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  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Application...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Mountains Chen, Yong UCLA Hall, Alex University of California, Los Angeles Liou, Kuo-Nan UCLA A large part of the land surface is not flat, but vertically structured. In...

  2. Detection and Retrieval of Mineral Dust Aerosol Using AERI during...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Campaign: Potential Application to ARM Measurements Hansell, Richard UCLA Liou, Kuo-Nan UCLA Ou, Szu-cheng University of California, Los Angeles Tsay, Si-Chee NASA Goddard...

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Simultaneous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM site from MODIS Data Roskovensky, John University of California, Los Angeles Liou, Kuo-Nan UCLA A new methodology for retrieving both thin cirrus and aerosol optical depths...

  4. Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Transfer Model and ARM Data Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast Radiative Transfer Model and ARM Data Yue, Qing Dept. of Atomspheric & Oceanic Sciences, UCLA Liou, Kuo-Nan UCLA Ou, Szu-cheng University of California, Los Angeles Kahn, Brian Jet Propulsion Laboratory Yang, Ping Texas A&M Mace, Gerald University of Utah Category: Radiation A thin cirrus cloud thermal infrared radiative transfer model has been developed to interpret AIRS

  5. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Nighttime cirrus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detection using AIRS radiances and total column precipitable water Nighttime cirrus detection using AIRS radiances and total column precipitable water Kahn, Brian Jet Propulsion Laboratory Liou, Kuo-Nan UCLA A method of cirrus detection at nighttime is presented that utilizes 3.8 and 10.4 m infrared (IR) window brightness temperature differences (dBT) and total column precipitable water (PW) measurements. This technique is applied to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced

  6. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accomplished using a fast radiative transfer code originally developed by Qiang Fu and Kuo-Nan Liou (Fu and Liou 1993) and subsequently highly modified by the SARB team. Details...

  7. UCLA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UCLA Jump to: navigation, search Name: UCLA Place: California Product: Education and research facility. References: UCLA1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  8. ARM - Events Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOAA-AGU Fellow Dr. Ruby Leung, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory-AGU Fellow Dr. Kuo-Nan Liou, University of California, Los Angeles-AGU Roger Revelle Medal Dr. Warren...

  9. Green Technology Institute at UCLA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Institute at UCLA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Technology Institute at UCLA Place: Los Angeles, California Product: California-based institute to reduce...

  10. UCLA Anderson School of Management LGBT Leadership Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This three day on-campus experience at UCLA spans five months, centering on three days on campus. Online trainings during and following the program cover leadership, decision-making, identity,...

  11. Vidvuds Ozolins: Department of Materials Science and Engineering UCLA &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director of DOE EFRC Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials | Center for Energy Efficient Materials Vidvuds Ozolins: Department of Materials Science and Engineering UCLA & Director of DOE EFRC Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials Nov 13, 2013 | 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Vidvuds Ozolins Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, & Director, DOE EFRC Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials, University of California, Los Angeles Title Coming Soon November 13, 2013 | 4:00pm

  12. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: UCLA Smart Grid Energy Research Center (SMERC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    UCLA Smart Grid Energy Research Center (SMERC) provides thought leadership via partnerships between utilities, government, policy makers, technology providers, electric vehicle manufacturers,...

  13. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1983-11-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results, and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. The research carried out by the Group last year may be divided into three separate programs: (1) baryon spectroscopy, (2) investigations of charge symmetry and isospin invariance, and (3) tests of time reversal invariance. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research. An update of the group bibliography is given at the end.

  14. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Robert D.

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERNs Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  15. NREL, UCLA Certify World Record for Polymer Solar Cell Efficiency - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL NREL, UCLA Certify World Record for Polymer Solar Cell Efficiency At 8.6% efficiency, cells clear path for devices that can harvest a broader spectrum of the sun's radiation February 29, 2012 Scientists boosted the significance of tandem polymer solar cells by successfully testing cells with low-bandgap polymers that achieved certified conversion efficiencies of 8.62 ± 0.3% with respect to standard terrestrial reporting conditions. That's the highest independently measured

  16. RF and Magnetic Measurements on the SPARC Photoinjector and Solenoid at UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cook, A.M.; Dunning, M.P.; Frigola, P.; Travish, G.; Sanelli, C.; Tazzioli, F.; Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC

    2006-01-30

    The rf photocathode gun and the solenoid for the SPARC project at INFN-LNF (Frascati) have been fabricated and undergone initial testing at UCLA. The advanced aspects of the design of these devices are detailed. Final diagnosis of the tuning of the RF gun performance, including operating mode frequency and field balance, is described. The emittance compensating solenoid magnet, which is designed to be tuned in longitudinal position by differential excitation of the coils, has been measured using Hall probe scans for field profiling, and pulsed wire methods to determine the field center. Comparisons between measurements and the predictions of design codes are made.

  17. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  18. Strengthening the fission reactor nuclear science and engineering program at UCLA. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okrent, D.

    1997-06-23

    This is the final report on DOE Award No. DE-FG03-92ER75838 A000, a three year matching grant program with Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to support strengthening of the fission reactor nuclear science and engineering program at UCLA. The program began on September 30, 1992. The program has enabled UCLA to use its strong existing background to train students in technological problems which simultaneously are of interest to the industry and of specific interest to PG and E. The program included undergraduate scholarships, graduate traineeships and distinguished lecturers. Four topics were selected for research the first year, with the benefit of active collaboration with personnel from PG and E. These topics remained the same during the second year of this program. During the third year, two topics ended with the departure o the students involved (reflux cooling in a PWR during a shutdown and erosion/corrosion of carbon steel piping). Two new topics (long-term risk and fuel relocation within the reactor vessel) were added; hence, the topics during the third year award were the following: reflux condensation and the effect of non-condensable gases; erosion/corrosion of carbon steel piping; use of artificial intelligence in severe accident diagnosis for PWRs (diagnosis of plant status during a PWR station blackout scenario); the influence on risk of organization and management quality; considerations of long term risk from the disposal of hazardous wastes; and a probabilistic treatment of fuel motion and fuel relocation within the reactor vessel during a severe core damage accident.

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parameterization of CloudRadiation Processes in the UCLA General Circulation Model Gu, Y., Farrara, J., Liou, K.N., and Mechoso, C.R., University of California, Los Angeles...

  20. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Effect of Dust in China on Precipitation in the UCLA AGCM Yu Gu and K. N. Liou Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Joint Institute for Regional Earth...

  1. ZipperDB: Predictions of Fibril-forming Segments within Proteins Identified by the 3D Profile Method (from the UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Goldschmidt, L.; Teng, P. K.; Riek, R.; Eisenberg, D.

    ZipperDB contains predictions of fibril-forming segments within proteins identified by the 3D Profile Method. The UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics has analyzed over 20,000 putative protein sequences for segments with high fibrillation propensity that could form a "steric zipper"two self-complementary beta sheets, giving rise to the spine of an amyloid fibril. The approach is unique in that structural information is used to evaluate the likelihood that a particular sequence can form fibrils. [copied with edits from http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/]. In addition to searching the database, academic and non-profit users may also submit their protein sequences to the database.

  2. ZipperDB: Predictions of Fibril-forming Segments within Proteins Identified by the 3D Profile Method (from the UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Goldschmidt, L.; Teng, P. K.; Riek, R.; Eisenberg, D.

    ZipperDB contains predictions of fibril-forming segments within proteins identified by the 3D Profile Method. The UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics has analyzed over 20,000 putative protein sequences for segments with high fibrillation propensity that could form a "steric zipper"ùtwo self-complementary beta sheets, giving rise to the spine of an amyloid fibril. The approach is unique in that structural information is used to evaluate the likelihood that a particular sequence can form fibrils. [copied with edits from http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/]. In addition to searching the database, academic and non-profit users may also submit their protein sequences to the database.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_032607_3647c.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ground-Based Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using MODIS IR Window Channels, AERI Spectra and ARM Data Richard Hansell Jr. (rhansell@atmos.ucla.edu) 1 , K.N. Liou 1 , S.C. Ou 1 , S.C. Tsay 2 ,J. Ji 3 and J. Reid 4 1 Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, UCLA, 2 Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, Maryland 3 University of Maryland College Park, Maryland, 4 Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, California 1. Introduction 2. MODIS Dust Detection - method * The effects of

  4. ERSUG/EXERSUG: Jan 12, 1994 (UCLA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kitchens: View from Washington---Staff of OSC: Dave Nelson, John Cavallini, Fred Howes, Dan Hitchcock, George Seweryniak, Greg Chartrand, Bob...

  5. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.M.K. Nefkens; J. Goetz; A. Lapik; M. Korolija; S. Prakhov; A. Starostin

    2011-05-18

    This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup #25;0}, 2{pi}{sup #25;}0, 3{pi}{sup #25;0}, {eta}#17;, {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4#25;. It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, Gâ??parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta}#17;,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta}#17; and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup #4;â??}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron skin" of {sup 208}Pb, which is of great interest to astroparticle physics for determining the properties of neutron stars. Processes of study are coherent and nonâ??coherent #25;0 photoproduction. The Crystal Ball is uniquely suited for these studies because of the large acceptance, good direction and energy resolution and it is an inclusive detector for the #25;{pi}{sup 0} final state and exclusive for background such as 2#25;{pi}{sup 0}.

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: UCLA Smart Grid Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SMERC currently provides charging for employees as part of its ongoing research on the topics of Electric Vehicle Integration Automated Demand Response Microgrids, and Distributed ...

  7. RESULTS FROM THE UCLA/FNPL UNDERDENSE PLASMA LENS EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Edwards, H; Fliller, R; Kazakevich, G M; Piot, P; Santucci, J; Li, J; Tikhoplav, R

    2006-04-18

    A gaussian underdense plasma lens with peak density 5 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and a full width half maximum (FWHM) length of 2.2 cm has been used to focus a relativistic electron beam. This plasma lens is equivalent in strength to a quadrupole magnet with a 150 T/m field gradient. The lens focused a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron beam with initial dimensions {sigma}{sub x,y} {approx} 650 {micro}m and {sigma}{sub z} {approx} 6.5 mm onto an optical transition radiation (OTR) screen {approx}2 cm downstream of the lens. The average transverse area of the plasma focused electron beam was typically demagnified by a factor of 23. The evolution of the beam envelope in the area near the beam waist was measured for both round beams and asymmetric beams with x:y aspect ratios as large as 1:5. The light from the OTR screen in the round beam case was also imaged into a streak camera in order to directly measure the correlation between z and {sigma}{sub r} within the beam.

  8. UCLA/FNPL Underdense Plasma Lens Experiment: Results and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.; Fliller, R.; Kazakevich, G. M.; Piot, P.; Santucci, J.; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.

    2006-11-27

    Focusing of a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron bunch by a gaussian underdense plasma lens operated just beyond the threshold of the underdense condition has been demonstrated. The strong 1.9 cm focal length plasma lens focused both transverse directions simultaneously and reduced the minimum area of the beam spot by a factor of 23. Analysis of the beam envelope evolution observed near the beam waist shows that the spherical aberrations of this underdense lens are lower than those of an overdense plasma lens, as predicted by theory. Time resolved measurements of the focused electron bunch are also reported and compared to simulations.

  9. Results from the UCLA/FNPL underdense plasma lens experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Piot, P.; Santucci, J.; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; /Rochester U.

    2007-01-01

    A gaussian underdense plasma lens with peak density 5 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and a full width half maximum (FWHM) length of 2.2 cm has been used to focus a relativistic electron beam. This plasma lens is equivalent in strength to a quadrupole magnet with a 150 T/m field gradient. The lens focused a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron beam with initial dimensions {sigma}{sub x,y} {approx} 650 {micro}m and {sigma}{sub z} {approx} 6.5 mm onto an optical transition radiation (OTR) screen {approx}2 cm downstream of the lens. The average transverse area of the plasma focused electron beam was typically demagnified by a factor of 23. The evolution of the beam envelope in the area near the beam waist was measured for both round beams and asymmetric beams with x:y aspect ratios as large as 1:5. The light from the OTR screen in the round beam case was also imaged into a streak camera in order to directly measure the correlation between z and {sigma}{sub r} within the beam.

  10. UCLA/FNPL Underdense Plasma Lens Experiment: Results and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Fliller, R; Kazakevich, G M; Piot, P; Santucci, J; Li, J; Tikhoplav, R

    2006-08-04

    Focusing of a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron bunch by a gaussian underdense plasma lens operated just beyond the threshold of the underdense condition has been demonstrated. The strong 1.9 cm focal length plasma lens focused both transverse directions simultaneously and reduced the minimum area of the beam spot by a factor of 23. Analysis of the beam envelope evolution observed near the beam waist shows that the spherical aberrations of this underdense lens are lower than those of an overdense plasma lens, as predicted by theory. Time resolved measurements of the focused electron bunch are also reported and compared to simulations.

