Sample records for link terrestrial ecosystem

  1. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  2. Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Projects Leads Nancy...

  3. EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Soil Composition http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebnewssoil-composition

  4. Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "seeks to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models thereby, improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the...

  5. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  6. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  7. CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eviner, Valerie

    -1-- 0-- +1-- -1-- 0-- +1-- CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function. A more limited set of studies suggests that pathogens can alter a wide range of ecosystem functions in terres- trial systems; however, we are lacking a framework to predict the type and magnitude of ecosystem

  8. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  9. Linking ecosystem and parasite Michel Loreau,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    13 CHAPTER 1 Linking ecosystem and parasite ecology Michel Loreau,1 Jacques Roy,2 and David Tilman3 Parasites are rarely considered in ecosystem studies. The current interest in the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, however, has stimulated the emergence of new synthetic approaches

  10. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  11. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  12. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  13. Responses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    to a wide range of environmental variations. Photosynthesis is a nonlinear function of solar radiationResponses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

  14. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  15. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  16. Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Cory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Debbie J. Thomas Frances Gelwick Head of Department, J. Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure. (May...

  17. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  18. Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palen, Wendy J.

    , Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

  19. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  20. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  1. T.G. Hinton: Radioactive Contaminants in Terrestrial Ecosystems | Savannah

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action(InsertAbout theSystems LongFacilityT h

  2. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of Contact CurrentSediments and

  3. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  4. Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

  5. A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , and on topics related to urban ecosystem services and their valuation. This conference will once again provideACES 2014 A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making December, DC, USA 1 Welcome to ACES 2014! On behalf of A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES) and our

  6. Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

  7. North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem E. Di Lorenzo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change E. Di Lorenzo,1 N Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08607, doi:10 to explain physical and biological fluctuations in the Northeast Pacific Ocean [Lynn et al., 1998; Lavaniegos

  8. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 2: Small mammal food chains and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Food chain transfer through the soil-vegetation-small mammal food chain was measured by concentration ratios (CRs) for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po at three sites near the Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Plant/soil CRs, animal carcass/GI tract CRs, and animal/soil CRs were depressed at sites impacted by mill and tailings dusts relative to a nearby control site. Thus, radionuclides associated with large particulates in tailings and/or ore dusts may be less bioavailable to terrestrial plants and animals than natural sources of radioactive dust. These results show that reliance on default food chain transfer parameters, obtained from uncontaminated terrestrial ecosystems, may overpredict impacts at uranium mine and mill sites. Given the omnivorous diet of small mammals and birds, animal/soil CRs are recommended as the most cost-effective and robust means of predicting animal concentrations from environmental monitoring data at uranium mill facilities.

  9. Comparing aquatic and terrestrial grazing ecosystems: is the grass really greener?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkepile, Deron

    and kelp forests (Burkepile and Hay 2006). Likewise, in freshwater ecosystems, waterfowl, zooplankton and benthic invertebrates impact the rates of primary production and nutrient regeneration (Lamberti and Resh

  10. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remote ocean temperatures to respond, while a terrestrial cooling,summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changescooling due to a change in ocean circulation would imply a compensating remote

  11. ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs: an experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucherousset, Julien

    approach Pia Bartels · Julien Cucherousset · Cristian Gudasz · Mats Jansson · Jan Karlsson · Lennart Cross-ecosystem movements of material and energy are ubiquitous. Aquatic ecosystems typically receive¨v Department of Ecology and Genetics/Limnology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala

  12. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 30193034 Terrestrial ecosystem processes of Victoria Land, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, Scotland, UK c Landcare Research, Private Bag diversity and biomass of organisms contributing to ecosystem processes (Campbell and Claridge, 1987; Freck

  13. Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

  14. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

  15. DOE/SC-ARM-13-011 Green Ocean Amazon Terrestrial Ecosystem Collaborative Project Science Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan24,7,INL is6 ARM203

  16. Terrestrial Ecosystem Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » High School Rules,SubsurfaceSupply

  17. Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography model version 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography] Insights into how terrestrial ecosystems affect the Earth's response to changes in climate and rising contain detailed mechanistic representations of biological processes affecting terrestrial ecosystems

  18. 23F.S. Chapin, III et al., Principles of Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4419-9504-9_2, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    ;24 2 Earth's Climate System temperature. Because it is hot (6,000°C), the sun emits most energy as high distribution of terrestrial biomes. This chapter provides a general back- ground on the functioning exerts a key control over the function- ing of Earth's ecosystems. Temperature and water availability

  19. Bridging the Divide: Linking Genomics to Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Melinda D.

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the project period, we have addressed the following objectives: 1) assess the effects of altered precipitation patterns (i.e., increased variability in growing season precipitation) on genetic diversity of the dominant C4 grass species, Andropogon gerardii, and 2) experimentally assess the impacts of extreme climatic events (heat wave, drought) on responses of the dominant C4 grasses, A. gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans, and the consequences of these response for community and ecosystem structure and function. Below is a summary of how we have addressed these objectives. Objective 1 After ten years of altered precipitation, we found the number of genotypes of A. gerardii was significantly reduced compared to the ambient precipitation treatments (Avolio et al., 2013a). Although genotype number was reduced, the remaining genotypes were less related to one another indicating that the altered precipitation treatment was selecting for increasingly dissimilar genomes (based on mean pairwise Dice distance among individuals). For the four key genotypes that displayed differential abundances depending on the precipitation treatment (G1, G4, and G11 in the altered plots and G2 in the ambient plots), we identified phenotypic differences in the field that could account for ecological sorting (Avolio & Smith, 2013a). The three altered rainfall genotypes also have very different phenotypic traits in the greenhouse in response to different soil moisture availabilities (Avolio and Smith, 2013c). Two of the genotypes that increased in abundance in the altered precipitation plots had greater allocation to root biomass (G4 and G11), while G1 allocated more biomass aboveground. These phenotypic differences among genotypes suggests that changes in genotypic structure between the altered and the ambient treatments has likely occurred via niche differentiation, driven by changes in soil moisture dynamics (reduced mean, increased variability and changes in the depth distribution of soil moisture) under a more variable precipitation regime, rather than reduced population numbers (A. gerardii tiller densities did not differ between altered and ambient treatments; p = 0.505) or a priori differences in genotype richness (Avolio et al.2013a). This ecological sorting of genotypes, which accounts for 40% of all sampled individuals in the altered plots, is an important legacy of the press chronic climate changes in the RaMPs experiment. Objective 2 In May 2010, we established the Climate Extremes Experiment at the Konza Prairie Biological Station. For the experiment, a gradient of temperatures, ranging from ambient to extreme, were imposed in 2010 and 2011 as a mid-season heat wave under well-watered or severe drought conditions. This study allowed us for the first time to examine species-specific thresholds of responses to climate extremes and assess how these phenotypic responses may impact selection of particular genotypes, with the ultimate goal of linking alterations in individual performance and genetic diversity to ecosystem structure and functioning. We found that tallgrass prairie was resistant to heat waves, but it was not resistant to extreme drought, which reduced aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) below the lowest level measured in this grassland in almost thirty years (Hoover et al. in press(a)). This extreme reduction in ecosystem function was a consequence of reduced productivity of both C4 grasses and C3 forbs. This reduction in biomass of the C4 grasses (Andropogon gerardii and Sorghastrum nutans) was, in part, due to significant reductions in photosynthesis, leaf water potential and productivity with drought in the dominant grasses species, with S. nutans was more sensitive than A. gerardii to drought (Hoover et al. in press(b)). However, the dominant forb was negatively impacted by the drought more than the dominant grasses, and this led to a reordering of species abundances within the plant community. Although this change in community composition persisted post-drought, ANPP recovered completely the year after drought

  20. Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

  1. ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Linking calcification by exotic snails to stream inorganic carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall Jr., Robert O.

    ecosystems, ignore biotic calcification (biocalcification) CO2 fluxes from animals with CaCO3 exoskeletons. When CaCO3 exoskeletons are formed from dissolved Ca2? and HCO3 - , nearly 1 mol CO2 is released for each mole of CaCO3 fixed (Ware et al. 1991; Frankignoulle et al. 1994): Ca2þ þ 2HCOÀ 3 $ CaCO3 þ H2O þ

  2. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993), Terrestrial ecosystem production – a process modeland H. L. Gholz (2005), Ecosystem and understory water andestimating per-pixel ecosystem C fluxes. Geophy. Res.

  3. Linking Ecological Function and Ecosystem Service Values of Estaurine Habitat Types Associated with a Barrier Island System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jeffrey Michael

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem services are benefits humans receive as a function of natural processes. Many current studies seek to express these benefits as an economic value per unit of habitat type without quantifying the ecological functions that allow...

  4. Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Useful Links BIOSYNC:

  5. Terrestrial sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  6. Terrestrial sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  7. Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A By A

  8. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

  9. Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Toward Predictions that Incorporate, Pocatello, Idaho 83209, USA; 2 Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA; 3, and debris flows) and shift distributions of terrestrial ecosystems on a global basis. Although

  10. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  11. The development of early terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selden, Paul A.; Edwards, Dianne

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,575-599. Burgess, N.D. & Edwards, D. (1991). Classification of uppermost Ordovician to Lower Devonian tubular and filamentous macerals from the Anglo-Welsh Basin. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 106,41-66. Campbell, S.E. (1979). Soil stabilization...., Massa, D. & Boucot A J . (1982). Caradocian land plant microfossils from Libya. Geology 10.197-201. Gray, J., Theron, J.N. & Boucot, A J . (1986). Age of the Cedarberg Formation, South Africa and early land plant evolution. Geological Magazine 123...

  12. Strong Links Between Teleconnections and Ecosystem Exchange Found at a Pacific Northwest Old-Growth Forest from Flux Tower and MODIS EVI Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Chasmer, L; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in three Pacific teleconnection patterns are examined to see if net carbon exchange at a low-elevation, old-growth forest is affected by climatic changes associated with these periodicities. Examined are the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Pacific/North American Oscillation (PNA) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We use nine years of eddy covariance CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and energy fluxes measured at the Wind River AmeriFlux site, Washington, USA and eight years of tower-pixel remote sensing data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to address this question. We compute a new Composite Climate Index (CCI) based on the three Pacific Oscillations to divide the measurement period into positive- (2003 and 2005), negative- (1999 and 2000) and neutral-phase climate years (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2007). The forest transitioned from an annual net carbon sink (NEP = + 217 g C m{sup -2} year{sup -1}, 1999) to a source (NEP = - 100 g C m{sup -2} year{sup -1}, 2003) during two dominant teleconnection patterns. Net ecosystem productivity (NEP), water use efficiency (WUE) and light use efficiency (LUE) were significantly different (P < 0.01) during positive (NEP = -0.27 g C m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, WUE = 4.1 mg C/g H{sub 2}O, LUE = 0.94 g C MJ{sup -1}) and negative (NEP = +0.37 g C m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, WUE = 3.4 mg C/g H{sub 2}O, LUE = 0.83 g C MJ{sup -1}) climate phases. The CCI was linked to variability in the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) but not to MODIS Fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR). EVI was highest during negative climate phases (1999 and 2000) and was positively correlated with NEP and showed potential for using MODIS to estimate teleconnection-driven anomalies in ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange in old-growth forests. This work suggests that any increase in the strength or frequency of ENSO coinciding with in-phase, low frequency Pacific oscillations (PDO and PNA) will likely increase CO{sub 2} uptake variability in Pacific Northwest conifer forests.

