Forrester, R.C. III; Singh, S.P.N.; Fisher, J.F.; Wham, R.M.; Thiel, S.W.; Meyer, J.P.

    1981-04-01

    Preliminary scoping evaluations of ten conceptual coal liquefaction processes were made for the Department of Energy using available published information. Production costs calculated under a consistent set of economic criteria varied from $0.78 to $1.47/gal for gasoline in constant 1979 dollars. However, existing design documents showed little consistency as to status of process development, credibility of process design basis, completeness of design, or conservatism of cost estimation. We concluded that a more complete and thorough design study of each process would be necessary to achieve any degree of technical and economic consistency, and that it was therefore not possible to satisfy DOE's desire for consistent technical and economic comparisons in this type of preliminary scoping study.

  3. Laboratory verification of blast-induced liquefaction mechanism. Final report Jan-Jul 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragaszy, R.J.; Voss, M.E.

    1981-10-01

    A mechanism for blast-induced liquefaction was tested in a series of high pressure undrained, isotropic compression tests on saturated samples of Eniwetok beach sand and Ottawa sand. Theory, based on inelastic volume compressibility of sand, was shown to be valid for the case of quasi-static, isotropic loading. Specimens of Eniwetok sand subjected to an initial effective stress of 1 MPa were liquefied by a single cycle of loading of 34 MPa. Specimens of Ottawa sand, tested in the same manner, generated excess pore pressure but not enough to completely liquefy the soil. The errors introduced by flexibility of the testing systems were analyzed and found to be insignificant. Suggestions for future research were made.

  4. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, G.P.

    1996-03-01

    Research on sulfate and metal (Mo, Sn) promoted Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in the current year focused on optimization of conditions. Parameters varied included temperature, solvent, solvent-to-coal ratio, and the effect of presulfiding versus in situ sulfiding. Oil yields were found to increase approximately proportionately with both temperature and solvent-to-coal ratio. The donor solvent, tetralin, proved to give better total conversion and oil yields than either 1-methylnaphthalene or Wilsonville recycle oil. A significant enhancement of both total liquefaction yields and oil yields from lignites and subbituminous coals has been achieved by incorporating iron into the coal matrix by cation exchange. A study has been conducted on the synthesis of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten catalysts using a laser pyrolysis technique.

  5. Liquefaction/solubilization of low-rank Turkish coals by white-rot fungus (Phanerochaete chrysosporium)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbeyli, I.Y.; Palantoken, A.; Piskin, S.; Kuzu, H.; Peksel, A.

    2006-08-15

    Microbial coal liquefaction/solubilization of three low-rank Turkish coals (Bursa-Kestelek, Kutahya-Seyitomer and Mugla-Yatagan lignite) was attempted by using a white-rot fungus (Phanerochaete chrysosporium DSM No. 6909); chemical compositions of the products were investigated. The lignite samples were oxidized by nitric acid under moderate conditions and then oxidized samples were placed on the agar medium of Phanerochaete chrysosporium. FTIR spectra of raw lignites, oxidized lignites and liquid products were recorded, and the acetone-soluble fractions of these samples were identified by GC-MS technique. Results show that the fungus affects the nitro and carboxyl/carbonyl groups in oxidized lignite sample, the liquid products obtained by microbial effects are the mixture of water-soluble compounds, and show limited organic solubility.

  6. Apparatus for the liquefaction of a gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-29

    Apparatuses and methods are provided for producing liquefied gas, such as liquefied natural gas. In one embodiment, a liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream may be sequentially pass through a compressor and an expander. The process stream may also pass through a compressor. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas may be used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line.

  7. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.

    2009-09-22

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates a vapor from the liquid natural gas. A portion of the liquid gas is used for additional cooling. Gas produced within the system may be recompressed for reintroduction into a receiving line or recirculation within the system for further processing.

  8. Apparatus for the liquefaction of natural gas and methods relating to same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilding, Bruce M. [Idaho Falls, ID; McKellar, Michael G. [Idaho Falls, ID; Turner, Terry D. [Ammon, ID; Carney, Francis H. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-29

    An apparatus and method for producing liquefied natural gas. A liquefaction plant may be coupled to a source of unpurified natural gas, such as a natural gas pipeline at a pressure letdown station. A portion of the gas is drawn off and split into a process stream and a cooling stream. The cooling stream passes through an expander creating work output. A compressor may be driven by the work output and compresses the process stream. The compressed process stream is cooled, such as by the expanded cooling stream. The cooled, compressed process stream is divided into first and second portions with the first portion being expanded to liquefy the natural gas. A gas-liquid separator separates the vapor from the liquid natural gas. The second portion of the cooled, compressed process stream is also expanded and used to cool the compressed process stream.

  9. Product analysis from direct liquefaction of several high-moisture biomass feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Butner, R.S.

    1987-04-01

    Product analysis in support of the process development research in biomass direct liquefaction began at rudimentary level of determining solvent-soluble portions of the product. Analysis was soon extended to elemental analyses and proximate analyses, such as ash and moisture. Later, spectrometric analyses were performed followed by detailed chemical analyses used in conjunction with chromatographic separation techniques. At all stages of development, the significant differences in composition between the products of flash pyrolysis and high-pressure processing have been evident. While polar solvents are most effective for both products, less polar solvents such as methylene chloride and even benzene and toluene have been used as extractants for high-pressure product oils.

  10. Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Indirect coal liquefaction, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    A comprehensive review of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, including fixed, fluidized, and bubble column reactors, was undertaken in order to develop an information base before initiating the design of the Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction PDU as a part of the Generic Coal Conversion Facilities to be built at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The pilot plant will include a fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactor for the F-T mode of operation. The review encompasses current status of both these technologies, their key variables, catalyst development, future directions, and potential improvement areas. However, more emphasis has been placed on the slurry bubble column reactor since this route is likely to be the preferred technology for commercialization, offering process advantages and, therefore, better economics than fixed and fluidized bed approaches.

  11. Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N.; Ying, David H. S.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

  12. Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1991-01-01

    A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

  13. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Inmyong; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon; Kim, Youngkwon

    2014-01-29

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi{sub 2}, Gd{sub 0.1}Dy{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.85}Er{sub 0.15}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper.

  14. Hydrogen Liquefaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4-7 European Installations 4-6 Japanese Installations India Program ESA French Guiana (South America) 4 Satisfies ASME J-2719 (hydrogen fuel quality) ...

  15. Phillips Petroleum`s Seastar Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upchurch, J.L.; Money, R.P.

    1997-02-01

    On May 1, 1995 Phillips Petroleum`s Seastar Project began production as the first cluster-type subsea development in the Gulf of Mexico. Seastar production reached approximately 60 million cubic feet of gas per day (mmscfd) in November 1995 with the completion of a second {open_quotes}sales{close_quotes} line (a pipeline that transports the petroleum to shore) at the Vermilion Block 386-B host platform. Currently, the field is producing 40 to 50 mmscfd and plans are on schedule for the addition of a third producing well during the first quarter of 1997. All of the subsea equipment was installed using a drilling vessel and onboard ROV support. The Seastar project began in 1987 when Phillips and its partners leased Garden Banks Blocks 70 and 71, located 110 miles south of Cameron Louisiana. The partnership drilled two wells in 1990 that discovered noncommercial hydrocarbon reserves. Following a reevaluation of the seismic data, Phillips assumed 100 percent ownership in the leases and drilled Garden Banks 71 No. 2, which discovered 350 feet of {open_quotes}pay{close_quotes} sand (oil resource) in March 1993. The initial phase of the project consisted of two satellite subsea trees tied back to a four-slot retrievable subsea manifold in 760 feet of water. Commingled gas production is delivered via dual subsea pipelines to a host platform processing facility in 300 feet of water 13 miles away in Vermilion Block 386-B, thence via sales lines to shore.

  16. Development of an extruder-feeder biomass direct liquefaction process. Volume 2, Parts 4--8: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; Wolf, D.