  11. UCLA Tokamak Program Close Out Report. (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shaing's enhanced neoclassical theory. The PI believes that ITER will have a good energy confinement time but deleteriously large particle confinement time and it will disrupt on...

  12. Algal Functional Annotation Tool from the DOE-UCLA Institute for Genomics and Proteomics

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lopez, David

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a bioinformatics resource to visualize pathway maps, identify enriched biological terms, or convert gene identifiers to elucidate biological function in silico. These types of analysis have been catered to support lists of gene identifiers, such as those coming from transcriptome gene expression analysis. By analyzing the functional annotation of an interesting set of genes, common biological motifs may be elucidated and a first-pass analysis can point further research in the right direction. Currently, the following databases have been parsed, processed, and added to the tool: 1( Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathways Database, 2) MetaCyc Encyclopedia of Metabolic Pathways, 3) Panther Pathways Database, 4) Reactome Pathways Database, 5) Gene Ontology, 6) MapMan Ontology, 7) KOG (Eukaryotic Clusters of Orthologous Groups), 5)Pfam, 6) InterPro.

  13. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-15-046 UCLA EC B3-6.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 SECTION A. Project Title: The Influences of Neutron Irradiation on Aggregate Induced Degradation of Concrete - University of California, Los Angeles SECTION B. Project Description The University of California, Los Angeles, in collaboration with a National Lab, proposes to examine evolutions/manifestations of irradiation assisted aggregate (and concrete) degradation caused by neutron exposure. Objectives of this research include 1) to quantify the impacts of damage cascades, caused by heavy ion

  14. UCLA Tokamak Program Close Out Report. (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasma heating of University Type Tokamaks did not produce useful results due to plasma edge disturbances of the antennae. The Electric Tokamak produced better confinement in the...

  15. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working...

  16. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crystal models used to compute single scattering properties of aggregates (e.g., Yang and Liou 1998). Here the single-scattering properties for idealized models describing...

  17. Transverse pulse shaping and optimization of a tapered hard X...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Authors: Emma, C. ; UCLA, Los Angeles ; Pellegrini, C. ; UCLA, Los Angeles SLAC ; Wu, Juhao ; SLAC ; , Publication Date:...

  18. Validation of the ARchived CERES Surface and Atmosphere Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Fu-Liou code employing surface photometer measured AOT (Holben et al. 1998), the mean bias (for 500 cloud-screened intervals of 30 minutes) was well within the errors...

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ou SS, KN Liou, XJ Wang, A Dybdahl, M Mussetto, LD Carey, J Niu, JA Kankiewicz, S Kidder, and TH Von der Haar. 2009. "Retrievals of mixed-phase...

  20. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Climate, 9, 2058-2082. Fu, Q., K. N. Liou, M. C. Cribb, T. P. Charlock, and A. Grossman, 1997: Multiple scattering parameterization in thermal infrared radiative transfer....

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detection of Thin Cirrus Using MODIS 1.38 Micron Reflection Roskovensky, J.K. and Liou, K.N., University of California, Los Angeles Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)...

  2. ARM - 2003 Science Team Meeting Pictures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Janet Inrieri discuss Dave and Tom's poster. ARM Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman, Dave Turner, and Janet Inrieri discuss Dave and Tom's poster. K.N. Liou and Andy Lacis discuss...

  3. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of ...

  4. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detection and Retrieval of Cirrus Clouds in the Tropics from AIRS: Validation from ARM Data Submitter: Yue, Q., Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Yue Q and KN Liou. 2009. "Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties determined from AIRS infrared spectra." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L05810,

  5. »ÃµÆƬ 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiative Forcings of Thin Cirrus in the Tropical Atmosphere Using AIRS/ARM Data Qing Yue, K. N. Liou, and Y. Gu University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Introduction and Motivation * Cirrus clouds are the highest clouds in the troposphere, regularly cover 20-30% of the globe (Liou 1986) and have been found to have a high frequency of occurrence (e. g. Wylie et al. 2004). * Given the high location, large coverage, and frequent occurrence, the effect of cirrus clouds on the

  6. Donald J. Cram, Host-Guest Chemistry, Cram's Rule of Asymmetric Induction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Carceplexes Donald J. Cram, Host-Guest Chemistry, Cram's Rule of Asymmetric Induction and Carceplexes Resources with Additional Information * Cram Honored Donald J. Cram Courtesy of UCLA Photography Donald J. Cram ... taught and conducted research at UCLA for more than 50 years ... . A chemist at UCLA since 1947, Cram opened broad new avenues for exploration across organic chemistry, with applications in both basic research as well as specific fields, such as pharmaceutical production

  7. NUG 1994

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 12, 1994 (Rockville, Maryland) Dates July 11 - 12, 1994 Location Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza Rockville,... Read More ERSUGEXERSUG: Jan 12, 1994 (UCLA) Dates Jan 12, 1994...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Gonen, Tamir ; Yeates, Todd O. ; Baker, David ; UCLA) ; et al We describe a general ... oligomeric states in solution, and the crystal structures of the complexes revealed that ...

  9. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCLA project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  10. SciTech Connect:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "SLAC UCLA" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report...

  11. High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation FY13 Q1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCLA project, funded by the SunShot CSP Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  12. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG 1996 NUG 1995 NUG 1994 ERSUG: July 11 - 12, 1994 (Rockville, Maryland) Presentations Agenda Minutes ERSUGEXERSUG: Jan 12, 1994 (UCLA) NUGEX Elections Charter User...

  13. HEP-v2-for-dist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Case S tudy: C on.nuing S tudies o f P lasma B ased Accelerators ( mp113) * PI: W. B. Mori (UCLA) * Presenter: F. S. Tsung (UCLA) Users: W. An, A. Davidson, V. K. Decyk, (UCLA), J. Vieira, L. Silva (IST), W. Lu (UCLA/ Tsinghua) F. S. Tsung, HEP Workshop HEP R equirements: Con.nuing S tudies o f P lasma B ased A ccelerators ( mp113) (PI: W . B . M ori, P resenter: F . S . T sung) An alternate scheme to accelerate particles using plasmas is the Plasma WakeField Accelerator (PWFA) concept where a

  14. NUGEX 2014 Meeting Planning Subcommittee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Meeting Planning Subcommittee NUGEX 2014 Meeting Planning Subcommittee Members Frank Tsung, UCLA (HEPFES) Gary Grest, Sandia (BES) Last edited: 2013-06-03 11:04:4...

  15. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids This fact sheet describes a UCLA-led solar project to ...

  16. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of performance between the SP and UCLA's own Appleseed cluster of G4 Macintosh computers will also be presented. Kernel and Application Code Performance for a Spectral...

  17. Structures of potent anticancer compounds bound to tubulin (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Todd O. ; Torres, Jorge Z. 1 + Show Author Affiliations (UCLA) Publication Date: 2015-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1188824 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:...

  18. October 26, 2011 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    List Felipe Gndara (Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry, UCLA) Understanding gas adsorption in zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) Sergey Maximoff (Dept. of Chemical &...

  19. SoCal Edge: Accelerating Investments in Innovative Building Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power, Kilroy Realty, UCLA, Hudson Pacific Properties, Jones Lang LaSalle, Morlin Asset Management, Los Angeles Green Building Council, Westin Bonaventure Hotel and Suites, ...

  20. SSRL HEADLINES June 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Russ Chianelli (UTEP), the panel included Franz Himpsel (Univ. of Wisconsin), Bennett Larson (ORNL), Simon Mochrie (Yale Univ.), Cyrus Safinya (UCSB), Sarah Tolbert (UCLA) and Don...

  1. RFP_WhitePaper_v4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    home team, five groups are supported directly or indirectly under the "MST Research" umbrella: UCLA, Xantho Technologies, Wheaton College, LANL, and ORNL. There are 16 other...

  2. Constructing QCD one-loop amplitudes (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    systematic extraction of bubble and triangle coefficients which is well suited to automation. less Authors: Forde, Darren ; SLAC UCLA Publication Date: 2008-02-22 OSTI...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... States) USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy ... computing, and information science (1) genes (1) ... ; UCLA) ; et al October 2015 Computational Design of ...

  4. Paul D. Boyer, Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), and the Binding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using Walker's methodology, one of Boyer's former graduate students "did some elegant ... Boyer Award Lecture Series, University of Wisconsin Journey Page 2, research at UCLA Paul ...

  5. Clean Cities: San Joaquin Valley Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coalition, these groups have conducted award-winning programs in the transportation, alternate fuels, agriculture, and public education arenas. A graduate of UCLA, Urata...

  6. Project Leader: Dr. Sungtaek Ju

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leader: Dr. Sungtaek Ju just@seas.ucla.edu MOTIVATION Liquid metals have superior heat transport properties, including low vapor pressure, high thermal conductivity, and relatively...

  7. Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam | Department of Energy Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam UCLA Logo The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), through the Concentrating Solar Power: Efficiently Leveraging

  8. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Influence of Ice Particle Shape on Albedo and Transmittance of Ice-Crystal Clouds A. G. Petrushin Institute of Experimental Meteorology Obninsk, Russia T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Numerous experimental and theoretical studies indicate that the single-scattering properties of nonspherical ice cloud particles can differ substantially from those of surface- or volume-equivalent spheres (e.g., Volkovitskiy et al. 1984; Takano and Liou 1989). These

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    26 September 1997 CART Case Study of a Cirrus Cloud Producing a Spectacular Optical Display Sassen, K., and Mace, G.G., Department of Meteorology, University of Utah; Arnott, W.P., and Hallett, J., Desert Research Institute; Liou, K.N., and Takano, Y., Dept. Atmospheric Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles; Poellot, M.R., Atmospheric Sciences Department, University of North Dakota Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting During the September 1997 Intensive

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Parameterization for Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds: Application to Climate Models Gu, Y. and Liou, K.N., University of California, Los Angeles Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model has been developed to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilizes a diffusion approximation approach (four-term expansion in the intensity)

  11. Microsoft Word - hoti_2014_cam.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Segregated nature of WANs, with network devices grouped in layers managed by their forwarding technology. Traffic Optimization in Multi-Layered WANs using SDN Henrique Rodrigues 1 , Inder Monga 2 , Abhinava Sadasivarao 3 , Sharfuddin Syed 3 , Chin Guok 2 , Eric Pouyoul 2 , Chris Liou 3 , Tajana Rosing 1 1 University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA, USA 2 Energy Sciences Network Berkeley, CA, USA 3 Infinera Corporation Sunnyvale, CA, USA Abstract - Wide area networks (WAN) forward traffic

  12. Final Scientific/Technical Report Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation Period of Performance: September 01, 2007 to August 31, 2012 For Grant DE-FC02-07ER41500 P.I.: Warren B. Mori UCLA Departments of Physics and Astronomy and of Electrical Engineering mori@physics.ucla.edu Summary: The UCLA Plasma Simulation Group is a major partner of the "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation". This is the final technical report. We include an overall summary, a list

  13. 032018.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tommasini 1 , J. Vierne 7 , D. White 1 , P. Whitman 1 1 LLNL, 2 LBL, 3 UCSD, 4 UCLA, 5 LLE, USA, 6 CEA, DAM, CESTA, France, 7 CEA, DAM, DIF, France Email: deder@llnl.gov Abstract. ...

  14. Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Robert [UCLA

    2013-01-22

    Robert Goldberg of UCLA presents "Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  15. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical ...

  16. Problem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Los Angeles (UCLA), has developed the Micro Power Source, a system that integrates a lithium-ion- based solid electrolyte battery with an ultra- thin PV cell, producing a...

  17. Sandia Energy - Sandia Labs, Front Edge Technology, Inc., Pacific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Los Angeles (UCLA), has developed the Micro Power Source, a system that integrates a lithium-ion-based solid electrolyte battery with an ultrathin PV cell, producing a...

  18. Los Angeles, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FB EcoSolutions LLC GFI Energy Ventures LLC Geothermal Power of America Global Clean Energy Holdings LLC GCEH Green Technology Institute at UCLA Grid Partners Hydrogen Car Co...

  19. Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Robert [UCLA] [UCLA

    2012-03-21

    Robert Goldberg of UCLA presents "Using Genomics to Dissect Seed Development" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  20. SSRL HEADLINES March 2001

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carried out by a BNL-LLNL-SLAC-UCLA collaboration within the broader framework of the LCLS R&D program funded by DOE-BES. The experiment, located in the Accelerator Test Facility...

  1. PPPL-led researchers seek to demonstrate a novel design for a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL-led researchers seek to demonstrate a novel design for a key diagnostic tool for ITER ... Researchers at DIII-D will be led by UCLA in testing the monostatic prototype on the ...

  2. NUG Meeting April 26 - 28, 1999

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Ricky Kendall, Ames laboratory 2. Mike Minkoff, ANL 3. Brian Hingerty, ORNL 4. Doug Rotman, LLNL 5. David J. Dean, ORNL 6. Don Spong, ORNL 7. Viktok K. Decyk, UCLA 8. Robert...