  13. China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors Hanqin Tian,1 to be investigated. China is important in determining the global carbon balance in terms of both carbon emission change) on net carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems of China for the period 1961­2005 were modeled

  14. Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem J . E . B A R R E over the previous decade and altered ecosystem properties in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of melt-water had significant influences on Taylor Valley ecosystems that persisted for several years

  15. Ris-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions Merete Bang Selsted Risø-PhD-63(EN) July 2010 #12;Author: Merete Bang Selsted Title: Ecosystem environmental factors have separately and in combination effect on ecosystem processes. Terrestrial ecosystems

  16. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

  17. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing

  18. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  19. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

  20. Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    A number of observational studies indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide and a warmer climate depends on the interactions between the carbon and ...

  1. Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Ryan Gary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

  2. Mycorrhizal fungi mediation of terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.

    . Plants often shift carbon allocation belowground and the activities of mycorrhizal associates responding to global change is not well understood. We emphasize the need for more research in this emerging scientific disciplines and society. ª 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. * Corresponding

  3. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetlands has negative impacts on ecosystem services (i.e. ,economically quanti?able ecosystem bene?ts, such as rechargeincluded the loss of natural ecosystem functions and their

  4. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetically modified crops and aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of genetically modified (GM) crops. The ERA for terrestrial agroecosystems is well-developed, whereas guidance for ERA of GM crops in aquatic ecosystems is not as well-defined. The purpose of this document studies are necessary to inform the risk assessment for a specific GM crop should be done on a case

  6. Ecosystem element cycling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

  7. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass burning occurs in all vegetated terrestrial central Europe, andEurope in Table 2.6 and F ig . 2.67. Climatological global biomass

  8. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 143 STATUS AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN WEST VIRGINIA Benktesh D. Sharma and Jingxin Wang1 Abstract.--Terrestrial ecosystem management offers cost-effective ways to enhance carbon (C) sequestration. This study utilized C stock and C sequestration in forest and agricultural lands, abandoned mine lands, and harvested wood

  9. SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

  10. Chesapeake Bay ecosystem modeling program. Technical synthesis report 1993-94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, S.B.; Boynton, W.R.; Kemp, W.M.; Wetzel, R.; Bartleson, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Contents: Ecosystem models for management; Ecosystem regession models; Patuxent River Sav-Littoral Ecosystem Process Model; Lower Chesapeake Bay Polyhaline Sav Model; Emergent Intertidal Marsh Process Model; Plankton-Benthos Ecosystem Process Model; Fish Bioenergetics Models; Linking Water Quality with Fish Habitat; Data Visualization; Publications and Scientific Presentations Resulting From This Research.

  11. 1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

  12. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystem Science SHARE Ecosystem Science Project the fate and function of ecosystems as they respond to a variety of stresses, ranging from contamination to climate change to...

  13. Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Function and the Ecosystem Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallianou, Koralia

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on mapping the delivery of three ecosystems services each in one case study area in Scotland and then identify how the Scottish policies such as woodland expansion biodiversity, conservation and food production affect the land...

  14. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  15. Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on “Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface” was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundation’s Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

  16. Cool Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cool Links Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Cool Links Los Alamos National Laboratory links Los...

  17. K. A. Garrett and C. M. Cox. Applied biodiversity science: Managing emerging diseases in agriculture and linked natural systems using 1 ecological principles. Pages 368-386 in Infectious disease ecology: The effects of ecosystems on disease and of disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Karen A.

    in agriculture and linked natural systems using 1 ecological principles. Pages 368-386 in Infectious disease in Agriculture and Linked Natural Systems Using Ecological Principles K. A. Garrett and C. M. Cox Summary particular crop species or genotypes are very common. Nonetheless, production agriculture is dominated

  18. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  19. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTriSolarEcosystem

  20. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of Contact Current

  1. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

  2. Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Frederick

    Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange David M. Blersch dblersch Shade of Blue and You 21 September 2010 #12;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange UB's ERIE Program www

  3. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  4. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 30013002 A synthesis of soil biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ecosystem functioning in Victoria Land, Antarctica Since the 1970s, ecological research on the ice and nutritional resources. These ecosystems are taxonomically and functionally simple, thus providing and comprehensively than is normally the case for soils and to link soil species explicitly with ecosystem functioning

  5. 13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    humans (Daily 1997). In this chapter, we introduce concepts associated with the valuation of ecosystem services, and discuss how costs generated by invasions relate to impacts on ecosystem services.We link13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes 13

  6. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  7. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  8. Monetising cultural ecosystem services? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinci, Igor

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT In the context of increasing degradation of the environment, the economic valuation of ecosystem services represents an attempt to quantify the contribution of nature to human wellbeing. This approach has been ...

  9. Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliaga, Daniel G.

    Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes Michel Abdul Massih Philip Jarvis Purdue University Daniel G. Aliaga Carlos A. Vanegas a) b) c) Figure 1: This example demonstrates the need for urban ecosystems. The image in a) shows a terrain occupied by a wild ecosystem and b) displays the same ecosystem grown over

  10. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems D. A. NEHER Department of Biology, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA; E-mail: dneher, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i

  11. Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions – through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels – to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

  12. Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braswell, B.H. Jr.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

  13. Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World www.wiley.com  The world’s ecosystems have always been 

  14. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  15. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  16. Links - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) - CenterLinks Berkeley Lab Links:links

  17. The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Michael

    The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Australia. THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICS SCHOOL OF PHYSICS Abstract Ecosystems are systems. Ecosystems operate autonomously, by a process of self-regulation. Their flows of energy mean they cannot

  18. CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

  19. Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Shi

    Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning Shi Pu International Institute for Geo hard to recover 3D building structures from 2D image. Recent studies ([2] [6]) show that laser scanning imagery, airborne and terrestrial laser scanning give explicit 3D information, which enables the rapid

  20. Original article Linking ecosystem engineers to soil processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    the isotopic compositions of buried plankton skeletons and other buried material are used as proxy indicators and relevant climate feedbacks 8.2.1 Energy balance, and the ice albedo feedback As a crude simpli£cation, one may write a simple equation for a globally averaged temperature T in which incoming solar radiation H

  1. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

  2. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

  3. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michelangelo Project: 3D Scanning of Large Statues,” Proc.for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damage

  4. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damageresolution 3d laser scanning to slope stability studies. ”

  5. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

  6. Related Links

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The links below provide useful algae resources and are organized by categories. Beyond this page, learn more about BETO's Algae Program R&D by visiting the Information Resources page.

  7. Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a great array Desert steppe Desert ecosystems MainMain ecosystems of Mongolia High mountain ecosystemsHigh mountain ecosystems High mountain occupies 4.48% of the total territory of Mongolia. Mountain forest ecosystems

  8. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  9. Cool Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSOConverting Biomass toCool Links

  10. Related Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by Websitehome / Related Links

  11. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  12. DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Private Lands, Public Goods: Engaging Landowners in Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferranto, Shasta Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practice: implementing ecosystem management objectives in2009. Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyondthe Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Proceedings of the

  14. Great Lakes Ecosystems Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    --> light energy ­ there is a loss of "useful" energy during transformation: heat The sun is the ultimate ­ Sun to producer to consumer to decomposer · Solar energy is trapped by photosynthesis as chemical1 Great Lakes Ecosystems Part I Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of matter within

  15. SPECIAL FEATURE Terrestrial and Freshwater Biogeochemistry1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    on the small watershed-ecosystem approach, this research has been instrumental in identifying acid rain with land use. It continues through the important discoveries of acid rain and nitrogen saturation in Europe to recover that must be considered in managing ecosystem recovery from acid rain and similar large

  16. Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport,de Nantes JumpEcosystem Japan Co Ltd

  17. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 February 2009 #12;2 #12;3 Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 buildings. By consuming solar energy in the process of evapotranspiration and blocking winter winds

  18. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE THE DEPARTMENT an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Recommendations for Establishing an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure Foreword The Internet is one of the most

  19. Relevant Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press Releases 2014References by Websitehome / Related

  20. Training Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliances » TopTours SignTrackingTraining

  1. MIDC: Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9November 6, In this3,OfficeWITH AT65-OCT. 5,

  2. MSDS Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'll Love YouTokamak |MPC EquipmentGlossary

  3. HELPFUL LINKS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic Engine GyroSolé(tm)HDFView HDFView

  4. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  5. Received: 1 October 2009, Revised: 21 June 2010, Accepted: 5 August 2010, Published online in Wiley Online Library: 10 February 2011 Ecosystem valuation: some principles and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and adapt definitions of ecosystem services in order to make an operational link to valuation methods. We clarification to practitioners on important considerations in ecosystem services valuation. We first review make a distinction between intermediate and final ecosystem services and also identify non

  6. Faculty Links - Links - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014FacilitiesSheet 300Office

  7. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  8. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Inclusion of Inland Water Surfaces. J. Clim. , 8, 2691-Estimating sensitivities of water and carbon budgets. J.H. , 1955: Wind Stress Over a Water Surface. Quart. J. Roy.

  9. Sequencing the fungal tree Terrestrial ecosystems host a complex array of interacting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    with heterotrophic and autotrophic organisms alike, and play an integral and growing role in the development in three areas: plant health, biorefinery and fungal diversity. Plant health depends on interactions

  10. GR Focus Review Impacts of global warming on Permo-Triassic terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    with long-term aridification and short-term bursts of warming and acid rain. Wildfires at the Permo have succumbed primarily to acid rain, mass wasting, and aridification. Plants may have been more

  11. Isoprene emission from terrestrial ecosystems in response to global change: minding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FACE apparatus (FACEp; 707 m2 ) was constructed in 1993, 10 years after planting, on a moderate (NPP) under CO2 e may be limited by nutrient availability (Ceulemans et al., 1999; Oren et al., 2001. Although CO2 e often increases NPP, it can also result in greater losses of C (relative to CO2 a ) via soil

  12. Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Cory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    2007; Western and Behrensmeyer 2009, Terry 2010, Toma?ov?ch and Kidwell 2010; Toma?ov?ch and Kidwell 2011). The results of this study suggest that the observed pattern of relationship would be even more robust for studies covering broader...

  13. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 1: Distribution and doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils, vegetation, small mammals, and birds were measured for uranium series radionuclides at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites, impacted by windblown tailings and mill dust, had significantly higher concentrations of uranium, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po in soils, litter, vegetation, tree needles and twigs, small mammals, and birds, compared to a control site. Samples were collected from both upland jackpine and black spruce bog habitats in triplicate at each site. Both habitats were similar in radionuclide accumulation. Absorbed doses averaged 0.92, 8.4, and 4.9 mGy y{sup {minus}1} to small mammals and 2.0, 5.8, and 2.8 mGy y{sup {minus}1} to Lincoln's sparrows at the control, tailings, and mill sites, respectively. These doses do not include doses from short-lived radon progeny. The majority of the dose increment at the tailings and mill sites was due to {sup 226}Ra, whereas it was {sup 210}Po at the control site. Thus, use of a radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha radiation raised equivalent doses (in mSv y{sup {minus}1}) by nearly a factor of 20.