    1991-10-01

    As an abundant, renewable, domestic energy resource, biomass could help the United States reduce its dependence on imported oil. Biomass is the only renewable energy technology capable of addressing the national need for liquid transportation fuels. Thus, there is an incentive to develop economic conversion processes for converting biomass, including wood, into liquid fuels. Through research sponsored by the US DOE`s Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program, the University of Arizona has developed a unique biomass direct liquefaction system. The system features a modified single-screw extruder capable of pumping solid slurries containing as high as 60 wt% wood flour in wood oil derived vacuum bottoms at pressures up to 3000 psi. The extruder-feeder has been integrated with a unique reactor by the University to form a system which offers potential for improving high pressure biomass direct liquefaction technology. The extruder-feeder acts simultaneously as both a feed preheater and a pumping device for injecting wood slurries into a high pressure reactor in the biomass liquefaction process. An experimental facility was constructed and following shakedown operations, wood crude oil was produced by mid-1985. By July 1988, a total of 57 experimental continuous biomass liquefaction runs were made using White Birch wood feedstock. Good operability was achieved at slurry feed rates up to 30 lb/hr, reactor pressures from 800 to 3000 psi and temperatures from 350{degree}C to 430{degree}C under conditions covering a range of carbon monoxide feed rates and sodium carbonate catalyst addition. Crude wood oils containing as little as 6--10 wt% residual oxygen were produced. 38 refs., 82 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. EA-1971: Golden Pass LNG Export and Pipeline Project, Texas and Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, announced its intent to prepare an EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate natural gas liquefaction and export facilities at the existing Golden Pass liquefied natural gas terminal in Jefferson County, Texas. In June 2014, FERC announced that due to changes in the project location and scope, it would prepare an EIS. See DOE/EIS-0501.

  18. Liquefaction process wherein solvents derived from the material liquefied and containing increased concentrations of donor species are employed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fant, B. T. (Kingwood, TX); Miller, John D. (Baytown, TX); Ryan, D. F. (Friendswood, TX)

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials wherein a solvent or diluent derived from the solid carbonaceous material being liquefied is used to form a slurry of the solid carbonaceous material and wherein the solvent or diluent comprises from about 65 to about 85 wt. % hydroaromatic components. The solvent is prepared by first separating a solvent or diluent distillate fraction from the liquefaction product, subjecting this distillate fraction to hydrogenation and then extracting the naphthenic components from the hydrogenated product. The extracted naphthenic components are then dehydrogenated and hydrotreated to produce additional hydroaromatic components. These components are combined with the solvent or diluent distillate fraction. The solvent may also contain hydroaromatic constituents prepared by extracting naphthenic components from a heavy naphtha, dehydrogenating the same and then hydrotreating the dehydrogenated product. When the amount of solvent produced in this manner exceeds that required for steady state operation of the liquefaction process a portion of the solvent or diluent distillated fraction will be withdrawn as product.

  19. Selection of components for the IDEALHY preferred cycle for the large scale liquefaction of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quack, H.; Seemann, I.; Klaus, M.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Berstad, D.; Walnum, H. T.; Neksa, P.; Decker, L.

    2014-01-29

    In a future energy scenario, in which storage and transport of liquid hydrogen in large quantities will be used, the efficiency of the liquefaction of hydrogen will be of utmost importance. The goal of the IDEALHY working party is to identify the most promising process for a 50 t/d plant and to select the components, with which such a process can be realized. In the first stage the team has compared several processes, which have been proposed or realized in the past. Based on this information a process has been selected, which is thermodynamically most promising and for which it could be assumed that good components already exist or can be developed in the foreseeable future. Main features of the selected process are the compression of the feed stream to a relatively high pressure level, o-p conversion inside plate-fin heat exchangers and expansion turbines in the supercritical region. Precooling to a temperature between 150 and 100 K will be obtained from a mixed refrigerant cycle similar to the systems used successfully in natural gas liquefaction plants. The final cooling will be produced by two Brayton cycles, both having several expansion turbines in series. The selected overall process has still a number of parameters, which can be varied. The optimum, i.e. the final choice will depend mainly on the quality of the available components. Key components are the expansion turbines of the two Brayton cycles and the main recycle compressor, which may be common to both Brayton cycles. A six-stage turbo-compressor with intercooling between the stages is expected to be the optimum choice here. Each stage may consist of several wheels in series. To make such a high efficient and cost-effective compressor feasible, one has to choose a refrigerant, which has a higher molecular weight than helium. The present preferred choice is a mixture of helium and neon with a molecular weight of about 8 kg/kmol. Such an expensive refrigerant requires that the whole refrigeration loop is extremely tight.

  20. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 2, appendices. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

    1995-04-01

    Liquefaction experiments were undertaken using subbituminous Black Thunder mine coal to observe the effects of aqueous SO{sub 2} coal beneficiation and the introduction of various coal swelling solvents and catalyst precursors. Aqueous SO{sub 2} beneficiation of Black Thunder coal removed alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, increased the sulfur content and increased the catalytic liquefaction conversion to THF solubles compared to untreated Black Thunder coal. The liquefaction solvent had varying effects on coal conversion, depending upon the type of solvent added. The hydrogen donor solvent, dihydroanthracene, was most effective, while a coal-derived Wilsonville solvent promoted more coal conversion than did relatively inert 1-methylnaphthalene. Swelling of coal with hydrogen bonding solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropanol, and methanol, prior to reaction resulted in increased noncatalytic conversion of both untreated and SO{sub 2} treated Black Thunder coals, while dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which was absorbed more into the coal than any other swelling solvent, was detrimental to coal conversion. Swelling of SO{sub 2} treated coal before liquefaction resulted in the highest coal conversions; however, the untreated coal showed the most improvements in catalytic reactions when swelled in either THF, isopropanol, or methanol prior to liquefaction. The aprotic solvent DMSO was detrimental to coal conversion.

  1. Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. and FLNG Liquefaction, LLC - FE Dkt. No. 10-161-LNG Federal Register Notice on Proposed Procedures for LNG Export Decisions Cameron LNG LLC Final Order

  2. EA-1845: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC Regarding Order Granting Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural Gas from Sabine Pass LNG Terminal to Non-Free Trade Agreement Nations, Cameron Parish, LA

  3. EA-1845: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC Regarding Order Granting Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural Gas from Sabine Pass LNG Terminal to Non-Free Trade Agreement Nations, Cameron Parish, LA

  4. Some Important Aspects of Physical Modelling of Liquefaction in 1-g Shaking Table

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Md. Jahangir; Towhata, Ikuo

    2008-07-08

    Physical modeling of liquefaction in 1-g shaking table and dynamic centrifuge test become very popular to simulate the ground behavior during earthquake motion. 1-g shaking table tests require scaled down model ground which can be prepared in three methods; water sedimentation, moist tamping and dry deposition method. Moist tamping and dry deposition method need saturation of model ground which is expensive and very difficult to achieve. Some model tests were performed in 1-g shaking table to see the influence of preparation method of model ground. Wet tamping and water sedimentation method of ground preparation were compared in these tests. Behavior of level ground and slope were also examined. Slope and level ground model test increased the understanding of excess pore pressure generation in both cases. Wet tamping method has a possibility of not being fully saturated. Pore pressure transducers should be fixed vertically so that it can not settle down during shaking but can move with ground. There was insignificant difference in acceleration and excess pore pressure responses between wet tamping and water sedimentation method in case of level ground. Spiky accelerations were prominent in slope prepared by water sedimentation method. Spiky accelerations were the result of lateral displacement induced dilatancy of soil.

  5. Process Development for Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Algae Feedstocks in a Continuous-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2013-10-01

    Wet algae slurries can be converted into an upgradeable biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a continuous-flow, pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause process difficulties. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations of up to 35 wt% of dry solids. Catalytic hydrotreating was effectively applied for hydrodeoxygenation, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrodesulfurization of the biocrude to form liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics, allowing the water to be considered for recycle of nutrients to the algae growth ponds. As a result, high conversion of algae to liquid hydrocarbon and gas products was found with low levels of organic contamination in the byproduct water. All three process steps were accomplished in bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  6. Apparatus and process for the refrigeration, liquefaction and separation of gases with varying levels of purity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.

    2000-01-01

    A process for the separation and liquefaction of component gasses from a pressurized mix gas stream is disclosed. The process involves cooling the pressurized mixed gas stream in a heat exchanger so as to condense one or more of the gas components having the highest condensation point; separating the condensed components from the remaining mixed gas stream in a gas-liquid separator; cooling the separated condensed component stream by passing it through an expander; and passing the cooled component stream back through the heat exchanger such that the cooled component stream functions as the refrigerant for the heat exchanger. The cycle is then repeated for the remaining mixed gas stream so as to draw off the next component gas and further cool the remaining mixed gas stream. The process continues until all of the component gases are separated from the desired gas stream. The final gas stream is then passed through a final heat exchanger and expander. The expander decreases the pressure on the gas stream, thereby cooling the stream and causing a portion of the gas stream to liquify within a tank. The portion of the gas which is not liquefied is passed back through each of the heat exchanges where it functions as a refrigerant.

