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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

Walton, D.W.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

3

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Burst BufferFluorite EnergyAPitchTerrestrial

4

EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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5

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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6

Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

7

Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

Minnesota, University of

8

Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

Xiao, Jingfeng

9

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

10

Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

Wike, L

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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12

USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

15

Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Debbie J. Thomas Frances Gelwick Head of Department, J. Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure. (May...

Redman, Cory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

Palen, Wendy J.

17

Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762Ė1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

Thorp, James H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during the past century: A retrospective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4 dynamics (3309); 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: methane emissions, methane oxidation, permafrost

McGuire, A. David

20

ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1- ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems Course:00 J 127 -Simcoe Building (first lecture September 11, 2008) Office Hours: Prior to the start of class will deal with a rather wide array of topics in the environmental sciences, with particular emphasis

Fox, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems in China and its equilibrium response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) was used to estimate net primary production (NPP) in China for contemporary climate and NPP responses to elevated CO? and climate changes projected by three atmospheric ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Pan, Yude.; McGuire, A. David.; Helfrich III, J.V.K.

22

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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23

T.G. Hinton: Radioactive Contaminants in Terrestrial Ecosystems | Savannah  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S. Department ofRiver

24

EMSL Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme Advisory Panel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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25

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

26

A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and on topics related to urban ecosystem services and their valuation. This conference will once again provideACES 2014 A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making December, DC, USA 1 Welcome to ACES 2014! On behalf of A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES) and our

Florida, University of

27

North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem E. Di Lorenzo,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change E. Di Lorenzo,1 N Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08607, doi:10 to explain physical and biological fluctuations in the Northeast Pacific Ocean [Lynn et al., 1998; Lavaniegos

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

28

Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

29

Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 2: Small mammal food chains and bioavailability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Food chain transfer through the soil-vegetation-small mammal food chain was measured by concentration ratios (CRs) for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po at three sites near the Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Plant/soil CRs, animal carcass/GI tract CRs, and animal/soil CRs were depressed at sites impacted by mill and tailings dusts relative to a nearby control site. Thus, radionuclides associated with large particulates in tailings and/or ore dusts may be less bioavailable to terrestrial plants and animals than natural sources of radioactive dust. These results show that reliance on default food chain transfer parameters, obtained from uncontaminated terrestrial ecosystems, may overpredict impacts at uranium mine and mill sites. Given the omnivorous diet of small mammals and birds, animal/soil CRs are recommended as the most cost-effective and robust means of predicting animal concentrations from environmental monitoring data at uranium mill facilities.

Thomas, P.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Comparing aquatic and terrestrial grazing ecosystems: is the grass really greener?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and kelp forests (Burkepile and Hay 2006). Likewise, in freshwater ecosystems, waterfowl, zooplankton and benthic invertebrates impact the rates of primary production and nutrient regeneration (Lamberti and Resh

Burkepile, Deron

31

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remote ocean temperatures to respond, while a terrestrial cooling,summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changescooling due to a change in ocean circulation would imply a compensating remote

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

DOE/SC-ARM-13-011 Green Ocean Amazon Terrestrial Ecosystem Collaborative Project Science Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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36

Terrestrial Ecosystem Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,BiosScience (SC)Supply and Demand of

37

The Environmental Change Network (ECN) was established in 1992 to provide a framework for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. The Alice Holt ECN site represents the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for monitoring the effects of a range of environmental drivers on freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems the functioning of ecosystems. Identifying the cause and effect of individual drivers is a major challenge for environmental monitoring, as it requires that the effects of those drivers are distinguished from background

38

Bridging the Divide: Linking Genomics to Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the project period, we have addressed the following objectives: 1) assess the effects of altered precipitation patterns (i.e., increased variability in growing season precipitation) on genetic diversity of the dominant C4 grass species, Andropogon gerardii, and 2) experimentally assess the impacts of extreme climatic events (heat wave, drought) on responses of the dominant C4 grasses, A. gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans, and the consequences of these response for community and ecosystem structure and function. Below is a summary of how we have addressed these objectives. Objective 1 After ten years of altered precipitation, we found the number of genotypes of A. gerardii was significantly reduced compared to the ambient precipitation treatments (Avolio et al., 2013a). Although genotype number was reduced, the remaining genotypes were less related to one another indicating that the altered precipitation treatment was selecting for increasingly dissimilar genomes (based on mean pairwise Dice distance among individuals). For the four key genotypes that displayed differential abundances depending on the precipitation treatment (G1, G4, and G11 in the altered plots and G2 in the ambient plots), we identified phenotypic differences in the field that could account for ecological sorting (Avolio & Smith, 2013a). The three altered rainfall genotypes also have very different phenotypic traits in the greenhouse in response to different soil moisture availabilities (Avolio and Smith, 2013c). Two of the genotypes that increased in abundance in the altered precipitation plots had greater allocation to root biomass (G4 and G11), while G1 allocated more biomass aboveground. These phenotypic differences among genotypes suggests that changes in genotypic structure between the altered and the ambient treatments has likely occurred via niche differentiation, driven by changes in soil moisture dynamics (reduced mean, increased variability and changes in the depth distribution of soil moisture) under a more variable precipitation regime, rather than reduced population numbers (A. gerardii tiller densities did not differ between altered and ambient treatments; p = 0.505) or a priori differences in genotype richness (Avolio et al.2013a). This ecological sorting of genotypes, which accounts for 40% of all sampled individuals in the altered plots, is an important legacy of the press chronic climate changes in the RaMPs experiment. Objective 2 In May 2010, we established the Climate Extremes Experiment at the Konza Prairie Biological Station. For the experiment, a gradient of temperatures, ranging from ambient to extreme, were imposed in 2010 and 2011 as a mid-season heat wave under well-watered or severe drought conditions. This study allowed us for the first time to examine species-specific thresholds of responses to climate extremes and assess how these phenotypic responses may impact selection of particular genotypes, with the ultimate goal of linking alterations in individual performance and genetic diversity to ecosystem structure and functioning. We found that tallgrass prairie was resistant to heat waves, but it was not resistant to extreme drought, which reduced aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) below the lowest level measured in this grassland in almost thirty years (Hoover et al. in press(a)). This extreme reduction in ecosystem function was a consequence of reduced productivity of both C4 grasses and C3 forbs. This reduction in biomass of the C4 grasses (Andropogon gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans) was, in part, due to significant reductions in photosynthesis, leaf water potential and productivity with drought in the dominant grasses species, with S. nutans was more sensitive than A. gerardii to drought (Hoover et al. in press(b)). However, the dominant forb was negatively impacted by the drought more than the dominant grasses, and this led to a reordering of species abundances within the plant community. Although this change in community composition persisted post-drought, ANPP recovered completely the year after drought

Smith, Melinda D.

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

23F.S. Chapin, III et al., Principles of Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-9504-9_2, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;24 2 Earth's Climate System temperature. Because it is hot (6,000¬įC), the sun emits most energy as high distribution of terrestrial biomes. This chapter provides a general back- ground on the functioning exerts a key control over the function- ing of Earth's ecosystems. Temperature and water availability

Hansen, Andrew J.

40

Linking Ecological Function and Ecosystem Service Values of Estaurine Habitat Types Associated with a Barrier Island System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem services are benefits humans receive as a function of natural processes. Many current studies seek to express these benefits as an economic value per unit of habitat type without quantifying the ecological functions that allow...

Francis, Jeffrey Michael

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for survival. Aquatic ecosystems consist of living organisms together... filled with rainwater, and is trans- formed from an aquatic ecosystem into a terrestrial one when......

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ECOSYSTEMS JOINT MODULE WITH UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA Summary: environments Fresh Water Ecosystems Aquatic policies Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Terrestrial... and...

44

Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011Liisa O'Neill About UsConduction. | EMSL

45

Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Ow A

46

Terrestrial sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

Charlie Byrer

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

47

Terrestrial sequestration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

Charlie Byrer

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

50

The development of early terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,575-599. Burgess, N.D. & Edwards, D. (1991). Classification of uppermost Ordovician to Lower Devonian tubular and filamentous macerals from the Anglo-Welsh Basin. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 106,41-66. Campbell, S.E. (1979). Soil stabilization...., Massa, D. & Boucot A J . (1982). Caradocian land plant microfossils from Libya. Geology 10.197-201. Gray, J., Theron, J.N. & Boucot, A J . (1986). Age of the Cedarberg Formation, South Africa and early land plant evolution. Geological Magazine 123...

Selden, Paul A.; Edwards, Dianne

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Litter-Carbon Dynamics: The Importance of Decomposition, Accretion, and Sequestration in Understanding Ecosystem Carbon Cycling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The atmospheric CO2 concentration has been increasing since the industrial revolution. A proposed mitigation strategy is sequestering carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, either in plantÖ (more)

Kochsiek, Amy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Australian terrestrial carbon budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as temperature anomalies, on NEE and carbon sequestration of ecosystems at interannual timescales have beenLETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from

Cai, Long

54

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of observational studies indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide and a warmer climate depends on the interactions between the carbon and ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

57

Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

Knox, Ryan Gary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Global Change and the Terrestrial Biosphere (449th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the Industrial Revolution, the increased use of fossil fuels has resulted in a dramatic and unprecedented rise in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Most scientists agree that increasing levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have raised Earth's temperature and, without a reduction in emissions, will continue to do so. Terrestrial ecosystems sustain life on Earth through the production of food, fuel, fiber, clean air, and naturally purified water. But how will agriculture and ecosystems be affected by global change? Rogers will describe the impact of projected climate change on the terrestrial biosphere and explain why plants are not just passive respondents to global change, but play an important role in determining the rate of change.

Rogers, Alistair (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department) [Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) plantation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest ecosystems are important in global carbon cycling be- cause 80% of the carbon stored in terrestrial vegetation is for- est biomass and forest soil contains more than 70% of the world's soil carbon- aged not only for timber and non-timber products, but also for CO2 sequestration. Therefore, ecosystem

Cohen, Ronald C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net C uptake by terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Predicting the fate of permafrost- sequestered carbon of these changes in the carbon cycle will depend on climate-driven changes in Arctic biogeochemical, vegetation, and hydrological processes, creating a critical feedback loop. A goal of the NGEE project is to assess the CO2

62

Relative role of changes in CO? and climate to equilibrium responses of net primary production and carbon storage of the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a partial factorial model experiment, we used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) to assess the relative roles of changes in CO2, temperature, precipitation and cloudiness in equilibrium responses of ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

63

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

64

1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

65

Cool Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cool Links Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Cool Links Los Alamos National Laboratory links Los...

66

Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on ďTrends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep SubsurfaceĒ was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundationís Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

K. A. Garrett and C. M. Cox. Applied biodiversity science: Managing emerging diseases in agriculture and linked natural systems using 1 ecological principles. Pages 368-386 in Infectious disease ecology: The effects of ecosystems on disease and of disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in agriculture and linked natural systems using 1 ecological principles. Pages 368-386 in Infectious disease in Agriculture and Linked Natural Systems Using Ecological Principles K. A. Garrett and C. M. Cox Summary particular crop species or genotypes are very common. Nonetheless, production agriculture is dominated

Garrett, Karen A.

68

Engineering the global ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Burst BufferFluorite

70

Graduate studies Ecosystem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

71

PROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy On the morning of Monday, August 29, Hurri- cane Katrina dependence we all have on power and energy systems. Nine major oil re- fineries in Louisiana and Mississippi- trial energy community is the question of why alternative energy sources, such as coal, solar, wind

Aggarwal, Suresh K.

72

Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i decomposition, and acting as an environmental buffer. Agricultural soils would more closely resemble soils

Neher, Deborah A.

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied ecosystem analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

life cycle assessment analysis (LCA), the article... of the problems with LCA. Linking industrial models with spatially explicit, dynamic and site-specific ecosystem......

