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1

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

2

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

3

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

4

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

5

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

6

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Optimisation of a transverse flux linear PM generator using 3D Finite Element Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Several transverse flux and longitudinal flux linear generator topologies exist for freepiston Stirling engine applications. In this thesis the transverse flux permanent magnet… (more)

Schutte, Jacques

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup 3} N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10`s of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup 3] N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER J Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Current techniques for estimating contaminant mass inputs to impaired flux meter, MS Thesis, UF. This work was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture

Watson, Craig A.

14

Measuring Spectral Actinic Flux and Irradiance: Experimental Results from the Actinic Flux Determination from Measurements of Irradiance (ADMIRA) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the Actinic Flux Determination from Measurements of Irradiance (ADMIRA) campaign to measure spectral global UV irradiance and actinic flux at the ground, beneath an atmosphere well defined by supporting measurements. ...

A. R. Webb; A. F. Bais; M. Blumthaler; G-P. Gobbi; A. Kylling; R. Schmitt; S. Thiel; F. Barnaba; T. Danielsen; W. Junkermann; A. Kazantzidis; P. Kelly; R. Kift; G. L. Liberti; M. Misslbeck; B. Schallhart; J. Schreder; C. Topaloglou

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Measurements over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This papar presents an extensive act of sensible heat (Reynolds flux and dissipation methods) and latent heat (dissipation method) flux measurements from a stable deep water tower and from ships on the deep sea. Operational difficulties ...

W. G. Large; S. Pond

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

MEASUREMENT OF LINEAR COUPLING RESONANCE IN RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear coupling is one of the factors that determine beam lifetime in RHIC. The traditional method of measuring the minimum tune separation requires a tune scan and can't be done parasitically or during the acceleration ramp. A new technique of using ac dipoles to measure linear coupling resonance has been developed at RHIC. This method measures the degree of coupling by comparing the amplitude of the horizontal coherent excitation with the amplitude of the vertical coherent excitation if the beam is excited by the vertical AC dipole and vice versa. One advantage of this method is that it can be done without changing tunes from the normal machine working points. In principle, this method can also localize the coupling source by mapping out the coupling driving terms throughout the ring. This is very useful for local decoupling the interaction regions in RHIC. A beam experiment of measuring linear coupling has been performed in RHIC during its 2003 run, and the analysis of the experimental data is discussed in this paper.

BAI,M.PILAT,F.SATOGATA,T.TOMAS,R.

2002-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

17

An LED pulser for measuring photomultiplier linearity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A light-emitting diode (LED) pulser for testing the low-rate response of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to scintillator-like pulses has been designed, developed, and implemented. This pulser is intended to simulate 80 ns full width at half maximum photon pulses over the dynamic range of the PMT, in order to precisely determine PMT linearity. This particular design has the advantage that, unlike many LED test rigs, it does not require the use of multiple calibrated LEDs, making it insensitive to LED gain drifts. Instead, a finite-difference measurement is made using two LEDs which need not be calibrated with respect to one another. These measurements give a better than 1% mapping of the response function, allowing for the testing and development of particularly linear PMT bases.

Friend, M; Quinn, B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ion-acoustic cnoidal wave and associated non-linear ion flux in dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using reductive perturbation method with appropriate boundary conditions, coupled evolution equations for first and second order potentials are derived for ion-acoustic waves in a collisionless, un-magnetized plasma consisting of hot isothermal electrons, cold ions, and massive mobile charged dust grains. The boundary conditions give rise to renormalization term, which enable us to eliminate secular contribution in higher order terms. Determining the non secular solution of these coupled equations, expressions for wave phase velocity and averaged non-linear ion flux associated with ion-acoustic cnoidal wave are obtained. Variation of the wave phase velocity and averaged non-linear ion flux as a function of modulus (k{sup 2}) dependent wave amplitude are numerically examined for different values of dust concentration, charge on dust grains, and mass ratio of dust grains with plasma ions. It is found that for a given amplitude, the presence of positively (negatively) charged dust grains in plasma decreases (increases) the wave phase velocity. This behavior is more pronounced with increase in dust concentrations or increase in charge on dust grains or decrease in mass ratio of dust grains. The averaged non-linear ion flux associated with wave is positive (negative) for negatively (positively) charged dust grains in the plasma and increases (decreases) with modulus (k{sup 2}) dependent wave amplitude. For given amplitude, it increases (decreases) as dust concentration or charge of negatively (positively) charged dust grains increases in the plasma.

Jain, S. L. [Poornima Group of Institution, Sitapura, Jaipur 302022 (India); Tiwari, R. S. [Regional College for Education, Research and Technology, Jaipur 302022 (India); Mishra, M. K. [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur 302004 (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Spatially averaged heat flux and convergence measurements at the ARM regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

Cloud formation and its relation to climate change is the greatest weakness in current numerical climate models. Surface heat flux in some cases causes clouds to form and in other to dissipate and the differences between these cases are subtle enough to make parameterization difficult in a numerical model. One of the goals of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is to make long term measurements at representative sites to improve radiation and cloud formation parameterization. This paper compares spatially averaged optical measurements of heat flux and convergence with a goal of determining how point measurements of heat fluxes scale up to the larger scale used for climate modeling. It was found that the various optical techniques used in this paper compared well with each other and with independent measurements. These results add confidence that spatially averaging optical techniques can be applied to transform point measurements to the larger scales needed for mesoscale and climate modeling. 10 refs., 6 figs. (MHB)

Porch, W.; Barnes, F.; Buchwald, M.; Clements, W.; Cooper, D.; Hoard, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Doran, C.; Hubbe, J.; Shaw, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Coulter, R.; Martin, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Kunkel, K. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

HF Doppler Measurements of Mesospheric Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent theoretical studies have emphasized the probable importance of internal gravity waves in balancing the momentum budget of the mesosphere. In this paper, we propose a method by which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum can be measured ...

R. A. Vincent; I. M. Reid

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Sampling Errors in Flux Measurements of Slowly Depositing Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling errors in vertical flux measurements obtained by eddy correlation methods are investigated by specifying a jointly normal–lognormal density distribution for the vertical velocity and scalar concentration. The probability density function ...

Edward E. O'Brien

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Technical Sessions Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces R. L. Coulter J. D. Shannon T. J. Martin Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 In a multilaboratory field study held near Boardman in northeastern Oregon in June 1991 and described in greater detail elsewhere (Doran et al. 1991), various properties of the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer over heavily irrigated cropland and adjacent desert steppe were investigated. The locale was selected because its disparate characteristics over various spatial scales stress the ability of general circulation models (GCMs) to describe lower boundary conditions, particularly across the discontinuity between desert (in which turbulent flux of heat must be primarily as sensible heat) and large irrigated tracts (in which turbulent flux of latent heat should be the larger term).

25

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A tall tower flux measurement setup was established in metropolitan Houston, Texas, to measure trace gas fluxes from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in… (more)

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Papka, P. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nuclear Physics group, iThemba labs, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Dobson, R. T. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Stellenbosch, Private bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

How Far is Far Enough?: The Fetch Requirements for Micrometeorological Measurement of Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent model estimates of the flux footprint are used to examine the fetch requirements for accurate micro-meteorological measurement of surface fluxes of passive, conservative scalars within the surface flux layer. The required fetch is ...

T. W. Horst; J. C. Weil

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The AmeriFlux Network of Long-Term CO{sub 2} Flux Measurement Stations: Methodology and Intercomparability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portable flux measurement system has been used within the AmeriFlux network of CO{sub 2} flux measurement stations to enhance the comparability of data collected across the network. No systematic biases were observed in a comparison between portable system and site H, LE, or CO{sub 2} flux values although there were biases observed between the portable system and site measurement of air temperature and PPFD. Analysis suggests that if values from two stations differ by greater than 26% for H, 35% for LE, and 32% for CO{sub 2} flux they are likely to be significant. Methods for improving the intercomparability of the network are also discussed.

Hollinger, D. Y.; Evans, R. S.

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Blue Springs, MO)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Measurement of Surface Energy Fluxes from Two Rangeland Sites and Comparison with a Multilayer Canopy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rangelands are often characterized by a patchy mosaic of vegetation types, making measurement and modeling of surface energy fluxes particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface energy fluxes measured using three eddy ...

Gerald N. Flerchinger; Michele L. Reba; Danny Marks

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Measurement of the Atmospheric $?_e$ flux in IceCube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496 $\\pm$ 66(stat.) $\\pm$ 88(syst.) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range.

IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose1; S. Boser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Diaz-Velez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegard; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glusenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; A. Gross; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Klas; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Kohne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Kopke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lunemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Meszaros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Perez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Radel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schoneberg; L. Schonherr; A. Schonwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stoss; E. A. Strahler; R. Strom; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge1; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

Measurements of Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum and Sensible Heat over the Labrador Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent fluxes of momentum and sensible heat were estimated from sonic anemometer measurements gathered over the Labrador Sea during a winter cruise of the R/V Knorr. The inertial dissipation method was used to calculate turbulent fluxes of ...

Karl Bumke; U. Karger; K. Uhlig

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Non-linear numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in small-scale flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of non-linear, 2D, numerical simulations of magneto-acoustic wave propagation in the photosphere and chromosphere of small-scale flux tubes with internal structure. Waves with realistic periods of three to five minutes are studied, after applying horizontal and vertical oscillatory perturbations to the equilibrium model. Spurious reflections of shock waves from the upper boundary are minimized thanks to a special boundary condition. This has allowed us to increase the duration of the simulations and to make it long enough to perform a statistical analysis of oscillations. The simulations show that deep horizontal motions of the flux tube generate a slow (magnetic) mode and a surface mode. These modes are efficiently transformed into a slow (acoustic) mode in the vA < cS atmosphere. The slow (acoustic) mode propagates vertically along the field lines, forms shocks and remains always within the flux tube. It might deposit effectively the energy of the driver into the chromosphere. When the driver oscillates with a high frequency, above the cut-off, non-linear wave propagation occurs with the same dominant driver period at all heights. At low frequencies, below the cut-off, the dominant period of oscillations changes with height from that of the driver in the photosphere to its first harmonic (half period) in the chromosphere. Depending on the period and on the type of the driver, different shock patterns are observed.

E. Khomenko; M. Collados; T. Felipe

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Simplified Quasi-Linear Model for Wave Generation and Air–Sea Momentum Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified model is described for wave generation and air–sea momentum flux. The model is based upon the quasilinear theory employed by Fabrikant and Janssen, in which the mean flow is approximated to second order in the wave amplitude and ...