  7. Apparatus and process for the refrigeration, liquefaction and separation of gases with varying levels of purity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A process for the separation and liquefaction of component gasses from a pressurized mix gas stream is disclosed. The process involves cooling the pressurized mixed gas stream in a heat exchanger so as to condensing one or more of the gas components having the highest condensation point; separating the condensed components from the remaining mixed gas stream in a gas-liquid separator; cooling the separated condensed component stream by passing it through an expander; and passing the cooled component stream back through the heat exchanger such that the cooled component stream functions as the refrigerant for the heat exchanger. The cycle is then repeated for the remaining mixed gas stream so as to draw off the next component gas and further cool the remaining mixed gas stream. The process continues until all of the component gases are separated from the desired gas stream. The final gas stream is then passed through a final heat exchanger and expander. The expander decreases the pressure on the gas stream, thereby cooling the stream and causing a portion of the gas stream to liquify within a tank. The portion of the gas which is hot liquefied is passed back through each of the heat exchanges where it functions as a refrigerant.

  8. Effect of product upgrading on Fischer-Tropsch indirect coal liquefaction economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.; Tam, S.S.; Fox, J.M. III

    1995-12-31

    Conceptual plant designs with cost estimates for indirect coal liquefaction technology to produce environmentally acceptable transportation liquid fuels meeting the Clear Air Act requirements were developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The designs incorporate the latest development in coal gasification technology and advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) slurry reactor design. ASPEN process simulation models were developed to provide detailed plant material and energy balances, utility requirements, operating and capital costs. A linear programming model based on a typical PADD II refinery was developed to assess the values of the produced F-T products. The results then were used in a discounted cash flow spreadsheet model to examine the effect of key process variables on the overall F-T economics. Different models were developed to investigate the various routes of upgrading the F-T products. The effects of incorporating a close-coupled ZSM-5 reactor to upgrade the vapor stream leaving the Fischer-Tropsch reactor have been reported previously. This paper compares two different schemes of F-T was upgrading, namely fluidized bed catalytic cracking verse mild hydrocracking.

  9. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to ``calibrate`` the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850{degrees}F{sup +} , 1050{degrees}F{sup +}, and 850 {times} 1050{degrees}F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  10. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  11. Development of Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading Technologies for Lipid-Extracted Algae Conversion to Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-10-01

    Bench-scale tests were performed for lipid-extracted microalgae (LEA) conversion to liquid fuels via hydrotreating liquefaction (HTL) and upgrading processes. Process simulation and economic analysis for a large-scale LEA HTL and upgrading system were developed based on the best available test results. The system assumes an LEA feed rate of 608 dry metric ton/day and that the feedstock is converted to a crude HTL bio-oil and further upgraded via hydrotreating and hydrocracking to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels, mainly alkanes. Performance and cost results demonstrate that HTL would be an effective option to convert LEA to liquid fuel. The liquid fuels annual yield was estimated to be 26.9 million gallon gasoline-equivalent and the overall energy efficiency at higher heating value basis was estimated to be 69.5%. The minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) was estimated to be $0.75/L with LEA feedstock price at $33.1 metric ton at dry basis and 10% internal rate of return. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the largest effects to production cost would come from the final products yields and the upgrading equipments cost. The impact of plant scale on MFSP was also investigated.

  12. Coal liquefaction process utilizing coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A coal hydrogenation and liquefaction process in which particulate coal feed is pressurized to an intermediate pressure of at least 500 psig and slurried with CO.sub.2 liquid to provide a flowable coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream, which is further pressurized to at least 1000 psig and fed into a catalytic reactor. The coal particle size is 50-375 mesh (U.S. Sieve Series) and provides 50-80 W % coal in the coal/CO.sub.2 slurry feedstream. Catalytic reaction conditions are maintained at 650.degree.-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure and coal feed rate of 10-100 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 reactor volume to produce hydrocarbon gas and liquid products. The hydrogen and CO.sub.2 are recovered from the reactor effluent gaseous fraction, hydrogen is recycled to the catalytic reactor, and CO.sub.2 is liquefied and recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, two catalytic reaction stages close coupled together in series relation can be used. The process advantageously minimizes the recycle and processing of excess hydrocarbon liquid previously needed for slurrying the coal feed to the reactor(s).

  13. Strategic evaluation central to LNG project formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissen, D.; DiNapoli, R.N.; Yost, C.C.

    1995-07-03

    An efficient-scale, grassroots LNG facility of about 6 million metric tons/year capacity requires a prestart-up outlay of $5 billion or more for the supply facilities--production, feedgas pipeline, liquefaction, and shipping. The demand side of the LNG chain requires a similar outlay, counting the import-regasification terminal and a combination of 5 gigawatts or more of electric power generation or the equivalent in city gas and industrial gas-using facilities. There exist no well-developed commodity markets for free-on-board (fob) or delivered LNG. A new LNG supply project is dedicated to its buyers. Indeed, the buyers` revenue commitment is the project`s only bankable asset. For the buyer to make this commitment, the supply venture`s capability and commitment must be credible: to complete the project and to deliver the LNG reliably over the 20+ years required to recover capital committed on both sides. This requirement has technical, economic, and business dimensions. In this article the authors describe a LNG project evaluation system and show its application to typical tasks: project cost of service and participant shares; LNG project competition; alternative project structures; and market competition for LNG-supplied electric power generation.

  14. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, E.; Kirby, S.; Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1994-04-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more, efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts can be superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires infinite contact between the catalyst and coal. The primary objective of this research is to explore the potential of bimetallic dispersed catalysts from heterometallic molecular precursors in their use in model compound liquefaction reactions. This quarterly report describes the use of three precursors in model compound reactions. The first catalyst is a heterometallic complex consisting of two transition metals, Mo and Ni, and sulfur in a single molecule. The second is a thiocubane type complex consisting of cobalt, molybdenum and sulfur. The third is a thiocubane type cluster consisting of iron and sulfur and the fourth, the pure inorganic salt ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATM). It was found that the structure and the ligands in the model complexes affect the activity of the resulting catalyst significantly. The optimum reaction at a pressure of 6.9 MPa hydrogen gas varied for different catalysts. The bimetallic catalysts generated in situ from the organometallic precursor are more active than monometallic catalysts like ATTM and the thiocubane type cluster Fe{sub 4}. Main products are hydrogenated phenanthrene derivatives, like DBP, THP, sym-OHP, cis- and trans-unsym-OHP with minor isomerization products such as sym-OHA. Our results indicate that other transition metal and ligand combinations in the organometallic precursors and the use of another model compound could result in substantially higher conversion activity.

  15. New technology concept for two-stage liquefaction of coal. Final summary report, 1 July 1983-30 September 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Duddy, J.E.; Koziel, M.L.; MacArthur, J.B.; McLean, J.B.; Smith, T.O.