  14. Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    understood and many remain uncertain in terms of their representation in Earth System models. Increasing our System models. By extending an already well-established framework for fractional sub-grid area System Model grid cell (i.e., 30x30 km grid size). This vision includes mechanistic studies in the field

  15. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1, http://and the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) (http://quantify these feedbacks, Earth System Models (ESMs) need to

  16. SCIENCE PLAN AND PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE --SCIENTIFIC FOCUS AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Earth system models. Integration of biophysical, biochemical, physiological, and ecological processes

  17. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the heat capacity of the ice mass and liquid water mass.all the ice (liquid) is melted (frozen). Heat capacities are

  18. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Arain, 2007: Impacts of peat and vegetation on permafrostdecomposition, water balance, and peat accumulation. Earth2008: High sensitivity of peat decomposition to climate

  19. CENTENARY SYMPOSIUM SPECIAL FEATURE Ecosystem CO2 starvation and terrestrial silicate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Catherine D. C. Bradshaw2 , Daniel J. Lunt2 , Paul J. Valdes2 , Steven A. Banwart3 , Mark Pagani4 (400, 280, 180 and 100 p.p.m.) and associated late Miocene (11.6­5.3 Ma) cooling. Marked reductions

  20. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil temperatures. Wetland treatments in GCMs (Ringeval etA more mechanistic treatment of wetland hydrology in an ESM

  1. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  2. Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anand R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

  3. Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News linkThermalInner Area Principles

  4. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  5. Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith.hanna@naturalengland.org.uk #12;Ecosystem services Constituents of well-beingSupporting­ecologicalprocesses:nutrient cycling:opportunityto achievewhatanindividualvaluesdoingandbeing Simplified from Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2003 #12;Source: MEA (2003) #12;Ecosystems

  6. What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons? The overarching goal of Ecosystem Commons is to enhance the use of ecosystem services and related science in conservation at regional and national ecosystem services events and conferences Provide news and information

  7. The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment. An Investigation of the Possible Roskilde, Denmark Febtuary 1990 #12;1 Risø-M-2851 THE BEHAVIOUR OF IODINE IN THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT influence the migration behaviour of iodine in the terrestrial environment. It is stated that the organic

  8. Intelligent spatial ecosystem modeling using parallel processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, T.; Costanza, R. (Maryland International Inst. for Ecological Economics, Solomons (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial modeling of ecosystems is essential if one's modeling goals include developing a relatively realistic description of past behavior and predictions of the impacts of alternative management policies on future ecosystem behavior. Development of these models has been limited in the past by the large amount of input data required and the difficulty of even large mainframe serial computers in dealing with large spatial arrays. These two limitations have begun to erode with the increasing availability of remote sensing data and GIS systems to manipulate it, and the development of parallel computer systems which allow computation of large, complex, spatial arrays. Although many forms of dynamic spatial modeling are highly amenable to parallel processing, the primary focus in this project is on process-based landscape models. These models simulate spatial structure by first compartmentalizing the landscape into some geometric design and then describing flows within compartments and spatial processes between compartments according to location-specific algorithms. The authors are currently building and running parallel spatial models at the regional scale for the Patuxent River region in Maryland, the Everglades in Florida, and Barataria Basin in Louisiana. The authors are also planning a project to construct a series of spatially explicit linked ecological and economic simulation models aimed at assessing the long-term potential impacts of global climate change.

  9. Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Fish, Wildlife, Ecosystem Monitoring and Evaluation Manager SUBJECT: Summary of Public and ISAB substitution), wildlife, habitat/ecosystem questions thereby balancing the currently predominant anadromous

  10. Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation by Oswald J. Schmitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation By Oswald J.Oswald J, Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation. Washington:when the protection of the ecosystem also extends outside of

  11. Size structuring of planktonic communities : biological rates and ecosystem dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taniguchi, Darcy Anne Akiko

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nutrient enriched ecosystems. Limnology and Oceanographyin the pelagic ecosystem. Helgol. Wiss. Meeresunters. 30:Size-structured planktonic ecosystems: constraints, controls

  12. azov coastal ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Ecosystems Mircea Lungua , Michele Lanzaa, research groups or even the open-source communities. We call these contexts software ecosystems of project ecosystems through...

  13. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  14. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rivers: implications for ecosystem restoration: Final reportto CALFED. Ecosystem Restoration Program Agreement No.support tools to guide ecosystem restoration planning and

  15. Modelling Marine Ecosystems Mick Follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://ocean.mit.edu/~mick/Downloads.html #12;What is the marine ecosystem limited Light limited Reveals environmental regulation of primary production #12;coccolithophores (CaCO3 of organic carbon Current Question: What regulatesC

  16. Terrestrial vertebrate fauna surveys for the preparation of environmental impact assessments; how can we do it better? A Western Australian example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Graham G. [Centre for Ecosystem Management, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup Dr., Joondalup, Western Australia 6010 (Australia)]. E-mail: g.thompson@ecu.edu.au

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Australian Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) in 2002 released Position Statement, No. 3, Terrestrial Biological Surveys as an Element of Biodiversity Protection outlining how terrestrial fauna survey data are to be used and interpreted in the preparation of environmental impact assessments (EIA). In 2004, the EPA released its Guidance for the Assessment of Environmental Factors, Terrestrial Fauna Surveys for Environmental Impact Assessment in Western Australia, No. 56. This paper briefly assesses the adequacy of recent terrestrial fauna surveys undertaken to support publicly released EIAs and indicates that the EPA is not always adhering to its own position and guidance statements. This paper argues that the current fauna survey guidelines are in need of improvement. The approach and requirements of some other Australian states are briefly assessed to identify similarities and where improvements can be made to the Western Australian (WA) guidelines. This paper concludes with suggestions on how the process and the guidelines in WA can be revised to more adequately assess the impact of developments on terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity and ecosystem function. These suggestions may have relevance for other areas where fauna surveys are undertaken to support EIAs.

  17. Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration to restoreTo the extent possible, we need to restore historic conditions on the ecosystem scalehistoric conditions on the ecosystem scale to achieve these goalsto achieve these goals Habitat LossHabitat Loss #12

  18. Abstract--The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Francesco

    Abstract-- The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful emerging inter-company cooperative structures. One of the main advantages of an ecosystem companies of the ecosystem is an essential binding element among them. The intention of this paper

  19. Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services increasingly important in government policy in the last decade. Ecosystem services have also become a significant focus for government following the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA). Human wellbeing is a key

  20. Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bittner, Thomas

    Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem ecosystems as a representative example of a geographic object. To achieve this goal we will develop a formalized framework for handling of the structure of ecosystem hierarchies. Our theory will be demonstrated

  1. Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism during of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545; and c Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia) Environmental sensor networks are developing rapidly to as- sess changes in ecosystems and their services. Some

  2. Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead-ing to impairment of natural ecosystem structure and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but coupling that potential with societal demands and eco- nomic feasibility.Valuation of ecosystem goods are ig- nored.Ascribing an economic value to some ecosystem goods and services,by contrastArticles Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead- ing to impairment of natural ecosystem

  3. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  4. Lessons from IT Ecosystems Michael Kster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    -Transport-Systems Smart-Energy-Systems etc. Smart Airport as a smaller instance of a Smart City Michael Köster · CIG, TU and interact massively. IT Ecosystem: analogue to biological ecosystems based on the balance between and continuously evolving IT Ecosystems requires deep understanding of this balance. Michael Köster · CIG, TU

  5. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam April 21- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model

  6. essm.tamu.edu of Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    essm.tamu.edu Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life of Ecosystem Science and Management (ESSM) at Texas A&M University invites applications for graduate.D. students whose research will focus on the ecology and management of dryland ecosystems. James M. Carder

  7. A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management Ratana Chuenpagdee,1 * Lisa Liguori,2 Dave ABSTRACT Although ecosystem-based management can lead to sustainable resource use, its successful imple the ecosystems with stakeholders' preferences is therefore needed. We propose here a 'Public Sen- timent Index

  8. Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate Craig R. Allen Nebraska Cooperative Fish ecosystems for critical services #12;What Do Species Do? · regulate biogeochemical cycles ­ e.g., moose.g., predation / herbivory · provide ecological services ­ e.g., pollination #12;Ecosystem Services - Supporting

  9. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam November the appli- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific

  10. CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT CCLME Inception Workshop 2-3 November 2010. Two possible case studies are presented: the Imraguen social-ecosystem of the Banc d'Arguin National Park, the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate

  11. PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

  12. affect ecosystem metabolism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike 9 Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: and agricultural ecosystems;...

  13. Site vegetation report: Terrestrial vegetation survey (1993--1995) for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (EcMP) was designed to investigate the long-term ecological trends in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems at the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) (DOE 1993). Field sampling was conducted during 1993, 1994, and 1995, until the program was terminated in late 1995. This report presents the terrestrial vegetation data that were gathered by the EcMP. The site is located on the Colorado Piedmont, east of the Front Range, between Boulder and Golden, approximately 25 km (16 miles) northwest of Denver. The topography and proximity of the Site to the mountain front result in an interesting mixture of prairie and mountain plant species. The Site is one of the few large, relatively undisturbed areas of its kind that remains along the Colorado Piedmont. Until 1989, the primary mission of the Site was the production of nuclear weapons components (DOE 1993). After production ceased, Site personnel shifted their focus to cleanup and closure.

  14. WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Brien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the WSDOT Highway Maintenance: Environmental Complianceand the Highway Maintenance Manual for Terrestrial Species.to impacts from routine maintenance activities. In response

  15. accumulating terrestrial plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keith Green, Megan Murphy, Jenna Pathways for Terrestrial Vertebrates. In Carlton, J., G. Ruiz, and R. Mack (Eds.), Invasive species: vectors and management strategies (pp....

  16. Terrestrial applications of the heatpipe power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A terrestrial reactor that uses the same design approach as the Heatpipe Power System (HPS) may have applications both on earth and on other planetary surfaces. The baseline HPS is a potential, near-term, low-cost space fission power system. The system will be composed of independent modules, and all components operate within the existing database. The HPS has relatively few system integration issues; thus, the successful development of a module is a significant step toward verifying system feasibility and performance estimates. A prototypic, refractory-metal HPS module is being fabricated, and testing is scheduled to begin in November 1996. A successful test will provide high confidence that the HPS can achieve its predicted performance. An HPS incorporating superalloys will be better suited for some terrestrial or planetary applications. Fabrication and testing of a superalloy HPS module should be less challenging than that of the refractory metal module. A superalloy HPS core capable of delivering > 100 kWt to a power conversion subsystem could be fabricated for about $500k (unfueled). Tests of the core with electric heat (used to simulate heat from fission) could demonstrate normal and off-normal operation of the core, including the effects of heatpipe failure. A power conversion system also could be coupled to the core to demonstrate full system operation.