74

Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

Braswell, B.H. Jr.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions Ė through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels Ė to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Received: 1 October 2009, Revised: 21 June 2010, Accepted: 5 August 2010, Published online in Wiley Online Library: 10 February 2011 Ecosystem valuation: some principles and a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and adapt definitions of ecosystem services in order to make an operational link to valuation methods. We clarification to practitioners on important considerations in ecosystem services valuation. We first review where valuation fits into the overall ecosystem services framework and discuss ecosystem service

Vermont, University of

78

Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the gas balance at night (when GPP is zero) and then GPP is calculated from Eq. 2. This gas COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

Berkowitz, Alan R.

79

Shelf-sea ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

Walsh, J J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Weile [NASA Ames Research Center; Wang, Han [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Hastings, Alan [University of California, Davis; Schimel, David [NEON Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant Ė Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Original article Linking ecosystem engineers to soil processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the isotopic compositions of buried plankton skeletons and other buried material are used as proxy indicators and relevant climate feedbacks 8.2.1 Energy balance, and the ice albedo feedback As a crude simpli£cation, one may write a simple equation for a globally averaged temperature T in which incoming solar radiation H

Berkowitz, Alan R.

83

Related Links  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The links below provide useful algae resources and are organized by categories. Beyond this page, learn more about BETO's Algae Program R&D by visiting the Information Resources page.

84

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

85

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

86

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

MIDC: Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3,MarchMFRC65-OCT. 5, 1999Links

89

Links - SRSCRO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission StatementCenter forCenterCenterVehicleslinks Links

90

Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

Jacobson, Seth A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

93

Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as they respond to a variety of stresses, ranging from contamination to climate change to energy extraction and conversion. ORNL researcher Ken Lowe with drill rig Ecosystem...

94

HELPFUL LINKS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWC Observatory1 July,

95

Cool Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOffice ofConversionCool

96

Training Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina ButlerToday inm"TopoTracking Living Courses

97

Relevant Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenterandGasAlternating Gradient

98

MSDS Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail ofDensity PhysicsImpurity No.Glossary

99

SPECIAL FEATURE Terrestrial and Freshwater Biogeochemistry1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the small watershed-ecosystem approach, this research has been instrumental in identifying acid rain with land use. It continues through the important discoveries of acid rain and nitrogen saturation in Europe to recover that must be considered in managing ecosystem recovery from acid rain and similar large

Jackson, Robert B.

100

Faculty Links - Links - Cyclotron Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFOR IMMEDIATE5FacilitiesFacilityAbout ¬ĽFaculty

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations · Healthy and productive coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Original Paradigm #12;We had Consumers & Coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Control

102

Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

Rey Benayas, José María

103

Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

104

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Isoprene emission from terrestrial ecosystems in response to global change: minding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACE apparatus (FACEp; 707 m2 ) was constructed in 1993, 10 years after planting, on a moderate (NPP) under CO2 e may be limited by nutrient availability (Ceulemans et al., 1999; Oren et al., 2001. Although CO2 e often increases NPP, it can also result in greater losses of C (relative to CO2 a ) via soil

106

Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 1: Distribution and doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils, vegetation, small mammals, and birds were measured for uranium series radionuclides at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites, impacted by windblown tailings and mill dust, had significantly higher concentrations of uranium, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po in soils, litter, vegetation, tree needles and twigs, small mammals, and birds, compared to a control site. Samples were collected from both upland jackpine and black spruce bog habitats in triplicate at each site. Both habitats were similar in radionuclide accumulation. Absorbed doses averaged 0.92, 8.4, and 4.9 mGy y{sup {minus}1} to small mammals and 2.0, 5.8, and 2.8 mGy y{sup {minus}1} to Lincoln's sparrows at the control, tailings, and mill sites, respectively. These doses do not include doses from short-lived radon progeny. The majority of the dose increment at the tailings and mill sites was due to {sup 226}Ra, whereas it was {sup 210}Po at the control site. Thus, use of a radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha radiation raised equivalent doses (in mSv y{sup {minus}1}) by nearly a factor of 20.

Thomas, P.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the numerical weather prediction model COSMO. Borealinto the numerical weather prediction model COSMO. BorealCurrent numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, regional

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the heat capacity of the ice mass and liquid water mass.all the ice (liquid) is melted (frozen). Heat capacities are

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Arain, 2007: Impacts of peat and vegetation on permafrostdecomposition, water balance, and peat accumulation. Earth2008: High sensitivity of peat decomposition to climate

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Inclusion of Inland Water Surfaces. J. Clim. , 8, 2691-Estimating sensitivities of water and carbon budgets. J.H. , 1955: Wind Stress Over a Water Surface. Quart. J. Roy.

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sequencing the fungal tree Terrestrial ecosystems host a complex array of interacting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with heterotrophic and autotrophic organisms alike, and play an integral and growing role in the development in three areas: plant health, biorefinery and fungal diversity. Plant health depends on interactions

Hibbett, David S.

112

Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

understood and many remain uncertain in terms of their representation in Earth System models. Increasing our System models. By extending an already well-established framework for fractional sub-grid area System Model grid cell (i.e., 30x30 km grid size). This vision includes mechanistic studies in the field

Hubbard, Susan

113

GR Focus Review Impacts of global warming on Permo-Triassic terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with long-term aridification and short-term bursts of warming and acid rain. Wildfires at the Permo have succumbed primarily to acid rain, mass wasting, and aridification. Plants may have been more

Benton, Michael

114

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1, http://and the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) (http://quantify these feedbacks, Earth System Models (ESMs) need to

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

SCIENCE PLAN AND PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE --SCIENTIFIC FOCUS AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Earth system models. Integration of biophysical, biochemical, physiological, and ecological processes

116

CENTENARY SYMPOSIUM SPECIAL FEATURE Ecosystem CO2 starvation and terrestrial silicate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Catherine D. C. Bradshaw2 , Daniel J. Lunt2 , Paul J. Valdes2 , Steven A. Banwart3 , Mark Pagani4 (400, 280, 180 and 100 p.p.m.) and associated late Miocene (11.6­5.3 Ma) cooling. Marked reductions

117

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

soil temperatures. Wetland treatments in GCMs (Ringeval etA more mechanistic treatment of wetland hydrology in an ESM

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

Kumar, Anand R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Assessing the influence of the solar orbit on terrestrial biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The terrestrial fossil record shows a significant variation in the extinction and origination rates of species during the past half billion years. Numerous studies have claimed an association between this variation and the motion of the Sun around the Galaxy, invoking the modulation of cosmic rays, gamma rays and comet impact frequency as a cause of this biodiversity variation. However, some of these studies exhibit methodological problems, or were based on coarse assumptions (such as a strict periodicity of the solar orbit). Here we investigate this link in more detail, using a model of the Galaxy to reconstruct the solar orbit and thus a predictive model of the temporal variation of the extinction rate due to astronomical mechanisms. We compare these predictions as well as those of various reference models with paleontological data. Our approach involves Bayesian model comparison, which takes into account the uncertainties in the paleontological data as well as the distribution of solar orbits consistent wi...

Feng, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment. An Investigation of the Possible Roskilde, Denmark Febtuary 1990 #12;1 RisÝ-M-2851 THE BEHAVIOUR OF IODINE IN THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT influence the migration behaviour of iodine in the terrestrial environment. It is stated that the organic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land Surface Emissivity in theSurface. |

122

Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

Peters, E.C. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Richmond, R.H. [Univ. of Guam, Mangilao (Guam). Marine Lab.; Power, E.A. [EVS Environment Consultants, Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Modelled effects of precipitation on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in different climatic zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing changes in the global climate expose the world s ecosystems not only to increasing CO2 concentrations and temperatures but also to altered precipitation (P) regimes. Using four well-established process-based ecosystem models (LPJ, DayCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), we explored effects of potential P changes on water limitation and net primary production (NPP) in seven terrestrial ecosystems with distinctive vegetation types in different hydroclimatic zones. We found that NPP responses to P changes differed not only among sites but also within a year at a given site. The magnitudes of NPP change were basically determined by the degree of ecosystem water limitation, which was quantified here using the ratio between atmospheric transpirational demand and soil water supply. Humid sites and/or periods were least responsive to any change in P as compared with moderately humid or dry sites/periods. We also found that NPP responded more strongly to doubling or halving of P amount and a seasonal shift in P occurrence than that to altered P frequency and intensity at constant annual amounts. The findings were highly robust across the four models especially in terms of the direction of changes and largely consistent with earlier P manipulation experiments and modelling results. Overall, this study underscores the widespread importance of P as a driver of change in ecosystems, although the ultimate response of a particular site will depend on the detailed nature and seasonal timing of P change.

Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service; Sowerby, ALWYN [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

azov coastal ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software Ecosystems Mircea Lungua , Michele Lanzaa, research groups or even the open-source communities. We call these contexts software ecosystems of project ecosystems through...

125

RESOLVING EQUIVOCALITY IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in the School of Resource and Environmental Management of Philosophy Title of Dissertation: Resolving Equivocality in Ecosystem Management Examining Committee: Chair. A case study approach compared information available for selecting protected areas for species-at-risk

126

Lessons from IT Ecosystems Michael Kster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Transport-Systems Smart-Energy-Systems etc. Smart Airport as a smaller instance of a Smart City Michael KŲster ∑ CIG, TU and interact massively. IT Ecosystem: analogue to biological ecosystems based on the balance between and continuously evolving IT Ecosystems requires deep understanding of this balance. Michael KŲster ∑ CIG, TU

Zachmann, Gabriel

127

PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

Palmer, Margaret A.

128

Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

129

Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Information, Agenda, and Abstracts June 26-28, 2013, Kunming, China #12;Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Kunming, China June 26-28, 2013 Information, Agenda

Ahmad, Sajjad

131

LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, flying robots, micro-air vehicles, robot communication, autonomous robot networks. #12;2 1. TERRESTRIAL1 LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS Arvin Agah This report focuses on locomotion and communication aspects of mobile robot networks for harsh polar

Kansas, University of

132

Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global priorities for biodiversity conservation are only as robust as the data used to identify them of freshwater biodiversity patterns. Given that many conservation priorities are currently driven by terrestrialLETTER Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1 , Michele Thieme1

Vermont, University of

133

Slide 1 (of 42) Observations of Terrestrial Planet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation epoch and occurrence rate of rocky terrestrial planets around solar- and intermediate- mass Observatory/Lynette Cook Zuckerman et al. (2008) #12;Slide 6 (of 42) What does Terrestrial mean 42) HD 15407A Gemini Observatory/Lynette Cook Melis et al. 2010, ApJ Letters #12;Slide 16 (of 42

Shumway, John

134

Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives of Low Impact Development with Community on the economic incentives of LID to address the local decisional realities of community watershed protection in nature but details the economic incentives to LID. It is best suited for audiences seeking to understand

135

Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Reuse Wastewater Seepage Management Surface Water Storage Reservoir Removing Barriers to SheetflowThe Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative Frank J. Mazzotti University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center

Mazzotti, Frank

137

Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. ďStructure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

Hardt, Marah Justine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

139

Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

140

Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy flow and ecosystem dynamics and wood energy in forest ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy flow and ecosystem dynamics and wood energy in forest ecosystems S.M.C.U.P. Subasinghe respectively. The forests are the most important ecosystems in wood energy aspect. Other than the energy all Originally published in the Proceedings of Workshop of Training of Trainers in Wood Energy Aspects in Sri

142

Solar Resonant Diffusion Waves as a Driver of Terrestrial Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theory is described based on resonant thermal diffusion waves in the sun that appears to explain many details of the paleotemperature record for the last 5.3 million years. These include the observed periodicities, the relative strengths of each observed cycle, and the sudden emergence in time for the 100 thousand year cycle. Other prior work suggesting a link between terrestrial paleoclimate and solar luminosity variations has not provided any specific mechanism. The particular mechanism described here has been demonstrated empirically, although not previously invoked in the solar context. The theory also lacks most of the problems associated with Milankovitch cycles.