Alastair D. Jenkins

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A highly portable, rapidly deployable system for eddy covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To facilitate the study of flux heterogeneity within a region, the authors have designed, built, and field-tested a highly portable, rapidly deployable, eddy covariance CO{sub 2} flux measurement system. The system is built from off-the-shelf parts and was assembled at a minimal cost. The unique combination of features of this system allow for a very rapid deployment with a minimal number of field personnel. The system is capable of making high precision, unattended measurements of turbulent CO{sub 2} fluxes, latent heat (LE) fluxes, sensible heat fluxes (H), and momentum transfer fluxes. In addition, many of the meteorological and ecosystem variables necessary for quality control of the fluxes and for running ecosystem models are measured. A side-by-side field comparison of the system at a pair of established AmeriFlux sites has verified that, for single measurements, the system is capable of CO{sub 2} flux accuracy of about {+-} 1.2 {micro}mole/m{sup 2}/sec, LE flux accuracy of about {+-} 15 Watts/m{sup 2}, H flux accuracy of about {+-} 7 Watts/m{sup 2}, and momentum transfer flux accuracy of about {+-} 11 gm-m/sec/sec. System deployment time is between 2 and 4 hours by a single person. The system was measured to draw between 30 and 35 Watts of power and may be run from available line power, storage batteries, or solar panels.

Billesbach, David P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Torn, Margaret S.; Berry, Joe A.

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report recornmenrls instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two rnonth measurement rnethodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

Young,, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. 0.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

40

A Relaxed Eddy Accumulation System for Measuring Surface Fluxes of Total Gaseous Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system was designed to continuously measure total gaseous mercury (TGM) fluxes over a forest canopy. TGM concentration measurements were measured at 5-min intervals with a Tekran model 2537A mercury analyzer ...

Jesse O. Bash; David R. Miller

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurement of the cosmic ray and neutrino-induced muon flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth’s surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring ...

Formaggio, Joseph A.

42

Dynamic Response of the Fine Wire Psychrometer for Direct Measurement of Water Vapor Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the measurement of humidity fluctuation in the atmospheric boundary layer, a wet- and dry-bulb ther-mocouple psychrometer has been used traditionally. However, in the direct measurement of water vapor flux with the eddy correlation method, ...

Osamu Tsukamoto

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Quest for K?—Preliminary Results from Direct Measurements of Turbulent Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of vertical velocity fluctuations, w?, and temperature fluctuations, T?, on scales of three-dimensional turbulence yield a direct measure of the turbulent heat flux, Jq. The scales contributing most significantly to Jq ...

J. N. Moum

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Measurements of Turbulent Heat and Momentum Fluxes In a Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of heat and momentum fluxes along the valley floor of Brush Creek in Colorado are described. The measurements were taken in the fall of 1984 as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain field program. ...

J. C. Doran; M. L. Wesely; R. T. McMillen; W. D. Neff

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

Duncan, R.V.

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Airborne measurements of mass, momentum, and energy fluxes for the boardman-arm regional flux experiment-1991. Preliminary data release. Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

During 2 - 19 June 1991 the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division of NOAA measured flux densities of mass, momentum, and energy from an airplane in support of DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Over 507 horizontal flux transects were completed, along with 24 vertical atmospheric profiles, during the 93 flight hours. Flux transects passed over both irrigated farmland and steppe. The report describes the variation in wind, radiation, and surface temperature, along with exchange of mass (CO2, H2O, and O3), momentum, and energy as observed along the transects. Airborne measurements are compared with those from flux towers in wheat, corn, and steppe. In general, the measurements correspond well. The largest difference occurs at the steppe tower, with stronger heat fluxes reported by the tower. This discrepancy increases as heat flux increases. The cause may be a significant vertical flux divergence or an inconsistant specification of the mean state.

Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Birdwell, K.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

Air–Sea Heat Flux Measurements from Nearly Neutrally Buoyant Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of neutrally buoyant, high-drag floats to measure the air–sea heat flux from within the turbulent oceanic boundary layer is investigated using float data from four different winter and fall float deployments. Two flux estimates can be ...

Eric A. D'Asaro

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Measurements of Trace Gas Fluxes by MAX-DOAS In Texas City, Texas spring 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of Trace Gas Fluxes by MAX- DOAS In Texas City, Texas ­ spring 2009 Elaina Shawver and NO2 from oil refineries in Texas City, TX by utilizing the spatial inhomogeneity of trace gas/hr, respectively. Determine facility averaged fluxes of NO2, HCHO, and SO2 in Texas City Determine source specific

Collins, Gary S.

53

Description of heat flux measurement methods used in hydrocarbon and propellant fuel fires at Sandia.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the methods commonly used to measure heat flux in fire applications at Sandia National Laboratories in both hydrocarbon (JP-8 jet fuel, diesel fuel, etc.) and propellant fires. Because these environments are very severe, many commercially available heat flux gauges do not survive the test, so alternative methods had to be developed. Specially built sensors include 'calorimeters' that use a temperature measurement to infer heat flux by use of a model (heat balance on the sensing surface) or by using an inverse heat conduction method. These specialty-built sensors are made rugged so they will survive the environment, so are not optimally designed for ease of use or accuracy. Other methods include radiometers, co-axial thermocouples, directional flame thermometers (DFTs), Sandia 'heat flux gauges', transpiration radiometers, and transverse Seebeck coefficient heat flux gauges. Typical applications are described and pros and cons of each method are listed.

Nakos, James Thomas

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

An Approximate Footprint Model for Flux Measurements in the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An explicit footprint model for flux measurements of passive scalars in the lower part of the convective boundary layer (CBL) is introduced. A simple footprint model is derived analytically in an idealized CBL. The simple model can simulate the ...

Weiguo Wang; Kenneth J. Davis; Daniel M. Ricciuto; Martha P. Butler

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Monte Carlo Simulation of the Eddy Accumulation Method for Measuring Scalar Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical simulation of the eddy accumulation technique for measuring scalar fluxes has been devised using pseudo-random number pairs generated by computer. Input information is the joint probability density function of the vertical velocity ...

Edward E. O'Brien

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Surface-Layer Fluxes Measured Using the CT2-Profile Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first experimental test of obtaining heat and momentum fluxes from measurements of the profile of the temperature structure parameter CT2 is performed. The parameter CT2 is obtained from resistance-wire thermometers as well as from optical-...

Reginald J. Hill; Gerard R. Ochs; James J. Wilson

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Effects of Airflow Trajectories Around Aircraft on Measurements of Scalar Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential-flow calculations of the airflow around two research aircraft are used to estimate the effect of flow distortion on measured fluxes of sensible heat and water vapor. From the calculated flow patterns, flow-distortion coefficients are ...

William A. Cooper; Diana Rogers

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A Practical Approach to Flux Measurements of Long Duration in the Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The practical limitations imposed by the marine environment on the principal flux-measurement methods for experiments requiring more than a few days’ duration are examined. Reservations are presented as to the suitability of the bulk method as a ...

Theodore V. Blanc

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Measured and Parameterized Energy Fluxes for Atlantic Transects of R/V Polarstern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible and latent heat fluxes were estimated from turbulence measurements gathered during several Atlantic transects of the R/V Polarstern. The inertial dissipation method was used to analyze the data. Resulting bulk transfer coefficients were ...

Karl Bumke; Michael Schlundt; John Kalisch; Andreas Macke; Henry Kleta

60

Estimates of Surface Heat Flux from Sodar and Laser Scintillation Measurements in the Unstable Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of acoustic backscatter in the lower planetary boundary layer and optical line-of-sight scintillation in the surface layer are each used to compute sensible heat fluxes in the unstable surface layer. Comparisons with simultaneous low-...

R. L. Coulter; M. L. Wesely

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Accurate Radiometric Measurement of the Atmospheric Longwave Flux at theSea Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The errors in pyrgeometer measurements of the atmospheric longwave flux at the sea surface due to differential heating of the sensor dome relative to the body and to shortwave leakage through the dome are evaluated. Contrary to the findings of ...

Robin W. Pascal; Simon A. Josey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Use of the Inertial Dissipation Method for Calculating Turbulent Fluxes from Low-Level Airborne Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements are currently used for computing turbulence fluxes of heat and momentum. The method generally used is the eddy correlation technique, which requires sophisticated equipments to calculate the absolute velocities of the air. ...

Pierre Durand; Leonardo De Sa; Aimé Druilhet; Frédérique Said

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux by Actinometer and of Maximal Polarization of Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, K. A....

64

A Relaxed Eddy Accumulator for Surface Flux Measurements on Ground-Based Platforms and Aboard Research Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method has become a standard tool for scalar flux measurements near the surface during field experiments. With this technique, turbulent fluxes of relatively slowly reacting species are measured using the ...

A. Brut; D. Legain; P. Durand; P. Laville

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Airborne and Wind Tunnel Evaluation of a Wind Turbulence Measurement System for Aircraft-Based Flux Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the ability to measure vertical eddy fluxes of gases from aircraft platforms represents an important capability to obtain spatially resolved data, accurate and reliable determination of the turbulent vertical velocity presents a great ...

K. E. Garman; K. A. Hill; P. Wyss; M. Carlsen; J. R. Zimmerman; B. H. Stirm; T. Q. Carney; R. Santini; P. B. Shepson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are compared with calculations made with a state-of-the art radiative transfer model (Modtran). The model is driven by measurements that give an as accurate as possible...

67

Vertical Heat-Flux Measurements from a Neutrally Buoyant Float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neutrally buoyant float instrumented to measure 1–5 m shear and stratification was deployed for ten days in a near-inertial critical layer at the base of a warm-core ring. Vertical velocity and temperature data, from which large-scale (>5 m) ...

Haili Sun; Eric Kunze; A. J. Williams III

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Johnson, S.D. [Oxbow Power Services, Reno, NV (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida  

SciTech Connect

As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Linear signal-compensated amplifier for reactor power measuring channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear amplifier with automatic signal compensation has been developed for nuclear channels. The amplifiercontrols its sensitivity automatically according to the reference input within the desired settings and has automatic signal compensation capability for use in the nuclear channels. The amplifier will be used in the existing safety channel of Pakistan Research Reactor-1

M. Tahir Khaleeq; Atique-ur-Rahman; Eijaz Ahmed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mercury Flux Measurements: An Intercomparison and Assessment: Nevada Mercury Emissions Project (NvMEP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An understanding of the contribution of natural nonpoint mercury sources to regional and global atmospheric mercury pools is critical for developing emission inventories, formulating environmental regulations, and assessing human and ecological health risks. This report discusses the results of the Nevada Mercury Emissions Project (NvMEP) and takes a close look at the emerging technologies used to obtain mercury flux field data. In specific, it provides an intercomparison of mercury flux measurements obt...

1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development and Testing of Instrumentation for UAV-Based Flux Measurements within Terrestrial and Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation packages have been developed for small (18–28 kg) unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to measure momentum fluxes as well as latent, sensible, and radiative heat fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the topography below. ...