  17. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  18. Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China Jingfeng Xiao droughts had significant effects on terrestrial carbon cycling in China, although future studies should Lafayette, Indiana @ Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

  19. LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    , flying robots, micro-air vehicles, robot communication, autonomous robot networks. #12;2 1. TERRESTRIAL1 LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS Arvin Agah vehicles, next generation robotic platforms, platform mechanics and materials, winterization of robotic

  20. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  1. China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Information, Agenda, and Abstracts June 26-28, 2013, Kunming, China #12;Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Kunming, China June 26-28, 2013 Information, Agenda

  2. Slide 1 (of 42) Observations of Terrestrial Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, John

    formation epoch and occurrence rate of rocky terrestrial planets around solar- and intermediate- mass Observatory/Lynette Cook Zuckerman et al. (2008) #12;Slide 6 (of 42) What does Terrestrial mean 42) HD 15407A Gemini Observatory/Lynette Cook Melis et al. 2010, ApJ Letters #12;Slide 16 (of 42

  3. Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

  4. Geothermal: Related Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Links Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links...

  5. Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives of Low Impact Development with Community on the economic incentives of LID to address the local decisional realities of community watershed protection in nature but details the economic incentives to LID. It is best suited for audiences seeking to understand

  6. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  7. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. “Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

  8. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  9. The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex interrelationships, participants in the online ecosystem are deeply interdependent. These participants include consumers; online

  10. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. II. MIGRATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia); O'Brien, David P. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: j.bond@unsw.edu.au [Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, Universite de Bordeaux, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  11. VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on and func9on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on Issue: ·Ecosystem condition affects the humans dependent on those ecosystems for life and livelihood. How do changes in ecosystem composition and function correlate with famine, exposure to harmful biotic

  12. Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest Professor: 2009-present Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT). "Novel ecosystems, rapid change, and no

  13. Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact: current and future measures James the information needs of domain scientists, software component producers, infrastructure providers, and ecosystem conclude with policy recommendations #12;designed to improve insight into the scientific software ecosystem

  14. Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and how of Engineers #12;The Issue The Corps created an ecosystem restoration mission out of congressional authorities ecosystem services enough to reduce national welfare. Implementing projects under that mission requires

  15. Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services Virginia H. Dalea,, Stephen of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity

  16. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 1.2003), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 2.global upper ocean ecosystem?biogeochemistry models against

  17. Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report ARB Award No. 98 of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall University Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mangement Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall

  18. Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Publishedbythe. ONeill, Harold A. Mooney, Osvaldo E. Sala, Amy J. Symstad, and David Tilman Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Critical processes at the ecosystem level influence

  19. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study National Planning Center of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study Prepared by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus

  20. Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ForReview Only Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer change, community assembly, ecosystem functioning, New Zealand Nothofagus (beech) forests, priority dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities Tadashi Fukami1,2,3 , Ian A

  1. ENVS 4000, Spring (Jan-Apr) 2006 Monitoring Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    systems depend on ecosystems for food, materials, energy, purification, enjoyment, a sense of place challenges. Adaptive ecosystem management depends on knowledge of system states and dynamics, and therefore and models for ecosystem monitoring and management, including Environmental Benefit Analysis, Environmental

  2. Relating carrion breakdown rates to ambient resource level and community structure in four cave stream ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benstead, Jon

    into ecosystems vary in quantity and quality (e.g., plant litter vs carrion). Variability in detrital quantity and quality potentially affects consumer biomass and rates of organic matter (OM) breakdown. We used cave streams to test 2 linked hypotheses regarding the influence of total detrital inputs on consumer biomass

  3. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  4. Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    University and the director of the Stanford GPS Laboratory. 1. INTRODUCTION The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Alternative Positioning Navigation & Timing (APNT) program is developing and examining1 Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs Sherman Lo, Yu

  5. Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

  6. aerobic microbial ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Ecosystem Viable Yields CERN Preprints Summary: The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010....

  7. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise...

  8. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS; Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  9. Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Bert G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since May of 1996, we have conducted an experiment in Florida Scrub Oak to determine the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and climate change on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling in this important terrestrial ecosystem. Florida scrub oak is the name for a collective of species occupying much of the Florida peninsula. The dominant tree species are oaks and the dwarf structure of this community makes it an excellent system in which to test hypotheses regarding the potential capacity of woody ecosystems to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic carbon. Scrub oak is fire dependent with a return cycle of 10-15 years, a time which would permit an experiment to follow the entire cycle. Our site is located on Cape Canaveral at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. After burning in 1995, we built 16 open top chambers, half of which have been fumigated with pure CO2 sufficient to raise the concentration around the plants to 350 ppm above ambient. In the intervening 10 years we have non destructively measured biomass of shoots and roots, ecosystem gas exchange using chambers and eddy flux, leaf photosynthesis and respiration, soil respiration, and relevant environmental factors such as soil water availability, temperature, light, etc. The overwhelming result from analysis of our extensive data base is that elevated CO2 has had a profound impact on this ecosystem that, overall, has resulted in increased carbon accumulation in plant shoots, roots and litter. Our measurements of net ecosystem gas exchange also indicate that the ecosystem has accumulated carbon much in excess of the increased biomass or soil carbon suggesting a substantial export of carbon through the porous, sandy soil into the water table several meters below the surface. A major discovery is the powerful interaction between the stimulation of growth, photosynthesis, and respiration by elevated CO2 and other environmental factors particularly precipitation and nitrogen. Our measurements focused attention on: stimulation of ecosystem gas exchange by elevated atmospheric CO2; the architecture and distribution of coarse roots using the novel approach of ground penetrating radar; mechanisms for the disturbance of soil carbon pools via the "priming" effect; and how interannual and seasonal variation in precipitation alters the physiological response of key species to elevated CO2. This project was a collaboration between research groups at the Smithsonian Institution, NASA, the Dynamac Corporation, Northern Arizona University, and Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

  10. SRR Rangeland Ecosystem Services Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming, University of

    derived from rangelands Link between the biophysical world and the social systems humans use Basic Fish Huntable or Catchable fish and wildlife Biofuels Fiber Biochemicals Genetic material #12 Assess biological, hydrological, atmospheric, and other physical resources (supply) Describe the market

  11. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry, E-mail: wade.g.henning@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  12. Beneficial Bees and Pesky Pests: Three Essays on Ecosystem Services to Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Brian James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region considered. Ecosystem service valuations can usefullyand valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services.

  13. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  14. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EB et al (2005) Valuing ecosystem services: toward bettershaping landscapes and ecosystems for human welfare. Scienceanalyzing, and managing ecosystem services. Front Ecol

  15. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van for the foreseeable future. #12;John Beddington's "Perfect Storm" Population Increase Poverty Reduction Food Security Globalisation Climate Change Health Water Security Poverty Alleviation Finance Urbanisation Population Energy

  16. Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich Oregon State University, Corvallis. The emerging field of Ecosystem Informatics applies meth- ods from computer science and mathematics to address fundamental and applied problems in the ecosystem sciences. The ecosystem sciences are in the midst

  17. Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity Erika (sent for review July 27, 2009) Society places value on the multiple functions of ecosystems from ecosystems to provide threshold levels of up to eight ecosystem functions simultaneously. Across years

  18. At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    EDITORIAL At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science The science and management of ecosystems to- gether is one of the most dynamic fields of contem- porary ecology. Ecosystem science has disciplines. The scope of ecosystem science encom- passes bounded systems like watersheds as well as spatially

  19. Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures D.A. Neher a,*, J. Wu b understanding of performance among major ecosystem types is necessary before nematode community indices can and agricultural ecosystems; (2) compare nematode community composition among and within ecosystem types and report

  20. Volume 3 Number 2 2011 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Volume 3 · Number 2 · 2011 55 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with Adaptive Agents* Joseph Engler1 of innovation and its place in a global economy or ecosystem is presented. The model utilizes simple agents-based model of an innovation ecosystem is presented. The ecosystem is considered as an environment in which

  1. Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S for the goods and services provided by natural ecosystems. However, relatively few studies have evalu- ated- ity to loss and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. ammonium diversity ecosystem function

  2. Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

  3. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

  4. Hydrogen Storage Related Links

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources provide details about DOE-funded hydrogen storage activities, research plans and roadmaps, models and tools, and additional related links.

  5. Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for detection, fate, and survival analysis of genetically engineered microorganisms and their recombinant genetic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Seidler, R.J.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research included in this document represents the current scientific information available regarding the applicability of terrestrial microcosms and related methodologies for evaluating detection methods and the fate and survival of microorganisms in the environment. The three terrestrial microcosms described in this document were used to evaluate the survival and fate of recombinant bacteria in soils and in association with plant surfaces and insects and their transport through soil with percolating water and root systems, and to test new methods and procedures to improve detection and enumeration of bacteria in soil. Simple (potting soil composed of peat mix and perlite, lacking environmental control and monitoring) and complex microcosms (agricultural soil with partial control and monitoring of environmental conditions) were demonstrated to be useful tools for preliminary assessments of microbial viability in terrestrial ecosystems. These studies evaluated the survival patterns of Enterobacter cloacae (pBR322) in soil and on plant surfaces and the ingestion of this same microorganism by cutworms and survival in the foregut and frass. The Versacore microcosm design was used to monitor the fate and competitiveness of genetically engineered bacteria in soil. Both selective media and gene probes were used successfully to follow the fate of two recombinant Pseudomonas sp. introduced into Versacore microcosms. Intact soil-core microcosms were employed to evaluate the fate and transport of genetically altered Azospirillum sp. and Pseudomonas sp. in soil and the plant rhizosphere. The usefulness of these various microcosms as a tool for risk assessment is underscored by the ease in obtaining soil from a proposed field release site to evaluate subsequent GEM fate and survival.

  6. Evaluation of terrestrial microcosms for assessing the fate and effects of genetically engineered microorganisms on ecological processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Bentjen, S.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McFadden, K.M.; Van Voris, P.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project evaluates and modifies the existing US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances (EPA/OPTS) terrestrial microcosm test system and test protocols such that they can be used to determine the environmental fate and ecological hazards of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs). The intact soil-core microcosm represents terrestrial ecosystems, and when coupled with appropriate test protocols, such microcosms may be appropriate to define and limit risks associated with the intentional release of GEMs. The terrestrial microcosm test system was used to investigate the survival and transport of two model GEMs (Azospirillum lipoferum and Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants) to various trophic levels and niches and through intact soil cores. Subsequent effects on nutrient cycling and displacement of indigenous microorganisms were evaluated. The model organisms were a diazotrophic root-colonizing bacterium (A. lipoferum) and a wheat root growth-inhibiting rhizobacterium (Pseudomonas sp.). The transposable element Tn5 was used as a genetic marker for both microorganisms in two separate experiments. The organisms were subjected to transposon mutagenesis using a broad host-range-mobilizable suicide plasmid. The transposon Tn5 conferred levels of kanamycin resistance up to 500 ..mu..g/ml (Pseudomonas sp.), which allowed for selection of the bacteria from environmental samples. The presence of Tn5 DNA in the genome of the model GEMs also allowed the use of Tn5 gene probes to confirm and enumerate the microorganisms in different samples from the microcosms. Two types of root growth-inhibiting Pseudomonas sp. Tn5 mutants were obtained and used in microcosm studies: those that lacked the ability to inhibit either wheat root growth or the growth of other microorganisms in vitro (tox/sup /minus//) and those which retained these properties (tox/sup +/). 53 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 1 Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects Running Head: Edge effects across ecosystem types Key Words: biomass 59717-3460. hansen@montana.edu 25 February 2008 #12;Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 2

  8. Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batavia Prairie and Agricultural Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

    Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

  9. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass and surface density profile of the disk, and the perturbations from giant planets and binary companions if they exist. Simple accretion models predicts that low-mass stars should form small, dry planets in their habitable zones. The migration of a giant planet through a disk of rocky bodies does not completely impede terrestrial planet growth. Rather, "hot Jupiter" systems are likely to also contain exterior, very water-rich Earth-like planets, and also "hot Earths", very close-in rocky planets. Roughly one third of the known systems of extra-solar (giant) planets could allow a terrestrial planet to form in the habitable zone.