    1986-02-01

    Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) has completed a series of studies for the evaluation of a ''New Technology Concept for Two-Stage Liquefaction of Coal''. The time period of studies covered May 26, 1983 to November 25, 1985, a total of thirty months, with the major effort devoted to Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal and the balance devoted to Wyodak sub-bituminous coal. A two-stage coal liquefaction process, based on two close-coupled catalytic ebullated-bed reactors with the first stage operating at low temperature for maximum hydrogenation, has been developed and demonstrated on Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals. This final report presents an executive summary of the program and completes the reporting requirements of Contract No. DE-AC22-83PC60017. A summary of the studies and process demonstrations is presented along with references to the Topical Reports on Illinois No. 6 coal, Wyodak coal, Conceptual Commercial Plant Design and Economics and reports by DOE sponsored support contractors. Experimental details are contained in the referenced reports. The accomplishments of this program and recommendations for a follow-on program are presented. By application of this new hydrogenation concept in this study, distillate yields of greater than 65 W % of M.A.F. Coal or 4.2 barrels per ton of M.A.F. coal were demonstrated on both Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals. This was accompanied by a ten-fold reduction in bottoms viscosity and the production of low sulfur environmentally clean fuels. As reported by Conoco, Inc. and Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, a higher level of hydrogenation is evident and the liquids produced are more petroleum-like than coal liquids derived from other liquefaction processes. Upgrading studies on the Wyodak products are being performed by Chevron. 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  16. Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

  17. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Indirect Liquefaction of Blended Biomass to Produce High Octane Gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Hao; Canter, Christina E.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Tan, Eric; Biddy, Mary; Talmadge, Michael; Hartley, Damon S.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) aims at developing and deploying technologies to transform renewable biomass resources into commercially viable, high-performance biofuels, bioproducts and biopower through public and private partnerships (DOE, 2015). BETO also performs a supply chain sustainability analysis (SCSA). This report describes the SCSA of the production of renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of lignocellulosic biomass. This SCSA was developed for the 2017 design case for feedstock logistics (INL, 2014) and for the 2022 target case for HOG production via IDL (Tan et al., 2015). The design includes advancements that are likely and targeted to be achieved by 2017 for the feedstock logistics and 2022 for the IDL conversion process. The 2017 design case for feedstock logistics demonstrated a delivered feedstock cost of $80 per dry U.S. short ton by the year 2017 (INL, 2014). The 2022 design case for the conversion process, as modeled in Tan et al. (2015), uses the feedstock 2017 design case blend of biomass feedstocks consisting of pulpwood, wood residue, switchgrass, and construction and demolition waste (C&D) with performance properties consistent with a sole woody feedstock type (e.g., pine or poplar). The HOG SCSA case considers the 2017 feedstock design case (the blend) as well as individual feedstock cases separately as alternative scenarios when the feedstock blend ratio varies as a result of a change in feedstock availability. These scenarios could be viewed as bounding SCSA results because of distinctive requirements for energy and chemical inputs for the production and logistics of different components of the blend feedstocks.

  18. Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Run 261 with Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the results of Run 261 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R & D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on January 12, 1991 and continued until May 31, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Illinois No. 6 seam bituminous coal (from Burning star No. 2 mine). In the first part of Run 261, a new bimodal catalyst, EXP-AO-60, was tested for its performance and attrition characteristics in the catalytic/catalytic mode of the CC-ITSL process. The main objective of this part of the run was to obtain good process performance in the low/high temperature mode of operation along with well-defined distillation product end boiling points. In the second part of Run 261, Criterion (Shell) 324 catalyst was tested. The objective of this test was to evaluate the operational stability and catalyst and process performance while processing the high ash Illinois No. 6 coal. Increasing viscosity and preasphaltenes made it difficult to operate at conditions similar to EXP-AO-60 catalyst operation, especially at lower catalyst replacement rates.

  19. EIS-0512: Alaska LNG Project, Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with DOE as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to develop, construct, and operate facilities that would commercialize the natural gas resources on Alaska’s North Slope. The proposed Alaska LNG Project would include a gas treatment plant, more than 800 miles of natural gas pipeline, liquefaction and storage facilities, an LNG export (marine) terminal, and associated infrastructure and facilities. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has an obligation under Section 3 of the Natural Gas Act to authorize the export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the export is not consistent with the public interest.

  20. Project financing knits parts of costly LNG supply chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minyard, R.J.; Strode, M.O.

    1997-06-02

    The supply and distribution infrastructure of an LNG project requires project sponsors and LNG buyers to make large, interdependent capital investments. For a grassroots project, substantial investments may be necessary for each link in the supply chain: field development; liquefaction plant and storage; ports and utilities; ships; receiving terminal and related facilities; and end-user facilities such as power stations or a gas distribution network. The huge sums required for these projects make their finance ability critical to implementation. Lenders have become increasingly comfortable with LNG as a business and now have achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with it. Raising debt financing for many future LNG projects, however, will present new and increasingly difficult challenges. The challenge of financing these projects will be formidable: political instability, economic uncertainty, and local currency volatility will have to be recognized and mitigated. Described here is the evolution of financing LNG projects, including the Rasgas LNG project financing which broke new ground in this area. The challenges that lie ahead for sponsors seeking to finance future projects selling LNG to emerging markets are also discussed. And the views of leading experts from the field of project finance, specifically solicited for this article, address major issues that must be resolved for successful financing of these projects.

  1. EIS-0513: Jacksonville Project, Jacksonville, Florida | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a natural gas liquefaction, storage, and export facility on the St. Johns River in Jacksonville,...

  2. "An Economic Process for Coal Liquefaction to Liquid Fuels" SBIR Phase II -- Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguli, Partha Sarathi

    2009-02-19

    The current commercial processes for direct coal liquefaction utilize expensive backmix-flow reactor system and conventional catalysts resulting in incomplete and retrogressive reactions that produce low distillate liquid yield and high gas yield, with high hydrogen consumption. The new process we have developed, which uses a less expensive reactor system and highly active special catalysts, resulted in high distillate liquid yield, low gas yield and low hydrogen consumption. The new reactor system using the special catalyst can be operated smoothly for direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Due to high hydrogenation and hydrocracking activities of the special catalysts, moderate temperatures and high residence time in each stage of the reactor system resulted in high distillate yield in the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F range with no 650{degrees}F{sup +} product formed except for the remaining unconverted coal residue. The C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F distillate is more valuable than the light petroleum crude. Since there is no 650{degrees}F{sup +} liquid product, simple reforming and hydrotreating of the C{sub 4}-650{degrees}F product will produce the commercial grade light liquid fuels. There is no need for further refinement using catalytic cracking process that is currently used in petroleum refining. The special catalysts prepared and used in the experimental runs had surface area between 40-155 m{sup 2}/gm. The liquid distillate yield in the new process is >20 w% higher than that in the current commercial process. Coal conversion in the experimental runs was moderate, in the range of 88 - 94 w% maf-coal. Though coal conversion can be increased by adjustment in operating conditions, the purpose of limiting coal conversion to moderate amounts in the process was to use the remaining unconverted coal for hydrogen production by steam reforming. Hydrogen consumption was in the range of 4.0 - 6.0 w% maf-coal. A preliminary economic analysis of the new coal liquefaction process was carried out by comparing the design and costs of the current commercial plant of the Shenhua Corporation in Erdos, Inner Mongolia. The cost of producing synthetic crude oil from coal in the current commercial process was estimated to be $50.5 per barrel compared to the estimated cost of $41.7 per barrel in the new process. As mentioned earlier, the light distillate product in the new process is of higher quality and value than the C{sub 4}-975{degrees}F product in the current commercial process adopted by the Shenhua Corporation. In sum, the new coal liquefaction process is superior and less capital intensive to current commercial process, and has a high potential for commercialization.

  3. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units phase II. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    A catalyst screening test (CST) was developed to evaluate the activity of various catalyst precursors for their liquefaction activity in a solvent comprising the solids-free components of a recycle solvent generated at Wilsonville, namely a ROSE SR V-130 deashed resid from period A and V-1074 heavy distillate from period B. Since the deashed resid has an elemental composition very nearly the same distillate from period B. Since the deashed resid has an elemental composition very nearly the same as in the solids-free fraction of the recycle solvent, the reactivity of these two resid and dry coal are nearly the same as in Run 263J, the overall composition should approximate the feed stream used in the Wilsonville pilot plant except for the absence of the solids component. Removing the solids from the reaction mixture should simplify the interpretation of the results since normally a considerable amount or recycled catalyst is contained in this fraction.

  4. Cameron Ridge Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Generating Capacity (MW) 5656 MW 56,000 kW 56,000,000 W 56,000,000,000 mW 0.056 GW Number of Units 80 Commercial...

  5. Cameron, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8758285, -111.4129207 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  6. West Hackberry Tertiary Project. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillham, T.; Cerveny, B.; Turek, E.

    1996-04-10

    The goal of the West Hackberry Tertiary Project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of combining air injection with the Double Displacement Process for tertiary oil recovery. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering oil through gravity drainage. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid. The target reservoir for the project is the Camerina C-1,2,3 sand located on the West Flank of West Hackberry Field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the use of air injection in the Double Displacement Process can economically recover oil in reservoirs where tertiary oil recovery is presently uneconomic. The first quarter of 1996 was outstanding both in terms of volume of air injected and low cost operations. More air was injected during this quarter than in any preceding quarter. The compressors experienced much improved run time with minimal repairs. Low operating costs resulted from no repairs required for injection or production wells. A discussion of the following topics are contained herein: (1) performance summary for the injection and production wells, (2) air compressor operations, (3) updated bottom hole pressure data, (4) technology transfer activities and (5) plans for the upcoming quarter.