  3. Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteriaare genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuelin this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLAs electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

  4. Named Fellowships Luminary - Glenn Seaborg | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Angeles in 1933. While at UCLA, he was invited by his German professor to meet Albert Einstein, an experience that had a profound impact on Seaborg. Seaborg received his...

  5. Technical Session III Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Coherent LS @ MIT (Graves) .pdf file (1.1MB) Terawatt X-ray FELs (Pellegrini) .pdf file (5.1MB) Advanced Beam Physics @ UCLA (Musumeci) .pdf file (1.3MB) Accelerator Modeling...

  6. Efficient CO2 Fixation Pathways: Energy Plant: High Efficiency Photosynthetic Organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: UCLA is redesigning the carbon fixation pathways of plants to make them more efficient at capturing the energy in sunlight. Carbon fixation is the key process that plants use to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere into higher energy molecules (such as sugars) using energy from the sun. UCLA is addressing the inefficiency of the process through an alternative biochemical pathway that uses 50% less energy than the pathway used by all land plants. In addition, instead of producing sugars, UCLAs designer pathway will produce pyruvate, the precursor of choice for a wide variety of liquid fuels. Theoretically, the new biochemical pathway will allow a plant to capture 200% as much CO2 using the same amount of light. The pathways will first be tested on model photosynthetic organisms and later incorporated into other plants, thus dramatically improving the productivity of both food and fuel crops.

  7. Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accelerator (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beam Loading by Distributed Injection of Electrons in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Authors: Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. ; Marsh, K.A. ; Clayton, C.E. ; An, W. ; Mori, W.B. ; Joshi, C. ; /UCLA ; Lu, W. ; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /UCLA ; Adli, E. ; /SLAC /U. Oslo ; Corde, S. ; Litos, M. ; Li, S. ; Gessner, S. ;

  8. Material Point Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Point Methods and Multiphysics for Fracture and Multiphase Problems Joseph Teran, UCLA and Alice Koniges, LBL Contact: jteran@math.ucla.edu Material point methods (MPM) provide an intriguing new path for the design of algorithms that are poised to scale to billions of cores [4]. These methods are particularly important for simulating various phases in the presence of extreme deformation and topological change. This brings about the possibility of new simulations enabled at the exascale

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Sensing of Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds: Application to Climate Research Liou, K.N. (a), Ou, S.C. (a), Rolland, P. (a), Gu, Y. (a), Mace, G.G. (b), and Sassen, K. (b), University of California, Los Angeles (a), University of Utah, Salt Lake City (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting We have innovated a remote sensing methodology involving the construction of three-dimensional (3D) fields of the ice water content (IWC) and ice crystal

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3D Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Parameters Using AVHRR and MODIS Data Coupled With Radar and Lidar Measurements Ou, S.C.(a), Liou, K.N.(a), Takano, Y.(a), Mace, G.G.(b), Sassen, K.(b), and Heymsfield, A.(c), University of California at Los Angeles, California (a), University of Utah, Utah (b), National Center for Atmospheric Research, Colorado (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Satellite mapping of the optical depth in midlatitude and tropical regions has

  11. The DOE Atmospheric Radia4on Measurement Program's LES ARM Symbio4c Simula4on and Observa4on (LASSO) Workflow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Atmospheric Radia4on Measurement Program's LES ARM Symbio4c Simula4on and Observa4on (LASSO) Workflow Ini4aliza4on, Forcing and Mul4scale Data Assimila4on Zhijin Li JPL and UCLA Coauthors: Xiaoping Cheng (UCLA), William I. Gustafson Jr. and Heng Xiao (PNNL), Andrew Vogelmann, Satoshi Endo and Tami Toto (BNL) AGU Fall Mee*ng 2015, San Francisco, CA, December 14, 2015 The Atmospheric Radia4on Measurement (ARM) Facility for Integra4ng Modeling with Observa4ons Dense observa4ons are coupled with

  12. IPAM-Latinos.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UCLA Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics Research Careers in Government Laboratories Alice E. Koniges Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory April 8-11, 2015 Latinos in the Mathematical Sciences UCLA Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics Some stuff about me * 1 st $Woman$to$get$a$PhD$in$Applied$Mathema5cs$at$ Princeton$ * Approximately$100$Papers$and$1000$Cita5ons$ * PI$on$a$few$million$dollars$of$research$grants$ * Raised$3$Kids,$have$a$physicist$spouse$(34$years)$ *

  13. Transverse pulse shaping and optimization of a tapered hard X-ray free

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron laser (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Transverse pulse shaping and optimization of a tapered hard X-ray free electron laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transverse pulse shaping and optimization of a tapered hard X-ray free electron laser Authors: Emma, C. ; /UCLA, Los Angeles ; Pellegrini, C. ; /UCLA, Los Angeles /SLAC ; Wu, Juhao ; /SLAC ; , Publication Date: 2014-05-05 OSTI Identifier: 1131466 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15940 arXiv:1403.5305 DOE Contract Number:

  14. May 23, 2012 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome May 23, 2012 Previous Next List William Morris (Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry, UCLA) Expanding the Chemistry of Zirconium Based Metal Organic Frameworks Joseph Chen (Dept. of Chemical & Biomolecular Eng., UC Berkeley) High-Throughput Screening of MOFs via NMR Relaxometry

  15. Standards Pave the Way for Next Generation Workplace Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11182014 2012 11 3G4G 3G4G 3G4G & WIFI 3G4G Parking Structure 3 Level 1 110 V x4 Parking Structure 8 Level 1 110 V Level 2 208 V Level 1 (UCLA Fleet) x4...

  16. Map refinement of locus RP13 to human chromosome 17p13.3 in a second family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojis, T.L.; Heinzmann, C.; Ngo, J.T.

    1996-02-01

    In order to elucidate the genetic basis of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in a large eight-generation family (UCLA-RP09) of British descent, we assessed linkage between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and numerous genetic loci, including eight adRP candidate genes, five anonymous adRP-linked DNA loci, and 20 phenotypic markers. Linkage to the UCLA-RP09 disease gene was excluded for all eight candidate genes analyzed, including rhodopsin (RP4) and peripherin/RDS (RP7), for the four adRP loci RP1, RP9, RP10 and RP11, as well as for 17 phenotypic markers. The anonymous DNA marker locus D17S938, linked to adRP locus RP13 on chromosome 17p13.1, yielded a suggestive but not statistically significant positive lod score. Linkage was confirmed between the UCLA-RP09 adRP gene and markers distal to D17S938 in the chromosomal region 17p13.3. A reanalysis of the original RP13 data from a South African adRP family of British descent, in conjunction with our UCLA-RP09 data, suggests that only one adRP locus exists on 17p but that it maps to a more telomeric position, at band 17p13.3, than previously reported. Confirmation of the involvement of RP13 in two presumably unrelated adRP families, both of British descent, suggests that this locus is a distinct adRP gene in a proportion of British, and possibly other, adRP families. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Cost-Effective Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Thermal Energy Storage With Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-02-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UCLA and JPL are creating cost-effective storage systems for solar thermal energy using new materials and designs. A major drawback to the widespread use of solar thermal energy is its inability to cost-effectively supply electric power at night. State-of-the-art energy storage for solar thermal power plants uses molten salt to help store thermal energy. Molten salt systems can be expensive and complex, which is not attractive from a long-term investment standpoint. UCLA and JPL are developing a supercritical fluid-based thermal energy storage system, which would be much less expensive than molten-salt-based systems. The teams design also uses a smaller, modular, single-tank design that is more reliable and scalable for large-scale storage applications.

  18. Microwave modeling of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    For a large laser fusion targets and nanosecond pulse lengths, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and self-focusing are expected to be significant problems. The goal of the contractual effort was to examine certain aspects of these physical phenomena in a wavelength regime (lambda approx.5 cm) more amenable to detailed diagnostics than that characteristic of laser fusion (lambda approx.1 micron). The effort was to include the design, fabrication and operation of a suitable experimental apparatus. In addition, collaboration with Dr. Neville Luhmann and his associates at UCLA and with Dr. Curt Randall of LLNL, on analysis and modelling of the UCLA experiments was continued. Design and fabrication of the TRW experiment is described under ''Experiment Design'' and ''Experimental Apparatus''. The design goals for the key elements of the experimental apparatus were met, but final integration and operation of the experiment was not accomplished. Some theoretical considerations on the interaction between Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Self-Focusing are also presented.

  19. Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54888, "Simulation of Beam-Electron Cloud Interactions in Circular Accelerators Using Plasma Models"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decyk, Viktor K.

    2012-11-27

    The primary goal of this collaborative proposal was to modify the code QuickPIC and apply it to study the long-time stability of beam propagation in low density electron clouds present in circular accelerators. The UCLA contribution to this collaborative proposal was in supporting the development of the pipelining scheme for the QuickPIC code, which extended the parallel scaling of this code by two orders of magnitude.

  20. Programming Hybrid HPC Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Hybrid HPC Systems What is Old is New Again Viktor K. Decyk UCLA Abstract The next generation of supercomputers will likely consist of a hierarchy of parallel computers. If we can define each node as a parameterized abstract machine, then it is possible to design algorithms even if the actual hardware varies. Such an abstract machine can be defined to consist of a collection of vector (SIMD) processors, each with a small shared memory, communicating via a larger global memory. This

  1. Minutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    » Minutes Minutes Minutes of the ERSUG/EXERSUG Meeting UCLA Faculty Center Jan 12-13, 1994 Wednesday, Jan 12, 1994 ----------------------- Morning Session --------------- Tom Kitchens: View from Washington ---------------------------------- Staff of OSC: Dave Nelson, John Cavallini, Fred Howes, Dan Hitchcock, George Seweryniak, Greg Chartrand, Bob Aiken, Wally Ermler, Gary Johnson, Jim Mcgraw, Linda Twenty, Melea Fogle, Jane Hiegel. Gary Johnson leaves in October. Gloomy expectations were

  2. Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluids | Department of Energy High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Logos for The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University, and Four graphics in a grid that represent the sputtering technique being used in this project. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), along with partners at the University of California, Berkeley, and

  3. Microsoft Word - Li_FinalReport_FASTER.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ATTN: ASR Program Managers, Drs. Dorothy Koch Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD20874 Title of Research Project: Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using ARM Measurements Investigator: Zhijin Li, Researcher Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering, UCLA 9258 Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095 Phone: (310) 794-5273; Fax: (310)943-1656

  4. Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser Authors: Jiao, Y. ; /SLAC /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. ; Wu, J. ; Cai, Y. ; Chao, A.W. ; Fawley, W.M. ; Frisch, J. ; Huang, Z. ; Nuhn, H.D. ; /SLAC ; Pellegrini, C. ; /SLAC /UCLA ; Reiche, S. ; /PSI, Villigen Publication Date: 2013-03-28 OSTI

  5. Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Secondary Gamma Rays (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of Secondary Gamma Rays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of Secondary Gamma Rays Authors: Inoue, Yoshiyuki ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Physics Dept. /SLAC ; Kalashev, Oleg E. ; /Moscow, INR ; Kusenko, Alexander ; /UCLA /Tokyo U., KIPMU ; , Publication Date: 2013-12-18 OSTI Identifier: 1111379 Report

  6. Radio Signals From Photon Beams in Sand And Salt (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Radio Signals From Photon Beams in Sand And Salt Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radio Signals From Photon Beams in Sand And Salt No abstract prepared. Authors: Williams, D. ; /Pennsylvania U. ; Gorham, P. ; Guillian, E. ; Milincic, R. ; Miocinovic, P. ; /Hawaii U. ; Saltzberg, D. ; Williams, D. ; /UCLA ; Field, R.C. ; Iverson, R. ; Odian, A. ; Walz, D. ; /SLAC ; Resch, G. ; /Caltech, JPL ; Schoessow, P. ; /Argonne Publication Date: 2006-09-22 OSTI Identifier:

  7. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids This fact sheet describes a UCLA-led solar project to investigate high operating temperature liquid metal heat transfer fluids, funded by the SunShot initiative. The project team is using a combination of modeling along with a variety of property measurement and validation studies to demonstrate that the metal alloys identified can meet all the needs of a

  8. Accelerator measurements of magnetically-induced radio emission from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    particle cascades with applications to cosmic-ray air showers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Accelerator measurements of magnetically-induced radio emission from particle cascades with applications to cosmic-ray air showers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Accelerator measurements of magnetically-induced radio emission from particle cascades with applications to cosmic-ray air showers Authors: Belov, K. ; /UCLA /Caltech, JPL ;

  9. Microsoft Word - cmpd publications.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-04ER54784 The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center that involved scientists from several universities and PPPL. We focused on plasma physics problems for which the traditional separation of the dynamics into microscale and macroscale processes breaks down. Maryland and UCLA led the effort. Foremost among these problems are