  10. Links - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) - CenterLinks Berkeley Lab Links: Nuclear

  11. Links - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) - CenterLinks Berkeley Lab Links: Faculty

  12. To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Elizabeth N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    goals and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecosystems 3:Kumar. 2008. Valuation of ecosystem services: A psycho-

  13. Sector 30 - useful links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Useful Links Sector 30 Printing from your laptop at the beamline Data retrival onsite from ftp:ftp.xray.aps.anl.govpubsector30 Sector Orientation Form HERIX experiment header...

  14. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  15. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

  16. Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe Luigi Maiorano1 to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing

  17. Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

  18. Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within a larger natural ecosystem. An Eco-Logical guide waschanges in the Great Lakes ecosystem from the introductionfor a State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) Pre-

  19. Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Oran R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management Preparergovernance to assist ecosystem-based management initiativesCurrent Large Marine Ecosystem. This geographic scope

  20. Species diversity and foundation species: Potential indicators of fisheries yields and marine ecosystem functioning.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracken, Matthew E.S.; Bracken, B. E.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning: a consensus ofWood. 1995. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: coastalSection 6. Biodiversity and ecosystem function: ecosys- tem

  1. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear dynamics in ecosystem response to climatic change:alteration within ecosystems. Conservation Biology 10: 1163-Paruelo, 1998. The value of ecosystem services: putting the

  2. Hydraulic controls on river biota and the consequence for ecosystem processes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limm, Michael Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of macroinvertebrates in stream ecosystem function. Annualin marine and freshwater ecosystems. Canadian Journal ofanimals in freshwater ecosystems. Annual Review of Ecology

  3. ECO-LOGICAL: AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacher-Gresock, Bethaney; Schwarzer, Julianne Siegel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developinghabitat and essential ecosystems. There are a variety ofdo very little to promote ecosystem sustainability. Concern

  4. An Assessment of Ecosystem Services Provided by Street Trees in Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOONSAWAD, NATTHANIJ

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecologicalquantification and valuation of ecosystem services using i-their valuation Although research on ecosystem services has

  5. [A field study of the effects of elevated CO2 concentration on physiology an ecosystem processes in Chesapeake Bay Wetland]. [Annual] progress report, 1989--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Research during 1988--1989 focused on several new aspects of the response of the salt marsh ecosystem to elevated CO{sub 2} of the effect of CO{sub 2} on biomass production into above and belowground tissues, nitrogen content, light response of photosynthesis of single leaves, leaf water potential and carbon dioxide and water vapor exchange between the plant canopy and the ambient air. Result from the work in 87 and 88 had shown that the C{sub 3} plant, Scirpus olneyi, responded vigorously to elevated CO{sub 2} but the two C{sub 4} species, Spartina patens and Distichlis spicata did not. The responses of photosynthesis were also reflected in the canopy and ecosystem processes: Carbon accumulated in the C{sub 3} community into belowground tissues but not in the C{sub 4} community suggesting that the main factor in the ecosystem responses would be photosynthesis and that the environmental controls on this process would determine the long-term ecosystem responses to rising CO{sub 2}. The main question at the outset of this project was: How much more carbon will be accumulated in the salt marsh ecosystem in a high CO{sub 2} atmosphere than is being accumulated under present CO{sub 2} concentration? This experiment has raised the possibility that rising CO{sub 2} will make the salt marsh ecosystem a bigger sink for carbon than we have previously thought it to be. By extrapolation, this finding suggests that other, terrestrial ecosystems may also become larger sinks for carbon.

  6. Radio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction 1.1. TGF Theory Overview [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma raysRadio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1 and Steven A. Cummer2 Received frequency (RF) emissions by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) is developed. These radio emissions, which

  7. Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    the discovery of short bursts of gamma rays originating from Earth, called terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFsMeasurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray associated with 26 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) recorded by the RHESSI satellite over the Caribbean

  8. Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder" Mission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Abstract This paper addresses visualization issues of the Terrestrial Planet the visualization of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission (TPF) as a case study to identify and analyze

  9. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin ZOGG*, David GRIMM* ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200-30106 is introduced as well

  10. Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

  11. Linking activity and function to ecosystem dynamics in a coastal bacterioplankton community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gifford, Scott Michael

    For bacterial communities containing hundreds to thousands of distinct populations, connecting functional processes and environmental dynamics at high taxonomic resolution has remained challenging. Here we use the expression ...

  12. Stabilizing effects of diversity on aboveground wood production in forest ecosystems: linking patterns and processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jucker, Tommaso; Bouriaud, Olivier; Avacaritei, Daniel; Coomes, David A.

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    determining which processes drive stability. In grasslands, the stabilizing effects of diversity 66 hinge on the assumption that composition is flexible among years (Gonzalez & Loreau 2009; 67 Allan et al. 2011; Mariotte et al. 2013). How does the slower... al. 2013; Vilà et al. 2013), mixed-species stands may 85 well exhibit greater stability as a result of faster rates of AWP. Nonetheless, additional 86 drivers of overyielding, such as asynchrony itself (e.g., Allan et al. 2011), are unlikely to 87...

  13. Linking social norms to efficient conservation investment in payments for ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs and plays an important role in global conservation efforts. Our study was conducted in China for efficient conservation in- vestments. China Grain-to-Green Program program re-enrollment stated choice of conservation investments (16). Like human population, per unit area costs of effective conservation also vary

  14. Nuclear Data Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /7 This is aLinks to Useful Online

  15. ARM - Quick Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51 ceilometergovPublicationsPublications4936Links

  16. ARM - Related Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-IIActRecovery

  17. Links (pbl/contracts)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Useful Links BIOSYNC:DOE

  18. Wind Power Link

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to globalWind Power Links These other

  19. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

  20. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  1. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and spatial distribution of ecosystems and users, the spatial relation- ships between them, and the presence; Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2003). Despite their importance for human well-being, eco- system services

  3. ANTARCTIC CLIMATE & ECOSYSTEMS COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , including economic damage or loss or injury to person or property, regardless of whether the Antarctic Centre Program. A U S T R A L I A ACE also has formal partnerships with the Department of the Environment be addressed to: The Manager Communications Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre Private

  4. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, J. T; Chapin, F. S; Harden, J. W; Neff, J. C; Harmon, M. E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F A. Bazzaz. August 2002 NET ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTION 1993.Net exchange of CO2 in a mid-latitude forest. ScienceN. , and E. -D. Schulze. 1999. Net CO, and H,O fluxes from

  5. Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature profiles using inverse methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature ecosystem carbon budgets from micrometeorological methods remains nighttime ecosystem respiration theory to infer the two components of ecosystem respiration (aboveground and forest floor) from measured

  6. LEED LINKS MENTOR TRAINING PROGRAM LEED LINKS Mentor Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    LEED LINKS MENTOR TRAINING PROGRAM LEED LINKS Mentor Program Provides ongoing support for new of LEED LINKS: LEED LINKS Community Building Academic Check-Ins Involvement Check-Ins Mentor-Mentee One-on-Ones A word from the LEED LINKS mentor "I thoroughly enjoyed my time as a mentor for LEED

  7. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  8. 5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction To understand the behaviour of an ecosystem it is important to know its resource requirements. Though numerous resources are mobilized models have attempted to represent the growth of entire plants or of entire ecosystems based on physical

  9. Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line: a Case Study on Digital increases the number of software ecosystems: software platforms developed and maintained in a decentralized YourCast from a single system to a medium- scale ecosystem, we show how organizing it as a multiple

  10. Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST to Convey Publication Metadata Peter Kraker1, Austria {pkraker, afessl, phoefler, slind}@know-center.at Abstract. In this paper we present an ecosystem of this ecosystem, semantically enriched RSS feeds are used for dissemination. These feeds are complemented

  11. California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy Winter 2014 Mondays, 4 Applying reconciliation ecology to aquatic ecosystems in California. Peter Moyle and Melanie Truan, UC of Chief Counsel, State Water Resources Control Board Feb. 10 Reconciling ecosystem goals for San Francisco

  12. Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data Dileep George, 1 Kazumi Saito, 2 Pat Langley, 1. Ecosystem models are used to interpret and predict the in- teractions of species and their environment. In this paper, we address the task of inducing ecosystem models from background knowledge and time- series data

  13. Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Mikls Herdon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Drivers Miklós Herdon1 , Mária Raffai2 , Ádám of the Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE) has been come life in order to build an Internet-based environment in which businesses will be able to interact with each other more efficiently. In a Digital Ecosystem

  14. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 that time, ecosystem restoration has advanced from planning to implementation; progress in research has

  15. Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review SelfStudy Document April, 2008 #12;ii Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review April, 2008 Table of Contents 1.0 Department of Ecosystem Science

  16. Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    . Despite this uncertainty, new methods of ecosystem service valuation are suggesting that the economicRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1 benefits of restoration can outweigh costs. Payment for Ecosystem Service schemes could therefore provide

  17. The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital Robert Costanza Matthew Wilson services are are mainly provided by ecosystems. Examples of ecosystem services ("ecoservices") include of ecoservices in a variety of locations using a variety of valuation methods and applies them to New Jersey

  18. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 1 16 .06.2008 Pastoral system and herders communities Professor D.Dorligsuren Programme Coordinator "Green Gold" Pasture Ecosystem Management Programme Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development, Mongolia "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management

  19. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Mapping and Valuing Ecosystem Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    society through unaccounted-for ecosystem services. A major challenge in mov- ing to a more ecosystem

  20. Resources & Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of0 Resource

  1. Bisfuel links - Photosynthesis tag

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable

  2. Bisfuel links - Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map PrintablePresentations

  3. Bisfuel links - Seminars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map

  4. CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Andrew

    CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink A N D R E W W H I T E , * M E L V, Hybrid v4.1, with a subdaily timestep, was driven by increasing CO2 and transient climate output from scenarios were used: (i) IS92a, giving 790 ppm CO2 by 2100, (ii) CO2 stabilization at 750 ppm by 2225

  5. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) Flight Baseline Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Marie; Shaklan, S; Kasting, J; Traub, W; Alexander, J; Angel, R; Blaurock, C; Brown, M; Brown, R; Burrows, C; Clampin, M; Cohen, E; Content, D; Dewell, L; Dumont, P; Egerman, R; Ferguson, H; Ford, V; Greene, J; Guyon, O; Hammel, H; Heap, S; Ho, T; Horner, S; Hunyadi, S; Irish, S; Jackson, C; Kasdin, J; Kissil, A; Krim, M; Kuchner, M; Kwack, E; Lillie, C; Lin, D; Liu, A; Marchen, L; Marley, M; Meadows, V; Mosier, G; Mouroulis, P; Noecker, M; Ohl, R; Oppenheimer, B; Pitman, J; Ridgway, S; Sabatke, E; Seager, S; Shao, M; Smith, A; Soummer, R; Stapelfeldt, K; Tenerell, D; Trauger, J; Vanderbei, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) mission presented here is an existence proof for a flagship-class internal coronagraph space mission capable of detecting and characterizing Earth-like planets and planetary systems at visible wavelengths around nearby stars, using an existing launch vehicle. TPF-C will use spectroscopy to measure key properties of exoplanets including the presence of atmospheric water or oxygen, powerful signatures in the search for habitable worlds.