  7. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  8. Energy Department Authorizes Sabine Pass Liquefaction’s Expansion Project to Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A press release on the final authorization to allow Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC to export liquefied natural gas (LNG).

  9. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LaboratoryNational Security Education Center Menu NSEC Educational Programs Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Science of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Judicial Science School SHM Data Sets and Software Research Projects Current Projects Past Projects Publications NSEC » Engineering Institute » Research Projects » Joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/UCSD research projects Past Research Projects Previous collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of

  10. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Research Projects Joint Los Alamos National LaboratoryUCSD Research Projects Collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San...

  11. Project Gnome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Gnome Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy The first underground physics experiment near Carlsbad was Project Gnome, December 10, 1961...

  12. Project Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Management Project Management MaRIE is the experimental facility needed to control the time-dependent properties of materials for national security science missions. It ...

  13. Project Accounts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Accounts Project Accounts A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:50

  14. Dependence of liquefaction behavior on coal characteristics. Part VI. Relationship of liquefaction behavior of a set of high sulfur coals to chemical structural characteristics. Final technical report, March 1981 to February 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, P. H.; Given, P. H.

    1984-09-01

    The initial aim of this research was to use empirical mathematical relationships to formulate a better understanding of the processes involved in the liquefaction of a set of medium rank high sulfur coals. In all, just over 50 structural parameters and yields of product classes were determined. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the empirical relationships between the various properties, a number of relatively complex statistical procedures and tests were applied to the data, mostly selected from the field of multivariate analysis. These can be broken down into two groups. The first group included grouping techniques such as non-linear mapping, hierarchical and tree clustering, and linear discriminant analyses. These techniques were utilized in determining if more than one statistical population was present in the data set; it was concluded that there was not. The second group of techniques included factor analysis and stepwise multivariate linear regressions. Linear discriminant analyses were able to show that five distinct groups of coals were represented in the data set. However only seven of the properties seemed to follow this trend. The chemical property that appeared to follow the trend most closely was the aromaticity, where a series of five parallel straight lines was observed for a plot of f/sub a/ versus carbon content. The factor patterns for each of the product classes indicated that although each of the individual product classes tended to load on factors defined by specific chemical properties, the yields of the broader product classes, such as total conversion to liquids + gases and conversion to asphaltenes, tended to load largely on factors defined by rank. The variance explained and the communalities tended to be relatively low. Evidently important sources of variance have still to be found.

  15. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  16. Review and Assessment of Commercial Vendors/Options for Feeding and Pumping Biomass Slurries for Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, Eric J.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2012-11-01

    The National Advanced Biofuels Consortium is working to develop improved methods for producing high-value hydrocarbon fuels. The development of one such method, the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process, is being led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The HTL process uses a wet biomass slurry at elevated temperatures (i.e., 300 to 360°C [570 to 680°F]) and pressures above the vapor pressure of water (i.e., 15 to 20 MPa [2200 to 3000 psi] at these temperatures) to facilitate a condensed-phase reaction medium. The process has been successfully tested at bench-scale and development and testing at a larger scale is required to prove the viability of the process at production levels. Near-term development plans include a pilot-scale system on the order of 0.5 to 40 gpm, followed by a larger production-scale system on the order of 2000 dry metric tons per day (DMTPD). A significant challenge to the scale-up of the HTL process is feeding a highly viscous fibrous biomass wood/corn stover feedstock into a pump system that provides the required 3000 psi of pressure for downstream processing. In October 2011, PNNL began investigating commercial feed and pumping options that would meet these HTL process requirements. Initial efforts focused on generating a HTL feed and pump specification and then providing the specification to prospective vendors to determine the suitability of their pumps for the pilot-scale and production-scale plants. Six vendors were identified that could provide viable equipment to meet HTL feed and/or pump needs. Those six vendors provided options consisting three types of positive displacement pumps (i.e., diaphragm, piston, and lobe pumps). Vendors provided capabilities and equipment related to HTL application. This information was collected, assessed, and summarized and is provided as appendices to this report.

  17. Techno-Economic Analysis of Liquid Fuel Production from Woody Biomass via Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-09-15

    A series of experimental work was conducted to convert woody biomass to gasoline and diesel range products via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydroprocessing. Based on the best available test data, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was developed for a large scale woody biomass based HTL and upgrading system to evaluate the feasibility of this technology. In this system, 2000 dry metric ton per day woody biomass was assumed to be converted to bio-oil in hot compressed water and the bio-oil was hydrotreated and/or hydrocracked to produce gasoline and diesel range liquid fuel. Two cases were evaluated: a stage-of-technology (SOT) case based on the tests results, and a goal case considering potential improvements based on the SOT case. Process simulation models were developed and cost analysis was implemented based on the performance results. The major performance results included final products and co-products yields, raw materials consumption, carbon efficiency, and energy efficiency. The overall efficiency (higher heating value basis) was 52% for the SOT case and 66% for the goal case. The production cost, with a 10% internal rate of return and 2007 constant dollars, was estimated to be $1.29 /L for the SOT case and $0.74 /L for the goal case. The cost impacts of major improvements for moving from the SOT to the goal case were evaluated and the assumption of reducing the organics loss to the water phase lead to the biggest reduction in the production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the final products yields had the largest impact on the production cost compared to other parameters. Plant size analysis demonstrated that the process was economically attractive if the woody biomass feed rate was over 1,500 dry tonne/day, the production cost was competitive with the then current petroleum-based gasoline price.

  18. Project Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Information Slider award map The REE Program funds projects focused on developing economically feasible and environmentally benign technologies for recovering REEs from coal and/or coal by-products. Project Information The listed projects represent the current REE program portfolio. Agreement Number Project Title Performer Name FWP-RIC REE FY2016-2020 Rare Earth Elements (REE) from Coal and Coal By-Products National Energy Technology Laboratory FE0027167 High Yield and Economical

  19. Aspen Process Flowsheet Simulation Model of a Battelle Biomass-Based Gasification, Fischer-Tropsch Liquefaction and Combined-Cycle Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-30

    This study was done to support the research and development program of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels using current state-of-the-art technology. The Mitretek study investigated the use of two biomass gasifiers; the RENUGAS gasifier being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology, and the indirectly heated gasifier being developed by Battelle Columbus. The Battelle Memorial Institute of Columbus, Ohio indirectly heated biomass gasifier was selected for this model development because the syngas produced by it is better suited for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with an iron-based catalyst for which a large amount of experimental data are available. Bechtel with Amoco as a subcontractor developed a conceptual baseline design and several alternative designs for indirect coal liquefaction facilities. In addition, ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation models were developed for each of designs. These models were used to perform several parametric studies to investigate various alternatives for improving the economics of indirect coal liquefaction.

  20. Line Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project Hooper Springs McNary-John Day Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project - M2W Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1...

  1. Project Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Benefits of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project including reducing energy upgrade costs for consumers, employers, and program administrators.

  2. Hydropower Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's hydropower project funding from fiscal years 2008 to 2014.

  3. Project Construction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule.

  4. Discontinued Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discontinued projects received a loan or a loan guarantee from DOE, but that are considered discontinued by LPO for one of several reasons.

  5. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure whose behavior is fundamentally nonlinear. Thus, the students assigned to this project will develop control techniques that will allow an electrodynamic shake table to...

  6. Project Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published its Record of Decision announcing and explaining DOE’s chosen project alternative and describing any commitments for mitigating potential environmental impacts. The NEPA process...

  7. Custom Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Management Small Industrial Lighting Compressed Air ESUE Motors Federal Agriculture Custom Projects No two industrial customers are alike; each has its own unique...

  8. Project Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Tour Transportation Transportation to the tour will be provided from Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder to Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55. After the...

  9. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  10. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  11. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Research Projects Composite-to-Steel Joint Integrity Monitoring and Assessment ... engineering programs and the pit manufacturing program. STUDENT RESOURCES Precollege ...

  12. FE Press Releases and Techlines | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Authorizes Sabine Pass Liquefaction's Expansion Project to Export Liquefied Natural Gas A press release on the final authorization to allow Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC to...

  13. EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas This FERC EA will evaluate the ... FLNG Liquefaction LLC (collectively referred to as Freeport) in Brazoria County, Texas. ...