  10. Structure of a designed tetrahedral protein assembly variant engineered to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    have improved soluble expression (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure of a designed tetrahedral protein assembly variant engineered to have improved soluble expression Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of a designed tetrahedral protein assembly variant engineered to have improved soluble expression Authors: Bale, Jacob B. ; Park, Rachel U. ; Liu, Yuxi ; Gonen, Shane ; Gonen, Tamir ; Cascio, Duilio ; King, Neil P. ; Yeates, Todd O. ; Baker, David [1] ; UCLA) [2] ;

  11. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamics: Final Technical Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA

  12. A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Authors: Leibly, David J. ; Arbing, Mark A. ; Pashkov, Inna ; DeVore, Natasha ; Waldo, Geoffrey S. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Yeates, Todd O. [1] ; LANL) [2] + Show Author Affiliations UCLA ( Publication Date: 2015-11-30 OSTI Identifier: 1227481 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:

  13. Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Thomas A. Steitz, Ada E. Yonath, and Ribosome

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Thomas A. Steitz, Ada E. Yonath, and Ribosome Resources with Additional Information V. Ramakrishnan Thomas A. Steitz Ada E. Yonath Venkatraman Ramakrishnan Thomas A. Steitz Ada E. Yonath Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory Courtesy of UCLA Chemistry & Biochemistry Department/William Short Photography 'The ribosome is a complex particle that makes the thousands of proteins that are required for the structure and

  14. Willard Libby, Radiocarbon, and Carbon Dating

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Willard Libby, Radiocarbon, and Carbon Dating Resources with Additional Information * Radiocarbon Dating Willard Libby Courtesy UCLA Photography 'Scientific discoveries of various magnitudes are constantly occurring in myriad fields of study. It is a rarity, however, to make a breakthrough that not only has an impact on an individual field but also revolutionizes scientific thought across multiple disciplines. Willard Frank Libby accomplished this feat. Libby first proposed his idea of carbon

  15. Albert Carnesale | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Albert Carnesale About Us Albert Carnesale - Chancellor Emeritus and Professor, University of California, Los Angeles Albert Carnesale Albert Carnesale is Chancellor Emeritus and Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He was Chancellor of the University from July 1, 1997 through June 30, 2006, and now serves as Professor of Public Policy and of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. His research and teaching focus on public policy issues having substantial scientific and

  16. new Global Bio Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pandemic detection tool ready to fight flu June 9, 2009 Los Alamos and Agilent Technologies develop first high-throughput system to be deployed at UCLA's new Global Bio Lab LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 9, 2009-In a joint effort by national laboratory-, university- and private-sector institutions, researchers are developing new tools for rapidly characterizing biological pathogens that could give rise to potentially deadly pandemics such as Influenza A (H1N1).The first tool, an automated

  17. Frank Tsung

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frank Tsung Frank Tsung FES Requirements Worksheet 1.1. Project Information - Large Scale Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Laser Plasma Interactions Relevant to Inertial Fusion En Document Prepared By Frank Tsung Project Title Large Scale Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Laser Plasma Interactions Relevant to Inertial Fusion En Principal Investigator Frank Tsung Participating Organizations UCLA Funding Agencies DOE SC DOE NSA NSF NOAA NIH Other: 2. Project Summary & Scientific Objectives for

  18. Magnetics + Mechanics + Nanoscale = Electromagnetics Future (Tuesday, March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15) | The Ames Laboratory Magnetics + Mechanics + Nanoscale = Electromagnetics Future (Tuesday, March 15) DATE: Tuesday, March 15, 1:10 pm LOCATION: 3043 Coover Hall Greg P. Carman, Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles. Efficient control of small scale magnetism presents a significant problem for future miniature electromagnetic devices. In most macroscale

  19. COLLOQUIUM: Space Physics and the Role of Magnetic Reconnection in Space

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weather | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab June 11, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Space Physics and the Role of Magnetic Reconnection in Space Weather Professor Vassilis Angelopoulous UCLA Earth's magnetosphere is buffeted by the solar wind. The interaction transfers energy electro-mechanically into Earth's environment and sets the magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma into motion. The energy is ultimately converted to heat raising the scale-height of the

  20. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2015 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Yu Huang, UCLA Title: The Roles of Biomolecular Specificity in Colloidal Crystal Growth Location: 67-3111 Chemla Room Abstract: Material formation in nature is precisely controlled in all aspects from crystal nucleation, growth to assembly to deliver superior functions. Specific biomolecule-material interactions have been hypothesized to play important roles in these processes. Proteins, polymers and small molecules have been extensively explored to replicate the

  1. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Foundry Goes to Capitol Hill On October 27, Director Jeff Neaton and two Molecular Foundry users led a group to Washington D.C. to educate key members of Congress and staff about advances in nanoscience and the research opportunities presented by user facilities. Ambika Bumb, CEO and Founder of Bikanta, described her company's efforts at the Foundry to synthesize and characterize nanodiamonds for cancer detection. Chris Regan from UCLA spoke about his collaborations with the

  2. Nancy M. Haegel - Curriculum Vitae

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    Nancy M. Haegel Experience and Education 2014 - Director, Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2009 - 2014 Distinguished Professor of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School 2003 - 2009 Professor, Dept. of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School 1993 - 2003 Professor, Fairfield University, Dept. of Physics. Assoc. Prof, (1993-98). 1987 -1993 UCLA, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Associate. Prof. (1989-93). Vice-chair (1991-93). Assistant Prof. (1987-89).

  3. Ultra-Relativistic Magnetic Monopole Search with the ANITA-II Balloon-Borne

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radio Interferometer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ultra-Relativistic Magnetic Monopole Search with the ANITA-II Balloon-Borne Radio Interferometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra-Relativistic Magnetic Monopole Search with the ANITA-II Balloon-Borne Radio Interferometer Authors: Detrixhe, M. ; Besson, D. ; /Kansas U. ; Gorham, P.W. ; Allison, P. ; /Hawaii U. ; Baughmann, B. ; Beatty, J.J. ; /Ohio State U. ; Belov, K. ; /UCLA ; Bevan, S. ; /University Coll. London ;

  4. SoCal Edge: Accelerating Investments in Innovative Building Technologies |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy SoCal Edge: Accelerating Investments in Innovative Building Technologies SoCal Edge: Accelerating Investments in Innovative Building Technologies October 26, 2015 - 2:53pm Addthis SoCal Edge First Movers and Advisory Board with representatives from the City of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Kilroy Realty, UCLA, Hudson Pacific Properties, Jones Lang LaSalle, Morlin Asset Management, Los Angeles Green Building Council, Westin Bonaventure Hotel

  5. Energy Storage Systems 2014 Peer Review Presentations - Session 6 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 6 Energy Storage Systems 2014 Peer Review Presentations - Session 6 OE's Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program conducted a peer review and update meeting in Washington, DC on Sept. 17-19, 2014. The 3-day conference included 11 sessions, two of which were poster sessions. Presentations from the sixth session, chaired by Sandia's Stan Atcitty, are below. PDF icon Development of Electrode Architectures for High Energy Density Electrochemical Capacitors - Bruce Dunn, UCLA PDF

  6. Is a Short-Interval Postradiation Mammogram Necessary After Conservative Surgery and Radiation in Breast Cancer?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Kevin Eradat, Jilbert B.S.; Mehta, Niraj H.; Bent, Chris; Lee, Steve P.; Apple, Sophia K.; Bassett, Lawrence W.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To examine, in a retrospective study, whether the initial posttreatment mammogram offers any benefit to patients. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected who had radiation after breast-conservation therapy from 1995 through 2005 and had follow-up mammography at University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) within 1 year of completing radiotherapy. Results of the initial follow-up mammogram were analyzed to determine the yield of this initial mammogram. Results: Between 1995 and 2005, 408 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy and radiation had follow-up mammograms at UCLA within 1 year of completion of radiation. Median age at radiation completion was 56.9 years. Median interval between radiation and the initial mammogram was 3.1 months. Ten patients were found to have suspicious findings on the initial postradiation mammogram, prompting biopsy, but only 2 were found to have recurrent cancer. None of those lesions were palpable. In both cases the recurrences were ductal carcinoma in situ. Thus, the yield of the initial postoperative mammogram as compared with physical examination findings is estimated at 0.49 recurrences detected per 100 mammograms performed (95% confidence interval 0.059-1.759). Conclusions: The yield of the initial postradiation mammography at UCLA seems to be low, and only noninvasive carcinomas were found. Our data support the rationale to avoid the initial short-interval postradiation mammography and evaluate patients at 12 months.

  7. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

    2005-03-18

    Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

  8. Cloud feedback studies with a physics grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dipankar, Anurag; Stevens, Bjorn

    2013-02-07

    During this project the investigators implemented a fully parallel version of dual-grid approach in main frame code ICON, implemented a fully conservative first-order interpolation scheme for horizontal remapping, integrated UCLA-LES micro-scale model into ICON to run parallely in selected columns, and did cloud feedback studies on aqua-planet setup to evaluate the classical parameterization on a small domain. The micro-scale model may be run in parallel with the classical parameterization, or it may be run on a "physics grid" independent of the dynamics grid.

  9. MTBreg: The Database of Conditionally Regulated Proteins in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kaufman, Markus; Pal, Debnath; Eisenberg, David

    Proteins up- and down- regulated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown under conditions mimicking infection are included in this database. It also includes information on proteins that are regulated by selected transcription factors or other regulatory proteins. The literature data provided here is complimentary to the databases provided by Michael Strong that include recent TB computational functional linkages and the Prolinks Database by Peter Bowers. The experimental condition, the experimental dataset and a literature reference will be displayed, including links to the computationally linked proteins in the Prolinks Database and the entry in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Structural Genomics Database.[Copied from information at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/Services/MTBreg/

  10. Scientists meet to chart roadmap to fusion | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

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    Scientists meet to chart roadmap to fusion By John Greenwald October 12, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The crucial next steps on the roadmap to developing fusion energy will be the focus of more than 70 top fusion scientists and engineers from around the world who will gather at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) this month. The Oct. 15-18 session will kick off a series of annual workshops under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that

  11. Lower Hybrid to Whistler Wave Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winske, Dan

    2012-07-16

    In this presentation we discuss recent work concerning the conversion of whistler waves to lower hybrid waves (as well as the inverse process). These efforts have been motivated by the issue of attenuation of upward propagating whistler waves in the ionosphere generated by VLF transmitters on the ground, i.e., the 'Starks 20 db' problem, which affects the lifetimes of energetic electrons trapped in the geomagnetic field at low magnetic altitude (L). We discuss recent fluid and kinetic plasma simulations as well as ongoing experiments at UCLA to quantify linear and nonlinear mode conversion of lower hybrid to whistler waves.

  12. SC12ProxyNov.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mini/Proxy Apps and NPBs 1 Miniapps and Proxy Apps for Fusion/Plasma Physics and Practical Programming Studies using NPBs Alice Koniges, Jean-Luc Vay, Rebecca Yuan (LBNL) Viktor Decyk, (UCLA) Stephane Ethier and Weixing Wang (PPPL) Berkeley UPC Group FROM: Using Application Proxies for Co-design of Future HPC Computer Systems and Applications SC12 Full Day Tutorial Michael A. Heroux, Alice E. Koniges, David F. Richards, Richard F. Barrett, Thomas Brunner Fusion Mini/Proxy Apps and NPBs 2 Value

  13. Development of Tandem, Double-Focusing, Electron Impact, Gas Source Mass Spectrometer for Measurement of Rare Double-Substituted Isotoplogues in Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Edward D.

    2015-07-30

    This project culminated in construction and delivery of the worlds first large-radius gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometer that permits unparalleled analyses of the stable isotopic composition of methane gas. The instrument, referred to as the Panorama and installed at UCLA in March 2015, can now be used to determine the relative abundances of rare isotopic species of methane that serve as tracers of temperature of formation and/or subsequent processing of gas. With this technology we can begin to delineate different sources and sinks of methane isotopically in ways not possible until now.

  14. Head Erosion with Emittance Growth in PWFA (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference: Head Erosion with Emittance Growth in PWFA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Head Erosion with Emittance Growth in PWFA Authors: Li, S.Z. ; /SLAC ; Adli, E. ; /SLAC /U. Oslo ; England, R.J. ; Frederico, J. ; Gessner, S.J. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Litos, M.D. ; Walz, D.R. ; /SLAC ; Muggli, P. ; /Munich, Max Planck Inst. ; An, W. ; Clayton, C.E. ; Joshi, C. ; Lu, W. ; Marsh, K.A. ; Mori, W. ; Vafaei, N. more »; /UCLA « less Publication Date: 2012-08-08 OSTI Identifier: 1053431 Report

  15. Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser Ionized Preformed Plasma at FACET Authors: Li, S.Z. ; /SLAC ; Adli, E. ; /SLAC /U. Oslo ; Clarke, C.I. ; Corde, S. ; Edstrom, S.A. ; Fisher, A.S. ; Frederico, J. ; Frisch, J.C. ; Gessner, S. ; Gilevich, S. ; Hering, P. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Jobe, R.K. ; Litos, M. ; May, J.E. ; Walz, D.R. ; Yakimenko ; /SLAC more »; Clayton, C.E. ; Joshi, C. ; Marsh, K.A. ; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. ; /UCLA /Munich, Max

  16. Microfluidics Transport and Path Control via Programmable Electrowetting on Dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theodore W. Von Bitner, Ph.D.