  6. Leptogenesis, neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Rodejohann

    2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Leptogenesis in left-right symmetric theories is studied. The usual see-saw mechanism is modified by the presence of a left-handed Higgs triplet. A simple connection between the properties of the light left-handed and heavy right-handed neutrinos is found. Predictions of this scenario for neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation in long-baseline experiments are given. These observables can in principle distinguish different realizations of the model.

  7. Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  8. Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3 Management Strategies4 5 Andrew James Hansen6 Ecology property, ecosystem energy levels, which,14 while once widely recognized as important, has received little

  9. Influence of massive planet scattering on nascent terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

    2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In most extrasolar planetary systems, the present orbits of known giant planets admit the existence of stable terrestrial planets. Those same giant planets, however, have typically eccentric orbits that hint at violent early dynamics less benign for low mass planet formation. Under the assumption that massive planet eccentricities are the end point of gravitational scattering in multiple planet systems, we study the evolution of the building blocks of terrestrial planets during the scattering process. We find that typically, evolutionary sequences that result in a moderately eccentric giant planet orbiting at a ~ 2.5 AU eject over 95% of the material initially present within the habitable zone. Crossing orbits largely trigger the ejection, and leave the surviving material with a wide dispersion in semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. Based on these results, we predict that radial velocity follow-up of terrestrial planet systems found by Kepler will find that these are anti-correlated with the presence of eccentric giant planets orbiting at a few AU.

  10. On the Survival of Short-Period Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemary A. Mardling; D. N. C. Lin

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The currently feasible method of detection of Earth-mass planets is transit photometry, with detection probability decreasing with a planet's distance from the star. The existence or otherwise of short-period terrestrial planets will tell us much about the planet formation process, and such planets are likely to be detected first if they exist. Tidal forces are intense for short-period planets, and result in decay of the orbit on a timescale which depends on properties of the star as long as the orbit is circular. However, if an eccentric companion planet exists, orbital eccentricity ($e_i$) is induced and the decay timescale depends on properties of the short-period planet, reducing by a factor of order $10^5 e_i^2$ if it is terrestrial. Here we examine the influence companion planets have on the tidal and dynamical evolution of short-period planets with terrestrial structure, and show that the relativistic potential of the star is fundamental to their survival.

  11. MSU BioEconomy Network COLLABORATE. Link Michigan State University's internal assets and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSU BioEconomy Network COLLABORATE. DISCOVER. INNOVATE. Mission Link Michigan State University's internal assets and external partners to establish a premier innovation ecosystem for the bioeconomy. The MSU BioEconomy Network (MBEN) was cre- ated to coordinate the increasingly diverse range of bioeconomy

  12. Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species identity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    REPORT Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species in recycling nutrients, thus providing a mechanism for how animal species identity mediates ecosystem processes) recycled nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in a tropical stream supports stoichiometry theory. Mass

  13. Helpful Links - Hanford Site

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  14. NREL: News - Related Links

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  15. Comments on: Links

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  16. News Links | Jefferson Lab

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  17. Link Alpha A

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  18. Link Alpha B

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  19. Link Alpha C

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  20. Link Alpha D

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  1. Link Alpha E

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  2. Link Alpha F

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  3. Link Alpha G

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  4. Link Alpha H

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  5. Link Alpha I

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  6. Link Alpha J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Link Alpha K

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Link Alpha L

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Link Alpha M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cj Alm

  10. Link Alpha N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cj

  11. Link Alpha O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cjo A

  12. Link Alpha P

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cjo Ap

  13. Link Alpha Q

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cjo

  14. Link Alpha R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cjor A

  15. Link Alpha S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cjor

  16. Link Alpha T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cjort

  17. Link Alpha V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B Cjortv

  18. Link Alpha W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A B

  19. Link Alpha Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A By A B C

  20. Link Alpha Z

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLeeLinearb A By A B

  1. Nuclear Data Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOE Directives,838

  2. Page 11, Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. CAMD Nanofabrication Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o . C l a r24Microfabrication

  4. CAMD Nanofabrication Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o . C l a

  5. WIPP - Related Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka Analytics andWFRNewsWindPrivacy

  6. A-Z Link

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are70 Years ofAA-Z Index A B C D E

  7. AlumniLink

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARES CERTIFICATE IN RENEWABLE ENERGY

  8. Bisfuel links - EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable VersiondiironArizonaEFRC

  9. Bisfuel links - Professional organizations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map PrintablePresentationsProfessional

  10. Bisfuel links - Research centers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map PrintablePresentationsProfessionalResearch

  11. Bisfuel links - Video

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolar energy newsVideo

  12. astro_links.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12ZeroVariations ofSenior Accelerator

  13. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  14. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmore »affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d?¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.« less

  15. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stark, Karolina [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Scott, David E. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Tsyusko, Olga [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Coughlin, Daniel P. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Hinton, Thomas G. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States); Inst. of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Cadarache (France); Amendola, Roberto [ENEA, (Italy)

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³?Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d?¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d?¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  16. Multilevel DC link inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui-Jia

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilevel DC link inverter and method for improving torque response and current regulation in permanent magnet motors and switched reluctance motors having a low inductance includes a plurality of voltage controlled cells connected in series for applying a resulting dc voltage comprised of one or more incremental dc voltages. The cells are provided with switches for increasing the resulting applied dc voltage as speed and back EMF increase, while limiting the voltage that is applied to the commutation switches to perform PWM or dc voltage stepping functions, so as to limit current ripple in the stator windings below an acceptable level, typically 5%. Several embodiments are disclosed including inverters using IGBT's, inverters using thyristors. All of the inverters are operable in both motoring and regenerating modes.

  17. Facilitation Guide Forging the Link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facilitation Guide Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Incentives of Low Impact Development of the economic incentives as well as how LID plays a role in helping communities adapt to changes in climate. Now heard? What about inconsistent? #12;Forging the Link: Linking the Economic Benefits of Low Impact

  18. 104 Department of Landscape Design and Ecosystem Management (LDEM) Graduate Catalogue 201415

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of agrochemicals in the environment. Effect on terrestrial and aquatic systems. Contamination, monitoring residues

  19. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

  20. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  1. Agency Links Agency Links and Proposal Development Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Agency Links - 1 - Agency Links and Proposal Development Resources National Institutes of Health NIH Peer Review: Grants & Cooperative Agreements (2013) Resources for applicants Parent Application Development Checklist from OSP Search for NSF grant recipients Writing aids / Resources Proposal Development

  2. ACES Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services represents a dynamic and growing assembly of professionals, researchers, and policy makers involved with ecosystem services. The ACES 2014 Conference brings...

  3. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Disks with Varying Surface Density Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Thomas Quinn; Jonathan I. Lunine

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``minimum-mass solar nebula'' (MMSN) model estimates the surface density distribution of the protoplanetary disk by assuming the planets to have formed in situ. However, significant radial migration of the giant planets likely occurred in the Solar system, implying a distortion in the values derived by the MMSN method. The true density profiles of protoplanetary disks is therefore uncertain. Here we present results of simulations of late-stage terrestrial accretion, each starting from a disk of planetary embryos. We assume a power-law surface density profile that varies with heliocentric distance r as r^-alpha, and vary alpha between 1/2 and 5/2 (alpha = 3/2 for the MMSN model). We find that for steeper profiles (higher values of alpha), the terrestrial planets (i) are more numerous, (ii) form more quickly, (iii) form closer to the star, (iv) are more massive, (v) have higher iron contents, and (vi) have lower water contents. However, the possibility of forming potentially habitable planets does not appear to vary strongly with alpha.

  4. Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

  5. alpine lake ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Lake Ecosystem Modelling: an Integrated Approach INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic eutrophication of water bodies and its consequences are of concern especially to Assess...

  6. anthropogenic ecosystem perturbations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Anthropogenic impacts such as fishing and eutrophication are significant challenges to the sustainable management of aquatic ecosystems....

  7. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  8. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  9. Toward a consistency cross-check of eddy covariance flux–based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance S.Uncertainty of annual net ecosystem productivity estimatedand par- titioning of ecosystem respiration in a southern

  10. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationCA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationBay–Delta Program. 2000. Ecosystem Restoration Program:

  11. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous United States by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Lianhong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    defensible annual sums of net ecosystem exchange. Agri. For.contrasting Florida ecosystems. Ecol. App. 9, 936- Clark,S. , 2002. Seasonality of ecosystem respiration and gross

  12. Near-surface remote sensing of canopy architecture and land-atmosphere interactions in an oak savanna ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngryel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007). Reduction of ecosystem productivity and respirationR. (2005). On the separation of net ecosystem exchange intoassimilation and ecosystem respiration: review and improved

  13. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the functioning of ecosystems. Science Chatterjee, A. ,inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.

  14. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locations in three ecosystems. Marine Biology 82 (2), 199–2009. Subtropical ocean ecosystem structure chang- es forcedrecent collapse of coastal ecosystems. Science 293, 629–637.