Robert Ehrlich

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van. Most ecosystems will change in the future. 2. Loss of species and biodiversity will continue to happen Energy Demand Urbanisation Climate Change Water Availability Infectious Diseases Biodiversity Loss #12

144

Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Isotope powered stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling ENgine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to data: (a) a development model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Battelle, Paific Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Company, 2952 George Washington Way, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium ,,Theoretical of natural communities #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Abstracts Carlos data sets and theory in a flexible framework. #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems

Wehrli, Bernhard

147

Link Building Martin Olsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Link Building Martin Olsen PhD Dissertation Department of Computer Science Aarhus University Denmark #12;#12;Link Building A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of Science of Aarhus University The Computational Complexity of Link Building Proc. Computing and Combinatorics, 14th Annual International

148

Relating carrion breakdown rates to ambient resource level and community structure in four cave stream ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into ecosystems vary in quantity and quality (e.g., plant litter vs carrion). Variability in detrital quantity and quality potentially affects consumer biomass and rates of organic matter (OM) breakdown. We used cave streams to test 2 linked hypotheses regarding the influence of total detrital inputs on consumer biomass

Benstead, Jon

149

Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

150

Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise...

151

Atmospheric aerosol light scattering and surface wetness influence the diurnal pattern of net ecosystem exchange in a semi-arid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and can enhance terrestrial carbon sequestration (Gu et al., 1999, 2002, 2003; Roderick et al., 2001 observational evidence of a link between routine aerosol variability, diffuse radiation and carbon sequestration.g. Baldocchi, 1997). Relation- ships using these variables have been used to model carbon exchange between

Cohen, Ronald C.

152

Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since May of 1996, we have conducted an experiment in Florida Scrub Oak to determine the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and climate change on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling in this important terrestrial ecosystem. Florida scrub oak is the name for a collective of species occupying much of the Florida peninsula. The dominant tree species are oaks and the dwarf structure of this community makes it an excellent system in which to test hypotheses regarding the potential capacity of woody ecosystems to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic carbon. Scrub oak is fire dependent with a return cycle of 10-15 years, a time which would permit an experiment to follow the entire cycle. Our site is located on Cape Canaveral at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. After burning in 1995, we built 16 open top chambers, half of which have been fumigated with pure CO2 sufficient to raise the concentration around the plants to 350 ppm above ambient. In the intervening 10 years we have non destructively measured biomass of shoots and roots, ecosystem gas exchange using chambers and eddy flux, leaf photosynthesis and respiration, soil respiration, and relevant environmental factors such as soil water availability, temperature, light, etc. The overwhelming result from analysis of our extensive data base is that elevated CO2 has had a profound impact on this ecosystem that, overall, has resulted in increased carbon accumulation in plant shoots, roots and litter. Our measurements of net ecosystem gas exchange also indicate that the ecosystem has accumulated carbon much in excess of the increased biomass or soil carbon suggesting a substantial export of carbon through the porous, sandy soil into the water table several meters below the surface. A major discovery is the powerful interaction between the stimulation of growth, photosynthesis, and respiration by elevated CO2 and other environmental factors particularly precipitation and nitrogen. Our measurements focused attention on: stimulation of ecosystem gas exchange by elevated atmospheric CO2; the architecture and distribution of coarse roots using the novel approach of ground penetrating radar; mechanisms for the disturbance of soil carbon pools via the "priming" effect; and how interannual and seasonal variation in precipitation alters the physiological response of key species to elevated CO2. This project was a collaboration between research groups at the Smithsonian Institution, NASA, the Dynamac Corporation, Northern Arizona University, and Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

Drake, Bert G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS] (ORCID:0000000210428452); Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

155

Southeast Idaho Area Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

156

Applied Geosciences Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Geosciencs Links USGS Mercury Research Uniteds States Geological Survey (USGS) investigations provide information to guide environmental planning and management. This...

157

Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

Rothstein, Lewis M.

158

Digital Ecosystems: Evolving Service-Orientated Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel optimisation technique inspired by natural ecosystems is presented, where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration of services which are distributed in a decentralised peer-to-peer network, operating continuously in time; this process feeds a second optimisation based on evolutionary computing that operates locally on single peers and is aimed at finding solutions to satisfy locally relevant constraints. Through this twofold process, the local search is accelerated and will yield better local optima, because the distributed optimisation already provides a good sampling of the search space by making use of computations already performed in other peers with similar constraints. We call this new distributed optimisation architecture a Digital Ecosystem, an Ecosystem Orientated Architecture (EOA) created by extending a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) with Distributed Evolutionary Computing (DEC). The Digital Ecosystem will allow services to recombine and evolve over time, ...

Briscoe, G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pollination Cultural: Aesthetic, spiritual, educational, recreational Security: personal safety, secureEcosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith, happiness, social/community acceptance, recognition, etc) #12;Some problems: · ***What is `culture

160

Nitric Acid Deposition following an Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Event is below Critical Loads for Terrestrial and Freshwater Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitric acid rainout is one of the effects of an astrophysical ionizing radiation event. The predicted values of nitrate rainout from previous work for a typical gamma ray burst (GRB) within our galaxy serve as an extreme example and are shown to be below critical loads of eutrophication and acidification for ecoregions in Europe and the US.

Melott, Ben Neuenswander Adrian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

Thomas, P.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Refined Hopf Link Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We establish a relation between the refined Hopf link invariant and the S-matrix of the refined Chern-Simons theory. We show that the refined open string partition function corresponding to the Hopf link, calculated using the refined topological vertex, when expressed in the basis of Macdonald polynomials gives the S-matrix of the refined Chern-Simons theory.

Amer Iqbal; Can KozÁaz

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to administer the project. Phase one of the project began in October 1999. During the initial meetings to begin planning the process of saltcedar removal, several major concerns emerged. First, the treatment method selected should provide a high rate...SR- 2004-01 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report C. Hart Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University 1 2003 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project...

Hart, C.

164

Air pollutants effects on forest ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference on the effects of acid rain on forests. The conference was sponsored by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Topics considered at the conference included the status of US research on acid deposition and its effects contributing factors to the decline of forests, evidence for effects on ecosystems, the effects of air pollutants on forest ecosystems in North America and Europe, forest management, and future scientific research programs and management approaches.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

Demers, Nora Egan

166

Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for assessing the fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms on ecological processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project evaluates and modifies the existing US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances (EPA/OPTS) terrestrial microcosm test system and test protocols such that they can be used to determine the environmental fate and ecological hazards of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). The intact soil-core microcosm represents terrestrial ecosystems, and when coupled with appropriate test protocols, such microcosms may be appropriate to define and limit risks associated with the intentional release of GEMs. The terrestrial microcosm test system was used to investigate the survival and transport of two model GEMs (Azospirillum lipoferum and Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants) to various trophic levels and niches and through intact soil cores. Subsequent effects on nutrient cycling and displacement of indigenous microorganisms were evaluated. The model organisms were a diazotrophic root-colonizing bacterium (A. lipoferum) and a wheat root growth-inhibiting rhizobacterium (Pseudomonas sp.). The transposable element Tn5 was used as a genetic marker for both microorganisms in two separate experiments. The organisms were subjected to transposon mutagenesis using a broad host-range-mobilizable suicide plasmid. The transposon Tn5 conferred levels of kanamycin resistance up to 500 ..mu..g/ml (Pseudomonas sp.), which allowed for selection of the bacteria from environmental samples. The presence of Tn5 DNA in the genome of the model GEMs also allowed the use of Tn5 gene probes to confirm and enumerate the microorganisms in different samples from the microcosms. Two types of root growth-inhibiting Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants were obtained and used in microcosm studies: those that lacked the ability to inhibit either wheat root growth or the growth of other microorganisms in vitro (tox/sup /minus//) and those which retained these properties (tox/sup +/). 53 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Bentjen, S.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Van Voris, P.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for detection, fate, and survival analysis of genetically engineered microorganisms and their recombinant genetic material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research included in this document represents the current scientific information available regarding the applicability of terrestrial microcosms and related methodologies for evaluating detection methods and the fate and survival of microorganisms in the environment. The three terrestrial microcosms described in this document were used to evaluate the survival and fate of recombinant bacteria in soils and in association with plant surfaces and insects and their transport through soil with percolating water and root systems, and to test new methods and procedures to improve detection and enumeration of bacteria in soil. Simple (potting soil composed of peat mix and perlite, lacking environmental control and monitoring) and complex microcosms (agricultural soil with partial control and monitoring of environmental conditions) were demonstrated to be useful tools for preliminary assessments of microbial viability in terrestrial ecosystems. These studies evaluated the survival patterns of Enterobacter cloacae (pBR322) in soil and on plant surfaces and the ingestion of this same microorganism by cutworms and survival in the foregut and frass. The Versacore microcosm design was used to monitor the fate and competitiveness of genetically engineered bacteria in soil. Both selective media and gene probes were used successfully to follow the fate of two recombinant Pseudomonas sp. introduced into Versacore microcosms. Intact soil-core microcosms were employed to evaluate the fate and transport of genetically altered Azospirillum sp. and Pseudomonas sp. in soil and the plant rhizosphere. The usefulness of these various microcosms as a tool for risk assessment is underscored by the ease in obtaining soil from a proposed field release site to evaluate subsequent GEM fate and survival.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Seidler, R.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batavia Prairie and Agricultural Sites  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

Matamala, Roser (ANL); Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry (ANL); Cook, David (ANL); Pekour, Mikhail (ANL); Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. (University of Illinois at Chicago); Katul, Gabriel G. (Duke University)

169

Location linked information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work builds an infrastructure called Location Linked Information that offers a means to associate digital information with public, physical places. This connection creates a hybrid virtual/physical space, called glean ...

Mankins, Matthew William David, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass and surface density profile of the disk, and the perturbations from giant planets and binary companions if they exist. Simple accretion models predicts that low-mass stars should form small, dry planets in their habitable zones. The migration of a giant planet through a disk of rocky bodies does not completely impede terrestrial planet growth. Rather, "hot Jupiter" systems are likely to also contain exterior, very water-rich Earth-like planets, and also "hot Earths", very close-in rocky planets. Roughly one third of the known systems of extra-solar (giant) planets could allow a terrestrial planet to form in the habitable zone.

Sean N. Raymond

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

NREL: News - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National NuclearoverAcquisitionEnergy153014 NRELRelated Links

172

ARM - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related Links

173

Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYear 1 Winners Announced!TriSolarCoatings

174

Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

Bassil, Youssef

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nuclear Data Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControls | National Nuclear SecurityLinks to

176

ARM - Quick Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data Derived fromgovPublicationsPublications516Links

177

Geothermal: Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning FunNeuTel2011Programmatic ReportsContactRelated Links

178

Links - 88-Inch Cyclotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission StatementCenter forCenterCenterVehicles andLinks

179

Links - Cyclotron Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission StatementCenter forCenterCenterVehicles andLinksPhysics

180

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe Luigi Maiorano1 to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

182

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal modelEstimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce

Mcdonough, William F.

183

Stabilizing effects of diversity on aboveground wood production in forest ecosystems: linking patterns and processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determining which processes drive stability. In grasslands, the stabilizing effects of diversity 66 hinge on the assumption that composition is flexible among years (Gonzalez & Loreau 2009; 67 Allan et al. 2011; Mariotte et al. 2013). How does the slower... al. 2013; Vilŗ et al. 2013), mixed-species stands may 85 well exhibit greater stability as a result of faster rates of AWP. Nonetheless, additional 86 drivers of overyielding, such as asynchrony itself (e.g., Allan et al. 2011), are unlikely to 87...

Jucker, Tommaso; Bouriaud, Olivier; Avacaritei, Daniel; Coomes, David A.

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

184

Linking social norms to efficient conservation investment in payments for ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by governments, private sectors, and conservation non-government organizations to conserve biodiversity and eco- vation resources, priorities for conservation investments have been placed on areas where biodiversity factor in global biodiversity conservation (14, 15), and the uneven distribution of human population

185

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs" was organized collaboratively by the NSF-funded Tengchong PIRE

Ahmad, Sajjad

186

Burial of terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments: A re-assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Burial of terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments: A re-assessment David J. Burdige being buried in marine sediments may be of terrestrial origin, with the majority of this terrestrial organic matter (TOM) burial occurring in muddy, deltaic sediments. These calculations further suggest

Burdige, David

187

Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder" Mission.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Abstract This paper addresses visualization issues of the Terrestrial Planet the visualization of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission (TPF) as a case study to identify and analyze

188

Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the discovery of short bursts of gamma rays originating from Earth, called terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFsMeasurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray associated with 26 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) recorded by the RHESSI satellite over the Caribbean

Cummer, Steven A.