    2002-08-22

    This research was conducted in collaboration with Professor Chang-Jin Kim of the University of California, Los Angeles. In phase I, the IOS-UCLA collaboration demonstrated the transport and manipulation of insulting liquid droplets using the principles of EWOD. A postage stamp sized array of electronically addressable Teflon pads, whose surface tension characteristics could be altered on command through computer algorithms, was developed and tested using deionized water as the liquid. Going beyond the tasks originally proposed for Phase I, droplet manipulation was achieved and droplet stability in the EWOD device was examined.

  17. Observation of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon-borne

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radio Interferometer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Observation of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon-borne Radio Interferometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon-borne Radio Interferometer Authors: Hoover, S. ; /UCLA ; Nam, J. ; /Ewha Women's U., Seoul ; Gorham, P.W. ; /Hawaii U. ; Grashorn, E. ; /Ohio State U. ; Allison, P. ; /Hawaii U. ; Barwick, S.W. ; /UC, Irvine ; Beatty, J.J. ; /Ohio

  18. First Results From the Electron Hose Instability Studies in FACET

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Results From the Electron Hose Instability Studies in FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: First Results From the Electron Hose Instability Studies in FACET Authors: Adli, E. ; /Oslo U. ; Corde, S. ; England, R.J. ; Frederico, J. ; Gessner, S.J. ; Li, S. ; Wu, Z. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Litos, M.D. ; /SLAC ; An, W. ; Clayton, C.E. ; Marsh, K.A. ; Lu, W. ; Mori, W.B. ; Joshi, C. ; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. ; /UCLA ; Muggli, P. more »; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "/SLAC/UCLA" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 2 1 » Next » Everything17 Electronic Full Text14 Citations3 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject particle accelerators (11) accelerators (8) plasma (8) electron beams (7)

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 31 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "/UCLA, Los Angeles" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 31 1 » Next » Everything307 Electronic Full Text3 Citations303 Multimedia1 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject astrophysics, cosmology and astronomy (70) physics of elementary

  1. An Automated Implementation of On-shell Methods for One-Loop Amplitudes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: An Automated Implementation of On-shell Methods for One-Loop Amplitudes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An Automated Implementation of On-shell Methods for One-Loop Amplitudes Authors: Berger, C.F. ; Bern, Z. ; Dixon, L.J. ; Febres Cordero, F. ; Forde, D. ; Ita, H. ; Kosower, D.A. ; Maitre, D. ; /MIT, LNS /Santa Barbara, KITP /SLAC /UCLA /Saclay Publication Date: 2008-04-11 OSTI Identifier: 927069 Report Number(s):

  2. A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multi-TeV (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to Multi-TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to Multi-TeV Authors: Adli, E ; Delahaye, J.P. ; Gessner, S.J. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Raubenheimer, T. ; /SLAC ; An, W. ; Joshi, C. ; Mori, W. ; /UCLA, Los Angeles Publication Date: 2013-09-30 OSTI Identifier: 1074154 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15426 DOE

  3. Cloudy Skies R. N. Byrne, D. N. Arion, and F. Malvagi Science Applications International Corporation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. N. Byrne, D. N. Arion, and F. Malvagi Science Applications International Corporation San Diego, CA 92121-1578 Y. Serra and R.C.J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0224 G. C. Pomraning and BJ Su School of Engineering and Applied Science, UCLA University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA Thesis 2. Theory of Stochastic Transfer. We have shown that the Titov and Pomraning-Levermore solutions to a certain problem in

  4. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attendee List Attendee List ERSUG Meeting Attendees, November 15, 1999 Here is a list of those in attendance in table order: 1. Ricky Kendall, Ames laboratory 2. Mike Minkoff, ANL 3. Brian Hingerty, ORNL 4. Doug Rotman, LLNL 5. David J. Dean, ORNL 6. Don Spong, ORNL 7. Viktok K. Decyk, UCLA 8. Robert Ryne, LANL 9. Ji Qiang, LANL 10. Sandy Merola, LBNL 11. Doug Olson, LBNL 12. Jim Craw, NERSC/LBNL 13. Greg Butler, NERSC/LBNL 14. Tammy S. Welcome, NERSC/LBNL 15. David H. Bailey, NERSC/LBNL 16.

  5. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attendee List Attendee List Here is a list of those in attendance in table order: 1. Ricky Kendall, Ames laboratory 2. Mike Minkoff, ANL 3. Brian Hingerty, ORNL 4. Doug Rotman, LLNL 5. David J. Dean, ORNL 6. Don Spong, ORNL 7. Viktok K. Decyk, UCLA 8. Robert Ryne, LANL 9. Ji Qiang, LANL 10. Sandy Merola, LBNL 11. Doug Olson, LBNL 12. Jim Craw, NERSC/LBNL 13. Greg Butler, NERSC/LBNL 14. Tammy S. Welcome, NERSC/LBNL 15. David H. Bailey, NERSC/LBNL 16. Alex Zunger, NREL 17. Bruce Ross, NOAA 18. Tom

  6. Technical Session III Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    III Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session III Talks Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Echo-7 (Raubenheimer) .pdf file (732KB) Coherent LS @ MIT (Graves) .pdf file (1.1MB) Terawatt X-ray FELs (Pellegrini) .pdf file (5.1MB) Advanced Beam Physics @ UCLA (Musumeci) .pdf file (1.3MB)

  7. Meet CMI Researcher Paul Canfield | Critical Materials Institute

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    Paul Canfield Image of Paul Canfield, researcher at Critical Materials Institute CMI researcher Dr. Paul C Canfield graduated, Suma Cum Laude, with a BS in Physics from the University of Virginia in 1983. He then performed his Master and Ph.D. work at UCLA with Professor George Gruner and received his Ph.D. in Experimental Condensed Matter physics in 1990. From 1990 - 1993 Dr. Canfield was a post-doctoral researcher in Los Alamos National Laboratory working with Drs. Joe Thompson and Zachary

  8. Eder_ICNSP.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Late-Time Numerical Simulations of High-Energy-Density (HED) Targets Twenty Second International Conference on Numerical Simulations of Plasmas Long Branch, New Jersey, USA September 7, 2011 David Eder 1 , David Bailey 1 , Andrea Bertozzi 2 , Aaron Fisher 1 , Alice Koniges 3 , Wangyi Liu 3 , Nathan Masters 1 , Marty Marniak 1 1 LLNL, 2 UCLA, 3 LBNL ALE - Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian! AMR - Adaptive Mesh Refinement! ALE-AMR! This work performed at LLNL is under the auspices of the U.S.

  9. News Item

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    Researchers Determine the Three-Dimensional Positions of Individual Atoms for the First Time Atoms are the building blocks of all matter on Earth, and the patterns in which they are arranged dictate how strong, conductive or flexible a material will be. Now, users from UCLA have partnered with Molecular Foundry staff to use the TEAM microscope to image the three-dimensional positions of individual atoms to a precision of 19 trillionths of a meter, which is several times smaller than a hydrogen

  10. LABORATORY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY

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    MEDICINE AND RADIATION BIOLOGY 900 VETERAN AVENUE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 AND DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES UCLA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90024 This manuscript is a contribution to the monograph edited by Daniel S. Berman and Dean Mason, entitled "Clinical Nuclear Cardiology". These studies were supported by Contract #DE-AM03-76-SF00012 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California Prepared for the U.S.

  11. LCLS - Contributions to the 20-Year BES Facilities Roadmap Workshop

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    Contributions to the 20-Year BES Facilities Roadmap Workshop February 22-24, 2002 Doubletree Hotel and Executive Meeting Center 1750 Rockville Pike Rockville, MD 20852 The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), John N. Galayda, 22 February 2003 (Presentation PPT 21,990 KB 30 pp.) (Document pdf_s.gif (926 bytes) PDF 2,431 KB 10 pp.) LCLS II, Jerry B. Hastings, 23 February 2003 (Presentation PPT 12,322 KB 30 pp.) (Document pdf_s.gif (926 bytes) PDF 564 KB 10 pp.) SLAC APS LANL LLNL UCLA Page last

  12. Index of /lcls/workshops/2004-09-22_diag_comm

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    LCLS Diagnostics and Commissioning Workshop Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Location: Redwood Room C/D, SLAC September 22-23, 2004 A two-day workshop will held at SLAC to discuss aspects of commissioning the LCLS. This is a follow-up to the LCLS Undulator Diagnostics and Commissioning Workshop held at UCLA January 19-20, 2004. The scope of the September 2004 workshop is increased compared to the January 2004 workshop to include commissioning of the entire LCLS, not just commissioning related

  13. Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Results From Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at FACET Authors: Li, S.Z. ; Clarke, C.I. ; England, R.J. ; Frederico, J. ; Gessner, S.J. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Jobe, R.K. ; Litos, M.D. ; Walz, D.R. ; /SLAC ; Muggli, P. ; /Munich, Max Planck Inst. ; An, W. ; Clayton, C.E. ; Joshi, C. ; Lu, W. ; Marsh, K.A. ; Mori, W. ; Tochitsky, S. ; /UCLA more »; Adli,

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 134 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "UCLA)" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 134 1 » Next » Everything1,333 Electronic Full Text419 Citations906 Multimedia8 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject particle accelerators (302) physics of elementary particles and fields

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    "/Hawaii U./Hawaii U./Caltech, JPL/Hawaii U./Taipei, Inst. Astron. Astrophys./Minnesota U./Hawaii U./Ohio State U./Hawaii U./Hawaii U./Taipei, Inst. Astron. Astrophys./Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U./Caltech, JPL/SLAC/University Coll. London/Ohio State U./SLAC/Hawaii U./Hawaii U./UCLA/Delaware U./Hawaii U./SLAC/UC, Irvine" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report

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  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 2 of 2 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "/SLAC/UCLA" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 2 of 2 2 » Next » Everything17 Electronic Full Text14 Citations3 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject particle accelerators (11) accelerators (8) plasma (8) electron beams (7)

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 2 of 31 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "/UCLA, Los Angeles" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 2 of 31 2 » Next » Everything307 Electronic Full Text3 Citations303 Multimedia1 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject astrophysics, cosmology and astronomy (70) physics of elementary

  20. Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells. Final technical report, March 22, 1982-April 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A two-year program has been carried out for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which the UCLA silicon MBE facility has been used to attempt to grow silicon solar cells of high efficiency. MBE ofers the potential of growing complex and arbitrary doping profiles with 10 A depth resolution. It is the only technique taht can readily grow built-in front and back surface fields of any desired depth and value in silicon solar cells, or the more complicated profiles needed for a double junction cascade cell, all in silicon, connected in series by a tunnel junction. Although the dopant control required for such structures has been demonstrated in silicon by UCLA, crystal quality at the p-n junctions is still too poor to allow the other advantages to be exploited. Results from other laboratories indicate that this problem will soon be overcome. A computer analysis of the double cascade all in silicon shows that efficiencies can be raised over that of any single silicon cell by 1 or 2%, and that open circuit voltage of almost twice that of a single cell should be possible.

  1. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, James; Travish, Gil; Hogan, Mark; Muggli, Patric; /Southern California U.

    2012-07-05

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are planning measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for efficient operation with pulse trains.

  2. High Frequency, High Gradient Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration Experiments at SLAC and BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.; Niknejadi, P.; Travish, G.; Williams, O.; Xuan, K.; Muggli, P.; Yakimenko, V.

    2010-11-04

    Given the recent success of >GV/m dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA) breakdown experiments at SLAC, and follow-on coherent Cerenkov radiation (CCR) production at the UCLA Neptune, a UCLA-USC-SLAC collaboration is now implementing a new set of experiments that explore various DWA scenarios. These experiments are motivated by the opportunities presented by the approval of the FACET facility at SLAC, as well as unique pulse-train wakefield drivers at BNL. The SLAC experiments permit further exploration of the multi-GeV/m envelope in DWAs, and will entail investigations of novel materials (e.g. CVD diamond) and geometries (Bragg cylindrical structures, slab-symmetric DWAs), and have an over-riding goal of demonstrating >GeV acceleration in {approx}33 cm DWA tubes. In the nearer term before FACET's commissioning, we are performing measurements at the BNL ATF, in which we drive {approx}50-200 MV/m fields with single pulses or pulse trains, and observe resonantly driven CCR as well as deflection modes. These experiments are of high relevance to enhancing linear collider DWA designs, as they will demonstrate potential for high efficiency operation with pulse trains, and explore transverse modes for the first time.