  15. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyllaconcentration ([Chl-a]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between?0.2and?0.6. Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted seamore »salt aerosol optical depth,AODdiff) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nmAODdiff(sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl-a] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl-a] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  16. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure, 1963; Gribbin, 1971]. Alternatively, magnetic storms might induce eddy electric currents in rocks along

  17. Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial microbial processes in the terrestrial subsurface. Previous geochemical studies suggested that sulfide environment in shallow sediments (5 m), and produces acidic waters (pH 3.8) that are rich in sulfate (28 m

  18. Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

  19. Heat partitioning in terrestrial planets during core formation by negative diapirism H. Samuel a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evonuk, Martha

    in terrestrial planets. We model the dynamic evolution of an iron diapir, sinking through a solid silicate proto experiments. This model can be applied to determine the heat distribution within terrestrial planets-like planets by conversion of potential into thermal energy via viscous heating (Rubie et al., 2007; Solomon

  20. To What Extent Does Terrestrial Life ``Follow The Water''? Eriita G. Jones and Charles H. Lineweaver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    uninhabited, we present empirical pressure-temperature (P-T ) phase diagrams of water, Earth, and terrestrial. This potentially uninhabited terrestrial liquid water includes (i) hot and deep regions of Earth where some combination of high temperature (T > 1228C) and restrictions on pore space, nu- trients, and energy

  1. Thompson March 2003 -1STEREO -Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson ­ March 2003 - 1STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR STEREO Science Center (SSC) William T. Thompson STEREO Science Center Code 682, NASA-Goddard (William.T.Thompson@gsfc.nasa.gov 301-286-2040) #12;Thompson ­ March 2003 - 2STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission

  2. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES satellite sensor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES Figure S1. December-January-Febuary (DJF, top) and June-July-August (JJA, bottom) biogenic3 methanol 1 Figure S4. Regions employed for quantifying terrestrial methanol fluxes (red) and for2

  3. App D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Restoration, Management 83 2.4.6 Compatibility of Wetland Management and Stream Management 84 2 2.5.5 Protection, Restoration, Management 103 2.5.6 Compatibility of Pond Management and StreamApp D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of Terrestrial Habitats

  4. An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark Williamson Working Paper 83 #12;An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark for long time period simulations and large ensemble studies in Earth system models of intermediate

  5. Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed fromSource altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys

  6. The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Research The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change Luigi climate change model outputs for two climate scenarios. Overall, a substantial number of Mediterranean in climate. For 181 terrestrial mammals (68% of all Mediterranean mammals), we used an ensemble forecasting

  7. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  8. Balanced link for dry coal extrusion pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bebejian, Maral

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A link which defines a link body that includes a multiple of link plates integral with a link body, the link body disposed at least partially forward of a forward edge of the multiple of link plates.

  9. The Link Collections A Register of Papers of Edwin A. Link, Marion Clayton Link, The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Description of Series Correspondence (19391981) Enclosures (19411979) Advertising Brochures and Company Charts, Diagrams, and Maps Financial Records Legal Documents Legislation Logs and Journals. Link Advertising Brochures and Company Publications E.A. Link Announcements, Business Cards

  10. Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

  11. EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF COWICHAN TRIBES of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Exploring Aboriginal Forestry and Ecosystem-based Management aboriginal forestry will be required. First Nations share a common desire for control over their forest

  12. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  13. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  14. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  15. Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Locatelli Carbon sequestration is recognised as a global ecosystem service (see box on next page such as the global climate (through carbon sequestration), the quantity and quality of water and the force of windsS Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store carbon, forests contribute

  16. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  17. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  18. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  19. DECISION-MAKING AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    options is reviewed and applied to ecosystem-based management. The model recommends a public decision process unless developing new alternatives is not possible, in which case segmented public consultation question involves the kind of public participation strategy to use. For ecosystem-based management to reach

  20. Global mapping of ecosystem services and conservation priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and ecosystem services. biodiversity carbon hotspots Global 200 conservation planning Efforts to conserve wild: the goods and services from ecological systems that benefit people (e.g., water purification, carbon sequestration, and crop pollination). These ``ecosystem services'' are currently the focus of intensive re

  1. Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services and poverty and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework' Ecosystem Services, vol 7, pp. 34­45., 10.1016/j.ecoser.2013 services and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework$ Janet A. Fisher a,n , Genevieve Patenaude

  2. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  3. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  4. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

  5. On the dynamics and thermodynamics of terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patton, Regan L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for terrestrial planets, inclusive of viscous fluid behavior and featuring finite normal stress differences, is developed. This work offers new insights for the interpretation of planetary survey data. Evolution equations for poloidal and toroidal motions include gradients of density, viscosity, and two normal stress moduli. The poloidal field exhibits gradients in the cubic dilation, which couple non-isotropic pressures to the combined deformation field. In contrast, the toroidal field exhibits vorticity gradients with magnitudes proportional to the natural time. This holds even in the absence of material gradients. Consequently, viscosity gradients are not required to drive toroidal motions. The toroidal field is governed by an inhomogeneous diharmonic equation, exhibiting dynamic shear localization. The strain-energy density for this model, as a function of temperature, is found via thermodynamics. Assuming heat transfer with characteristic diffusivity, a radial model parameterized by thermomechani...

  6. System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

  7. Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

  8. Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday of ecosystem services, its history and rise to prominence. We then explore the ways in which ecosystem services can be valued, measured and monetized by society, across

  9. Let's talk about symbiosis! 9:15 Matthias Horn, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science Welcome Session 1 9:30 Julie Klose Session 2 11:30 Buck Hanson, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science 13:30 Daryl Domman, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

  10. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inputs of nitrogen to forest ecosystems in south- ern Chile:forms, ?uxes, and sources. Ecosystems 3: 590–5.Ecosystems (2009) 12: 417–433 DOI: 10.1007/s10021-009-9232-x

  11. PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division rate functions of planktonic ecosystems has been hypothesized to add stability or persistence planktonic ecosystem, one indirect and two direct. 1) The indirect measure, copepod stage frequency

  12. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1029/2010JG001390, 2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxesdioxide fluxes of black spruce ecosystems in eastern Northof a stand?replacing fire on ecosystem CO 2 exchange of a

  13. Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900 provided by ecosystems, from food and medicines to a stable climate, clean water and storm protection. This course provides an introduction to the ecosystem ecology

  14. Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

  15. Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobrand, Lars E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

  16. California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy and Management, MC 3110, University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor Mediterranean species. In this changed ecosystem, grazing and pastoral practices can benefit native wildlife, and land, livestock, and ecosystem service markets. Keywords: transhumance, oak woodlands, ecosystem

  17. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  18. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance, June 24-26, 2008 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin Zogg* David Grimm* ETH Zurich, Switzerland [zogg, grimm]@geod.baug.ethz.ch Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200

  19. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium acceleration of electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    . Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating fromTerrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium accelerationV) of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). This analysis provides the first direct evidence that TGFs are produced

  20. Partners and related links | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are the organizations with which EMSL maintains closest relationships in high performance computing and software development. Partners Note: The links below leave this site...

  1. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  2. Superfluid 4 He weak links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Packard, Richard E.

    from the response of the cell to a step in the chemical potential difference across the array. When present a "Chemical potential battery" for superfluid 4He weak link cells, whereby a constant heater power in this dissertation represent a breakthrough in super- fluid 4He weak link research, and provide a big step

  3. Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise businesses that interacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loke, Seng W. - Loke, Seng W.

    Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise ecosystems. We introduce the idea of creating an eco- system from a number of smart devices. This ecosystem is categorised as a micro ecosystem rather than macro ecosystem. The proposed model of this digital ecosystem

  4. Links

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More Legal Research ResourcesEnergy Law NetLegal Citation Style GuideNuclear Regulatory LegislationOpen CRSPublic Library of LawTreatiesU.S. Code Classification TablesU.S. Congressional Documents...

  5. Links - MST - UW Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) - CenterLinks Berkeley Lab Links:

  6. links | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires mayYuan T.External Links External Links This page

  7. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  8. Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

  9. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute control during this interval. During the 1st year after harvest, K concentrations tripled in shallow soil

  10. arctic ecosystem final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROST-BOIL ECOSYSTEMS A PROJECT SUMMARY The central goal of this project to changing climate. We focus on frost-boils because: (1) The processes that are involved in the self...

  11. Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS: The development of Agro-IBIS Chris Kucharik Department of Agronomy & Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment balance Soil and canopy physics Leaf physiology Minutes Phenology Budburst, senescence, dormancy Daily

  12. Stakeholder value network analysis for the mobile services ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind, A. S. (Amarnath Sury)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile services ecosystem has evolved and continues to evolve at a rapid pace adjusting to the different players competing to be part of the value creation and capture. This thesis attempts to capture a holistic view ...

  13. aquatic ecosystem restoration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. A. Aguirre 2006-01-01 124 Climate change as an ecosystem architect: Implications to rare plant ecology, conservation, and restoration CiteSeer Summary: Recent advances in...

  14. agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems Physics Websites Summary: Predicting and...

  15. Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pigeon, Timothy David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

  16. Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

  17. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. I. PHOTOCHEMISTRY MODEL AND BENCHMARK CASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu

    We present a comprehensive photochemistry model for exploration of the chemical composition of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. The photochemistry model is designed from the ground up to have the capacity to treat all ...

  18. Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haifei

    Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2 , Qinghua Zheng1, 2 , Lingzhi believed that an E-Learning ecosystem is the next generation E-Learning. Nowadays, the current trend of Web-Learning ecosystem. A mashup approach to an E-Learning ecosystem enhances the flourish and sustainability of E

  19. Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 11 Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Di.2.1 Ecosystem Resource Dynamics, with Emphasis on Primary Production 11.2.2 Ecosystem Stability, with Emphasis.3.5 Biodiversity Effects on Human Disease Regulation 11.4 Biodiversity Effects on the Provision of Marine Ecosystem

  20. Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, David. S.

    Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias Department ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially

  1. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem services Forest , and there is consensus that this can decrease ecosystem functioning and services2­7 . It remains unclear, though, whether few8 or many9 of the species in an ecosystem are needed to sustain the provisioning of ecosystem

  2. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America B. D. Amiro,1 A. G, and New Brunswick). Net ecosystem production (NEP) showed a carbon loss from all ecosystems following a standreplacing disturbance, becoming a carbon sink by 20 years for all ecosystems and by 10 years for most

  3. Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

  4. Ising-link Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Fleming; Mark Gross; Ray Renken

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a simplified version of Regge quantum gravity where the link lengths can take on only two possible values, both always compatible with the triangle inequalities. This is therefore equivalent to a model of Ising spins living on the links of a regular lattice with somewhat complicated, yet local interactions. The measure corresponds to the natural sum over all 2^links configurations, and numerical simulations can be efficiently implemented by means of look-up tables. In three dimensions we find a peak in the ``curvature susceptibility'' which grows with increasing system size. However, the value of the corresponding critical exponent as well as the behavior of the curvature at the transition differ from that found by Hamber and Williams for the Regge theory with continuously varying link lengths.

  5. Effect of the terrestrial magnetic field on direct-current measurements in underground pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhala, R.M.; Dikmarova, L.P.; Kornienko, V.Yu.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the secondary field of an underground pipeline, magnetized by the terrestrial magnetic field, on noncontacting measurements of direct current flowing in it is discussed. The systematic errors of three known measurement methods are compared. A method based on the measurement of the difference between the field components parallel to the terrestrial field component orthogonal to the pipline is identified as the most accurate. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  6. SetLink the CERN Document Server Link Manager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Meur, Jean-Yves

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the problems encountered by electronic libraries to cope with long term keeping of on-line documents. What is thebest solution not to fill in a library system with non persistent addresses ? Different possible solutions are studied, based on theexperience of the CERN Document Server and its library. This paper will stress the importance of using a Link Manager for any long term Web server. It will explain how the CERN SetLink Link Manager is designed to handle a wide range of document types and formats, from photos in JPEG to eprints in PDF. It will also focus onother possibilities offered by using such an application, like automatic figures extraction or concatenation, full text searching andon-the-fly format conversions.