189

Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1 and Jeremy N. Thomas2 that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure

Thomas, Jeremy N.

190

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

DeLucia, Evan H.

191

Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle 24 Dr. Longley gone to NPS Workshop 26 Surface H20 Environments . 31 Water Treatment Feb 2Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006 Jan. 17 Introduction 19 Water Characteristics & Water Wastewater Treatment 7 Chlorination & other Treatment methods 9 San Marcos Treatment Plants tours 14 Species

Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

192

JIANGXIAO QIU Ecosystem and Landscape Ecology Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus: Trade-offs and synergies among ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural landscape-Madison Project: NSF Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC)--Climate change, shifting land use, and urbanization Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Beijing China Thesis: Landscape pattern and urban morphology

Turner, Monica G.

193

Soil as natural capital Ecosystem services and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

threats Decline in: Lead to: soil carbon soil erosion biological ac2 tool box Information on sustainable soil use incentives After Daiily et al 2009 "decision loop" #12;Soil is a natural capital Ecosystem services Nutrient retention Carbon storage Water retention

194

ANTARCTIC CLIMATE & ECOSYSTEMS COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including economic damage or loss or injury to person or property, regardless of whether the Antarctic Centre Program. A U S T R A L I A ACE also has formal partnerships with the Department of the Environment be addressed to: The Manager Communications Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre Private

Phipps, Steven J.

195

UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

196

Bisfuel links - Photosynthesis tag  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological

197

Bisfuel links - Presentations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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198

Bisfuel links - Research centers  

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199

Bisfuel links - Video  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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200

Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

Han, Richard Y.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital Robert Costanza Matthew Wilson services are are mainly provided by ecosystems. Examples of ecosystem services ("ecoservices") include of ecoservices in a variety of locations using a variety of valuation methods and applies them to New Jersey

202

White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective Yuan Luo, Lin Gao, and Jianwei Huang Abstract--The successful deployment of a TV white space network requires the coordination-users), which form the White Space Ecosystem. In this paper, we study the white space ecosystem from

Huang, Jianwei

203

RESEARCH ARTICLE Response of an aridland ecosystem to interannual climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on ecosystem structure and function. In the south- western US, interactions among regional climate drivers (e drivers strongly affect the distribution and composition of ecosystems worldwide. Indeed, potential to which increased climate variability will affect ecosystem processes requires long-term analysis

204

Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of U.S. and international coral reef ecosystems. The CRCA also required that the National OceanicStatus of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam By Val Porter, Trina Leberer, Mike Gawel, Jay Gutierrez Marine Laboratory Technical Report No. 113 October 2005 #12;Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam

Mcilwain, Jenny

205

SUSTAINABLE RESERVOIR OPERATION: CAN WE GENERATE HYDROPOWER AND PRESERVE ECOSYSTEM VALUES?y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health operation; hydropower; sustainability; riverine ecosystems; ecological valuation; natural flow regime, influence the health of the downstream ecosystem. Healthy riverine ecosystems provide ecosystem services

Jager, Henriette I.

206

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production, and Tradeoffs at Landscape Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production ECOSYSTEM SERVICES_ 4 o Modeling multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation, commodity tradeoff between biodiversity conservation and J?l ecosystem services. Scenarios involving more development

Vermont, University of

207

THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Mapping and Valuing Ecosystem Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

society through unaccounted-for ecosystem services. A major challenge in mov- ing to a more ecosystem

Weiblen, George D

208

Comments on: Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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209

News Links | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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210

Nuclear Data Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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211

Links (pbl/contracts)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011Liisa O'Neill About UsConduction. | EMSLDOE

212

A-Z Link  

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213

Sector 30 - useful links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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214

Page 11, Links  

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215

Energy Links Page - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003of Energy for39 Table A3.9995 0

216

Wind Power Link  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhatFellows - PastFarmWindWind Power

217

Resources & Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource Program September 2010 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R

218

BCDA Machine Status Link  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t i o nLiquids Reserve ClassBBEEBunch

219

Links to Other EFRCs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission StatementCenter forCenterCenterVehicleslinks

220

Bisfuel links - EFRC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological ImagingSafetyforsediments:Department

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bisfuel links - Professional organizations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,BiologicalPresentationsProfessional organizations

222

Bisfuel links - Seminars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,BiologicalPresentationsProfessionalSeminars

223

CAMD Nanofabrication Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route Segments (notCAMD Cleanroom ChemicalHome ::

224

CAMD Nanofabrication Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route Segments (notCAMD Cleanroom ChemicalHome

225

Link Alpha A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R

226

Link Alpha B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q Rb

227

Link Alpha C  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q

228

Link Alpha D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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229

Link Alpha E  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Qd

230

Link Alpha F  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Qdf

231

Link Alpha G  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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232

Link Alpha H  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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233

Link Alpha I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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234

Link Alpha J  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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235

Link Alpha K  

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236

Link Alpha L  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Pi Akl

237

Link Alpha M  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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238

Link Alpha N  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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239

Link Alpha O  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Pin Ao

240

Link Alpha P  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Pin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Link Alpha Q  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Pinq A

242

Link Alpha R  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Pinq

243

Link Alpha S  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Pinqs

244

Link Alpha T  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Pinqst

245

Link Alpha V  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O

246

Link Alpha W  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Ow A B C

247

Link Alpha Y  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Ow A B

248

Link Alpha Z  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocsCenterCentera A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Ow A Bz

249

astro_links.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview ofashleye1 Ames LaboratoryFebruary 12,

250

WIPP - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | Blandine Jerome VelenciaNewsNews ThisPrivacy Act

251

AlumniLink  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail Share AlternativeRight

252

Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) Flight Baseline Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) mission presented here is an existence proof for a flagship-class internal coronagraph space mission capable of detecting and characterizing Earth-like planets and planetary systems at visible wavelengths around nearby stars, using an existing launch vehicle. TPF-C will use spectroscopy to measure key properties of exoplanets including the presence of atmospheric water or oxygen, powerful signatures in the search for habitable worlds.

Levine, Marie; Shaklan, S; Kasting, J; Traub, W; Alexander, J; Angel, R; Blaurock, C; Brown, M; Brown, R; Burrows, C; Clampin, M; Cohen, E; Content, D; Dewell, L; Dumont, P; Egerman, R; Ferguson, H; Ford, V; Greene, J; Guyon, O; Hammel, H; Heap, S; Ho, T; Horner, S; Hunyadi, S; Irish, S; Jackson, C; Kasdin, J; Kissil, A; Krim, M; Kuchner, M; Kwack, E; Lillie, C; Lin, D; Liu, A; Marchen, L; Marley, M; Meadows, V; Mosier, G; Mouroulis, P; Noecker, M; Ohl, R; Oppenheimer, B; Pitman, J; Ridgway, S; Sabatke, E; Seager, S; Shao, M; Smith, A; Soummer, R; Stapelfeldt, K; Tenerell, D; Trauger, J; Vanderbei, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink A N D R E W W H I T E , * M E L V, Hybrid v4.1, with a subdaily timestep, was driven by increasing CO2 and transient climate output from scenarios were used: (i) IS92a, giving 790 ppm CO2 by 2100, (ii) CO2 stabilization at 750 ppm by 2225

White, Andrew

254

Influence of massive planet scattering on nascent terrestrial planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In most extrasolar planetary systems, the present orbits of known giant planets admit the existence of stable terrestrial planets. Those same giant planets, however, have typically eccentric orbits that hint at violent early dynamics less benign for low mass planet formation. Under the assumption that massive planet eccentricities are the end point of gravitational scattering in multiple planet systems, we study the evolution of the building blocks of terrestrial planets during the scattering process. We find that typically, evolutionary sequences that result in a moderately eccentric giant planet orbiting at a ~ 2.5 AU eject over 95% of the material initially present within the habitable zone. Crossing orbits largely trigger the ejection, and leave the surviving material with a wide dispersion in semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. Based on these results, we predict that radial velocity follow-up of terrestrial planet systems found by Kepler will find that these are anti-correlated with the presence of eccentric giant planets orbiting at a few AU.

Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

On the Survival of Short-Period Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The currently feasible method of detection of Earth-mass planets is transit photometry, with detection probability decreasing with a planet's distance from the star. The existence or otherwise of short-period terrestrial planets will tell us much about the planet formation process, and such planets are likely to be detected first if they exist. Tidal forces are intense for short-period planets, and result in decay of the orbit on a timescale which depends on properties of the star as long as the orbit is circular. However, if an eccentric companion planet exists, orbital eccentricity ($e_i$) is induced and the decay timescale depends on properties of the short-period planet, reducing by a factor of order $10^5 e_i^2$ if it is terrestrial. Here we examine the influence companion planets have on the tidal and dynamical evolution of short-period planets with terrestrial structure, and show that the relativistic potential of the star is fundamental to their survival.

Rosemary A. Mardling; D. N. C. Lin

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Ecological Society of America www.frontiersinecology.org Societal concern over global warming and its link to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATIONS Limited potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration to offset fossil-fuel emissions warming and its link to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concen- trations has motivated many- tration of atmospheric carbon (C) in standing biomass or C-depleted agricultural soils through changes

Weiblen, George D

258

Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species identity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species in recycling nutrients, thus providing a mechanism for how animal species identity mediates ecosystem processes) recycled nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in a tropical stream supports stoichiometry theory. Mass

Flecker, Alex

259

Facilitation Guide Forging the Link  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facilitation Guide Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives of Low Impact Development of the economic incentives as well as how LID plays a role in helping communities adapt to changes in climate. Now heard? What about inconsistent? #12;Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Benefits of Low Impact

260

Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coupling Terrestrial and Atmospheric Water Dynamics to Improve Prediction in a Changing Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluxes across the land surface directly influence predictions of ecological processes, atmospheric dynamics, and terrestrial hydrology. However, many simplifications are made in numerical models when considering ...

Lyon, Steve W.; Dominguez, Francina; Gochis, David J.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Castro, Christopher; Chow, Fotini K.; Fan, Ying; Fuka, Daniel; Hong, Yang; Kucera, Paul A.; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Salzmann, Nadine; Schmidli, Juerg; Snyder, Peter K.; Teuling, Adriaam J.; Twine, Tracy E.; Levis, Samuel; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Salvucci, Guido D.; Sealy, Andrea M.; Walter, M. Todd

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ACES Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services represents a dynamic and growing assembly of professionals, researchers, and policy makers involved with ecosystem services. The ACES 2014 Conference brings...

264

Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays in the Earth's mantle and crust; this leads to a very ``peripheral'' angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles > 60 degrees away from the downward vertical. We note the possibility of that the Earth's core contains potassium; different geophysical predictions lead to strongly varying, and hence distinguishable, central intensities (< 30 degrees from the downward vertical). Other uncertainties in the models, and prospects for observation of the geoneutrino angular distribution, are briefly discussed. We conclude by urging the development and construction of antineutrino experiments with angular sensitivity. (Abstract abridged.)

Brian D. Fields; Kathrin A. Hochmuth

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

267

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

Arkin, Adam P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species interactions,Ö (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing speciesÖ (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Link Collections A Register of Papers of Edwin A. Link, Marion Clayton Link, The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description of Series Correspondence (19391981) Enclosures (19411979) Advertising Brochures and Company Charts, Diagrams, and Maps Financial Records Legal Documents Legislation Logs and Journals. Link Advertising Brochures and Company Publications E.A. Link Announcements, Business Cards

Suzuki, Masatsugu

271

Balanced link for dry coal extrusion pumps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A link which defines a link body that includes a multiple of link plates integral with a link body, the link body disposed at least partially forward of a forward edge of the multiple of link plates.