Benjamin D. Reineman; Luc Lenain; Nicholas M. Statom; W. Kendall Melville

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Eddy-Correlation Measurements of Air-Sea Fluxes from a Discus Buoy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates that it is practical to measure turbulent air-sea fluxes from a discus buoy. It proposes a method to correct the measured wind flow, for velocities induced by angular and axial movements of the anemometer, allowing the ...

François Anctil; Mark A. Donelan; William M. Drennan; Hans C. Graber

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Gas-Capture Buoy for Measuring Bubbling Gas Flux in Oceans and Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, calibration, and deployment of a buoy and gas-capture assembly for measuring bubbling gas flux in oceans and lakes are described. The assembly collects gas in a chamber while continuously measuring the position of the gas–water ...

Libe Washburn; Cyril Johnson; Chris C. Gotschalk; E. Thor Egland

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

Nakos, James Thomas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Measurements of neutron flux from an inertial-electrostatic confinement device  

SciTech Connect

A neutron-detection system was built for the purpose of measuring the neutron flux from an Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement Device located at Brigham Young University. A BF$sub 3$ proportional counter was used for absolute flux measurements and a pair of scintillation detectors was used to compare neutron output under different operating conditions. The detectors were designed to be compatible with the operating conditions of the device and to be able to measure small changes in neutron output. The detectors were calibrated using a Pu-Be source with corrections made for laboratory conditions. Performance of the counting system was checked and data were collected on the neutron flux from the device. (auth)

Westenskow, G.A.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Linear signal-compensated amplifier for reactor power measuring channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear amplifier with automatic signal compensation has been developed for nuclear channels. The amplifier controls its sensitivity automatically according to the reference input within the desired settings and has automatic signal compensation capability for use in the nuclear channels. The amplifier will be used in the existing safety channel of Pakistan Research Reactor-1, where the system has an independent sensitivity control unit for manual compensation of xenon effect. The new amplifier will improve the safety of the system. The amplifier is tested and the results found are in very good agreement with the designed specifications. This article presents design and construction of the amplifier and test results.

Khaleeq, M. Tahir; Atique-ur-Rahman,; Ahmed, Eijaz [Electronics Division, PINSTECH, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); F. G. Post Graduate College H-8, Islamabad, 44000 (Pakistan)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

FE Magnetic Field Analysis Simulation Models based Design, Development, Control and Testing of An Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Oscillating Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Development, finite element(FE) analysis of magnetic field distribution, performance, control and testing of a new axial flux permanent magnet linear oscillating motor (PMLOM) along with a suitable speed and thrust control technique is described in this paper. The PMLOM can perform precision oscillation task without exceeding the given limit on allowable average power dissipation. The use of new powerful permanent magnet materials such as Neodymium-Iron-Boron alloys can greatly improve the performance of electrical machines. Also its performance parameters, such as the force, current etc. are experimentally assessed. The objective of this paper is to determine the forces for aluminium mover embedded with rare earth permanent magnet experimentally and analytically through FEMM software and develop a microcontroller based IGBT Inverter for its control. Index Terms- Axial flux machine, finite element analysis, microcontroller based IGBT inverter, permanent magnet linear oscillating motor, rare earth permanent magnet. I.

Govindaraj T; Prof Dr; Ashoke K. Ganguli

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fuzziness measure on complete hedge algebras and quantifying semantics of terms in linear hedge algebras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the paper, we shall examine the fuzziness measure (FM) of terms or of complete and linear hedge algebras of a linguistic variable. The notion of semantically quantifying mappings (SQMs) previously examined by the first author will be redefined more ... Keywords: Fuzziness measure of linguistic terms, Fuzziness of linguistic terms, Interpolative reasoning method, Linear hedge algebras, Membership functions, Semantically quantifying mappings

Nguyen Cat Ho; Nguyen Van Long

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

Erdos, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Micrometeorological Facility for Eddy Flux Measurements of CO2 and H2O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based eddy flux system which is used to measure the CO2 and H2O exchange between the atmosphere and the biosphere is described. Fluctuations of CO2, H2O, air temperature and atmospheric turbulence are sampled at frequencies up to 50 Hz. ...

F. Chahuneau; R. L. Desjardins; R. Verdon; E. Brach

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Inertial-Dissipation Air-Sea Flux Measurements: A Prototype System Using Realtime Spectral Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype system for the measurement and computation of air–sea fluxes in realtime was tested in the Humidity Exchange Over the Sea (HEXOS) main experiment, HEXMAX. The system used a sonic anemometer/thermometer for wind speed, surface stress ...

C. W. Fairall; J. B. Edson; S. E. Larsen; P. G. Mestayer

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Measurement, interpretation and use of unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a two-phase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe by means of an impulse technique using a turning tee and beam. Different electrical filters have ...

Yih, Tien Sieh

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

86

Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND  

SciTech Connect

We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M.P.

2011-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

87

Brief paper: Global trajectory tracking control of VTOL-UAVs without linear velocity measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the position control of Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) without linear velocity measurements. We propose a multistage constructive procedure, exploiting the cascade property of the translational ... Keywords: Linear-velocity observer, Trajectory tracking, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Abdelkader Abdessameud; Abdelhamid Tayebi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The measurement of non-linear damping in metal-matrix composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the measurement of non-linear (i.e. strain amplitude dependent) intrinsic material damping in continuous fiber reinforced metalmatrix composites. The particular MMC studied is a 4-ply, [O?]S, (O = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 degree), P55Gr/Al-6061 composite. A popular method for measuring damping is the free-decay of flexural vibrations of a cantilevered beam. The strain field in a cantilevered beam is inhomogeneous. For materials whose damping is non-linear, the measured damping is not equal to the intrinsic material damping. Using an elementary algorithm developed by Lazan, we extract non-linear intrinsic material damping from non-linear specimen damping. In general, damping is a function of temperature, strain amplitude and strain rate. For the measurements reported herein, the range of these parameters is: [ ] where T is the absolute temperature, Er is the root strain and f is the frequency in Hz.

Ray, Sourav

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Analysis and Interpretation of Dual-Polarized Radar Measurements at +45° and ?45° Linear Polarization States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equations are derived for transforming radar data obtained with ±45° linear polarization states to conventional radar parameters measured at horizontal and vertical polarization states. The derivation is based on the covariance matrix and assumes ...

V. Chandrasekar; J. Hubbert; V. N. Bringi; P. F. Meischner

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Estimation of Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes from Soil Surface Temperature Using a Linear Air-Land Heat Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a linearized model of the heat transfer between the soil layer and the atmosphere. Using this model, the moisture availability at the surface can be estimated from the diurnal variations of the soil surface temperature and ...

Fujio Kimura; Yugo Shimizu

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Time-resolved measurements of hydrogen and deuterium fluxes in the ASDEX plasma boundary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and deuterium fluxes parallel to the toroidal magnetic field were measured in the plasma boundary of ASDEX using graphite collector probes. Time resolution of the order of 100 ms can be obtained by rotating the cylindrical probes behind an aperture during the discharge. The trapped amount of hydrogen was determined by subsequent thermal desorption; in the analyses of deuterium the D(/sup 3/He,p)/sup 4/He nuclear reaction was used. Both methods yield quantitative results. Measurements were done for limiter and divertor discharges in the range of 4 to 20 cm outside the limiter or separatrix. The time distributions show a maximum flux at the beginning and the end of the discharge. The relatively lower flux during the plateau phase of the discharge is in the range 10/sup 15/ to 2 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/, depending on the radial probe position; the maximum values are higher by a factor of 5 to 50. During neutral hydrogen injection, an additional maximum can be observed. The radial l/e-decay length is about 0.9 cm in front and 0.4 cm behind the fixed limiter. The results are compared with independent measurements in ASDEX and other plasma machines.

Roth, J.; Varga, P.; Martinelli, A.P.; Scherzer, B.M.U.; Chen, C.K.; Wampler, W.R.; Taglauer, E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Long-Term Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from a Very Tall Tower in a Northern Forest: Flux Measurement Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methodology for determining fluxes of CO2 and H2O vapor with the eddy-covariance method using data from instruments on a 447-m tower in the forest of northern Wisconsin is addressed. The primary goal of this study is the validation of the methods ...

Bradford W. Berger; Kenneth J. Davis; Chuixiang Yi; Peter S. Bakwin; Cong Long Zhao

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Simultaneous energy distribution and ion fraction measurements using a linear time-of-flight analyzer with a floatable drift tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simultaneous energy distribution and ion fraction measurements using a linear time A technique for simultaneous energy distribution and ion fraction measurements using a linear time Laboratory's Multicharged Ion Research Facility. Energy distributions of the scattered projectiles

94

Real time mass flux measurements of gas-solid suspensions at low velocities  

SciTech Connect

In previous work, measurement of the particulate mass flux was made based upon a novel electrostatic technique. A small conducting wire sensor was inserted in the flow and as each particle hit the sensor an individual pulse of current was identified. Through suitable electronic circuitry, the number of pulses in a given time were counted. This was a direct measure of the number of particle-probe collisions which was related to local particle mass flow. The technique is currently limited to monodisperse suspensions. A primary advantage of the impact counter system is that the output does not depend upon the magnitude of the actual charge transfer. As long as the pulses are sufficiently above the noise level, variations in charge transfer will not affect the measurement. For the current work, the technique was applied to vertical gas-solid flow where the fluid velocity was slightly above the particle terminal velocity. Under these conditions a sufficient signal to noise ratio was not found. The Cheng-Soo charge transfer theory indicated that the low particle-sensor impact velocity was responsible. The probe system was then modified by extracting a particulate sample isokinetically and accelerating the particles to a sufficient velocity by an area reduction in the sampling tube. With this technique the signal to noise ratio was about 12 to 1. Mass flux results are shown to compare favorably with filter collection and weighing.

Saunders, J H; Chao, B T; Soo, S L

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Comparison of Measured and Modeled Broadband Fluxes from Aircraft Data during the ICE '89 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1989 intensive field campaign of the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE) over the North Sea, broadband radiative fluxes were measured in, above, and below cirrus cloud by a number of European meteorological research aircraft. One ...

R. W. Saunders; G. Brogniez; J. C. Buriez; R. Meerkötter; P. Wendling

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Aerosol Radiative Impact on Spectral Solar Flux at the Surface, Derived from Principal-Plane Sky Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of the spectral solar flux reaching the surface in cloud-free conditions are required to determine the aerosol radiative impact and to test aerosol models that are used to calculate radiative forcing of climate. Spectral ...

Y. J. Kaufman; D. Tanré; B. N. Holben; S. Mattoo; L. A. Remer; T. F. Eck; J. Vaughan; Bernadette Chatenet

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

An Intercomparison of Two Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometers Used for Eddy Correlation Measurements of Methane Flux in a Prairie Wetland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison was made between two tunable diode laser spectrometers used to measure methane fluxes by the eddy correlation technique at a prairie wetland site. The spectrometers were built by Unisearch Associates Inc. of Concord, Ontario, ...