  7. Terrestrial perturbation experiments as an environmental assessment tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was initially interpreted as requiring full disclosure of the environmental impacts of a federal action. Because of the limitations of time, money, and manpower, this requirement that all impacts be considered has led to superficial analysis of many important impacts. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has provided a solution to this problem by reinterpreting NEPA as requiring analysis of those impacts which have significant bearing on decision making. Because assessment resources can now be concentrated on a few critical issues, it should be possible to perform field perturbation experiments to provide direct evidence of the effects of a specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific receiving ecosystem. Techniques are described for field simulation of gaseous and particulate air pollution, soil pollutants, disturbance of the earth's surface, and disturbance of wildlife. These techniques are discussed in terms of their realism, cost, and the restrictions which they place on the measurement of ecological parameters.

  8. Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial ecology, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen) and a Convening Lead Author for the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment Chapter on Ecosystems, Biodiversity

  9. LTS Related Links - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 16,3/14 LOWRelated Links About Us

  10. Terrestrial biogeochemistry in the community climate system model (CCSM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    Project (C4 MIP) Phase 1 experiments. In addition, CASA is one of three models--in addition to CN, and sea ice linked through a coupler that exchanges mass and energy fluxes and state information among, 5], the Community Sea Ice Model Version 5 (CSIM5) [6], and the Parallel Ocean Program Version 1

  11. Environmental Science and Management Mission Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Science and Management Mission Statement Approved by the faculty November 29, 2006 Environmental Science and Management is the study of the interactions between society. Environmental Science and Management at PSU focuses on processes that link terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems

  12. Terrestrial Background Reduction in RPM Systems by Direct Internal Shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sean M.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Schweppe, John E.

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray detection systems that are close to the earth or other sources of background radiation often require shielding, especially when trying to detect a relatively weak source. One particular case of interest that we address in this paper is that encountered by the Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) systems placed at border-crossing Ports of Entry (POE). These RPM systems are used to screen for illicit radiological materials, and they are often placed in situations where terrestrial background is large. In such environments, it is desirable to consider simple physical modifications that could be implemented to reduce the effects from background radiation without affecting the flow of traffic and the normal operation of the portal. Simple modifications include adding additional shielding to the environment, either inside or outside the apparatus. Previous work [2] has shown the utility of some of these shielding configurations for increasing the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of gross-counting RPMs. Because the total cost for purchasing and installing RPM systems can be quite expensive, in the range of hundreds of thousands of dollars for each cargo-screening installation, these shielding variations may offer increases in detection capability for relatively small cost. Several modifications are considered here in regard to their real-world applicability, and are meant to give a general idea of the effectiveness of the schemes used to reduce background for both gross-counting and spectroscopic detectors. These scenarios are modeled via the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code package [1] for ease of altering shielding configurations, as well as enacting unusual scenarios prior to prototyping in the field. The objective of this paper is to provide results representative of real modifications that could enhance the sensitivity of this, as well as the next generation of radiation detectors. The models used in this work were designed to provide the most general results for an RPM. These results are therefore presented as general guidance on what shielding configurations will be the most valuable for a generalized RPM, considered in light of their economic and geometric possibility in the real world.

  13. Innovation Ecosystem Initiative - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFPTri-PartyFor manyInhibitingInnovate inInnovation

  14. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption SurveyEnergy Storage EnergyD Energy

  15. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption SurveyEnergy Storage EnergyD EnergyEnergy-Water

  16. EcoSystem Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport, Maine:EauEcoFactor

  17. Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteel Corporation Jump to: navigation,Siri

  18. Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Nathan A. Kaib

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both Earth-mass and Saturn-mass planets. Here we simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems -- 55 Cancri, HD 38529, HD 37124, and HD 74156 -- under the assumption that these systems of giant planets are complete and that their orbits are well-determined. Assuming the giant planets formed and migrated quickly, then terrestrial planets may form from a second generation of planetesimals. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that planets form relatively easily in 55 Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents and orbits in the habitable zone. HD 38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass. No terrestrial planets form in HD 37124 and HD 74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos survive for 100 Myr. If migration occurred later, depleting the planetesimal disk, then massive terrestrial planets are unlikely to form in any of these systems.

  19. 4 Assessment The assessment for the UMM Subbasin consists of terrestrial/wildlife and aquatic/fish sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment for the small tributaries. Ecosystem, Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) was not deemed appropriate with riparian and wetland hab

  20. Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  1. Breaking information-thermodynamics link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Alicki

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The information-thermodynamics link is revisited, going back to the analysis of Szilard's engine. It is argued that instead of equivalence rather complementarity of physical entropy and information theoretical one is a correct concept. Famous Landauer's formula for a minimal cost of information processing is replaced by a new one which takes into account accuracy and stability of information encoding. Two recent experiments illustrating the information-energy conversion are critically discussed.

  2. MAJOR CONFORMED CONTRACTS LINKS Site/Project Contract Link Idaho

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6,Projects | DepartmentLow-TemperatureMAMA-60MAJOR

  3. Survival of Terrestrial Planets in the Presence of Giant Planet Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of ``Hot Jupiters'', Jovian mass planets with very short orbital periods orbiting nearby main sequence stars, has been proposed to be primarily due to the orbital migration of planets formed in orbits initially much further from the parent star. The migration of giant planets would have profound effects on the evolution of inner terrestrial planets in these systems, and previous analyses have assumed that no terrestrial planets survive after migration has occurred. We present numerical simulations showing that a significant fraction of terrestrial planets could survive the migration process, eventually returning to circular orbits relatively close to their original positions. A fraction of the final orbits are in the Habitable Zone, suggesting that planetary systems with close-in giant planets are viable targets for searches for Earth-like habitable planets around other stars.

  4. Metal accumulation in terrestrial pulmonates at a lead/zinc smelter site in Arnoldstein, Austria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabitsch, W.B. [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)] [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently,the suitability of terrestrial gastropods was reviewed as quantitative indicator organisms for environmental metal pollution. The peculiar metal accumulation capabilities in molluscs have been known in detail for decades, but {open_quotes}only few data are available for terrestrial pulmonates{close_quotes}. Furthermore, data are restricted to only a few species, and despite similarities in metabolic pathways, species-specific properties in metal-budget strategies exist. Information concerning the potential range of metal burden in these animals form the field are, therefore, of ecophysical relevance. Snails satisfy a basic demand as quantitative indicators of the bioavailable fraction of terrestrial metal pollution. In this study concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc were measured in tissues of 4 species of snails collected in the vicinity of a lead/zinc smelter with a long history of pollution. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Multi-temporal Terrestrial Lidar for Estimating Individual Tree Dimensions and Biomass Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Shruthi

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -destructive methods. This study developed algorithms to extract individual tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and crown width in plots at Ecosystem Science and Management (ESSM) research area and Huntsville, Texas. Further, the influence of scan settings...

  6. 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Terrestrial Feedstocks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, soFuelDepartment of EnergyEnergy

  7. NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NREL RefinesAnalysis Software(PPS)Cell

  8. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department ofDepartmentScalable Thermo-2

  9. Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWaranaWater

  10. Department of Energy Idaho - Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGas SeparationsRelevantDOEDelegations Current ByCommonInside

  11. NREL: Energy Analysis - Related Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | NationalWebmaster To

  12. EIA - Related Links for Transportation

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877Southwest Region About U.S. NaturalStorage

  13. Related Links | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RM ExitPropertySeptemberofsituationBeginning

  14. Links | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.govSecurity Administration Leader, LosSigned | NationalAbout

  15. Links | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.govSecurity Administration Leader, LosSigned |

  16. Related Links | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyasto the NRC Committee on

  17. Related Links | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyasto the NRC Committee onInformation

  18. Website Policies / Important Links | Geothermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youTheWSRC-TR-97-0100 ControlledScientific

  19. Website Policies / Important Links | DOEpatents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRuralthe emergency response assets of

  20. Website Policies / Important Links | DOEpatents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRuralthe emergency response assets ofDOepatents

  1. Related Links | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29,3, 2012VisitorsThis page providesThe

  2. Related Links | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29,3, 2012VisitorsThis page

  3. Fermilab at Work | Physics Links

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13, 2013 NAME:Job Opportunities Join thePolicies

  4. AlumniLink: January 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAluminaSolarAlumni

  5. AlumniLink: July 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAluminaSolarAlumni

  6. AlumniLink: March 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAluminaSolarAlumni

  7. AlumniLink: May 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAluminaSolarAlumni

  8. AlumniLink: November 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAluminaSolarAlumni

  9. AlumniLink: September 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAluminaSolarAlumni

  10. Beryllium Related Links - Hanford Site

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  11. Bisfuel links - Arizona State University

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable VersiondiironArizona State

  12. Bisfuel links - Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable VersiondiironArizona

  13. Bisfuel links - Solar energy news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolar energy news

  14. astro_links2.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12ZeroVariations ofSenior AcceleratorApril 6,

  15. TAMU Websites - Links - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...SuccessSurprisingSynchrotronsPlasma Physics

  16. How important is diversity for capturing environmental-change responses in ecosystem models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prowe, A. E. F.

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic plankton diversity. Diversity, however, may affect functions such as primary production ...

  17. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We foundPerennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; b Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US Department

  18. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  19. ELSEVIER Ecological Economics 14(1995) 143-159 Ecological economic modeling and valuation of ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -economicmodeling; Ecosystem models; Patuxent River basin; Spatial modeling; Land use 1. Introduction In its report, Reducing of ecological systems. Startingwith an existing spatially articulated ecosystem model of the Pqtuxent River

  20. Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

  1. Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology Eric Karsenti1 *, Silvia G. Acinas-year study of the global ocean ecosystem aboard the ship Tara. A unique sampling programme encompass

  2. Related Links | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    About Us Our Programs Defense Programs Future Science & Technology Programs Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D Programs Related Links Related Links...

  3. Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

  4. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  5. Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Jose A. Carrera, Estanislao de Simon Conservacion de la Naturaleza), Madrid, Spain. Abstract: Management of the fragile and greatly modified level studies on reforestation, hydrol- ogy, and desert control. Most of Spain has a typical

  6. Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results from field experiments fire frequency Woody mortality Introduction of exotic grasses Is cover dominated by annuals or short intensity precipitation Low wind speeds Low P/PE High variability High intensity precipitation High wind

  7. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  8. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  9. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  10. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments ­ NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report December 31, 2011 A progress Dynamics Model Used to Design Permafrost Simulator 2 Details at a Glance 3 Progress and Accomplishments 3 sample in a sleeve of highly conductive copper foil (shown in red) and then cooling coils placed

  11. Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

  12. Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Luther

    Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

  13. ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource £ Heng Zeng, Carla S. Ellis design. This paper explores how to support energy as a first-class operating system resource. En- ergy the limited energy resource among competing tasks. 1. INTRODUCTION Traditionally, the operating system plays

  14. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  15. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  16. Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

  17. Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

  18. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  19. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ‘‘

  20. The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), up and walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opgenoorth, Lars; Faith, Daniel P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    valuation, and accounting (3d)  Platform goal  Strengthen the science?policy interface for biodiversity and ecosystem services