Bebejian, Maral

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development, oil/gas exploration, and food production1,3 . This is a primary reason for the higher per capita grounds for commercial shellfish and finfish, and bio- chemically process terrestrial runoff2 . Nearly

273

Alien Terrestrial Invertebrates of Europe Alain Roques, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Jean-Yves Rasplus,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5 Alien Terrestrial Invertebrates of Europe Alain Roques, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Jean of animals and plants, no checklist of alien terrestrial inverte- brates was available in any of the European the existing lists were inherently difficult because they used different definitions of alien. Thus, estimat

Richner, Heinz

274

Heat partitioning in terrestrial planets during core formation by negative diapirism H. Samuel a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in terrestrial planets. We model the dynamic evolution of an iron diapir, sinking through a solid silicate proto experiments. This model can be applied to determine the heat distribution within terrestrial planets-like planets by conversion of potential into thermal energy via viscous heating (Rubie et al., 2007; Solomon

Evonuk, Martha

275

To What Extent Does Terrestrial Life ``Follow The Water''? Eriita G. Jones and Charles H. Lineweaver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uninhabited, we present empirical pressure-temperature (P-T ) phase diagrams of water, Earth, and terrestrial. This potentially uninhabited terrestrial liquid water includes (i) hot and deep regions of Earth where some combination of high temperature (T > 1228C) and restrictions on pore space, nu- trients, and energy

Lineweaver, Charles H.

276

Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

Pasko, Victor

277

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS: INTERPLANETARY ASPECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS, with peak value of -16 nT. In this paper the interplanetary aspects of these two solar-terrestrial connection events are analyzed and compared. Plasma and magnetic field data obtained from sensors on board

278

The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change Luigi climate change model outputs for two climate scenarios. Overall, a substantial number of Mediterranean in climate. For 181 terrestrial mammals (68% of all Mediterranean mammals), we used an ensemble forecasting

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

279

Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed fromSource altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys

Pasko, Victor

280

Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial Heterogeneity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial microbial processes in the terrestrial subsurface. Previous geochemical studies suggested that sulfide environment in shallow sediments (5 m), and produces acidic waters (pH 3.8) that are rich in sulfate (28 m

Grossman, Ethan L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark Williamson Working Paper 83 #12;An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark for long time period simulations and large ensemble studies in Earth system models of intermediate

Williamson, Mark

282

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

Johnson, Pieter

283

Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

284

DECISION-MAKING AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

options is reviewed and applied to ecosystem-based management. The model recommends a public decision process unless developing new alternatives is not possible, in which case segmented public consultation question involves the kind of public participation strategy to use. For ecosystem-based management to reach

Lawrence, Rick L.

285

Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

286

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field Deborah S. Kelley,1 * Jeffrey A. Baross,1 Roger E. Summons,7 Sean P. Sylva4 The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field is a remarkable submarine ecosystem in which geological, chemical, and biological processes are intimately

Gilli, Adrian

287

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Slatton, Clint

288

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Watson, Craig A.

289

CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan Envision a Dynamic Community of Wellbeing for innovation that can be exported outside of its boundaries. Umore Park: Ecosystems of Infrastructure it every day in the form of roads, buildings, power lines, stoplights, energy plants, water pipes, when

Netoff, Theoden

290

Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

291

EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF COWICHAN TRIBES of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Exploring Aboriginal Forestry and Ecosystem-based Management aboriginal forestry will be required. First Nations share a common desire for control over their forest

292

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

293

ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

Iliffe, Thomas M.

294

Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

213 Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab- olism for Giltner in the estimation of ecosystem metabolism by open-channel methods (McCutchan et al. 2002; Hall and Tank 2005). To estimate metabolism in Giltner Spring Creek, Hall and Tank (2005) employ a mass-balance equation

Lewis Jr., William M.

295

Assessment of radioisotope heaters for remote terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the feasibility of using radioisotope byproducts for special heating applications at remote sites in Alaska and other cold regions. The investigation included assessment of candidate radioisotope materials for heater applications, identification of the most promising cold region applications, evaluation of key technical issues and implementation constraints, and development of conceptual heater designs for candidate applications. Strontium-90 (Sr-90) was selected as the most viable fuel for radioisotopic heaters used in terrestrial applications. Opportunities for the application of radioisotopic heaters were determined through site visits to representative Alaska installations. Candidate heater applications included water storage tanks, sludge digesters, sewage lagoons, water piping systems, well-head pumping stations, emergency shelters, and fuel storage tank deicers. Radioisotopic heaters for water storage tank freeze-up protection and for enhancement of biological waste treatment processes at remote sites were selected as the most promising applications.

Uherka, K.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

297

On the dynamics and thermodynamics of terrestrial planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model for terrestrial planets, inclusive of viscous fluid behavior and featuring finite normal stress differences, is developed. This work offers new insights for the interpretation of planetary survey data. Evolution equations for poloidal and toroidal motions include gradients of density, viscosity, and two normal stress moduli. The poloidal field exhibits gradients in the cubic dilation, which couple non-isotropic pressures to the combined deformation field. In contrast, the toroidal field exhibits vorticity gradients with magnitudes proportional to the natural time. This holds even in the absence of material gradients. Consequently, viscosity gradients are not required to drive toroidal motions. The toroidal field is governed by an inhomogeneous diharmonic equation, exhibiting dynamic shear localization. The strain-energy density for this model, as a function of temperature, is found via thermodynamics. Assuming heat transfer with characteristic diffusivity, a radial model parameterized by thermomechani...

Patton, Regan L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

299

Protective link for superconducting coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Tourism destinations as digital business ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism has been experiencing very relevant changes since when Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), in all their forms, have started to pervade the industry and the market. In the last decade, a new concept gained the attention of both researchers and practitioners, that of Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE). It can be considered as a technological infrastructure aimed at creating a digital environment to support and enhance networking between enterprises and stakeholders operating within a sector. Aim of this paper is to assess the extent to which the technological connection has affected the structural configuration of the tourism system and, specifically, of tourism destinations. The present study argues that two components can be considered when assessing the relationships among stakeholders within a tourism destination: a real and a virtual one. Further it shows how these two components are structurally strongly coupled and co-evolve forming a single system.

Baggio, Rodolfo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

Gary D. Kronrad

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

Landis, Doug

303

Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework energy levels as a strategic framework to help identify conservation priorities and22 those management of three energy levels to achieve conservation objectives. The24 #12;2 geographic distribution of each

Hansen, Andrew J.

304

Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

Mobrand, Lars E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

306

The Climate Impacts LINK Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

Feigon, Brooke

307

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal ecosystem engineers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the approach with regards to ecosystem engineering... in an engineered ecosystem (e.g., water purification, biomass production, etc.). In the short term, the objective......

308

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic microbial ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Starch Glucose Complex anaerobic... 12;Microbial Systems as Model Ecosystems P C R Energy Heat ... Source: Vallino, Joseph J. - Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological...

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic ecosystem perturbations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

processes and functions How do we define and quantify relationships between biodiversity, ecosystem function and Summary: biodiversity, ecosystem function and services at...

310

Implementing Ad Hoc to Terrestrial Network Gateways Jonathan McGee, Manish Karir, and John S. Baras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Ad Hoc to Terrestrial Network Gateways Jonathan McGee, Manish Karir, and John S. Baras we describe our experience of implementing a gateway between ad hoc and terrestrial routing protocols terrestrial network interface and MAODV on a wireless ad hoc network interface.Although we focus primarily

Baras, John S.

311

Terrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium acceleration of electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating fromTerrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium accelerationV) of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). This analysis provides the first direct evidence that TGFs are produced

Pasko, Victor

312

links | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNLBuildings andExternal Links External Links This page

313

Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

314

Useful Weather Links Nolan Doesken  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Useful Weather Links Nolan Doesken Odie Bliss Colorado Climate Center Presented at Professional://www.weather.gov/nwr/ #12;City of Fort Collins Alert Network ­ Rainfall and Streamflow http

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulating terrestrial plant Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest Ecology Group Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 7 Exotic Ecosystem Engineers Change the Emergence of Plants from the Summary: change the seedling...

316

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

SetLink the CERN Document Server Link Manager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyses the problems encountered by electronic libraries to cope with long term keeping of on-line documents. What is thebest solution not to fill in a library system with non persistent addresses ? Different possible solutions are studied, based on theexperience of the CERN Document Server and its library. This paper will stress the importance of using a Link Manager for any long term Web server. It will explain how the CERN SetLink Link Manager is designed to handle a wide range of document types and formats, from photos in JPEG to eprints in PDF. It will also focus onother possibilities offered by using such an application, like automatic figures extraction or concatenation, full text searching andon-the-fly format conversions.

Le Meur, Jean-Yves

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

arctic ecosystem final: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FROST-BOIL ECOSYSTEMS A PROJECT SUMMARY The central goal of this project to changing climate. We focus on frost-boils because: (1) The processes that are involved in the self...

319

Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS: The development of Agro-IBIS Chris Kucharik Department of Agronomy & Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment balance Soil and canopy physics Leaf physiology Minutes Phenology Budburst, senescence, dormancy Daily

320

Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from†states, tribes, federal...

322

Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite its relative distance from most populated regions of the world, the Arctic has been significantly impacted by anthropogenic contamination and climate change. The entire Arctic ecosystem has been affected, with upper trophic level predators...

Jordan, John E.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems Physics Websites Summary: Predicting and...

324

California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Hap Dunning and Richard Frank, UC Davis School of Law Feb. 24 Farms, floods, fowl and fish on the Yolo, Yolo County; others TBA Mar. 10 Science and ecosystem reconciliation for the Delta. Peter Goodwin

Ferrara, Katherine W.

325

STUART E.G. FINDLAY Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and K.A. Kuehn. 2002. Microbial growth and nitrogen retention in litter of Phragmites australis.M. Groffman and S. Dye. 2003. Trade-offs among ecosystem functions during restoration: Phragmites removal from

326

Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

partitioning among marine species (Kohn 1959). Facilitation, which occurs when one species improves envi- ronmental conditions for others, is well documented in such marine ecosystems as salt marshes, coral reefs, and kelp forests (Knowlton 1999; Bruno et al... food per acre as a commercial shrimp farm. These complex services are provided by thousands of plant, animal, and microbial species. (c) Kelp forests and (d) coral reefs are some of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Recreational, commercial...

Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Multi-temporal Terrestrial Lidar for Estimating Individual Tree Dimensions and Biomass Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate measures of forest structural parameters are essential to forest inventory and growth models, managing wildfires, and modeling of carbon cycle. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides accurate understory information rapidly through non...

Srinivasan, Shruthi

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. I. IN SITU SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extrasolar planet host stars have been found to be enriched in key planet-building elements. These enrichments have the potential to drastically alter the composition of material available for terrestrial planet formation. Here, we report on the combination of dynamical models of late-stage terrestrial planet formation within known extrasolar planetary systems with chemical equilibrium models of the composition of solid material within the disk. This allows us to determine the bulk elemental composition of simulated extrasolar terrestrial planets. A wide variety of resulting planetary compositions are found, ranging from those that are essentially 'Earth like', containing metallic Fe and Mg silicates, to those that are dominated by graphite and SiC. This shows that a diverse range of terrestrial planets may exist within extrasolar planetary systems.