  3. Integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management in the Philippines - What does it need?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Johannes G.

    2012-11-15

    The integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management is a challenge many developing countries face. In Iloilo City, Philippines around 220 tons of municipal solid waste are collected every day and disposed at a 10 ha large dumpsite. In order to improve the local waste management system the Local Government decided to develop a new Waste Management Center with integrated landfill. However, the proposed area is adjacent to the presently used dumpsite where more than 300 waste pickers dwell and depend on waste picking as their source of livelihood. The Local Government recognized the hidden threat imposed by the waste picker's presence for this development project and proposed various measures to integrate the informal sector into the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) program. As a key intervention a Waste Workers Association, called USWAG Calahunan Livelihood Association Inc. (UCLA) was initiated and registered as a formal business enterprise in May 2009. Up to date, UCLA counts 240 members who commit to follow certain rules and to work within a team that jointly recovers wasted materials. As a cooperative they are empowered to explore new livelihood options such as the recovery of Alternative Fuels for commercial (cement industry) and household use, production of compost and making of handicrafts out of used packages. These activities do not only provide alternative livelihood for them but also lessen the generation of leachate and Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions from waste disposal, whereby the life time of the proposed new sanitary landfill can be extended likewise.

  4. An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-09-07

    The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

  5. Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

    2011-09-01

    A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

  6. Scintillating fiber tracking at high luminosities using Visible Light Photon counter readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atac, M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper reviews the research work on the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC) that have been developed for the scintillating fiber tracking at high luminosity colliders and high rate fixed target experiments. The devices originated from the joint work between UCLA and Rockwell International Science Center. The VLPCs are capable of counting photons very efficiently down to a single photon level with high avalanche gain, producing pulses at very high rates with very short rise times. Due to small gain dispersions they can be used in counting photons with high quantum efficiencies, therefore they are excellent devices for charged particle tracking using small diameter scintillating plastic fibers. In this paper, fiber tracking for the CDF and D0 upgrades and a possible usage of the VLPC readout for the experiment E803 at Fermilab will be discussed.

  7. Properties of the ion-ion hybrid resonator in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales, George J.

    2015-10-06

    The project developed theoretical and numerical descriptions of the properties of ion-ion hybrid Alfvén resonators that are expected to arise in the operation of a fusion reactor. The methodology and theoretical concepts were successfully compared to observations made in basic experiments in the LAPD device at UCLA. An assessment was made of the excitation of resonator modes by energetic alpha particles for burning plasma conditions expected in the ITER device. The broader impacts included the generation of basic insight useful to magnetic fusion and space science researchers, defining new avenues for exploration in basic laboratory experiments, establishing broader contacts between experimentalists and theoreticians, completion of a Ph.D. dissertation, and promotion of interest in science through community outreach events and classroom instruction.

  8. Pankratz DOE Presentation.ppt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tom Pankratz - 5 November 2015 - tp@globalwaterintel.com Reverse Osmosis Desalination ! !"#$%&'()&*+,$-&*.)$/.0&12'&3"'$4.5")* $ "#$%&'!()*+,-$.!/$012,#1*3#!! 4$56#323&'!/$7$23)+$#8!93%:063)!! Coalinga, California - 1965 source: UCLA Bermuda Avia*on - 1974 source: Dave Laker ;1%20K1.<!;12,=3%#,1!>!LM?B! 03C%5$D!N30$,.3#! * 14,440 RO plants produce 16,075 MGD o 10,340 BWROs produce 8,400 MGD o 4,100 SWROs produce 7,675 MGD o US: 2,114 BWROs

  9. Project:Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowee, Misa; Gary, S. Peter; Winske, Dan; Liu, Kaijun

    2012-07-17

    We present a summary of the FY12 activities for DTRA-funded project 'Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere'. We briefly review the outstanding scientific questions and discuss the work done in the last year to try to answer these questions. We then discuss the agenda for this Technical Meeting with the DTRA sponsors. In the last year, we have continued our efforts to understand artificial radiation belts from several different perspectives: (1) Continued development of Electron Source Model (ESM) and comparison to HANE test data; (2) Continued studies of relativistic electron scattering by waves in the natural radiation belts; (3) Began study of self-generated waves from the HANE electrons; and (4) Began modeling for the UCLA laser experiment.

  10. DAPS: Database of Aligned Protein Structures

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mallick, Parag; Rice, Danny; Eisenberg, David

    How is DAPS constructed? We begin with the set of all chains from the current release of the PDB. An all on all search is done on the list to find pairs that have the same fold acoording to both the FSSP and CATH databases and clustered into groups by a representative structure (representative structures have less than 25% sequence identity to each other). For each protein pair, regions aligned by the DALI program are extracted from the corresponding FSSP file, or recomputed using DALI-lite. In domain DAPS, only regions that are called "domains" by CATH are included in the alignment. The amino acid type, secondary structure type, and solvent accessibility are extracted from the DSSP file and written pairwise into the database. DAPS is updated with updates of CATH.[Taken from http://nihserver.mbi.ucla.edu/DAPS/daps_help.html

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of Interfacial Flows: Implicit Sharp-Interface Method (I-SIM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Nourgaliev; Theo Theofanous; HyeongKae Park; Vincent Mousseau; Dana Knoll

    2008-01-01

    In recent work (Nourgaliev, Liou, Theofanous, JCP in press) we demonstrated that numerical simulations of interfacial flows in the presence of strong shear must be cast in dynamically sharp terms (sharp interface treatment or SIM), and that moreover they must meet stringent resolution requirements (i.e., resolving the critical layer). The present work is an outgrowth of that work aiming to overcome consequent limitations on the temporal treatment, which become still more severe in the presence of phase change. The key is to avoid operator splitting between interface motion, fluid convection, viscous/heat diffusion and reactions; instead treating all these non-linear operators fully-coupled within a Newton iteration scheme. To this end, the SIMs cut-cell meshing is combined with the high-orderaccurate implicit Runge-Kutta and the recovery Discontinuous Galerkin methods along with a Jacobian-free, Krylov subspace iteration algorithm and its physics-based preconditioning. In particular, the interfacial geometry (i.e., markers positions and volumes of cut cells) is a part of the Newton-Krylov solution vector, so that the interface dynamics and fluid motions are fully-(non-linearly)-coupled. We show that our method is: (a) robust (L-stable) and efficient, allowing to step over stability time steps at will while maintaining high-(up to the 5th)-order temporal accuracy; (b) fully conservative, even near multimaterial contacts, without any adverse consequences (pressure/velocity oscillations); and (c) highorder-accurate in spatial discretization (demonstrated here up to the 12th-order for smoothin-the-bulk-fluid flows), capturing interfacial jumps sharply, within one cell. Performance is illustrated with a variety of test problems, including low-Mach-number manufactured solutions, shock dynamics/tracking with slow dynamic time scales, and multi-fluid, highspeed shock-tube problems. We briefly discuss preconditioning, and we introduce two physics-based preconditioners Block-Diagonal and Internal energy-Pressure-Velocity Partially Decoupled, demonstrating the ability to efficiently solve all-speed flows with strong effects from viscous dissipation and heat conduction.

  12. Basic Studies of Non-Diffusive Transport in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales, George J.; Maggs, James E.

    2014-10-25

    The project expanded and developed mathematical descriptions, and corresponding numerical modeling, of non-diffusive transport to incorporate new perspectives derived from basic transport experiments performed in the LAPD device at UCLA, and at fusion devices throughout the world. By non-diffusive it is meant that the transport of fundamental macroscopic parameters of a system, such as temperature and density, does not follow the standard diffusive behavior predicted by a classical Fokker-Planck equation. The appearance of non-diffusive behavior is often related to underlying microscopic processes that cause the value of a system parameter, at one spatial position, to be linked to distant events, i.e., non-locality. In the LAPD experiments the underlying process was traced to large amplitude, coherent drift-waves that give rise to chaotic trajectories. Significant advances were made in this project. The results have lead to a new perspective about the fundamentals of edge transport in magnetically confined plasmas; the insight has important consequences for worldwide studies in fusion devices. Progress was also made in advancing the mathematical techniques used to describe fractional diffusion.

  13. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  14. Conditions for Debris-Background Ion Interactions and Collisionless Shock Wave Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    We use hybrid simulations and simple theoretical arguments to determine when debris ions streaming relative to background ions in a collisionless, magnetized plasma couple strongly enough to generate a magnetosonic shock wave. We consider three types of configurations: one-dimensional, the two-dimensional extension of the 1-D case, and a more complex 2-D geometry that contains some effects that would be found in a laser-produced, laboratory plasma. We show that the simulation results as well as previous Russian and LLNL results reduce to a simple condition (R{sub m}/{rho}{sub d} = equal mass radius/debris ion gyroradius {ge} 0.7) for the generation of a shock wave. Strong debris interaction with the background is characterized by the formation of a magnetic pulse that steepens and speeds up as it encounters the debris ions deflected by the magnetic field. The pulse further evolves into a shock. As the earlier work has indicated, the process also involves the generation of a transverse electric field perpendicular to the flow and the magnetic field that accelerates the background ions radially outward, which in turn causes the speedup of the pulse. With electric and magnetic field probes, the UCLA laser experiments should be able to detect these signatures of coupling as well as the generation of the shock wave.

  15. Bioengineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabita, F. Robert [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University

    2013-07-30

    In this study, the Principal Investigator, F.R. Tabita has teemed up with J. C. Liao from UCLA. This project's main goal is to manipulate regulatory networks in phototrophic bacteria to affect and maximize the production of large amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions where wild-type organisms are constrained by inherent regulatory mechanisms from allowing this to occur. Unrestrained production of hydrogen has been achieved and this will allow for the potential utilization of waste materials as a feed stock to support hydrogen production. By further understanding the means by which regulatory networks interact, this study will seek to maximize the ability of currently available unrestrained organisms to produce hydrogen. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Moreover, due to their great metabolic versatility, such organisms highly regulate these processes in the cell and since virtually all such capabilities are dispensable, excellent experimental systems to study aspects of molecular control and biochemistry/physiology are available.

  16. Status of the database for solid breeder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The databases for solid breeder ceramics (Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and LiAl0{sub 2}) and beryllium multiplier material were critically reviewed and evaluated as part of the ITER/CDA design effort (1988-1990). The results have been documented in a detailed technical report which includes progress made in expanding the solid breeder and beryllium databases up through September 1993. Emphasis was placed on the physical, thermal, mechanical, chemical-stability/compatibility, tritium retention/release and radiation stability properties which are needed to assess the performance of these materials in a fusion reactor environment. Materials properties correlations were selected for use in design analysis, and ranges of input parameters (e.g., temperature, porosity, etc.) were established. The need for updating the ceramic breeder database was discussed at the Third Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions (CBBI-3) workshop at UCLA in June 1994. Progress made in expanding the ceramic breeder database and plans for updating the database are discussed.

  17. HotPatch Web Gateway: Statistical Analysis of Unusual Patches on Protein Surfaces

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Pettit, Frank K.; Bowie, James U. [DOE-Molecular Biology Institute

    HotPatch finds unusual patches on the surface of proteins, and computes just how unusual they are (patch rareness), and how likely each patch is to be of functional importance (functional confidence (FC).) The statistical analysis is done by comparing your protein's surface against the surfaces of a large set of proteins whose functional sites are known. Optionally, HotPatch can also write a script that will display the patches on the structure, when the script is loaded into some common molecular visualization programs. HotPatch generates complete statistics (functional confidence and patch rareness) on the most significant patches on your protein. For each property you choose to analyze, you'll receive an email to which will be attached a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors (temp. factors) are replaced by patch indices; and the PDB file's Header Remarks will give statistical scores and a PDB-format file in which atomic B-factors are replaced by the raw values of the property used for patch analysis (for example, hydrophobicity instead of hydrophobic patches). [Copied with edits from http://hotpatch.mbi.ucla.edu/

  18. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  19. Update on Electron-Cloud Simulations Using the Package WARP-POSINST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J.-L.; Celata, Christine M.; Furman, Miguel; Venturini, Marco; Sonnad, Kiran G.; Penn, G.; Grote, D.P.

    2009-04-01

    At PAC05[1] and PAC07[2], we presented the package WARP-POSINST for the modeling of the effect of electron clouds on high-energy beams. We present here the latest developments in the package. Three new modes of operations were implemented: (1) a build-up mode where, similarly to POSINST (LBNL) or ECLOUD (CERN), the build-up of electron clouds driven by a legislated bunch train is modeled in one region of an accelerator; (2) a quasistatic mode where, similarly to HEADTAIL (CERN) or QuickPIC (USC/UCLA), the frozen beam approximation is used to split the modeling of the beam and the electrons into two components evolving on their respective time scales; and (3) a Lorentz boosted mode where the simulation is performed in a moving frame where the space and time scales related to the beam and electron dynamics fall in the same range. The implementation of modes (1) and (2) was primary motivated by the need for benchmarking with other codes, while the implementation of mode (3) fulfills the drive toward fully self-consistent simulations of e-cloud effects on the beam including the build-up phase.