  14. EIS-0487: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Freeport LNG Liquefaction Project, Brazoria County, Texas As previously noticed on August ... FLNG Liquefaction LLC (collectively referred to as Freeport) in Brazoria County, Texas. ...

  15. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  16. Awarded projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    projects Awarded projects 2016 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2016 allocation year (Jan 12, 2016 through Jan 09, 2017). Read More » Previous Year Awards Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:1

  17. EA-1963: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elba Liquefaction Project; Chatham, Hart, Jefferson, and Effingham Counties, Georgia, and Jasper County, South Carolina

  18. EA-1963: FERC Notice of Availability for Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elba Liquefaction Project; Chatham, Hart, Jefferson, and Effingham Counties, Georgia, and Jasper County, South Carolina

  19. Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01

    This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

  20. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

    1986-12-02

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

  1. Coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skinner, Ronald W.; Tao, John C.; Znaimer, Samuel

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved process for the production of liquid carbonaceous fuels and solvents from carbonaceous solid fuels, especially coal. The claimed improved process includes the hydrocracking of the light SRC mixed with a suitable hydrocracker solvent. The recycle of the resulting hydrocracked product, after separation and distillation, is used to produce a solvent for the hydrocracking of the light solvent refined coal.

  2. Coal liquefaction model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajewski, J.J.; Gilbert, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report is divided into sections dealing with tetralin pyrolysis, chroman pyrolysis, solvent effects on reactions, pi conjugated biradical, and molecular mechanics of organometallic systems. Proposals are given as well as current progress.

  3. Catalytic coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Sunder, Swaminathan (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

  4. Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Bruce Kelly of Nexant at the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007

  5. EGS Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS projects span research, development, and demonstration. Unlike traditional hydrothermal systems, EGS capture heat from areas that traditional geothermal energy cannot—where fluid and/or...

  6. RENOTER Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of French project on thermoelectric waste heat recovery for cars and trucks with focus on cheap, available, efficient, and sustainable TE materials, as well as efficient material integration and production process.

  7. Project Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The purpose of this project is to develop improved heat transfer fluids, thermal storage ... The majority of the current R&D effort is focused on parabolic trough facilities. Sandia ...

  8. Project 1027697

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    05 ERSD Annual Report Project #1027697 Long-term Stewardship of Mixed Wastes: Passive Reactive Barriers for Simultaneous In Situ Remediation of Chlorinated Solvent, Heavy Metal and Radioactive.... Principal Investigator: Gerlach, Robin Organization: Montana State University Results To Date 1. MOST RECENT RESULTS TO DATE This project report addresses one part of a 3-way collaboration between researchers (Drs. Robin Gerlach and Al Cunningham) at Montana State University's (MSU's) Center for

  9. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects Joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/UCSD Research Projects Collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email Administrative Assistant Stacy Baker (505) 663-5233 Email "Since 2003, LANL has funded numerous collaborative

  10. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hogan, Robin

    2008-01-15

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  11. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  12. DOE Project Scorecards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Project Scorecards DOE project scorecards summarize capital asset project performance compared to the current approved baseline. 

  13. DOE Project Scorecards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Project Scorecards DOEproject scorecards summarize capital asset project performance compared to the current approved baseline.

  14. EIS-0488: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LNG, LLC (collectively Cameron), respectively. The Commission will use this EIS in its decision-making process to determine whether the Project is in the public interest....

  15. EIS-0510: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Calcasieu Pass Project, Cameron Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced its intent to prepare an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental...

  16. Levelized Cost of Energy: A Parametric Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Models and Their Impact on Project Risk Christopher P. Cameron, Joshua S. Stein, and Clifford W. Hansen PO Box 5800, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM ...

  17. EIS-0510: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0510: FERC Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Calcasieu Pass Project, Cameron ...

  18. Hydropower Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-04-02

    The Water Power Program helps industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Through support for public, private, and nonprofit efforts, the Water Power Program promotes the development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced hydropower devices and pumped storage hydropower applications. These technologies help capture energy stored by diversionary structures, increase the efficiency of hydroelectric generation, and use excess grid energy to replenish storage reserves for use during periods of peak electricity demand. In addition, the Water Power Program works to assess the potential extractable energy from domestic water resources to assist industry and government in planning for our nation’s energy future. From FY 2008 to FY 2014, DOE’s Water Power Program announced awards totaling approximately $62.5 million to 33 projects focused on hydropower. Table 1 provides a brief description of these projects.

  19. NESAP Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NESAP Projects NESAP Roles and Liaisons NERSC-8 Procurement Programming models File Storage and I/O Edison PDSF Genepool Testbeds Retired Systems Storage & File Systems Data & Analytics Connecting to NERSC Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Statistics Application Performance Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option

  20. Hallmark Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity,

  1. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Research Projects Composite-to-Steel Joint Integrity Monitoring and Assessment Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email UCSD Faculty and Graduate Students Professor

  2. Project Financing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Columbus HTS Power Cable Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202 \ 586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585 Plugging America Into the Future of Power This project involves field-testing of a long-length high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable under real environmental stresses and real electrical loads. The cable system forms an important electrical

  3. Integration & Scale-Up Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or otherwise restricted information Integration & Scale-Up WBS 2.4.1.301 NREL is a ... * Tt-K. Bio-oil Pathways Process Integration * Tt-E. Liquefaction of Biomass and ...

  4. EIS-0492: Oregon LNG Export Project (Warrenton, OR) and Washington...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    proposals (1) to add liquefaction and export capability to a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Warrenton, Oregon, and add 39 miles of new pipeline in Columbia...

  5. Studies in coal liquefaction with application to the SRC and related processes. Quarterly report, August 1981-October 1981. [Using model compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarrer, A. R.; Guin, J. A.; Curtis, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Model compound reactions were studied to evaluate the effects of mass transfer, solvent type, solvent blending, hydrogen partial pressure, temperature, reactant concentration, additive loading and its preparation, etc. Naphthalene hydrogenation and benzothiophene hydrodesulfurization were investigated under the conditions comparable to commercial coal liquefaction and related processes. Both of these reaction systems were observed to be surface reaction controlled under the reaction conditions used in this work. Certain aromatic compounds were observed to cause a reduction in the reaction rates of naphthalene and benzothiophene. Single stage coal dissolution was investigated using tetralin as a hydrogen donor solvent and a commercial cobalt-molybdate catalyst. A spinning basket system was developed to allow injection of the catalyst at a desired time in the reaction cycle. This catalyst injection technique proved to be reliable for the exploratory work done here. The degree of catalyst deactivation was rated by comparing the activities of the spent catalyst for model compound (naphthalene and cumene) reactivities relative to those of the fresh catalyst. No substantial reduction in deactivation was observed to result with delayed contacting of the catalyst with the coal-tetralin reaction mixture. The effect of reaction temperature on the initial rate of catalyst deactivation was also studied.

  6. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organization Examples Example 8 4.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION Chapter 4.0 describes the principle project organizations, including their responsibilities and relationships. Other organizations, that have an interest in the project, also are described. 4.1 Principal Project Organizations and Responsibilities The management organization for the 324/327 Buildings Stabilization/Deactivation Project represents a partnership between four principal project organizations responsible for the project. The four

  7. EIS-0432: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Medicine Bow Gasification and Liquefaction Coal-to-Liquids, Carbon County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is assessing the potential environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Medicine Bow Fuel & Power LLC (MBFP), a wholly-owned subsidiary of DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC. MBFP submitted an application to DOE under the Federal loan guarantee program pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to support the construction and startup of the MBFP coal-to-liquids facility, a coal mine and associated coal handling facilities. This project is inactive.