D. P. Billesbach; Joon Kim; R. J. Clement; S. B. Verma; F. G. Ullman

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Coherent Doppler Profiler for High-Resolution Particle Velocimetry in the Ocean: Laboratory Measurements of Turbulence and Particle Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pulse-to-pulse coherent acoustic Doppler profiler has been developed for high-resolution particle velocimetry in the ocean, in particular for remote measurements of suspended sediment flux and turbulence in the nearshore and continental shelf ...

Len Zedel; Alex E. Hay

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Magnet-only loudspeaker motors: linear behavior theory vs. Nonlinear measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnet-only loudspeaker motors: linear behavior theory vs. Nonlinear measurements A. Novaka and B, the exclusive use of permanent magnets and the absence of iron can lead to uniform motor parameters (force [6] presented loudspeaker distortion reduction us- ing bonded magnet-only motors. Advantages

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

100

Higgs Coupling Measurements at a 1 TeV Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

Methods for extracting Higgs boson signals at a 1 TeV center-of-mass energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider are described. In addition, estimates are given for the accuracy with which branching fractions can be measured for Higgs boson decays to b{bar b} WW, gg, and {gamma}{gamma}.

Barklow, T

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A New Parameterization for the Determination of Solar Flux Absorbed at the Surface from Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier parameterization that relates the outgoing solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the flux absorbed at the surface is modified and extended to allow for variations in atmospheric properties that were not considered in the original ...

Kazuhiko Masuda; H. G. Leighton; Zhanqing Li

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Design of the AmeriFlux Portable Eddy Covariance System and Uncertainty Analysis of Carbon Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AmeriFlux network continues to improve the understanding of carbon, water, and energy fluxes across temporal and spatial scales. The network includes 120 research sites that contribute to the understanding of processes within and among ...

T. W. Ocheltree; H. W. Loescher

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Liner velocity, current, and symmetry measurements on the 32 MEGAMP flux compression generator experiment ALT-1  

SciTech Connect

A flux compression generator pulse power system, designed, built, and fielded by a Russian team at the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF), was used to successfully drive an aluminum liner to velocities greater than 12 km/sec. The experiment objective was to demonstrate performance of a precision liner implosion at an Atlas current of 30 MA or greater. Diagnostics to measure liner performance were an essential part of the experiment. An experimental team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided a suite of diagnostics to measure liner performance. Three diagnostics were fielded: (1) A velocity interferometer (VISAR) to continuously measure the liner innersurface velocity throughout the entire range of travel, (2) Two Faraday rotation devices to measure liner current during the implosion, and, (3) Sixteen fiber optic impact pins to record liner impact time and provide axial and azimuthal symmetry information. All diagnostics performed very well. Major results are maximum current: 32.3 MA, velocity at impact: greater than 12 km/sec, symmetry: the impact pins indicated that the liner was smooth, solid, and axially symmetric upon arrival at the diagnostic package. The LANL team fabricated, installed, and recorded the three diagnostics presented here. All necessary equipment was brought to the site in Russia. The VNIIEF team fielded other diagnostics to measure machine performance. Results of machine diagnostics are reported in other presentations.

Anderson, B. G. (Brodie G.); Rodriguez, G. (George); Stokes, J. L. (John L.); Tabaka, L. J. (Leonard J.); Clark, D. A. (David A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Estimating Clear-Sky Regional Surface Fluxes in the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site with Ground Measurements and Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compared methods for estimating surface fluxes under clear-sky conditions over a large heterogeneous area from a limited number of ground measurements and from satellite observations using data obtained from the southern Great Plains ...

W. Gao; R. L. Coulter; B. M. Lesht; J. Qiu; M. L. Wesely

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

Ian MacDonald

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Measurement of the Higgs Boson Mass with a Linear e+e- Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential of a linear e+e- collider operated at a centre-of-mass energy of 350 GeV is studied for the measurement of the Higgs boson mass. An integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 is assumed. For Higgs boson masses of 120, 150 and 180 GeV the uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass measurement is estimated to be 40, 65 and 70 MeV, respectively. The effects of beam related systematics, namely a bias in the beam energy measurement, the beam energy spread and the luminosity spectrum due to beamstrahlung, on the precision of the Higgs boson mass measurement are investigated. In order to keep the systematic uncertainty on the Higgs boson mass well below the level of the statistical error, the beam energy measurement must be controlled with a relative precision better than 10-4.

P. Garcia-Abia; W. Lohmann; A. Raspereza

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator  

SciTech Connect

We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

108

Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

109

Neutron Flux Measurements and Calculations in the Gamma Irradiation Facility Using MCNPX.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gamma irradiation facility at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)is used to deliver a pure gamma dose to any target of interest. in addition… (more)

Giuliano, Dominic Richard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Can Shipboard Measurements Reveal Secular Changes in Tropical Air–Sea Heat Flux?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set for the period 1854–1979 will soon become available for studies of secular climate changes in ocean surface heat flux. Of the observed variables from which heat flux is calculated, wind speed and sea ...

C. S. Ramage

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CFD Model Estimates of the Airflow Distortion over Research Ships and the Impact on Momentum Flux Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind velocity and air–sea turbulent flux measurements made from shipborne instruments are biased due to the effect of the ship on the flow of air to the instruments. The presence of the ship causes the airflow to a particular instrument site to ...

M. J. Yelland; B. I. Moat; R. W. Pascal; D. I. Berry

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Water Vapor Flux Measurements from Ground-Based Vertically Pointed Water Vapor Differential Absorption and Doppler Lidars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, two lidar systems were used to measure the vertical water vapor flux in a convective boundary layer by means of eddy correlation. This was achieved by combining a water vapor differential absorption lidar and a heterodyne wind ...

Andreas Giez; Gerhard Ehret; Ronald L. Schwiesow; Kenneth J. Davis; Donald H. Lenschow

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Surface-Layer Fluxes, Profiles, and Turbulence Measurements over Uniform Terrain under Near-Neutral Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric surface-layer experiment over a nearly uniform plowed field was performed to determine the constants in the flux-profile similarity formulas, particularly the von Kármán constant. New instruments were constructed to minimize flow ...

Steven P. Oncley; Carl A. Friehe; John C. Larue; Joost A. Businger; Eric C. Itsweire; Sam S. Chang

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Tower and Aircraft Eddy Covariance Measurements of Water Vapor, Energy, and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes during SMACEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A network of eddy covariance (EC) and micrometeorological flux (METFLUX) stations over corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] canopies was established as part of the Soil Moisture–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) in ...

J. H. Prueger; J. L. Hatfield; T. B. Parkin; W. P. Kustas; L. E. Hipps; C. M. U. Neale; J. I. MacPherson; W. E. Eichinger; D. I. Cooper

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advances in measurements of particle cycling and fluxes in the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sinking flux of particles is an important removal mechanism of carbon from the surface ocean as part of the biological pump and can play a role in cycling of other chemical species. This work dealt with improving methods ...

Owens, Stephanie Anne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Can CO2 Turbulent Flux Be Measured by Lidar? A Preliminary Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical profiling of CO2 turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is investigated using a coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL) operated nearby a tall tower in Wisconsin during June 2007. A CDIAL can perform ...

Fabien Gibert; Grady J. Koch; Jeffrey Y. Beyon; Timothy W. Hilton; Kenneth J. Davis; Arlyn Andrews; Pierre H. Flamant; Upendra N. Singh

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

Measurement of the {sup 8}B solar neutrino flux with the KamLAND liquid scintillator detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F. [Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

How Long Is Long Enough When Measuring Fluxes and Other Turbulence Statistics?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is determined how long a time series must be to estimate covariances and moments up to fourth order with a specified statistical significance. For a given averaging time T there is a systematic difference between the true flux or moment and ...

D. H. Lenschow; J. Mann; L. Kristensen

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Neutron flux measurements in the side-core region of Hunterston B advanced gas-cooled reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The core restraints of advanced gas-cooled reactors are important structural components that are required to maintain the geometric integrity of the cores. A review of neutron dosimetry for the sister stations Hunterston B and Hinkley Point B identified that earlier conservative assessments predicted high thermal neutron dose rates to key components of the restraint structure (the restraint rod welds), with the implication that some of them may be predicted to fail during a seismic event. A revised assessment was therefore undertaken [Thornton, D. A., Allen, D. A., Tyrrell, R. J., Meese, T. C., Huggon, A.P., Whiley, G. S., and Mossop, J. R., 'A Dosimetry Assessment for the Core Restraint of an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor,' Proceedings of the 13. International Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry (ISRD-13, May 2008), World Scientific, River Edge, NJ, 2009, W. Voorbraak, L. Debarberis, and P. D'hondt, Eds., pp. 679-687] using a detailed 3D model and a Monte Carlo radiation transport program, MCBEND. This reassessment resulted in more realistic fast and thermal neutron dose recommendations, the latter in particular being much lower than had been thought previously. It is now desirable to improve confidence in these predictions by providing direct validation of the MCBEND model through the use of neutron flux measurements. This paper describes the programme of work being undertaken to deploy two neutron flux measurement 'stringers' within the side-core region of one of the Hunterston B reactors for the purpose of validating the MCBEND model. The design of the stringers and the determination of the preferred deployment locations have been informed by the use of detailed MCBEND flux calculations. These computational studies represent a rare opportunity to design a flux measurement beforehand, with the clear intention of minimising the anticipated uncertainties and obtaining measurements that are known to be representative of the neutron fields to which the vulnerable steel restraint components are exposed. (authors)

Allen, D.A. [Serco, Rutherford House, Quedgeley, Gloucester, GL2 4NF (United Kingdom); Shaw, S.E. [British Energy, Barnett Way, Barnwood, Gloucester, GL4 3RS (United Kingdom); Huggon, A.P.; Steadman, R.J.; Thornton, D.A. [Serco, Rutherford House, Quedgeley, Gloucester, GL2 4NF (United Kingdom); Whiley, G.S. [British Energy, Barnett Way, Barnwood, Gloucester, GL4 3RS (United Kingdom)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Estimating Liquid Fluxes in Thermally Perturbed Fractured Rock Using Measured Temperature Profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new temperature-profile method was recently developed for analyzing perturbed flow conditions in superheated porous media. The method uses high-resolution temperature data to estimate the magnitude of the heat-driven liquid and gas fluxes that form as a result of boiling, condensation, and recirculation of pore water. In this paper, we evaluate the applicability of this new method to the more complex flow behavior in fractured formations with porous rock matrix. In such formations, with their intrinsic heterogeneity, the porous but low-permeable matrix provides most of the mass and heat storage capacity, and dominates conductive heat transfer, Fractures, on the other hand, offer highly effective conduits for gas and liquid flow, thereby generating significant convective heat transfer. After establishing the accuracy of the temperature-profile method for fractured porous formations, we apply the method in analyzing the perturbed flow conditions in a large-scale underground heater test conducted in unsaturated fractured porous tuff. The flux estimates for this test indicate a significant reflux of water near the heat source, on the order of a few hundred millimeter per year-much larger than the ambient percolation flux of only a few millimeter per year.