  20. High-brightness picosecond ion beam source based on BNL Terawatt CO2 laser: Proof-of-principle experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnikov, Peter

    2012-10-04

    Under the continuing DOE support, we have: o assembled the basic experiment setup and then continued expanding it to include diverse diagnostics and to accommodate gas jet targets in addition to metal foils; o conducted an extensive study of our novel laser, significantly enhanced laser beam diagnostics, and improved relevant laser parameters; o turned our experiments into a truly international endeavor with active collaboration of close to 20 researchers in US, UK, and Germany; o conducted the first ever experiments with proton and ion acceleration by lasers interacting with overcritical plasma of gas jets; o for the first time directly observed radiation pressure acceleration of protons, including quasi-monoenergetic spectra promising for future applications; o for the first time directly observed quasi-stable, bubble-like plasma structures that likely evolved from relativistic laser-plasma solitons (post-solitons). Thus, we have confirmed a strong potential of a picosecond TW CO2 laser as a research tool in laser-plasma science and as a promising vehicle for future applications of laser ion acceleration. This has led to apparent increase of the interest in mid-IR laser ion acceleration. In particular, another major research group began extensive proton acceleration experiments with their own CO2 laser at UCLA. As a result, the mechanisms responsible for laser proton acceleration in gas jets have become somewhat clearer. It is also important to note that modest DOE funding played the role of a seed support ensuring the formation of a multinational research team, whose members contributed its time and equipment with value well in excess of that seed amount.

  1. SU-D-BRD-04: A Logical Organizational Approach to Clinical Information Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, W; Kupelian, P; Wang, J; Low, D; Ruan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinical information management system (CIMS) that collects, organizes physician inputs logically and supports analysis functionality. Methods: In a conventional electronic medical record system (EMR), the document manager component stores data in a pool of standalone .docx or .pdf files. The lack of a content-based logical organization makes cross-checking, reference or automatic inheritance of information challenging. We have developed an information-oriented clinical record system that addresses this shortcoming. In CIMS, a parent library predefines a set of available questions along with the data types of their expected answers. The creation of a questionnaire template is achieved by selecting questions from this parent library to form a virtual group. Instances of the same data field in different documents are linked by their question identifier. This design allows for flexible data sharing and inheritance among various forms using a longitudinal lineage of data indexed according to the modification time stamps of the documents. CIMS is designed with a web portal to facilitate querying, data entry and modification, aggregate report generation, and data adjudication. The current implementation addresses diagnostic data, medical history, vital signs, and various quantities in consult note and treatment summaries. Results: CIMS is currently storing treatment summary information of over 1,000 patients who have received treatment at UCLA Radiation Oncology between March 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014. We are in the process of incorporating a DICOM-RT dosimetry parser and patient reporting applications into CIMS, as well as continuing to define document templates to support additional forms. Conclusion: We are able to devise an alternative storage paradigm which results in an improvement in the accuracy and organizational structure of clinical information.

  2. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project ???¢????????Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations???¢???????. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  3. Algal functional annotation tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations tomore » interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion. CONCLUSIONS: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool aims to provide an integrated data-mining environment for algal genomics by combining data from multiple annotation databases into a centralized tool. This site is designed to expedite the process of functional annotation and the interpretation of gene lists, such as those derived from high-throughput RNA-seq experiments. The tool is publicly available at http://pathways.mcdb.ucla.edu.« less

  4. Collaborative Research: Dynamics of Electrostatic Solitary Waves on Current Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, Jolene S.

    2012-10-31

    The research carried out under the subject grant has provided insight into the generation of Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs), which are nonlinear structures observed in space plasma data. These ESWs, appearing as pulses in the electric field time series data, represent the presence of several hundred meters to kilometer size positive potential structures, similar to champagne bubbles, where the electrons have been depleted, and which travel along Earth's magnetic field lines. The laboratory experiments carried out at the UCLA LAPD under the grant allowed us the opportunity to change various plasma and field conditions within the plasma device, and experiment with injection of suprathermal electron beams, in order to create ESWs. This then allowed us to determine the most likely method of generation of the ESWs. By comparing the properties of the ESWs observed in the LAPD to those observed in space and the plasma and field conditions under which those ESWs were observed in both locations, we were able to evaluate various ESW generation mechanisms. The findings of the laboratory experiments are that ESWs are generated through a lower hybrid instability. The ESWs observed in Earth's auroral current regions have similar characteristics to those generated by the laboratory when referenced to basic plasma and field characteristics, leading us to the conclusion that the lower hybrid drift instability is certainly a possibility for generation of the ESWs, at least in the auroral (northern/southern lights) regions. Due to space instrumentation insufficiencies and the limitations on telemetry, and thus poor time resolution, it is not possible to determine absolutely what generates these bubbles in space, but the laboratory experiments and supporting simulations have helped us to further our understanding of the processes under which they are generated. The public benefits from the findings of this research because the research is focused on current layers around Earth, which are affected by our Sun's activity. Understanding how these current layers are affected by the Sun provides insight into why radio communications are sometimes affected on Earth and how these layers help protect and facilitate our life on Earth.

  5. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, David H.; Jongewaard, Erik; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2008-09-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL) requiring extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new type of light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. Therefore a new RF gun or at least the modification of an existing gun was necessary. The parameters listed in Table 1 illustrate the unique characteristics of LCLS which drive the requirements for the electron gun as given in Table 2. The gun beam quality needs to accommodate emittance growth as the beam is travels through approximately one kilometer of linac and two bunch compressors before reaching the undulator. These beam requirements were demonstrated during the recent commissioning runs of the LCLS injector and linac [2] due to the successful design, fabrication, testing and operation of the LCLS gun. The goal of this paper is to relate the technical background of how the gun was able to achieve and in some cases exceed these requirements by understanding and correcting the deficiencies of the prototype s-band RF photocathode gun, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA Gun III. This paper begins with a brief history and technical description of Gun III and the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC, and studies of the gun's RF and emittance compensation solenoid. The work at the GTF identified the gun and solenoid deficiencies, and helped to define the specifications for the LCLS gun. Section 1.1.5 describes the modeling used to compute and correct the gun RF fields and Section 1.1.6 describes the use of these fields in the electron beam simulations. The magnetic design and measurements of the emittance compensation solenoid are discussed in Section 1.1.7. The novel feature of the LCLS solenoid is the embedded quadrupole correctors. The thermo-mechanical engineering of the LCLS gun is discussed in Section 1.1.8, and the cold and hot RF tests are described in Section 1.1.9. The results of this work are summarized and concluding remarks are given in Section 1.1.10.

  6. Final report for the NSF/DOE partnership in basic plasma science grant DE-FG02-06ER54906 '?Laser-driven collisionless shocks in the Large Plasma Device'?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, Christoph; Gekelman, W.; Winske, D.; Larsen, D.

    2012-12-14

    We have performed several thousand high-energy laser shots in the LAPD to investigate the dynamics of an exploding laser-produced plasma in a large ambient magneto-plasma. Debris-ions expanding at super-Alfvenic velocity (up to MA=1.5) expel the ambient magnetic field, creating a large (> 20 cm) diamagnetic cavity. We observed field compressions of up to B/B{sub 0} = 1.5 at the edge of the bubble, consistent with the MHD jump conditions, as well as localized electron heating at the edge of the bubble. Two-dimensional hybrid simulations reproduce these measurements well and show that the majority of the ambient ions are energized by the magnetic piston to super-Alfvenic speeds and swept outside the bubble volume. Nonlinear shear-Alfven waves ({delta}B/B{sub 0} > 25%) are radiated from the cavity with a coupling efficiency of 70% from magnetic energy in the bubble to the wave. While the data is consistent with a weak magneto-sonic shock, the experiments were severely limited by the low ambient plasma densities (10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}). 2D hybrid simulations indicate that future experiments with the new LAPD plasma source and densities in excess of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} will drive full-blown collisionless shocks with MA>10 over several c/wpi and shocked Larmor radii. In a separate experiment at the LANL Trident laser facility we have performed a proof-of-principle experiment at higher densities to demonstrate key elements of collisionless shocks in laser-produced magnetized plasmas with important implications to NIF. Simultaneously we have upgraded the UCLA glass-laser system by adding two large amplitude disk amplifiers from the NOVA laser and boost the on-target energy from 30 J to up to 1 kJ, making this one of the worlds largest university-scale laser systems. We now have the infrastructure in place to perform novel and unique high-impact experiments on collision-less shocks at the LAPD.

  7. Collaborative research: Dynamics of electrostatic solitary waves and their effects on current layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The project has accomplished the following achievements including the goals outlined in the original proposal. Generation and measurements of Debye-scale electron holes in laboratory: We have generated by beam injections electron solitary waves in the LAPD experiments. The measurements were made possible by the fabrication of the state-of-the-art microprobes at UCLA to measure Debye-scale electric fields [Chiang et al., 2011]. We obtained a result that challenged the state of knowledge about electron hole generation. We found that the electron holes were not due to two-stream instability, but generated by a current-driven instability that also generated whistler-mode waves [Lefebvre et al., 2011, 2010b]. Most of the grant supported a young research scientist Bertrand Lefebvre who led the dissemination of the laboratory experimental results. In addition to two publications, our work relevant to the laboratory experiments on electron holes has resulted in 7 invited talks [Chen, 2007, 2009; Pickett et al., 2009a; Lefebvre et al., 2010a; Pickett et al., 2010; Chen et al., 2011c, b] (including those given by the co-I Jolene Pickett) and 2 contributed talks [Lefebvre et al., 2009b, a]. Discovery of elecctron phase-space-hole structure in the reconnection electron layer: Our theoretical analyses and simulations under this project led to the discovery of an inversion electric field layer whose phase-space signature is an electron hole within the electron diffusion layer in 2D anti-parallel reconnection [Chen et al., 2011a]. We carried out particle tracing studies to understand the electron orbits that result in the phase-space hole structure. Most importantly, we showed that the current density in the electron layer is limited in collisionless reconnection with negligible guide field by the cyclotron turning of meandering electrons. Comparison of electrostatic solitary waves in current layers observed by Cluster and in LAPD: We compared the ESWs observed in a supersubstorm by the Cluster spacecraft and those measured in LAPD. One of the similarities in the characteristics of ESWs observed in space and in LAPD is that the time duration tends to be approximately the inverse of the electron plasma frequency [Pickett et al., 2009b]. Discovery of suprathermal electron bursts inside a series of magnetic islands: Our effort in examining the roles of ESWs in reconnection current layers resulted in the serendipitous discovery that was published in Nature Physics. In earths magnetosphere, we observed through the measurements from the four Cluster spacecraft, a series of magnetic islands and suprathermal electron bursts within the islands. The islands were identified to be effectively acceleration sites for electrons [Chen et al., 2008, 2009].

  8. The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

    2011-01-05

    Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates???¢????????s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI???¢????????s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M???????©t???????©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

  9. TH-C-18A-09: Exam and Patient Parameters Affecting the DNA Damage Response Following CT Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgart, S; Adibi, A; Bostani, M; Ruehm, S; Enzmann, D; McNitt-Gray, M; Iwamoto, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To identify exam and patient parameters affecting the biological response to CT studies using in vivo and ex vivo blood samples. Methods: Blood samples were collected under IRB approval from 16 patients undergoing clinically-indicated CT exams. Blood was procured prior to, immediately after and 30minutes following irradiation. A sample of preexam blood was placed on the patient within the exam region for ex vivo analysis. Whole blood samples were fixed immediately following collection and stained for ?H2AX to assess DNA damage response (DDR). Median fluorescence of treated samples was compared to non-irradiated control samples for each patient. Patients were characterized by observed biological kinetic response: (a) fast phosphorylation increased by 2minutes and fell by 30minutes, (b) slow phosphorylation continued to increase to 30minutes and (c) none little change was observed or irradiated samples fell below controls. Total dose values were normalized to exam time for an averaged dose-rate in dose/sec for each exam. Relationships between patient biological responses and patient and exam parameters were investigated. Results: A clearer dose response at 30minutes is observed for young patients (<61yoa; R2>0.5) compared to old patients (>61yoa; R{sup 2}<0.11). Fast responding patients were significantly younger than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Unlike in vivo samples, age did not significantly affect the patient response ex vivo. Additionally, fast responding patients received exams with significantly smaller dose-rate than slow responding patients (p<0.05). Conclusion: Age is a significant factor in the biological response suggesting that DDR may be more rapid in a younger population and slower as the population ages. Lack of an agerelated response ex vivo suggests a systemic response to radiation not present when irradiated outside the body. Dose-rate affects the biological response suggesting that patient response may be related to scan timing and dose delivery within an exam protocol. All authors receive(d) funding from a Master Research Agreement from Siemens Healthcare with UCLA Radiological Sciences.