  8. MHK Projects/Manchac Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    el":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St Gabriel, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  9. MHK Projects/Claiborne Island Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    el":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St Gabriel, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  10. MHK Projects/Point Pleasant Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    el":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St Gabriel, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  11. MHK Projects/College Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bel":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112008 Project City St James, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  12. FUSRAP Project

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Project 23b 14501 FUSRAP TECHNICAL BULLETIN N O . - R 3 v . L DATE: 1.2 9-99 SUBJECT : Pr.pec.d BY T r m L u d Approval Summary of the results for the Springdale characterization activities performed per WI-94-015, Rev. 0. TUO separate radiological characterization surveys and a limited cherical characterization survey were performed on the Springdale Site in Octcjer and December, 1993. The design of the radiological surveys were to supplement and define existing ORNL surveys. The limited

  13. EIS-0489: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

  14. EIS-0489: FERC Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

  15. EIS-0489: Notice of Additional Public Scoping Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

  16. EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

  17. EIS-0489: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, Oregon) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, Oregon)

  18. EIS-0489: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, Klamath, Jackson, and Douglas Counties, OR)

  19. PORTNUS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loyal, Rebecca E.

    2015-07-14

    The objective of the Portunus Project is to create large, automated offshore ports that will the pace and scale of international trade. Additionally, these ports would increase the number of U.S. domestic trade vessels needed, as the imported goods would need to be transported from these offshore platforms to land-based ports such as Boston, Los Angeles, and Newark. Currently, domestic trade in the United States can only be conducted by vessels that abide by the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 – also referred to as the Jones Act. The Jones Act stipulates that vessels involved in domestic trade must be U.S. owned, U.S. built, and manned by a crew made up of U.S. citizens. The Portunus Project would increase the number of Jones Act vessels needed, which raises an interesting economic concern. Are Jones Act ships more expensive to operate than foreign vessels? Would it be more economically efficient to modify the Jones Act and allow vessels manned by foreign crews to engage in U.S. domestic trade? While opposition to altering the Jones Act is strong, it is important to consider the possibility that ship-owners who employ foreign crews will lobby for the chance to enter a growing domestic trade market. Their success would mean potential job loss for thousands of Americans currently employed in maritime trade.

  20. Preparing for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Project Implementation Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Project Implementation Seminar Series Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Agenda Seminar Series ...

  1. PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans Overview Project Management Plan Suggested Outline Subjects Crosswalk between the Suggested PMP Outline Subjects and a Listing ...

  2. BETO Active Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contributes to setting goals * In-depth knowledge of project statusaccomplishmentsissues ... Project Project Program eere.energy.gov Management Lifecycle Budget & Procurement Planning ...

  3. Capital Project Prioritization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capital-Project-Prioritization Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  4. Project Grandmaster

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-09-16

    The purpose of the Project Grandmaster Application is to allow individuals to opt-in and give the application access to data sources about their activities on social media sites. The application will cross-reference these data sources to build up a picture of each individual activities they discuss, either at present or in the past, and place this picture in reference to groups of all participants. The goal is to allow an individual to place themselves inmore » the collective and to understand how their behavior patterns fit with the group and potentially find changes to make, such as activities they weren’t already aware of or different groups of interest they might want to follow.« less

  5. Project Grandmaster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-16

    The purpose of the Project Grandmaster Application is to allow individuals to opt-in and give the application access to data sources about their activities on social media sites. The application will cross-reference these data sources to build up a picture of each individual activities they discuss, either at present or in the past, and place this picture in reference to groups of all participants. The goal is to allow an individual to place themselves in the collective and to understand how their behavior patterns fit with the group and potentially find changes to make, such as activities they weren?t already aware of or different groups of interest they might want to follow.

  6. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  7. Conceptual process design and economics for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass through methanol/dimethyl ether intermediates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Humbird, David; Schaidle, Joshua; Biddy, Mary

    2015-10-28

    This paper describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas via indirect gasification, gas clean-up via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and the homologation of DME over a zeolite catalyst to high-octane gasoline-range hydrocarbon products. The current process configuration has similarities to conventional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies, but there are key distinctions, specifically regarding the product slate, catalysts, and reactor conditions. A techno-economicmore » analysis is performed to investigate the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock. The design features a processing daily capacity of 2000 tonnes (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The process yields 271 liters of liquid fuel per dry tonne of biomass (65 gal/dry ton), for an annual fuel production rate of 178 million liters (47 MM gal) at 90% on-stream time. The estimated total capital investment for an nth-plant is $438 million. The resulting minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) is $0.86 per liter or $3.25 per gallon in 2011 US dollars. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance. Sustainability metrics for the conversion process are quantified and assessed. The potential premium value of the high-octane gasoline blendstock is examined and found to be at least as competitive as fossil-derived blendstocks. A simple blending strategy is proposed to demonstrate the potential for blending the biomass-derived blendstock with petroleum-derived intermediates. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining published by Society of Industrial Chemistry and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.« less

  8. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  9. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  10. Conceptual process design and economics for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass through methanol/dimethyl ether intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Humbird, David; Schaidle, Joshua; Biddy, Mary

    2015-10-28

    This paper describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas via indirect gasification, gas clean-up via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and the homologation of DME over a zeolite catalyst to high-octane gasoline-range hydrocarbon products. The current process configuration has similarities to conventional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies, but there are key distinctions, specifically regarding the product slate, catalysts, and reactor conditions. A techno-economic analysis is performed to investigate the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock. The design features a processing daily capacity of 2000 tonnes (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The process yields 271 liters of liquid fuel per dry tonne of biomass (65 gal/dry ton), for an annual fuel production rate of 178 million liters (47 MM gal) at 90% on-stream time. The estimated total capital investment for an nth-plant is $438 million. The resulting minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) is $0.86 per liter or $3.25 per gallon in 2011 US dollars. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance. Sustainability metrics for the conversion process are quantified and assessed. The potential premium value of the high-octane gasoline blendstock is examined and found to be at least as competitive as fossil-derived blendstocks. A simple blending strategy is proposed to demonstrate the potential for blending the biomass-derived blendstock with petroleum-derived intermediates. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining published by Society of Industrial Chemistry and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Project Management Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-05

    The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and aids the federal project directors and integrated project teams in the execution of projects.

  12. Perspectives on Project Finance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Perspectives on Project Finance John May, Managing Partner, Stern Brothers & Co.

  13. Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstration Project Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project Resources & Links Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Synchrophasor measurements are a...

  14. Cameron, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price to Spain (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 7.58 -- -- --

  15. Energy Department Authorizes Cameron LNG and Carib Energy to Export

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Protect the Nation's Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Attack | Department of Energy WASHINGTON - Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz today announced awards totaling approximately $30 million for the development of new tools and technologies to strengthen protection of the nation's electric grid and oil and gas infrastructure from cyber attack. With support from the Energy Department, energy sector organizations in California, Georgia, New Jersey, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and

  16. MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112006 Project City Port Townsend, WA Project StateProvince Washington Project Country United States...

  17. Demonstration project Smart Charging (Smart Grid Project) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smart Grid Projects Smart Grid Projects in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Distribution Smart Grid Projects - Integrated System Smart Grid Projects - Home...

  18. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  19. Photovoltaic Solar Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Solar Projects Photovoltaic Solar Projects Photovoltaic Solar Projects Photovoltaic Solar Projects Photovoltaic Solar Projects Photovoltaic Solar Projects Photovoltaic ...

  20. Solar Manufacturing Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects Solar Manufacturing Projects SOLAR ...

  1. Geothermal Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy Projects Geothermal Energy ...

  2. Step 3: Project Refinement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3: Project Refinement 2 1 Potential 3 Refinement 4 Implementation 5 Operations & Maintenance 2 Options 3 Refinement 1/28/2016 2 3 FUNDING AND FINANCING OPTIONS Project Ownership Financing structure is highly dependent on size of the project and the capital available for a given project: * Tribe owns the project (cash purchase or debt) * Tribe hosts the project and buys the electricity (power purchase agreement) * Tribe partners with private sector and co-owns the project (uncertainties about

  3. Project Reports for Haida Corporation- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Reynolds Creek Hydroelectric Project ("Reynolds Creek" or the "Project") is a 5 MW hydroelectric resource to be constructed on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, approximately 10 miles east of Hydaburg.

  4. Project Reports for Chickasaw Nation- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this project, the Chickasaw Nation, Division of Commerce (CNDC) will upgrade old, inefficient lighting systems throughout CNDC to new, energy saving systems. Learn more about this project or...

  5. Step 4: Project Implementation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Process Step 4: Project Implementation Presentation Agenda * Step 4: Project Implementation - Pre-construction - Contract execution - Interconnection - Project construction - Commissioning * Project Example 2 1/28/2016 2 1 Potential 3 Refinement 5 Operations & Maintenance 2 Options 4 Implementation 4 Implementation 3 Potential Options Refinement Implementation Operations & Maintenance Step 4: Implementation 4 Purpose: Contract and begin physical construction of project Tasks: * Finalize

  6. Project File System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with each project directory. This user must have a NIM role of PI, PI Proxy, or Project Manager. Access control for project directories is based on Unix groups. The...