J.T. Birkholzer

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Constraints on the opacity profile of the sun from helioseismic observables and solar neutrino flux measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the solar composition problem and by using the recently developed Linear Solar Model approach, we analyze the role of opacity and metals in the sun. After a brief discussion of the relation between the effects produced by a variation of composition and those produced by a modification of the radiative opacity, we calculate numerically the opacity kernels that, in a linear approximation, relate an arbitrary opacity variation to the corresponding modification of the solar observable properties. We use these opacity kernels to discuss the present constraints on opacity (and composition) provided by helioseismic and solar neutrino data.

Villante, F L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fractional models for modeling complex linear systems under poor frequency resolution measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When modeling a linear system in a parametric way, one needs to deal with (i) model structure selection, (ii) model order selection as well as (iii) an accurate fit of the model. The most popular model structure for linear systems has a rational form ... Keywords: Continuous-time modeling, Fractional order systems, Linear systems, Non-asymptotic, Nonlinear least squares, Parametric models, Poor frequency resolutions, Statistical signal processing, Transfer function

Kurt Barbé, Oscar J. Olarte Rodriguez, Wendy Van Moer, Lieve Lauwers

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Mean and Variability of the WHOI Daily Latent and Sensible Heat Fluxes at In Situ Flux Measurement Sites in the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily latent and sensible heat fluxes for the Atlantic Ocean from 1988 to 1999 with 1° × 1° resolution have been recently developed at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) by using a variational object analysis approach. The present study ...

Lisan Yu; Robert A. Weller; Bomin Sun

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

30 GHz flux density measurements of the Caltech-Jodrell flat-spectrum sources with OCRA-p  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To measure the 30-GHz flux densities of the 293 sources in the Caltech-Jodrell Bank flat-spectrum (CJF) sample. The measurements are part of an ongoing programme to measure the spectral energy distributions of flat spectrum radio sources and to correlate them with the milliarcsecond structures from VLBI and other measured astrophysical properties. The 30-GHz data were obtained with a twin-beam differencing radiometer system mounted on the Torun 32-m telescope. The system has an angular resolution of 1.2 arcmin. Together with radio spectral data obtained from the literature, the 30-GHz data have enabled us to identify 42 of the CJF sources as Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources. Seventeen percent of the sources have rising spectra (alpha > 0) between 5 and 30 GHz.

S. R. Lowe; M. P. Gawro?ski; P. N. Wilkinson; A. J. Kus; I. W. A. Browne; E. Pazderski; R. Feiler; D. Kettle

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

30 GHz flux density measurements of the Caltech-Jodrell flat-spectrum sources with OCRA-p  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To measure the 30-GHz flux densities of the 293 sources in the Caltech-Jodrell Bank flat-spectrum (CJF) sample. The measurements are part of an ongoing programme to measure the spectral energy distributions of flat spectrum radio sources and to correlate them with the milliarcsecond structures from VLBI and other measured astrophysical properties. The 30-GHz data were obtained with a twin-beam differencing radiometer system mounted on the Torun 32-m telescope. The system has an angular resolution of 1.2 arcmin. Together with radio spectral data obtained from the literature, the 30-GHz data have enabled us to identify 42 of the CJF sources as Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) sources. Seventeen percent of the sources have rising spectra (alpha > 0) between 5 and 30 GHz.

Lowe, S R; Wilkinson, P N; Kus, A J; Browne, I W A; Pazderski, E; Feiler, R; Kettle, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Real-Time Optical Flux Limits From Gamma-Ray Bursts Measured By The GROCSE Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gamma-Ray Optical Counterpart Search Experiment (GROCSE) presents new experimental upper limits on the optical flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Our experiment consisted of a fully-automated very wide-field opto-electronic detection system that imaged locations of GRBs within a few seconds of receiving trigger signals provided by BATSE’s real-time burst coordinate distribution network (BACODINE). The experiment acquired 3800 observing hours, recording 22 gamma-ray burst triggers within ?30 s of the start of the burst event. Some of these bursts were imaged while gamma-ray radiation was being detected by BATSE. We identified no optical counterparts associated with gamma-ray bursts amongst these events at the mV ? 7.0 to 8.5 sensitivity level. We find the ratio of the upper limit to the V-band optical flux, F?, to the gamma-ray fluence, ??, from these data to be 2 × 10?18 gamma rays: bursts – 3 – 1.

H. S. Park; E. Ables; S. D. Barthelmy; R. M. Bionta; P. S. Butterworth; T. L. Cline; D. H. Ferguson; G. J. Fishman; N. Gehrels; K. Hurley; C. Kouveliotou; B. C. Lee; C. A. Meegan; L. L. Ott; E. L. Parker Received Accepted

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Method for measuring dose-equivalent in a neutron flux with an unknown energy spectra and means for carrying out that method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring the dose-equivalent for exposure to an unknown and/or time varing neutron flux which comprises simultaneously exposing a plurality of neutron detecting elements of different types to a neutron flux and combining the measured responses of the various detecting elements by means of a function, whose value is an approximate measure of the dose-equivalent, which is substantially independent of the energy spectra of the flux. Also, a personnel neutron dosimeter, which is useful in carrying out the above method, comprising a plurality of various neutron detecting elements in a single housing suitable for personnel to wear while working in a radiation area.

Distenfeld, Carl H. (Mattituck, NY)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

Richerme, Philip J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Field Results from a Second-Generation Ocean/Lake Surface Contact Heat Flux, Solar Irradiance, and Temperature Measurement Instrument—The Multisensor Float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from two field programs that support development of a wave-following surface contact multisensor float (MSF) designed to simultaneously measure net surface heat flux, net solar irradiance, and water temperature. The ...

J. P. Boyle

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Comparison of ECMWF, NCEP–NCAR, and SOC Surface Heat Fluxes with Moored Buoy Measurements in the Subduction Region of the Northeast Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of surface heat flux estimates from the NCEP–NCAR and ECMWF atmospheric model reanalyses is assessed by comparison with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute research buoy measurements made during the Subduction Experiment in the ...

S. A. Josey

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Arm Mobile Facility and Its First International Deployment: Measuring Radiative Flux Divergence in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was recently developed to enable collection of detailed climate data in locations not currently sampled by ARM's five fixed sites. The AMF includes a comprehensive suite of active ...

Mark A. Miller; Anthony Slingo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Lidar Measurement of Ammonia Concentrations and Fluxes in a Plume from a Point Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment was performed that demonstrated the ability of a scanning carbon dioxide (CO2) coherent lidar system to measure the concentration distribution of ammonia in a plume from a point source. This application of the differential ...

Yanzeng Zhao; W. Alan Brewer; Wynn L. Eberhard; Raul J. Alvarez

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Determination of Longwave Heat Flux at the Air-Sea Interface Using Measurements from Buoy Platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory for pyrgeometer operation is utilized for determining downwelling longwave radiation. Errors in downwelling longwave radiation measurements are due to differences in pyrgeometer body and dome temperatures compared to that of the ...

T. D. Dickey; D. V. Manov; R. A. Weller; D. A. Siegel

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Spatially Distributed Measurements of Platform Motion for the Correction of Ship-Based Turbulent Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for determining the angular offsets between measurement axes for multiple motion sensing systems and a sonic anemometer using underway data is demonstrated. This enables a single angular rate sensor to be used with spatially separated ...

Ian M. Brooks

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Quasi-linear Eddy-Viscosity Model for the Flux of Energy and Momentum to Wind Waves Using Conservation-Law Equations in a Curvilinear Coordinate System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The airflow above ocean waves is calculated using a quasi-linear model—one in which the effect of the waves on the mean flow is taken into account. The model uses curvilinear coordinates, in which one coordinate surface coincides with the ...

Alastair D. Jenkins

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate variation and disturbance. Frameworks and methodologies developed by the PI will contribute to AmeriFlux Network facility functions for data acquisition, exchange and modeling of results in a broad spectrum of carbon cycle research.

Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

High power high linearity waveguide photodiodes : measurement, modeling, and characterization for analog optical links  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the three-laser two-tone measurement system was designed inat alternative measurement systems. A four-laser three-tonedifferent measurement systems are discussed. A three laser

Draa, Meredith Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Statistical Analysis of Sodium Doppler Wind–Temperature Lidar Measurements of Vertical Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical study is presented of the errors in sodium Doppler lidar measurements of wind and temperature in the mesosphere that arise from the statistics of the photon-counting process that is inherent in the technique. The authors use data ...

Liguo Su; Richard L. Collins; David A. Krueger; Chiao-Yao She

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Experimental measurement methods and data on irradiation of functional design materials by helium ions in linear accelerator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental research on the irradiation of the functional design materials by the Helium ions in the linear accelerator is conducted. The experimental measurements techniques and data on the irradiation of the functional design materials by the Helium ions with the energy up to 4 MeV, including the detailed scheme of experimental measurements setup, are presented. The new design of accelerating structure of the IH-type such as POS-4, using the method of alternate-phase focusing with the step-by-step change of the synchronous phase along the focusing periods in a linear accelerator, is developed with the aim to irradiate the functional design materials by the Helium ions. The new design of the injector of the charged Helium ions with the energy of 120 KeV at the output of an accelerating tube and the accelerating structure of the type of POS-4 for the one time charged Helium ions acceleration in the linear accelerator are researched and developed. The special chamber for the irradiation of functional design materials by the Helium ions is also created. In the process of experiment, the temperature of a sample, the magnitude of current of Helium ions beam and the irradiation dose of sample are measured precisely. The experimental measurement setup and techniques are fully tested and optimized in the course of the research on the electro-physical properties of irradiated samples and the thermal-desorption of Helium ions in a wide range of temperatures

R. A. Anokhin; V. N. Voyevodin; S. N. Dubnyuk; A. M. Egorov; B. V. Zaitsev; A. F. Kobets; O. P. Ledenyov; K. V. Pavliy; V. V. Ruzhitsky; G. D. Tolstolutskaya

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

142

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated from empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper ...