Bond, Jade C.; Lauretta, Dante S. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); O'Brien, David P., E-mail: jbond@psi.ed [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

Pigeon, Timothy David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery Linked Environments for Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unidata Program Center #12;Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery The Team: 9 institutions and 105 MethodologyTraditional NWP Methodology STATIC OBSERVATIONS Radar Data Mobile Mesonets Surface Observations Satellites The Process is Entirely Prescheduled and Serial; It Does NOT Respond to the Weather! The Process

332

Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011Liisa O'Neill About UsConduction. |Links UWAbout

333

Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011Liisa O'Neill About UsConduction. |Links

334

Department of Energy Idaho - Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. The Desert Southwest RegionInside ID Inside IdahoLinks

335

AlumniLink: January 2015  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane TankWashingtonAlternativeSolar Alumni Link:

336

AlumniLink: June 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane TankWashingtonAlternativeSolar Alumni Link:

337

AlumniLink: March 2015  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane TankWashingtonAlternativeSolar Alumni Link:

338

AlumniLink: November 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane TankWashingtonAlternativeSolar Alumni Link:

339

AlumniLink: September 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane TankWashingtonAlternativeSolar Alumni Link:

340

3D Corporate Tourism in the Marine Sciences: Application-Oriented Problem Solving in Marine and Coastal Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D corporate tourism in the marine sciences is a solution-based approach to innovation in science, engineering and design. Corporate international scientists, engineers and designers work with local experts in Malaysian marine and coastal environments: they jointly discover, develop and design complex materials and designs inspired by nature directly on site (e.g. at the UKM Marine Ecosystem Research Centre EKOMAR and Malaysian Marine Parks) and construct initial biomimetic prototypes and novel designs. Thereby, new links, networks and collaborations are established between communities of thinkers in different countries. 3D tourism aims at mapping new frontiers in emerging engineering and design fields. This provides a novel way to foster and promote innovative thinking in the sciences, and considers the need for synergy and collaboration between marine sciences, engineering and design rather than segmentation and isolation. With the concept of 3D corporate tourism the potential of Malaysian marine ecosystems...

Gebeshuber, Ille Christine; Esichaikul, Ranee; Macqueen, Mark; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Terrestrial perturbation experiments as an environmental assessment tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was initially interpreted as requiring full disclosure of the environmental impacts of a federal action. Because of the limitations of time, money, and manpower, this requirement that all impacts be considered has led to superficial analysis of many important impacts. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has provided a solution to this problem by reinterpreting NEPA as requiring analysis of those impacts which have significant bearing on decision making. Because assessment resources can now be concentrated on a few critical issues, it should be possible to perform field perturbation experiments to provide direct evidence of the effects of a specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific receiving ecosystem. Techniques are described for field simulation of gaseous and particulate air pollution, soil pollutants, disturbance of the earth's surface, and disturbance of wildlife. These techniques are discussed in terms of their realism, cost, and the restrictions which they place on the measurement of ecological parameters.

Suter, G.W. II

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa, Mallorca:up DataBusSimply Efficient

343

Innovation Ecosystem Initiative - EERE Commercialization Office  

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AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planningtoAInfrastructureInitiativesInnovation

344

RELATED LINKS Green Technology for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have been certified to the National Green Building Standard, which was approved earlier this year by the American National Standards Institute. Preferences for specific green building techniques are decidedlyRELATED LINKS Green Technology for 2009: See the Photos Green Building: Getting Past the Media Hype

345

Terrestrial biogeochemistry in the community climate system model (CCSM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project (C4 MIP) Phase 1 experiments. In addition, CASA is one of three models--in addition to CN, and sea ice linked through a coupler that exchanges mass and energy fluxes and state information among, 5], the Community Sea Ice Model Version 5 (CSIM5) [6], and the Parallel Ocean Program Version 1

Hoffman, Forrest M.

346

Building Links with the Fishing, Aquaculture and Management Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and management approach to a more holistic `Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries' (EAF), or variations on the theme and international studies, with applications to ecosystem approaches to fisheries (Polovina and Howell, 2005; Platt or other activities on the ecosystem, and more directly in relation to fisheries assessment, management

Meyers, Steven D.

347

EcoSystem Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThisEcoGrid EU (Smart Grid Project)

348

Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It is classified asThisEcoGrid EU (Smart GridNantesPower-Station

349

Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmart Grocer Program

350

Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmart Grocer ProgramEnergy-Water Resource Systems SHARE

351

Breaking information-thermodynamics link  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The information-thermodynamics link is revisited, going back to the analysis of Szilard's engine. It is argued that instead of equivalence rather complementarity of physical entropy and information theoretical one is a correct concept. Famous Landauer's formula for a minimal cost of information processing is replaced by a new one which takes into account accuracy and stability of information encoding. Two recent experiments illustrating the information-energy conversion are critically discussed.

Robert Alicki

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

NREL: Energy Analysis - Related Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National Nuclearover twoPrintable Version

353

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments on NBPSiting GuidelinesFinancial Opportunities ¬Ľ

354

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromComments on NBPSiting GuidelinesFinancial Opportunities

355

EIA - Related Links for Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S. Department of EnergyD

356

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and LaunchesRelated Financial Opportunities

357

MAJOR CONFORMED CONTRACTS LINKS Site/Project Contract Link Idaho  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | DepartmentEnergy InvitationLegaltoLizLow- LEVEL

358

2015 Peer Review Presentations-Terrestrial Feedstocks | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014 HouseCoveredAirDepartment ofof Energy

359

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster,Winside,Warren CountyUtility

360

Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both Earth-mass and Saturn-mass planets. Here we simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems -- 55 Cancri, HD 38529, HD 37124, and HD 74156 -- under the assumption that these systems of giant planets are complete and that their orbits are well-determined. Assuming the giant planets formed and migrated quickly, then terrestrial planets may form from a second generation of planetesimals. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that planets form relatively easily in 55 Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents and orbits in the habitable zone. HD 38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass. No terrestrial planets form in HD 37124 and HD 74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos survive for 100 Myr. If migration occurred later, depleting the planetesimal disk, then massive terrestrial planets are unlikely to form in any of these systems.

Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Nathan A. Kaib

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Environmental Science and Management Mission Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Science and Management Mission Statement Approved by the faculty November 29, 2006 Environmental Science and Management is the study of the interactions between society. Environmental Science and Management at PSU focuses on processes that link terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems

362

4 Assessment The assessment for the UMM Subbasin consists of terrestrial/wildlife and aquatic/fish sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment for the small tributaries. Ecosystem, Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) was not deemed appropriate with riparian and wetland hab

363

Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

LTS Related Links - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS,

365

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutiveWatchdogofto the

366

Related Links | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |RebeccaRegional StandardsExecutiveWatchdogofto

367

Website Policies / Important Links | DOEpatents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWasteWebWebsite Policies

368

Website Policies / Important Links | DOEpatents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWasteWebWebsite

369

Fermilab at Work | Physics Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall Works:OklahomaatWayneFermilab NowLab Life AIP

370

Links - MST - UW Plasma Physics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region serviceMission StatementCenter forCenterCenterVehicles

371

Climate VISION: Resources and Links  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart ofMeasuring DopamineEnergy,6. Radiative Forcing ofPROGRAM

372

Beryllium Related Links - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I.Program Information About Us

373

Bisfuel links - Arizona State University  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological ImagingSafetyforsediments:

374

Bisfuel links - Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological ImagingSafetyforsediments:Department of

375

Bisfuel links - Solar energy news  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,BiologicalPresentationsProfessionalSeminarsSolar

376

Biosafety Links | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for aCouldBiofuelHelpBiologyBSafety Biosafety

377

astro_links2.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, partReview ofashleye1 Ames LaboratoryFebruary

378

Partners and related links | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizingToolstoPartnering MechanismsPartners and related

379

Sandia National Laboratories: Industry Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit atVehicle TechnologiesImproved Power SystemIndustry

380

TAMU Websites - Links - Cyclotron Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout ¬ĽLabSustainabilitySynthetic fuelT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Related Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

About Us Our Programs Defense Programs Future Science & Technology Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs Related Links Related Links...

382

Survival of Terrestrial Planets in the Presence of Giant Planet Migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The presence of ``Hot Jupiters'', Jovian mass planets with very short orbital periods orbiting nearby main sequence stars, has been proposed to be primarily due to the orbital migration of planets formed in orbits initially much further from the parent star. The migration of giant planets would have profound effects on the evolution of inner terrestrial planets in these systems, and previous analyses have assumed that no terrestrial planets survive after migration has occurred. We present numerical simulations showing that a significant fraction of terrestrial planets could survive the migration process, eventually returning to circular orbits relatively close to their original positions. A fraction of the final orbits are in the Habitable Zone, suggesting that planetary systems with close-in giant planets are viable targets for searches for Earth-like habitable planets around other stars.

Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Metal accumulation in terrestrial pulmonates at a lead/zinc smelter site in Arnoldstein, Austria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently,the suitability of terrestrial gastropods was reviewed as quantitative indicator organisms for environmental metal pollution. The peculiar metal accumulation capabilities in molluscs have been known in detail for decades, but {open_quotes}only few data are available for terrestrial pulmonates{close_quotes}. Furthermore, data are restricted to only a few species, and despite similarities in metabolic pathways, species-specific properties in metal-budget strategies exist. Information concerning the potential range of metal burden in these animals form the field are, therefore, of ecophysical relevance. Snails satisfy a basic demand as quantitative indicators of the bioavailable fraction of terrestrial metal pollution. In this study concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc were measured in tissues of 4 species of snails collected in the vicinity of a lead/zinc smelter with a long history of pollution. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rabitsch, W.B. [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)] [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage ¬Ľof EnergyThe EnergyDepartment ofPoweredEngine-Powered

385

NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements of Women |hitsAwards and Honors(PPS)

386

Valuing ecosystem services: A shadow price for net primary production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, United States c Center for Energy & Environmental Studies, Boston 2007 We analyze the contribution of ecosystem services to GDP and use this contribution to calculate production per unit output. The rate of technical substitution indicates that the quantity of capital needed

Myneni, Ranga B.

387

INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

Alvarez, Nadir

388

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America: modelling service services provided to the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan hydroelectric sectors, which are crucial sectors for the conservation and restoration of forests for the services they provide to the hydroelectric sector. As such

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Fisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Sierra National Forest, Fresno County, California, with fieldwork beginning in 1994 (Verner and Figure 1--The Kings River administrative study area in the Sierra National Forest in central California includesFisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Current Results

Standiford, Richard B.

390

REVIEW PAPER Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering: A Review for Developing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW PAPER Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering: A Review for Developing a Science Plan Lynn M September 2011 / Accepted: 31 January 2012 / Published online: 20 March 2012 Abstract Geoengineering methods and functioning in some regions. Two types of geoengineering activities that have been proposed are: carbon

Jackson, Robert B.

391

Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program ¤ IGERT intends to ¤ meet the challenges of educating U a cultural change in graduate education by establishing innovative new models for graduate education

392

Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Jose A. Carrera, Estanislao de Simon Conservacion de la Naturaleza), Madrid, Spain. Abstract: Management of the fragile and greatly modified level studies on reforestation, hydrol- ogy, and desert control. Most of Spain has a typical

Standiford, Richard B.

393

BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

Walter, M.Todd

394

BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

Walter, M.Todd

395

"Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

desertification process; B) May affect economic and social resilience and further sustainable socio-economic right and organizations 5. Economic mechanisms of Self- governing Organizations "Green Gold" pasture to the changing conditions. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 8 Community Development Processes

396

Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

Roulet, Nigel T.

397

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems CNRS Institut √?cologie et scales. This book provides an overview of current sensors for ecology and makes a strong case of practical ecological applications, this text is meant to be an invaluable resource for students, researchers

van Tiggelen, Bart

398

A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

Hubbard, Susan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

Reiterer, Harald

400

Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine how trees affect the behavior of these nutrients in soil water, both during growth and afterTree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute Sciences/US Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; 4 USDA

Vermont, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better and affect the magnitude of seasonal change in water levels through water loss as LE (evapotranspiration (ET that produce considerable variation in the hydrologic cycle, affecting nutrient delivery, ecosystem primary

402

Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

Moritz, Max A.

403

Fire and Thinning Effects on Mixed-Conifer Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for low-intensity underburns but is now estimated to be over 600 years. · Tree density has dramatically out of a key question raised in the Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project: Critical Findings Section, 1996. · Old-growth has fairly stable carbon and nutrient pools. · Old forest conditions are often what

North, Malcolm

404

Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance A. Mansour*1 of the most up-to-date innovations in sensor technology and sensor networks, our current project should as well as the second phase of the project which consists in analyzing living underwater micro

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S, 2007) Declines in biodiversity have prompted concern over the conse- quences of species loss the functional consequences of realistic, nonrandom changes in biodiversity. Instead, most designs have used

Brody, James P.