  10. The Next Generation Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, Dennis Thomas; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2005-09-12

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 {pi} mm mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes. The Cu QE was found to be 4.5 x 10{sup -5} with a 25% variation in the QE across the emitting surface of the cathode, while supporting a field gradient of 125 MV/m. At low charge, the transverse normalized rms emittance, {epsilon}{sub n,rms}, produced by the NGP is {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.2 {pi} mm mrad for Q{sub T} = 0.3 nC. The 95% electron beam bunch length was measured to 10.9 psec. The emittance due to the finite magnetic field at the cathode has been studied. The scaling of this magnetic emittance term as a function of cathode magnetic field was found to be 0.01 {pi} mm mrad per Gauss. The 1.6 cell rf gun has been designed to reduce the dipole field asymmetry of the longitudinal accelerating field. Low level rf measurements show that this has in fact been accomplished, with an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field. High power beam studies also show that the dipole field has been decreased. An upper limit of the intrinsic non-reducible thermal emittance of a photocathode under high field gradient was found to be {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 0.8 {pi} mm mrad. Agreement is found between the theoretical calculation of the thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub 0} = 0.62 {pi} mm mrad, and the experimental results, after taking into account all of the emittance contribution terms. The 1 nC emittance was found to be {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 4.75 {pi} mm mrad with a 95% electron beam bunch length of 14.7 psec. Systematic bunch length measurements showed electron beam bunch lengthening due the electron beam charge. They will show that the discrepancy between measurement and simulation is due to three effects. The major effect is due to the variation of the QE in the photo-emitting area of the Cu cathode. Also, space charge emittance blowup in the transport line will be shown to be a significant effect because the electron beam is still in the space charge dominated regime. The last effect, which has been observed experimentally, is the electron bunch lengthening as a function of total electron bunch charge.

  11. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded beyond ICF-related laser-plasma interactions to encompass closely related technical areas including laser particle acceleration, high-intensity laser effects, short­ pulse laser interactions, PIC and Vlasov/rad-hydro modeling, inertial and magnetic fusion plasmas, advanced plasma diagnostics, alternate ignition schemes, EOS/transport/opacity, and this year, x­ ray free-electron lasers and their applications. The conference continues to be a showcase for the presentation and discussion of the latest developments in these areas. II. Meeting Report The conference was extremely successful with more than one hundred participants. There were ninety-nine (99) abstracts submitted. There were forty-four (44) presentations including eleven (11) invited talks. The following topics were covered: a) Radiation Hydrodynamics b) Implosion Plasma Kinetic Effects c) Alternate Ignition Schemes d) Astrophysical Phenomena e) Opacity/Transport/EOS f) High Power Lasers and Facilities g) High-Intensity Laser-Matter Interactions h) Hydrodynamics and Hydro-instabilities i) Hot Dense Plasma Atomic Processes j) High Energy Density Physics k) Laser Particle Acceleration Physics l) Advanced Plasma Diagnostics m) Advanced light sources and applications Despite significant advertising, there were two students who applied for the travel grants: Charlie Jarrott and Joohwan Kim. The total funds expended were $3,216.14.

  12. Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tynan, George R.; Diamond, P. H.; Ji, H.; Forest, C. B.; Terry, P. W.; Munsat, T.; Brummell, N.

    2013-07-29

    The Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO) is a DOE Plasma Science Center formed in late 2009 to focus on the general principles underlying momentum transport in magnetic fusion and astrophysical systems. It is composed of funded researchers from UCSD, UW Madison, U. Colorado, PPPL. As of 2011, UCSD supported postdocs are collaborating at MIT/Columbia and UC Santa Cruz and beginning in 2012, will also be based at PPPL. In the initial startup period, the Center supported the construction of two basic experiments at PPPL and UW Madison to focus on accretion disk hydrodynamic instabilities and solar physics issues. We now have computational efforts underway focused on understanding recent experimental tests of dynamos, solar tachocline physics, intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas and L-H transition physics in tokamak devices. In addition, we have the basic experiments discussed above complemented by work on a basic linear plasma device at UCSD and a collaboration at the LAPD located at UCLA. We are also performing experiments on intrinsic rotation and L-H transition physics in the DIII-D, NSTX, C-Mod, HBT EP, HL-2A, and EAST tokamaks in the US and China, and expect to begin collaborations on K-STAR in the coming year. Center funds provide support to over 10 postdocs and graduate students each year, who work with 8 senior faculty and researchers at their respective institutions. The Center has sponsored a mini-conference at the APS DPP 2010 meeting, and co-sponsored the recent Festival de Theorie (2011) with the CEA in Cadarache, and will co-sponsor a Winter School in January 2012 in collaboration with the CMSO-UW Madison. Center researchers have published over 50 papers in the peer reviewed literature, and given over 10 talks at major international meetings. In addition, the Center co-PI, Professor Patrick Diamond, shared the 2011 Alfven Prize at the EPS meeting. Key scientific results from this startup period include initial simulations of the effects of boundary conditions on turbulent dynamo experiments; simulations of intrinsic rotation showing the strong link between toroidal rotation and temperature gradients and elucidation of the turbulence symmetry breaking mechanisms that lead to this macroscopic behavior; first experiments in a large tokamak testing the roll of turbulent momentum transport in driving intrinsic rotation; experiments in tokamaks showing strong evidence that zonal flows, together with the more widely recognized mean sheared ExB flow, act to trigger the L-H transition in tokamak devices and the first experimental measurement of collisional viscosity in an unmagnetized plasma. In the coming three year period, we will continue these efforts by a combination of basic hydrodynamic, liquid metal and plasma experiments combined with experiments on numerous tokamak devices around the world. In addition, we will use MHD, gyrofluid and gyrokinetic codes combined with theory to address the problems of interest to the Center.

  13. Final Technical Report for the Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.; Tynan, George R.

    2013-07-29

    The Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO) is a DOE Plasma Science Center formed in late 2009 to focus on the general principles underlying momentum transport in magnetic fusion and astrophysical systems. It is composed of funded researchers from UCSD, UW Madison, U. Colorado, PPPL. As of 2011, UCSD supported postdocs are collaborating at MIT/Columbia and UC Santa Cruz and beginning in 2012, will also be based at PPPL. In the initial startup period, the Center supported the construction of two basic experiments at PPPL and UW Madison to focus on accretion disk hydrodynamic instabilities and solar physics issues. We now have computational efforts underway focused on understanding recent experimental tests of dynamos, solar tacholine physics, intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas and L-H transition physics in tokamak devices. In addition, we have the basic experiments discussed above complemented by work on a basic linear plasma device at UCSD and a collaboration at the LAPD located at UCLA. We are also performing experiments on intrinsic rotation and L-H transition physics in the DIII-D, NSTX, C-Mod, HBT EP, HL-2A, and EAST tokamaks in the US and China, and expect to begin collaborations on K-STAR in the coming year. Center funds provide support to over 10 postdocs and graduate students each year, who work with 8 senior faculty and researchers at their respective institutions. The Center has sponsored a mini-conference at the APS DPP 2010 meeting, and co-sponsored the recent Festival de Theorie (2011) with the CEA in Cadarache, and will co-sponsor a Winter School in January 2012 in collaboration with the CMSO-UW Madison. Center researchers have published over 50 papers in the peer reviewed literature, and given over 10 talks at major international meetings. In addition, the Center co-PI, Professor Patrick Diamond, shared the 2011 Alfven Prize at the EPS meeting. Key scientific results from this startup period include initial simulations of the effects of boundary conditions on turbulent dynamo experiments; simulations of intrinsic rotation showing the strong link between toroidal rotation and temperature gradients and elucidation of the turbulence symmetry breaking mechanisms that lead to this macroscopic behavior; first experiments in a large tokamak testing the roll of turbulent momentum transport in driving intrinsic rotation; experiments in tokamaks showing strong evidence that zonal flows, together with the more widely recognized mean sheared ExB flow, act to trigger the L-H transition in tokamak devices and the first experimental measurement of collisional viscosity in an unmagnetized plasma. In the coming three year period, we will continue these efforts by a combination of basic hydrodynamic, liquid metal and plasma experiments combined with experiments on numerous tokamak devices around the world. In addition, we will use MHD, gyrofluid and gyrokinetic codes combined with theory to address the problems of interest to the Center.

  14. Proc. Agent 2004 Conf. on Social Dynamics : Interaction, Reflexivity and Emergence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Macal, D. Sallach, M. J. North, eds.

    2004-01-01

    I'd like to welcome you to the Agent 2004 conference. As most of you are aware, this conference is the fifth in a series of meetings that began in 1999. A conference followed the next year in 2000. The 2001 conference was skipped because of some conflicts with other conferences, and the conferences have proceeded annually since then. We have the proceedings of the previous conferences available here on CDs. One CD has the proceedings from 1999, 2000, and 2002; the other contains last year's proceedings. The purpose of these conferences is to advance the state of the computational social sciences and to integrate the social sciences with the decision sciences and something that is traditionally known as the management sciences. Those of you in the operations/research area are familiar with the traditional school of modeling simulation that emerged from that scientific area. This conference will bring together a different group of people to talk about the topic of agent-based theories and simulations. This fifth agent conference is one of a group of conferences held annually around the country. Most of you are probably aware of the CASOS Conference held at Carnegie Mellon University, usually in July. UCLA holds the Arrowhead Conference, generally around May. The University of Michigan is now holding a conference as well. Of course everyone is aware of SwarmFest, which has been held annually for about a decade. The Swarm seems to 'swarm' in different locations each year. As you're well aware, this conference is organized into a three-day program. This is the first time we've used three days for the full conference setting. Last year, we held simultaneous sessions, and that didn't work well for most of those who attended. We had complaints from people who missed sessions and papers because of scheduling, so we decided to extend this year's conference by one day. As a result, we now have a program designed to present the papers in a serial sequence rather than in a parallel manner. Today, we'll focus on toolkits. Tomorrow we'll look at computational social theory, and Saturday is application day. We'll talk about how we're taking some of the theories and toolkits to look at real-world problems in order to understand how our very complex world works and maybe even to predict how it might work in the future. In addition to the content of the papers themselves, one of the more important things about this conference is the discussion that is inspired by these papers. I invite you to ask penetrating questions, offer insightful comments, share your experiences with toolkits or your ideas on theories, and help to create an atmosphere that will help this field move along and grow. It's a fairly new science--it is just emerging--but it seems to have been gaining momentum in the last couple of years. This is a conference to get your energy going and perhaps foster your creativity. With that, I welcome you to Agent 2004; have a great time at the conference.

  15. Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument - Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, R.F.; Boyce, R.M.; Haller, G.; Hastings, J.B.; Hays, G.; Lee, H.J.; Lee, R.W.; Nagler, B.; Scharfenstein, M.; Marsh, D.; White, W.E.; ,

    2009-12-09

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) research facility. The FEL has already met its performance goals in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This facility, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC 2-Mile Linear Accelerator (linac) and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac is used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons are transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which houses a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons are bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength is tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS includes two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing an X-ray instrument in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of LCLS by creating extreme conditions and study the behavior of plasma under those controlled conditions. This instrument will address the Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, mission objective related to study of Plasma and Warm Dense Matter as described in the report titled LCLS, the First Experiments, prepared by the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in September 2000. The technical objective of the LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS an X-ray instrument that will complement the initial instrument suite included in the LCLS construction and the LUSI Major Item of Equipment (MIE) Instruments. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation must be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The MEC concept has been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops team meetings and focused reviews. In particular, the MEC instrument has been identified as meeting one of the most urgent needs of the scientific community based on the advice of the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in response to an open call for letters of intent (LOI) from the breadth of the scientific community. The primary purpose of the MEC instrument is to create High Energy Density (HED) matter and measure its physical properties. There are three primary elements of the MEC instrument: (A) Optical laser drivers that will create HED states by irradiation in several ways and provide diagnostics capability; (B) The LCLS x-ray free electron laser, which will provide the unique capability to create, probe and selectively pump HED states; and, (C) A suite of diagnostic devices required to observe the evolution of the HED state. These elements when combined in the MEC instrument meet the 'Mission Need' as defined in CD-0. For the purposes of the description we separate the types of experiments to be performed into three categories: (1) High pressure: Here we are interested in the generation of high pressure using the optical lasers to irradiate a surface that ablates and drives a pressure wave into a sample, similar to a piston. The pressures that can be reached exceed 1 Mbar and the properties of interest are for example, the reflectivity, conductivity, opacity as well as the changes driven by the pressure wave on, e.g., condensed matter structure. These phenomena will be studied by means of diffraction measurements, measurements of the pressure wave characteristics, in situ probing by x-ray scattering of various types all time resolved. The necessary diagnostics are discussed.