Norman G. Loeb; Konstantin Loukachine; Natividad Manalo-Smith; Bruce A. Wielicki; David F. Young

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Numerical Study of the Influence of a Clearcut on Eddy-Covariance Fluxes of CO2 Measured Above a Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the contributions of unit source fluxes over a clear-cutting area in a forest and over the contiguous forested area to the eddy-covariance (EC) flux of CO2 measured at a tower standing in the center of the clearcut under daytime convective conditions. The large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is used to simulate the dispersion and transport of two conservative and passive tracers that are released from the clearcut and from the forested area, respectively. The time series of the LES-generated vertical velocity and the mixing ratios of both tracers on all the levels at the tower location are recorded every model time step during the last hour of each LES run; this somewhat mimics real EC flux measurements at the tower. The contribution of the unit surface flux over the clearcut relative to that over the forested area decreases exponentially with increasing measurement height, decreasing convective boundary layer depth, increasing atmospheric stability, and decreasing size of the clearcut. LES-derived results are fitted to an empirical relation and applied to flux measurements at the 447-m tall tower in Wisconsin, USA. The contribution of the unit flux over the clearcut on the EC flux measured at the 30-m level of the tower is larger than 50% of that over the forested area under most unstable conditions, while smaller than 2.5% at the 396-m level. Existing analytical footprint models are inappropriate to address the clearcut influence due to clearcut-induced heterogeneity of the turbulent flow in the tower area.

Wang, Weiguo; Davis, Kenneth J.

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

Beating the One-half Limit of Ancilla-free Linear Optics Bell Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that optically encoded two-qubit Bell states can be unambiguously discriminated with a success probability of more than 50% in both single-rail and dual-rail encodings by using active linear-optical resources that include Gaussian squeezing operations. These results are in contrast to the well-known upper bound of 50% for unambiguous discrimination of dual-rail Bell states using passive, static linear optics and arbitrarily many vacuum modes. We present experimentally feasible schemes that improve the success probability to 64.3% in dual-rail and to 62.5% in single-rail for a uniform random distribution of Bell states. Conceptually, this demonstrates that neither interactions that induce nonlinear mode transformations (such as Kerr interactions) nor auxiliary entangled photons are required to go beyond the one-half limit. We discuss the optimality of our single-rail scheme, and talk about an application of our dual-rail scheme in quantum communication.

Hussain A. Zaidi; Peter van Loock

2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with theSudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set  

SciTech Connect

This article provides the complete description of resultsfrom the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ThePhase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water tothe solar 8B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physicsand detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, andestimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach tostatistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions(charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and theresults of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the ?e flux. Under theassumption that the 8B spectrum is undistorted, the measurements fromthis phase yield a solar ?e flux of ?(?e) =1.76+0.05?0.05(stat.)+0.09?0.09 (syst.) x 106 cm?2 s?1, and a non-?ecomponent ?(? mu) = 3.41+0.45?0.45(stat.)+0.48?0.45 (syst.) x 106 cm?2s?1. The sum of these components provides a total flux in excellentagreement with the predictions of Standard Solar Models. The day-nightasymmetry in the ?e flux is found to be Ae = 7.0 +- 4.9 (stat.)+1.3?1.2percent (sys.), when the asymmetry in the total flux is constrained to bezero.

Aharmim, B.; Ahmad, Q.R.; Ahmed, S.N.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen,T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Buehler, G.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch,M.; Bergevin, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Deng, H.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon,N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Henning, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime,A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar,R.J.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Kouzes, R.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss,C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,A.B.; McDonald, D.S.; McFarlane, K.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; MeijerDrees, R.; Mes, H.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Milton,G.; Moffat, B.A.; Monreal, B.; Moorhead, M.; Morrissette, B.; Nally,C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; et al.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Development of the OSO-6 high-energy neutron detector and correlation of measured solar neutron fluxes to solar flares  

SciTech Connect

Thesis. The development of a directional high energy (20 to 160 MeV) neutron detector which was flown to satellite altitudes (500 km; circular equatorial orbit) in the NASA Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO-6) in August 1969 is described. Both the angle of incidence and the energy of the neutron are determined by a proton-recoil telescope (Pilot B scintillation plastic) which provides the source for proton-recoils and defines the dE/dX versus E method for particle identification and energy determination. The telescope is embedded in a scintillation plastic guard counter envelope which eliminates the unwanted charged particle background as well as recoil protons (electrons) whose energies and direction do not satisfy neutron (gamma-ray) detection requirements, respectively. Results from a Monte Carlo calculation indicate that the overall average efficiency within an average angular acceptance of about 29 deg (FWHM) is approximately (2.25 plus or minus 0.113) x 10/sup -4/. The inflight calibration procedure, the main frame data bit error analysis, and the method for determining the orientation of the detector axis in the spacecraft spin plane are described. Results indicate a discrepancy in the measured (0.461 x 10/sup -2/ plus or minus 0.254 x 10/sup -2/ n/cm/sup 2/sec) and theoretical (2 to 70 n/cm/ sup 2/sec) neutron flux es which suggests a lack of basic underatanding of mechanisms leading to high energy neutron production at the sun. (auth)

Young, F.

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Land Surface Heterogeneity in the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97). Part I: Comparing Modeled Surface Flux Maps with Surface-Flux Tower and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface heterogeneity over an area of 71 km × 74 km in the lower Walnut River watershed, Kansas, was investigated using models and measurements from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) field experiment. As an ...

Fei Chen; David N. Yates; Haruyasu Nagai; Margaret A. LeMone; Kyoko Ikeda; Robert L. Grossman

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Relative Humidity Effect on the High-Frequency Attenuation of Water Vapor Flux Measured by a Closed-Path Eddy Covariance System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the high-frequency loss of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) fluxes, measured by a closed-path eddy covariance system, were studied, and the related correction factors through the cospectral transfer function method were ...

Ivan Mammarella; Samuli Launiainen; Tiia Gronholm; Petri Keronen; Jukka Pumpanen; Üllar Rannik; Timo Vesala

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimating Regional Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes above Prairie Cropland from Surface and Upper-Air Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper-air budget methods can be used to estimate the surface sensible and latent heat flux densities on a regional scale. This study assesses the application of radiosonde-based budget methods above homogeneous cropland. Serial daytime soundings ...

Alan G. Barr; G. S. Strong

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Measurement of Water Vapor Flux Profiles in the Convective Boundary Layer with Lidar and Radar-RASS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A remote-sensing method to retrieve vertical profiles of water vapor flux in the convective boundary layer by using a differential absorption lidar and a radar-radio acoustic sounding system is described. The system's height range presently ...

Christoph Senff; Jens Bösenberg; Gerhard Peters

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Aircraft Regional-Scale Flux Measurements over Complex Landscapes of Mangroves, Desert, and Marine Ecosystems of Magdalena Bay, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural ecosystems are rarely structurally simple or functionally homogeneous. This is true for the complex coastal region of Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico, where the spatial variability in ecosystem fluxes from the Pacific coastal ...

Rommel C. Zulueta; Walter C. Oechel; Joseph G. Verfaillie; Steven J. Hastings; Beniamino Gioli; William T. Lawrence; Kyaw Tha Paw U

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Deployment and Evaluation of a System for Ground-Based Measurement of Cloud Liquid Water Turbulent Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct interception of windblown cloud water by forests has been dubbed “occult deposition” because it represents a hydrological input that is hidden from rain gauges. Eddy correlation studies of this phenomenon have estimated cloud water fluxes ...

Andrew S. Kowalski; Peter M. Anthoni; Richard J. Vong; Anthony C. Delany; Gordon D. Maclean

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Spatially resolved temperature and heat flux measurements for slow evaporating droplets heated by a microfabricated heater array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evaporation phenomenon of a liquid droplet was investigated by using microfabricated heaters. All 32 microheaters were designed to have the same resistance. Gold microheaters worked both as temperature indicators and as heaters. The first experiment was performed under a constant voltage mode to investigate the temperature and heat flux variation of the heated surface by the evaporating droplet. The second experiment was performed under constant temperature mode to investigate the spatial and temporal heat flux variation of the constant temperature heater surface by the evaporating droplet heater. Droplet evaporation was recorded with a CCD camera. Experimental data showed temperature and heat flux variations inside and outside of the droplet with respect to time and radial position from the center of the droplet by tomographic deconvolution.

Paik, Sokwon

158

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

159

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a mixed forest from tall tower mixing ratio measurements,vapor measurements from a tall tower, Journal of Geophysical

Riley, W. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP B. Schmid and J. Redemann Bay Area Environmental Research Institute National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California W. P. Arnott Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada A. Bucholtz and J. Reid Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California P. Colarco Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. Covert and R. Elleman University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Eilers, P. Pilewskie, and A. Strawa National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames, Research Center Moffett Field, California R. A. Ferrare

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Measurement of the $?_e$ and Total $^{8}$B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article provides the complete description of results from the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). The Phase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water to the solar $^8$B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physics and detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, and estimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach to statistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions (charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and the results of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the $\

SNO Collaboration

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

162

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Depolarization Estimates from Linear H and V Measurements with Weather Radars Operating in Simultaneous Transmission–Simultaneous Receiving Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circular depolarization ratio (CDR) is a polarimetric parameter, which, unlike linear depolarization ratio (LDR), does not exhibit significant dependence on hydrometeor orientation and can be used for particle type identification and shape ...

Sergey Y. Matrosov

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

CONSTRUCTION OF A 14 Mev NEUTRON GENERATOR UTILIZING T$sup 3$(d,n)He$sup 4$ REACTION AND MEASUREMENT OF FAST NEUTRON FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Construction of a low-voltage accelerating machine for accelerating deuterons which is utilized as a source of production of 14-Mev neutrons by T/sup 3/(d,n)He/sup 4/ reaction is described. Neutron counting has been done by counting recoil protons in a suitable scintillation counter. Neutron yield hss also been measured indirectly from saturated activity of an irradiated thin silver foil. Increase in relative flux with increasing deuteron energy trom 30 kev to 0.1 Mev has been obtained. (auth)

Mitra, B.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Non-interceptive Method to Measure Longitudinal Twiss Parameters of a Beam in a Hadron Linear Accelerator using Beam Position Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of measuring of the RMS longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in linear accelerators is presented. It is based on using signals from beam position monitors (BPM) sensitive to the second order moment of the longitudinal charge distribution in the bunch. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on the superconducting section of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linear accelerator. The results are compared to a direct measurement of the bunch longitudinal profiles using an interceptive bunch shape monitor (BSM) in the linac warm section of the same accelerator. Limitations of the method are discussed. The method is fast and simple, and can be used to obtain the initial parameters for the longitudinal matching in linear accelerators where interceptive diagnostics are not desirable.

Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Determination of Surface-Layer Stability and Eddy Fluxes Using Wind Speed and Vertical Temperature Gradient Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical relations are developed that relate the Monin-Obukhov parameter to a modified bulk Richardson number expressed in terms of measured wind speed and vertical temperature difference. Measured Monin-Obukhov parameters and Richardson ...