406

Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enjoying traction in places where ethical argu- ments for biodiversity conservation are given short shriftEditorial Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation Conservation biology began life as a crisis discipline, its central tenet to understand and help reverse losses of biodiversity

Vermont, University of

407

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source of methane, the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, the absolute contribution

M√ľhlemann, Oliver

408

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations R E B E C C and lit- ter decomposition varied between Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) willow bioenergy plantations., 2009). Willow (Salix spp) short rotation coppice (SRC) is one of the most widely planted second

409

Original article Nutrient cycling in deciduous forest ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Castanea sativa chestnut coppice located in the Sierra de Gata mountains (Cen- tral System, western Spain coppice lie in the fact that in the latter ecosystem potentially more N, P, K, Mg, Na and Mn return). Additionally, the relative importance of some bioelements (N, P, K and Mn) in the chestnut coppice is different

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

New Hampshire, University of

411

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 Failing or nearby septic tank systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 · Failing or nearby septic tank systems · Exfiltration from sanitary sewers in poor repair · Leaking underground storage tanks and pipes · Landfill seepage or natural environment Leaks from underground storage tanks and pipes are a common source of soil

Pitt, Robert E.

412

Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

Lamberti, Gary A.

413

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

White, Luther

414

Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

415

Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity Thorsten B. H. Reusch with such climatic extremes is a question central to contem- porary ecology and biodiversity conservation. Previous, and it may buffer against extreme climatic events. In a manipulative field experiment, increasing

Myers, Ransom A.

416

Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes. Nilsson and J. Svensson Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 1. Introduction Wetlands filters in the landscape. Many kinds of wetlands and peatlands can be found, each with a particular

417

Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

Beas, Rodrigo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

Chen, Jiquan

419

Application of conditional sampling for measuring ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange in coastal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and seasonal carbon cycles in these ecosystems as well as the response of these systems to environmental change. One convenient method for continuously measuring CER in remote ecosystems is tower-based conditional sampling. With conditional sampling, CER...

Cobos, Douglas Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

SciTech Connect: Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2 This report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology Eric Karsenti1 *, Silvia G. Acinas-year study of the global ocean ecosystem aboard the ship Tara. A unique sampling programme encompass

Sullivan, Matthew B.

422

Methane in lakes and wetlands -Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methane in lakes and wetlands - Microbiological production, ecosystem Z√ľrcher, Fortunat Joos Global methane emissions from wet ecosystems 9:50 - 10 Were tropical wetlands C4-dominated during the glacial? A view from methane

M√ľhlemann, Oliver

423

Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of terrestrial carbon fluxes ({delta}{sub bio}) provides an important constraint for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, insight into vegetation physiology, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} vegetation productivity, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed {delta}{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C{sub 3} winter wheat) and C{sub 4} pasture grasses. {delta}{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8{per_thousand}. Ensemble monthly mean {delta}{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} ({+-}SE) in March to -20.1 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil {delta}{sub 13}C values were about -15{per_thousand}, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive {delta}{sub bio} values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes ({delta}{sub bio} x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because {delta}{sub bio} and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in {delta}{sub bio} and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes.

Torn, M.S.; Biraud, S.; Still, C.J.; Riley, W.J.; Berry, J.A.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Wireless Link Scheduling under Physical Interference Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximation algorithms for link scheduling with or without power control. Index Terms--Link schedulingWireless Link Scheduling under Physical Interference Model Peng-Jun Wan, Ophir Frieder, Xiaohua Jia: jia@cs.cityu.edu.hk, csfyao@cityu.edu.hk Abstract--Link scheduling is a fundamental problem in multi

Jia, Xiaohua

425

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ĎĎ

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

COMPARISON OF DSMS GENERATED FROM MINI UAV IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER IN A CULTURAL HERITAGE APPLICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF DSMS GENERATED FROM MINI UAV IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER IN A CULTURAL Navigation KEY WORDS: UAV, Laser scanning, DEM/DTM, Comparison, Analysis, Accuracy, Archaeology ABSTRACT was recorded using a terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl LMS-Z420i) and a mini UAV-system (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

427

Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma Tobias Hoink, Jorg Schmalzl, and Ulrich Hansen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma ocean Tobias Ho¨ink, Jo¨rg Schmalzl-48149 Mu¨nster, Germany (hoeink@earth.uni-muenster.de) [1] In a terrestrial magma ocean, the metal-silicate the separation of metal droplets from the liquid silicate, occurs on a characteristic timescale, which

Schmalzl, Jörg

428

BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1 Jess K in Caribbean ecosystems. Most (11) of the articles describe the responses of Caribbean forests to hurricane of the comparative responses of Caribbean ecosystems to different disturbances. Finally, we identify those areas

Willig, Michael

429

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened 25 years ago of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl √Ā Ecosystem functioning √Ā Fruits

Mousseau, Timothy A.

430

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl √Ā Ecosystem functioning √Ā Fruits

Mousseau, Timothy A.

431

Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1 C. Eugene Conrad of Mediterranean- type ecosystems to supply biomass as a supplemen- tal source of energy is a natural result to less than 25¬į C. Also, wet-season precip- itation approaches 1000 mm. Biomass from such ecosystems

Standiford, Richard B.

432

This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

433

Estimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Ecosystem services Economic valuation Hedonic pricing Spatial econometrics a b s t r a c t A need. These include production function methods in which an ecosystem service or amenity is viewed as an inputEstimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic

Fried, Jeremy S.

434

UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil, consisting of a large percentage of very fine particles. Lunar soil also contains very irregular and jagged particles formed from the sintering together of broked grains during micro-meteorite bombardment. NASA has soil

Farritor, Shane

435

Acta Protozool. (2006) 45: 407 -413 An Initial Account of the Terrestrial Protozoa of Ascension Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acta Protozool. (2006) 45: 407 - 413 An Initial Account of the Terrestrial Protozoa of Ascension 2001, Finlay 2002, Dolan 2006, McArthur 2006). In this paper we present data on protozoa isolated from) or the Green Turtles Chelonia mydas (e.g. Broderick et al. 2006). The invertebrates have been shown to include

Brown, Richard

436

Critical remarks on the use of terrestrial moss (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) for monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are widely used to monitor airborne heavy metal pollution, have been collected from eight catchments spread been used successfully to map and monitor airborne heavy metal pollution in northern European countries reserved. Keywords: Terrestrial moss; Environmental monitoring; Northern Europe; Airborne pollution; Heavy

Filzmoser, Peter

437

TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1 , L produces a strong spectral band contrast. This also gives varnish its shiny appearance. On Earth rock varnish may have a microbial origin [3]. Clays are transported from an external source and deposited

Kirkland, Laurel

438

Historical Reconstruction of Terrestrial Organic Matter Inputs to Fiordland, NZ Over the Last ~500 Years  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................ 92 OMfossil ....................................................................................... 96 Source Reconstruction: Marine, Terrestrial, Fossil ................... 99 Conclusion...) demonstrates that in peat and 9 soil-poor environments, the BIT Index does not provide similar estimates of %OMterr in Northern Hemisphere fjords as 8, 13C, and C/N analysis. Additionally, it has been shown that the soil and marine GDGTs may vary...

Smith, Richard

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

On the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a series of calculations aimed at examining how an inner system of planetesimals/protoplanets, undergoing terrestrial planet formation, evolves under the influence of a giant planet undergoing inward type II migration through the region bounded between 5 - 0.1 AU. We find that > 60% of the solids disk survives by being scattered by the giant planet into external orbits. Planetesimals are scattered outward almost as efficiently as protoplanets, resulting in the regeneration of a solids disk where dynamical friction is strong and terrestrial planet formation is able to resume. A simulation extended for a few Myr after the migration of the giant planet halted at 0.1 AU, resulted in an apparently stable planet of ~ 2 Earth masses forming in the habitable zone. Migration-induced mixing of volatile-rich material from beyond the `snowline' into the inner disk regions means that terrestrial planets that form there are likely to be water-rich. We predict that hot--Jupiter systems are likely to harbor water-rich terrestrial planets in their habitable zones. These planets may be detected by future planet search missions.

Martyn J. Fogg; Richard P. Nelson

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

440

Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Southern Great Plains region of the United States, using the terrestrial water balance as the constraint system, ARM/CART Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) latent heat estimates and USGS streamflow from. The water balance was applied at the domain scale, and estimates of the water balance components

Pan, Ming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Wearable Computer System with Augmented Reality to Support Terrestrial Navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Wearable Computer System with Augmented Reality to Support Terrestrial Navigation Bruce Thomas1, Australia Salisbury, SA, Australia The Levels, SA, Australia Bruce.Thomas@UniSA.Edu.Au Abstract To date- stead of the computer being hand-held, it is attached to the user on a backpack or belt, as illustrated

Thomas, Bruce

442

Volume estimates of trees with complex architecture from terrestrial laser scanning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consuming and can require destructive sampling. In this study we used a terrestrial lidar sensor; data was analyzed on the basis of branch size and the sampling pattern of the sensor. Two hundred and fifty. 2, 023521 (14 May 2008) © 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers [DOI: 10

Lefsky, Michael

443

Small reductions in forest cover weaken terrestrial-aquatic linkages in headwater streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assessed the impacts of deforestation on the energy base of headwater food webs in seven headwater streams. Standing crop of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) declined with deforestation at large scales (i.e. catchment deforestation and riparian deforestation at the entire stream network scale). Terrestrial plant

Rosemond, Amy Daum

444

Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction [2] Brief (typically bursts of gamma rays with mean energies of 2 MeV originating from the Earth's atmosphere, referred to as terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), have been observed by the Burst et al., 2010; Briggs et al., 2010]. With spectra typically harder than cosmic gamma ray bursts

Cummer, Steven A.

445

Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

Franz, Nico M.

446

Improvements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao, Steven W. Running  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

towers. The global annual total ET over the vegetated land surface is 62.8√?103 km3 , agrees very wellImprovements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao Vegetation cover fraction MODIS MODIS global evapotranspiration (ET) products by Mu et al. [Mu, Q., Heinsch

Montana, University of

447

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En-vironmental Data Service, National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En- vironmental Data Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric-Milwaukee, will become director of the Great Lakes and Marine Waters Center at the University of Michigan on I July 1976, the University of Michigan reports. Before joining the UW faculty, Beeton was chiefof the En- vironmental

448

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

Hopkins, William A.

449

Rescuing ecosystems from extinction cascades through compensatory perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food-web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and habitat degradation often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions, posing considerable challenges to ecosystem conservation efforts. Here we devise a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions using a predictive modeling framework. We show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal or population suppression of other specific species, which is a counterintuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not evident from local predator-prey relationships. In numerous cases, even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. These compensatory perturbations only exploit resources available in the system, and illustrate the potential of human intervention combined with predictive modeling for ecosystem management.

Sagar Sahasrabudhe; Adilson E. Motter

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

450

Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readilyóand this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have demonstrated that molecular structure alone does not control SOM stability: in fact, environmental and biological controls predominate. Here we propose ways to include this understanding in a new generation of experiments and soil carbon models, thereby improving predictions of the SOM response to global warming.

Schmidt, M.W.; Torn, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Dittmar, T.; Guggenberger, G.; Janssens, I.A.; Kleber, M.; KŲgel-Knabner, I.; Lehmann, J.; Manning, D.A.C.; Nannipieri, P.; Rasse, D.P.; Weiner, S.; Trumbore, S.E.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Developmental Plasticity Links Local Adaptation and Evolutionary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developmental Plasticity Links Local Adaptation and Evolutionary Diversification in Foraging, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona Developmental plasticity is thought to reconcile the constraining role morphology into adulthood, providing an opportunity to directly examine the links between plasticity of bone

Badyaev, Alex

452

Optimal Power Schedule for Distributed MIMO Links  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an integration of link scheduling and power control for MIMOmedium access control, space-time power scheduling. Fig. 1.