  7. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCACAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: ...

  8. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    One project >100M achieved CD-2 in 1 st qtr FY09. 5. TRA Use: By end of FY11, 80% of projects >750M will implement TRA no later than CD-2. 50% - No projects >750 M achieved ...

  9. Buckman Direct Diversion Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buckman Direct Diversion Project Buckman Direct Diversion Project This project takes surface water from the Rio Grande, and then treats and distributes these waters to the city and county of Santa Fe through their drinking water distribution systems. August 1, 2013 Water flumes at Buckman Direct Diversion Project Water flumes at Buckman Direct Diversion Project The City of Santa Fe and Santa Fe County completed the construction of the Buckman Direct Diversion (BDD) Project in December 2010. The

  10. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Baselines - Performance Baseline Examples Example 34 6.0 PROJECT BASELINE This section presents a summary of the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project baseline, which was prepared by an inter- contractor team to support an accelerated planning case for the project. The project schedules and associated cost profiles presented in this section are compared to the currently approved project baseline, as contained in the Facility Stabilization Project Fiscal Year 1999 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP)

  11. Perspectives on Project Finance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Typical Project Finance Structure 2 SOUND PROJECT ECONOMICS Leads to Adequate Debt Service Coverage And Acceptable Equity Returns Market Risk Assessment Competitive positioning. ...

  12. 2016 Technology Innovation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects FY 2016 Technology Innovation Project Briefs Demand Response TIP 292: Advanced Heat Pump Water Heater Research TIP 336: Scaled Deployment and Demonstration of Demand...

  13. GTO Project Portfolio

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office funds 154 research and development projects leveraging nearly $500 million in total combined investment. Each project represents a growing technology sector in conventional hydrothermal,...

  14. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  15. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...Project Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset ...

  16. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Forecast FY ...

  17. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...Project Management Performance Metric FY 2013 Target FY 2013 Forecast FY 2013 Pre- & Post-CAP* Forecast Comment Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset ...

  18. Evaluation Project 4492

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization area to allow the movement and radio-graphing of component for evaluation to determine the proper Project Execution Plan for dismantlement. Evaluation Project...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Threat and Intelligence Insight Game-changing projects with a high degree of technical risk realized and produced in support of the warfighter Threat and Intelligence...

  20. Manhattan Project: Maps

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scroll down to view thumbnails of each map. Leslie Groves looks at a map of Japan. Manhattan Project: General Manhattan Project Facilities Places map "Signature Facilities of the ...

  1. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast ...

  2. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 ...

  3. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2013 Target FY 2013 Final FY ...

  4. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 ...

  5. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fourth Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY ...

  6. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    First Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast ...

  7. Step 4: Project Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... expected * Technology O&M Assumed low, mitigable or allocatable Sources: Adapted from Holland & Hart, RE Project Development & Finance & Infocast, Advanced RE Project Finance & ...

  8. Mentors and Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentors and Projects Bringing together top space science students with internationally ... scientists, on challenging research projects in the Space Weather Summer School. ...

  9. Transmission Commercial Project Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects Expand Projects Skip navigation links Ancillary and Control Area Services (ACS) Practices Forum Attachment K Commercial Business Process Improvement (CBPI) Customer...

  10. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the Program Management Scorecard. The Department has maintained performance measures for key project (Federal Project ... of FY11, on a program portfolio basis, 90% of all ...

  11. Project Finance and Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Project Finance and Investments Chris Cassidy, National Business Renewable Energy Advisor, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  12. ARRA Electrification Projects

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    U.S. Department of Energy funded multiple electrification projects through the American ... The U.S. Department of Energy funded multiple electrification projects through the ...

  13. MHK Projects/Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Country Australia Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Clarence Strait Coordinates -12.083533792616, 131.04972839355 Project...

  14. 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop - "Enhancing Project Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Workshop - "Enhancing Project Management" 2016 DOE Project Management Workshop - "Enhancing Project Management" 20160407-doe-project-management-workshop-ADJUST-slide.png ...

  15. MHK Projects/Twelve Mile Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Province Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Coordinates 29.9177, -89.9307 Project Phase Phase 1 Project Installed Capacity...

  16. Statement of Project Objectives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Project Objectives, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  17. West Valley Demonstration Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Valley Demonstration Project compliance agreements, along with summaries of the agreements, can be viewed here.

  18. Financing Project Implementation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation covers typical sources of financing to implement energy efficiency projects in industry.

  19. EM Projects Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jack Surash, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management, Environmental Management March 22, 2016

  20. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Desert Peak EGS Project presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  1. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Execution Example

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Project Execution Example Example 73 6.3 Project Approach The overall schedule strategy for the PFP project includes ongoing minimum safe activities, combined with stabilization of materials followed by materials disposition, and subsequent transition of the PFP complex to a decommissioned state. The PFP material stabilization baseline was developed using a functionally-based work WBS. The WBS defines all activities required to take each material stream from their current location/conditions

  2. December 2015 Project Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) provides a monthly assessment of DOEs portfolio of capital assets projects, which is summarized in the monthly Project Dashboard report. The current portfolio consists of 32 active projects with established scope, schedule, and cost performance baselines. Based on current performance, projects that are expected to meet their performance baseline are assessed as GREEN, projects that are at-risk of breaching their performance baselines are assessed as YELLOW, and projects that are expected to breach their performance baselines are assessed as RED.

  3. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 nd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% - Two projects completed in the 2 nd Qtr FY09. This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects

  4. January 2016 Project Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) provides a monthly assessment of DOEs portfolio of capital assets projects, which is summarized in the monthly Project Dashboard report. The current portfolio consists of 32 active projects with established scope, schedule, and cost performance baselines. Based on current performance, projects that are expected to meet their performance baseline are assessed as GREEN, projects that are at-risk of breaching their performance baselines are assessed as YELLOW, and projects that are expected to breach their performance baselines are assessed as RED.

  5. Project Reports for Winnebago Tribe- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Following through with the Winnebago Tribe's commitment to reduce energy usage and consumption, the Winnebago Tribe Solar Project will focus on renewable energy production and energy cost savings...

  6. EIS-0491: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0491: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana Federal Energy Regulatory ...

  7. Project Management Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Career Development Program Project Management Career Development Program The Project Management Career Development Program (PMCDP) in Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments was established in 2001 by a Congressional mandate to ensure the Department of Energy (DOE) has well qualified and experienced Federal Project Directors (FPDs) to oversee the agency's diverse portfolio of highly-technical construction, experimental equipment and environmental cleanup projects. The

  8. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Biorefinery for the Direct Production of Synthetic Fuel from Waste Carbonaceous Feedstocks

  9. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.

    1986-10-14

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  10. Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Methods have evolved over the years, but there is currently only one consensus methodology; Youd et al., 2001 Two other methods have emerged in the last few years;...

  11. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

    1986-01-01

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  12. 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What:  2014 DOE Project Management Workshop (Meeting the Challenge—Integrated Acquisition & Project Management)

  13. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 4 th Quarter Metrics Final Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2008 Target FY 2008 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 75% 76% This is a 3-year rolling average Data includes FY06 to FY08. (37/48) 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete

  14. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% - No 1 st Qtr FY09 completions. This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of

  15. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 80% 72% This is a 3-year rolling average (FY07 to FY09). No 3 rd qtr FY09 completions. 2. EM Cleanup (Soil and Groundwater Remediation, D&D, and Waste Treatment and Disposal) Projects: 90% of EM cleanup projects complete 80% of

  16. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Second Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 73% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10).

  17. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 Contract/Project Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Forecast FY 2010 Pre- & Post-CAP Comment 1a. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Pre-RCA/CAP) 90% of projects completed within 110% of CD-2 TPC by FY11. 1b. Capital Asset Line Item Projects: (Post-RCA/CAP) 85% Line Item 71% Line Item 70% Pre-CAP 100% Post-CAP This is a projection based on a 3-year rolling average (FY08 to FY10).

  18. Concentrating Solar Power Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects Concentrating Solar Power Projects

  19. Integrated Project Team RM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Integrated Project Team (IPT) is an essential element of the Department’s acquisition process and will be utilized during all phases of a project life cycle. The IPT is a team of professionals...

  20. Acquisition and Project Management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Acquisition and Project Management Office volunteers get up-close look at Office of Secure Transportation exercise http:nnsa.energy.govblogacquisition-and-project-mana...