I. T. Wang

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Non-Linear Luminescent Coupling in Series-Connected Multijunction Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assumption of superposition or linearity of photocurrent with solar flux is widespread for calculations and measurements of solar cells. The well-known effect of luminescent coupling in multijunction solar cells has also been assumed to be linear with excess current. Here we show significant non-linearities in luminescent coupling in III-V multijunction solar cells and propose a simple model based on competition between radiative and nonradiative processes in the luminescent junction to explain these non-linearities. We demonstrate a technique for accurately measuring the junction photocurrents under a specified reference spectrum, that accounts for and quantifies luminescent coupling effects.

Steiner, M. A.; Geisz, J. F.

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

173

PIV Measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer within and above a Mature Corn Canopy. Part I: Statistics and Energy Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements just within and above a mature corn canopy have been performed to clarify the small-scale spatial structure of the turbulence. The smallest resolved scales are about 15 times the Kolmogorov length ...

R. van Hout; W. Zhu; L. Luznik; J. Katz; J. Kleissl; M. B. Parlange

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Spectral UV Measurements of Global Irradiance, Solar Radiance, and Actinic Flux in New Zealand: Intercomparison between Instruments and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presented here are the results of a short but intense measurement campaign at Lauder, New Zealand, in which spectral irradiance from instruments operated by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) and Austria/Innsbruck (...

Mario Blumthaler; Barbara Schallhart; Michael Schwarzmann; Richard McKenzie; Paul Johnston; Michael Kotkamp; Hisako Shiona

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The Effect of Local Atmospheric Circulations on Daytime Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements over a Pinus elliottii Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The daytime net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was measured in an even-aged slash pine plantation in northern Florida from 1999 to 2001 using the eddy covariance technique. In August 2000, two clear-cuts were formed approximately 1 km west of ...

H. W. Loescher; G. Starr; T. A. Martin; M. Binford; H. L. Gholz

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Flow Distortion by a Solent Sonic Anemometer: Wind Tunnel Calibration and Its Assessment for Flux Measurements over Forest and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main flow distortion effects caused by the sonic probe (i.e., deflection and attenuation/amplification of the wind vector) as a function of the azimuth angle of the incoming flow were examined by means of wind tunnel measurements at four ...

A. Grelle; A. Lindroth

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Measurement of the [superscript 8]B solar neutrino flux with the KamLAND liquid scintillator detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from [superscript 8]B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV ...

Winslow, Lindley

178

The Excess Temperature of a Rigid Fast-Response Thermometer and Its Effects on Measured Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In outdoor experiments a temperature sensor is always subjected to a radiation load that results in a temperature excess error. Not only the mean temperature is effected by this radiation load but also, for a fast-responding sensor, the measured ...

A. F. G. Jacobs; K. G. McNaughton

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

CRTF Real-Time Aperture Flux system  

SciTech Connect

The Real-Time Aperture Flux system (TRAF) is a test measurement system designed to determine the input power/unit area (flux density) during solar experiments conducted at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The RTAF is capable of using both thermal sensors and photon sensors to determine the flux densities in the RTAF measuring plane. These data are manipulated in various ways to derive input power and flux density distribution to solar experiments.

Davis, D.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Linear Quadratic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposal of Reshef et. al. (“MIC”) is an interesting new approach for discovering non-linear dependencies among pairs of measurements in exploratory data mining. However, it has a potentially serious drawback. The authors laud the fact that MIC has no preference for some alternatives over others, but as the authors know, there is no free lunch in Statistics: tests which strive to have high power against all alternatives can have low power in many important situations. To investigate this, we ran simulations to compare the power of MIC to that of standard Pearson correlation and distance correlation (dcor) Székely & Rizzo (2009). We simulated pairs of variables with different relationships (most of which were considered by the Reshef et. al.), but with varying levels of noise added. To determine proper cutoffs for testing the independence hypothesis, we simulated independent data with the appropriate marginals. As one can see from the Figure, MIC has lower power than dcor, in every case except the somewhat pathological

Noah Simon; Robert Tibshirani; Noah Simon; Robert Tibshirani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Use of a cryogenic sampler to measure radioactive gas concentrations in the main off-gas system at a high-flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for measuring gamma-emitting radioactive gases in air has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This method combines a cryogenic air-sample collector with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectroscopy system. This methodology was developed to overcome the inherently difficult collection and detection of radioactive noble gases. The cryogenic air-sampling system and associated HPGe detector has been used to measure the concentration of radioactive gases in the primary coolant main off-gas system at ONRL's High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This paper provides: (1) a description of the cryogenic sampler, the radionuclide detection technique, and a discussion of the effectiveness of sampling and detection of gamma-emitting noble gases; (2) a brief description of HFIR and its associated closed high off-gas system; and (3) quantification of gamma-emitting gases present in the off-gas of the HFIR primary core coolant (e.g. radioisotopes of argon, xenon, and krypton).

Berven, B.A.; Perdue, P.T.; Kark, J.B.; Gibson, M.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimation of Surface Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors reconsider the problem of estimating the sensible heat transfer at the earth's surface from direct measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. For simplicity, only horizontally homogeneous conditions are ...

Jielun Sun; Steven K. Esbensen; L. Mahrt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes  

SciTech Connect

The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Measurement of the neutron leakage from a dedicated intraoperative radiation therapy electron linear accelerator and a conventional linear accelerator for 9, 12, 15(16), and 18(20) MeV electron energies  

SciTech Connect

The issue of neutron leakage has recently been raised in connection with dedicated electron-only linear accelerators used for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In particular, concern has been expressed about the degree of neutron production at energies of 10 MeV and higher due to the need for additional, perhaps permanent, shielding in the room in which the device is operated. In particular, three mobile linear accelerators available commercially offer electron energies at or above the neutron threshold, one at 9 MeV, one at 10 MeV, and the third at 12 MeV. To investigate this problem, neutron leakage has been measured around the head of two types of electron accelerators at a distance of 1 m from the target at azimuthal angles of 0 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 135 deg., and 180 deg. The first is a dedicated electron-only (nonmobile) machine with electron energies of 6 (not used here), 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV and the second a conventional machine with electron energies of 6 (also not used here), 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV. Measurements were made using neutron bubble detectors and track-etch detectors. For electron beams from a conventional accelerator, the neutron leakage in the forward direction in Sv/Gy is 2.1x10{sup -5} at 12 MeV, 1.3x10{sup -4} at 16 MeV, and 4.2x10{sup -4} at 20 MeV, assuming a quality factor (RBE) of 10. For azimuthal angles >0 deg., the leakage is almost angle independent [2x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; (0.7-1.6)x10{sup -5} at 16 MeV, and (1.6-2.9)x10{sup -5} at 20 MeV]. For the electron-only machine, the neutron leakage was lower than for the conventional linac, but also independent of azimuthal angle for angles >0 deg. : ([0 deg. : 7.7x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; 3.0x10{sup -5} at 15 MeV; 1.0x10{sup -4} at 18 MeV]; [other angles: (2.6-5.9)x10{sup -7} at 12 MeV; (1.4-2.2)x10{sup -6} at 15 MeV; (2.7-4.7)x10{sup -6} at 18 MeV]). Using the upper limit of 6x10{sup -7} Sv/Gy at 12 MeV for the IORT machine for azimuthal angles >0 deg. and assuming a workload of 200 Gy/wk and an inverse square factor of 10, the neutron dose equivalent is calculated to be 0.012 mSv/wk. For the primary beam at 12 MeV (0 deg. ), the 10x higher dose would be compensated by the attenuation of a primary beam stopper in a mobile linear accelerator. These neutron radiation levels are below regulatory values (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 'Limitation of exposure to ionizing radiation', NCRP Report No. 116, NCRP Bethesda, MD, 1993)

Jaradat, Adnan K.; Biggs, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Plasma-Neutrals Simulation of Linear Configurations for PSI  

SciTech Connect

Coupled fluid plasma and kinetic Monte Carlo neutrals simulations in a linear configuration are reported. The configuration mimics the tokamak divertor plasma channel contacting a target surface with nearby wall. We calculate the parameters of the source plasmas, 3-5m from the target, required to produce high recycling target plasmas recently simulated for ITER. It is shown that the source plasma needs to deliver heat fluxes of 10-20MW/m2, ion fluxes of 1023/m2/s, densities of 2-6x1019/m3, and electron and ion temperatures of 15-30eV over a plasma radius of 5-6cm. The neutral H and H2 fluxes to the vessel wall are calculated to be comparable to those measured in the divertor regions of today s tokamaks. These results identify some design features for a prospective plasma material test station and the research required for this plasma source.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL; Bonnin, X. [CNRS-LIMHP, Universite, Paris; Canik, John [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based elongation measurements in Advanced Test Reactor high temperature irradiation testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. These materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. Currently, such changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The labor and time to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To resolve these issues, an instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop this testing capability. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper focuses on efforts to design and evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL).

D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based elongation measurements in Advanced Test Reactor high temperature irradiation testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. These materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. Currently, such changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The labor and time to remove, examine and return irradiated samples for each measurement make this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To resolve these issues, an instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated under pressurized water reactor coolant conditions in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop this testing capability. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper focuses on efforts to design and evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory.

D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Apparatus and method for detecting and measuring changes in linear relationships between a number of high frequency signals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic measurement circuit for high speed comparison of the relative amplitudes of a predetermined number of electrical input signals independent of variations in the magnitude of the sum of the signals. The circuit includes a high speed electronic switch that is operably connected to receive on its respective input terminals one of said electrical input signals and to have its common terminal serve as an input for a variable-gain amplifier-detector circuit that is operably connected to feed its output to a common terminal of a second high speed electronic switch. The respective terminals of the second high speed electronic switch are operably connected to a plurality of integrating sample and hold circuits, which in turn have their outputs connected to a summing logic circuit that is operable to develop first, second and third output voltages, the first output voltage being proportional to a predetermined ratio of sums and differences between the compared input signals, the second output voltage being proportional to a second summed ratio of predetermined sums and differences between said input signals, and the third output voltage being proportional to the sum of signals to the summing logic circuit. A servo system that is operably connected to receive said third output signal and compare it with a reference voltage to develop a slowly varying feedback voltage to control the variable-gain amplifier in said common amplifier-detector circuit in order to make said first and second output signals independent of variations in the magnitude of the sum of said input signals.