Rong, Yue; Hua, Yingbo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Predictions for the correlation between giant and terrestrial extrasolar planets in dynamically evolved systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large eccentricities of many giant extrasolar planets may represent the endpoint of gravitational scattering in initially more crowded systems. If so, the early evolution of the giant planets is likely to be more restrictive of terrestrial planet formation than would be inferred from the current, dynamically quiescent, configurations. Here, we study statistically the extent of the anti-correlation between giant planets and terrestrial planets expected in a scattering model. We use marginally stable systems of three giant planets, with a realistic range of planetary masses, as a simple model for the initial conditions prior to scattering, and show that after scattering the surviving planets reproduce well the known extrasolar planet eccentricities beyond a > 0.5 AU. By tracking the minimum periastron values of all planets during the evolution, we derive the distribution of orbital radii across which strong perturbations (from crossing orbits) are likely to affect low mass planet formation. We find that scattering affects inner planet formation at orbital separations less than 50% of the final periastron distance of the innermost massive planet in approximately 30% of the realizations, and can occasionally influence planet formation at orbital separations less than 20% of the final periastron distance of the innermost massive planet. The domain of influence of the scattering massive planets increases as the mass differential between the massive planets decreases. Observational study of the correlation between massive and terrestrial extrasolar planets in the same system has the potential to constrain the origin of planetary eccentricity.

Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

457

Observable Consequences of Planet Formation Models in Systems with Close-in Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To date, two planetary systems have been discovered with close-in, terrestrial-mass planets (planet; 4) formation from material being shepherded by moving secular resonances during dispersal of the protoplanetary disk; 5) tidal circularization of eccentric terrestrial planets with close-in perihelion distances; and 6) photo-evaporative mass loss of a close-in giant planet. Models 1-4 have been validated in previous work. We show that tidal circularization can form hot Earths, but only for relatively massive planets (> 5 Earth masses) with very close-in perihelion distances (planets of less than about 70 Earth masses, photo-evaporation can remove the planet's envelope and leave behind the solid core on a Gyr timescale, but only for planets inside 0.025-0.05 AU. Using two quantities that are observable by current and upcoming missions, we show that these models each produce unique signatures, and can be observationally distinguished. These observables are the planetary system architecture (detectable with radial velocities, transits and transit-timing) and the bulk composition of transiting close-in terrestrial planets (measured by transits via the planet's radius).

Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Avi M. Mandell

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther Kletetschka b,c,d  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther-mail address: kohout@natur.cuni.cz (T. Kohout). URL: http://www.volny.cz/tomkohout/meteo/. www

Kletetschka, Gunther

459

Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland typesóthan was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

New Optical Link Technologies for HEP Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a concern with the reliability and mass of current optical links in LHC experiments, we are investigating CW lasers and light modulators as an alternative to VCSELs. In addition we are developing data links in air, utilizing steering by MEMS mirrors and optical feedback paths for the control loop. Laser, modulator, and lens systems used are described, as well as two different electronic systems for a free space steering feedback loop. Our prototype system currently operates at 1.25 Gb/s, but could be upgraded. This link works over distances of order meters. Such links might enable one to move communication lasers (e.g. VCSELs) and optical fibers out of tracking detectors, for reasons such as reliability and power consumption. Some applications for free space data links, such as local triggering and data readout and trigger-clock distribution and links for much longer distances are also discussed.

P. Delurgio; W. Fernando; B. Salvachua; D. Lopez; R. Stanek; D. Underwood

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

Severinghaus, J.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

463

Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

464

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

Chivian, Dylan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpine lake ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: alpine lake ecosystems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sustainable Sediment Management of ine oirs considering ecological and economical aspects Summary:...

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

submergedmacrophytes.Ecosystems9:112. Aquatic Ecology Laboratory at the Lake Erie Center (419) 530-4570; FAX: (419) 530... ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake...

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - arizona forest ecosystem Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Forest, Arizona (Photo by P.B. Shafroth) 12;Water Resources Research Center College... Riparian Ecosystem Restoration in the Gila River Basin: Opportunities and...

468

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massmore suscep- tible to climate change stressors (Hughes and

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - agro-ecosystems annual progress Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to allow time... .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Agro-ecosystem; Bio-indicators; Farming systems; Micro Source: Adl, Sina - Department of Biology, Dalhousie University...

470

2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters, communication units, and related...

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems pollution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for implementing aquatic ecosystem restoration projects pursuant to Section 206 of the Water Resources Development... for Section 206 projects (and separable elements thereof)...

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems endocrine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 3 Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental...

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Ecosystem Prediction- Aquatic... In a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every ... Source: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural landscapes ecosystem Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uncertainty in ecosystem and ... Source: Minnesota, University of - Department of Soil, Water and Climate, Biometeorology Group Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5...

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect ecosystem metabolism Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

America Summary: . Stoichiometry of the net ecosystem metabolism in a coastal inlet affected by upwelling. The Ria de Arousa (NW... act as resource subsidies to many...

476

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massby direct effects of climate change including ocean warming,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Comprehensive ecosystem model-experiment synthesis using multiple datasets at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment experiments: model performance and compensating biases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a remarkable wealth of data to test the sensitivities of terrestrial ecosystem models (TEMs). In this study, a broad set of 11 TEMs were compared to 22 years of data from two contrasting FACE experiments in temperate forests of the south eastern US the evergreen Duke Forest and the deciduous Oak Ridge forest. We evaluated the models' ability to reproduce observed net primary productivity (NPP), transpiration and Leaf Area index (LAI) in ambient CO2 treatments. Encouragingly, many models simulated annual NPP and transpiration within observed uncertainty. Daily transpiration model errors were often related to errors in leaf area phenology and peak LAI. Our analysis demonstrates that the simulation of LAI often drives the simulation of transpiration and hence there is a need to adopt the most appropriate of hypothesis driven methods to simulate and predict LAI. Of the three competing hypotheses determining peak LAI (1) optimisation to maximise carbon export, (2) increasing SLA with canopy depth and (3) the pipe model the pipe model produced LAI closest to the observations. Modelled phenology was either prescribed or based on broader empirical calibrations to climate. In some cases, simulation accuracy was achieved through compensating biases in component variables. For example, NPP accuracy was sometimes achieved with counter-balancing biases in nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen uptake. Combined analysis of parallel measurements aides the identification of offsetting biases; without which over-confidence in model abilities to predict ecosystem function may emerge, potentially leading to erroneous predictions of change under future climates.

Walker, Anthony P [ORNL] [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL] [ORNL; DeKauwe, Martin G [Macquarie University] [Macquarie University; Medlyn, Belinda [Macquarie University] [Macquarie University; Zaehle, S [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry] [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Asao, Shinichi [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Hickler, Thomas [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany] [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; Huntinford, Chris [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, United Kingdom] [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, United Kingdom; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lomas, Mark [University of Sheffield] [University of Sheffield; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University] [Duke University; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Prentice, I. Collin [Macquarie University] [Macquarie University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Shusen [Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS)] [Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS); Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research] [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Warlind, David [Lund University, Sweden] [Lund University, Sweden; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL] [ORNL; Woodward, F. Ian [University of Sheffield] [University of Sheffield; Oren, Ram [Duke University] [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Track with overlapping links for dry coal extrusion pumps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chain for a particulate material extrusion pump includes a plurality of links, each of the plurality of links having a link body and a link ledge, wherein each link ledge of the plurality of links at least partially overlaps the link body of an adjacent one of the plurality of links.

Saunders, Timothy; Brady, John D

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

479

Channel coding for high speed links  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the benefit of channel coding for high-speed backplane or chip-to-chip interconnects, referred to as the high-speed links. Although both power-constrained and bandwidth-limited, the high-speed links ...

Blitvic, Natasa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Air Pollutant Data for Linking Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Pollutant Data for Linking Studies New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services #12;New Jersey Close-up View View from Space #12;Air Pollutant/Health Linking Studies in New Jersey · CDC 03074 ­ Air toxics (carcinogens) in relation to: · incidence of selected cancers · prevalence of selected

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "link terrestrial ecosystem" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Disulfide-Linked Protein Folding Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disulfide-Linked Protein Folding Pathways Bharath S. Mamathambika1,3 and James C. Bardwell2,3, 1 of protein folding is difficult because it involves the identification and characterization of folding to protein folding in vitro and in vivo. 211 Click here for quick links to Annual Reviews content online

Bardwell, James

482

Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of speciesĖhabitat associations for coastal land-use decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methodsecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methods

Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Sandia National Laboratories: Water Power Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wave EnergyLinks Water Power Links Water Power

486

Climate VISION: Resources and Links - Plant Assessments  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links -ResultsLinks -Resources

487

Climate VISION: Resources and Links - Software Tools  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links -ResultsLinks -ResourcesPrograms

488

Climate VISION: Resources and Links - Training Sessions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links -ResultsLinks -ResourcesProgramsTraining

489

Evaluation of Continental and Site Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Simulations with North American Flux Tower Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extracts of photosynthesis (GPP), total respiration (Re) and NEE (net ecosystem exchange) at annual. The models range from -50% to +50% of the observations, and are centered near a bias of zero. The Can. 1st order, w/N 1st order 1st order, w/N zero order 1st order, w/N 1st order, w/N zero order VEGAS2

490

Distribution of terrestrial age and petrologic type of meteorites from western Libya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A group of 54 meteorites have been recovered from Daraj, Western Libya. After assessment of pairing of samples, using petrologic criteria, {sup 14}C terrestrial ages were obtained on 13 samples selected from 9 different fall events. Eleven of the ages range from 3,500 to 7,600 years, with only two samples having ages in excess of 10,000 years. The cut-off in ages may be related to the timing of climatic changes in the Hammadah al Hamra.

Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA)); Wlotzka, F.; Palme, H. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (West Germany))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Linear and Bayesian Planet Detection Algorithms for the Terrestrial Planet Finder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current plans call for the first Terrestrial Planet Finder mission, TPF-C, to be a monolithic space telescope with a coronagraph for achieving high contrast. The coronagraph removes the diffracted starlight allowing the nearby planet to be detected. In this paper, we present a model of the planet measurement and noise statistics. We utilize this model to develop two planet detection algorithms, one based on matched filtering of the PSF and one using Bayesian techniques. These models are used to formulate integration time estimates for a planet detection with desired small probabilities of false alarms and missed detections.

N. Jeremy Kasdin; Isabelle Braems

2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

492

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

Wanlass, M.W.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

493

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

US Army Corps of Engineers

494

Long-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extending now for more than 14 years (2­5). The release of 42 million liters of Alaskan North Slope crudeLong-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Charles H. Peterson,1 * Stanley D. Rice The ecosystem response to the 1989 spill of oil from the Exxon Valdez into Prince William Sound, Alaska, shows

495

14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ ) = the incident solar irradiance in relative energy units; F = factor modifying that flux as a function of ozone14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems Warwick F in these ecosystems may also be more vulnerable to UV toxicity because of the inhibiting effects of cold tempera

Vincent, Warwick F.

496

An Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should NOAA value where? What valuation methods should be used? Is a NOAA valuation strategy evenAn Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration 5/22/13 #12; What are ecosystem services? How are they valued? NOAA drivers for valuations

497

Technology Transfer for Ecosystem Management1 Tim O'Keefe2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the "ecosystem management" program. This new program is a belated effort to redirect public forest management). In response to the Thomas report, and growing public pressures for a diverse, sustainable management system management is composed of both biological (ecosystem sustainablitily and diversity) and sociological (public

Standiford, Richard B.

498

EcoGIS GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EcoGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management May 2009 NOAA TechnicalGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 75. 38 Fisheries Science Centers, NOAA Fisheries Regional Offices, NatureServe's EBM Tools Network, and other

499

Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 375392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services: Integrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis of these concepts in order to address the issue of valuation of ecosystem services. We wantEcological Economics 41 (2002) 375≠392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services is to elucidate concepts of value and methods of valuation that will assist in guiding human decisions vis

Vermont, University of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass ha√?1 yr√?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

Zhuang, Qianlai