Bittner, John W. (Shoreham, NY); Biscardi, Richard W. (Ridge, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Apparatus and method for detecting and measuring changes in linear relationships between a number of high frequency signals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic measurement circuit is disclosed for high speed comparison of the relative amplitudes of a predetermined number of electrical input signals independent of variations in the magnitude of the sum of the signals. The circuit includes a high speed electronic switch that is operably connected to receive on its respective input terminals one of said electrical input signals and to have its common terminal serve as an input for a variable-gain amplifier-detector circuit that is operably connected to feed its output to a common terminal of a second high speed electronic switch. The respective terminals of the second high speed electronic switch are operably connected to a plurality of integrating sample and hold circuits, which in turn have their outputs connected to a summing logic circuit that is operable to develop first, second and third output voltages, the first output voltage being proportional to a predetermined ratio of sums and differences between the compared input signals, the second output voltage being proportional to a second summed ratio of predetermined sums and differences between said input signals, and the third output voltage being proportional to the sum of signals to the summing logic circuit. A servo system that is operably connected to receive said third output signal and compare it with a reference voltage to develop a slowly varying feedback voltage to control the variable-gain amplifier in said common amplifier-detector circuit in order to make said first and second output signals independent of variations in the magnitude of the sum of said input signals. 2 figures.

Bittner, J.W.; Biscardi, R.W.

1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

198

A linear Stark shift in dressed atoms as a signal to measure a nuclear anapole moment with a cold atom fountain or interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate theoretically the existence of a linear dc Stark shift of the individual substates of an alkali atom in its ground state, dressed by a circularly polarized laser field. It arises from the electroweak nuclear anapole moment violating P but not T. It is characterized by the pseudoscalar equal to the mixed product formed with the photon angular momentum and static electric and magnetic fields. We derive the relevant left-right asymmetry with its complete signature in a field configuration selected for a precision measurement with cold atom beams. The 3,3 to 4,3 Cs hyperfine-transition frequency shift amounts to 7 $\\mu$Hz for a laser power of about 1 kW at 877 nm, E=100 kV/cm and B larger than 0.5 G.

Bouchiat, M A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A linear Stark shift in dressed atoms as a signal to measure a nuclear anapole moment with a cold atom fountain or interferometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate theoretically the existence of a linear dc Stark shift of the individual substates of an alkali atom in its ground state, dressed by a circularly polarized laser field. It arises from the electroweak nuclear anapole moment violating P but not T. It is characterized by the pseudoscalar equal to the mixed product formed with the photon angular momentum and static electric and magnetic fields. We derive the relevant left-right asymmetry with its complete signature in a field configuration selected for a precision measurement with cold atom beams. The 3,3 to 4,3 Cs hyperfine-transition frequency shift amounts to 7 $\\mu$Hz for a laser power of about 1 kW at 877 nm, E=100 kV/cm and B larger than 0.5 G.

Marie-Anne Bouchiat

2006-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

arXiv:nuclex/0309004 Measurement of the Total Active 8 B Solar Neutrino Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Van Berg, 9 R.G. Van de Water, 7 C.J. Virtue, 5 B.L. Wall, 13 D. Waller, 3 C.E. Waltham, 1 H. Wan Chan. Yeh, 2 and K. Zuber 8 (SNO Collaboration) 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of BritishCl in the heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral­current interactions. The flux is found

Waltham, Chris

202

Heat flux solarimeter  

SciTech Connect

The solarimeter presented in this work is easy to assemble. It is calibrated and its performance is validated by means of Hottel's method. Finally, the curves obtained with this solarimeter are compared to the ones obtained with a commercial solarimeter. This device is based on the evaluation of the heat flow in a metal rod. In consequence, measurements are not affected by ambient temperature variations. On the other hand, there is a linear relationship between the temperatures measured at the rod ends and the incident radiation, as can be concluded both from the theory of its operation and the calibration lines obtained. The results obtained from the global irradiance measurements in the area of Los Polvorines (Buenos Aires Province), together with a preliminary evaluation of the solarimeter's response time, are presented in this work. (author)

Sartarelli, A.; Vera, S.; Cyrulies, E. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Echarri, R. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Samson, I. [INTEC (Instituto Tecnologico Santo Domingo), Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dynamic Characteristics of Regional Flows around the Pyrénées in View of the PYREX Experiment. Part II: Solution of a Linear Model Compared to Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers a linear hydrostatic model of a stable, uniform, constant rotational airflow over three- dimensional, elliptic, cross-sectional families of mountains in a z system. The surface pressure and the winds that are induced around ...

E. Koffi; B. Bénech; J. Stein; B. Terliuc

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Geometrical vector flux sinks and ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The description of ideal flux concentrators as shapes that do not disturb the geometrical vector flux field is extended to all the known types of ideal flux concentrators. This is accomplished, in part, by the introduction of vector flux sinks.

Greenman, P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Momentum Flux and Flux Divergence of Gravity Waves in Directional Shear Flows over Three-Dimensional Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear mountain wave theory is used to derive the general formulas of the gravity wave momentum flux (WMF) and its vertical divergence that develop in directionally sheared flows with constant vertical shear. Height variations of the WMF and its ...

Xin Xu; Yuan Wang; Ming Xue

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part I: Design and Laboratory Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An untended instrument to measure ocean surface heat flux has been developed for use in support of field experiments and the investigation of heat flux parameterization techniques. The sensing component of the Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy flux limitation by tame turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-linear theory of energy flux limitation by ion acoustic turbulence is presented. This distribution function is modelled by a Maxwellian plus an additional piece which carries a heat flux Q. By taking the fourth moment of the Vlasov equation one finds the anomalous thermal conductivity K approximately 3 v/sub e/ delta/sub De/ (e phi/T/sub e/)$sup -2$. Other moments treated self-consistently include anomalous ion heating, electron cooling, current generation and enhanced inverse bremsstrahlung due to the nonthermal ion fluctuations. (auth)

Manheimer, W.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long-term meteorological measurements by active (radar and lidar) and ...

M. Chiriaco; R. Vautard; H. Chepfer; M. Haeffelin; J. Dudhia; Y. Wanherdrick; Y. Morille; A. Protat

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Water Flux in a Cashew Orchard during a Wet-to-Dry Transition Period: Analysis of Sap Flow and Eddy Correlation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information regarding biosphere–atmosphere interactions is important in the study of a hydrological cycle. To this purpose, xylem sap flow (SF) using the Granier system and evapotranspiration (ET) using the eddy correlation method were measured ...

P. G. Oguntunde; N. C. van de Giesen; P. L. G. Vlek; H. Eggers

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

Cameron, C.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Deriving the Surface Soil Heat Flux from Observed Soil Temperature and Soil Heat Flux Profiles Using a Variational Data Assimilation Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach to infer surface soil heat fluxes from measured profiles of soil temperature, soil heat flux, and observations of the vegetation canopy temperature and the incoming shortwave radiation is evaluated for the Cabauw measurement ...

R. J. Ronda; F. C. Bosveld

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

215

A Comparison Between Modeled and Measured Clear-Sky Radiative Shortwave Fluxes in Arctic Environments, with Special Emphasis on Diffuse Radiation  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the SBDART radiative transfer model to predict clear-sky diffuse and direct normal broadband shortwave irradiances is investigated. Model calculations of these quantities are compared with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. The model tends to consistently underestimate the direct normal irradiances at both sites by about 1%. In regards to clear-sky diffuse irradiance, the model overestimates this quantity at the SGP site in a manner similar to what has been observed in other studies (Halthore and Schwartz, 2000). The difference between the diffuse SBDART calculations and Halthore and Schwartz’s MODTRAN calculations is very small, thus demonstrating that SBDART performs similarly to MODTRAN. SBDART is then applied to the NSA site, and here it is found that the discrepancy between the model calculations and corrected diffuse measurements (corrected for daytime offsets, Dutton et al., 2001) is 0.4 W/m2 when averaged over the 12 cases considered here. Two cases of diffuse measurements from a shaded “black and white” pyranometer are also compared with the calculations and the discrepancy is again minimal. Thus, it appears as if the “diffuse discrepancy” that exists at the SGP site does not exist at the NSA sites. We cannot yet explain why the model predicts diffuse radiation well at one site but not at the other.

Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Donna M.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Linear Thermite Charge  

The Linear Thermite Charge (LTC) is designed to rapidly cut through concrete and steel structural components by using extremely high temperature thermite reactions jetted through a linear nozzle. 

217

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~24°C, indicating that heat conduction was small. T h i sday, indicating large heat conduction a n d storage. Control2.1.3 showed that conduction heat flux through the roof was

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Quantum-mechanical linear filtering of random signal sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of estimating a member of a scalar random signal sequence with quantum-mechanical measurements is considered. The minimum variance linear estimator based on an optimal present quantum measurement and optimal linear processing of past measurements ...

J. Baras; R. Harger; Young Park

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An experimental evaluation of the instrumented flux synthesis method for the real-time estimation of reactivity. Final report  

SciTech Connect

One method of determining the flux density is flux synthesis which approximates the flux in the core by linear combinations of precomputed shape functions. In traditional flux synthesis, the unknown mixing coefficients are determined using a weighted residual method of solving the diffusion equation. In the instrumented synthesis method, the mixing coefficients are determined using count rates from neutron detectors in the core. In this way the mixing coefficients are linked to conditions in the reactor. Using the synthesized flux, kinetics parameters, notably reactivity, can be calculated in real time. An experimental evaluation has been performed in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor, MITR-II. Detector measurements have been collected using fission chambers placed at the periphery of the core. The reactor was put into a number of various conditions, both static and transient, and data were collected using a digital acquisition system for later combination with shape functions. Transients included increasing power, decreasing power, and a reactor scram. The shape functions were generated using Version 3.0 of the QUARTZ code, a quadratic nodal diffusion theory code in triangular-Z geometry. Supernodal analysis algorithms have been added to the original program, along with subroutines to guarantee diagonal dominance of the leakage matrix in the finite difference or quadratic current approximations in the coarse mesh. The agreement between coarse mesh and fine mesh in all cases is excellent, with finite difference coarse mesh solutions generally slightly better. The synthesis method has been shown to accurately reflect the changes from an initial condition by combining representative flux shapes. It can be concluded that, with proper calibration of the measurement system and inclusion of representative flux shapes, the instrumented synthesis method will properly predict the flux in the core under a number of conditions.

Hughes, J.C.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Direct Estimation of Heat Flux in a Seasonal Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a direct measurement of the turbulent heat flux. The sampling was from a submarine that used a conventional airfoil probe to measure the vertical component of turbulent velocity and a thermistor probe to measure the ...

Hidekatsu Yamazaki; Thomas Osborn

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging  

SciTech Connect

CO2 storage in a 30-minute period in a tall forest canopy often makes significant contributions to net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in the early morning and at night. When CO2 storage is properly measured and taken into account, underestimations of NEE on calm nights can be greatly reduced. Using CO2 data from a 12-level profile, we demonstrate that the lower canopy layer (below the thermal inversion) is a disproportional contributor to the total CO2 storage. This is because time derivative of CO2 density ( c/ t) generally shows increasing magnitude of mean and standard deviation with decreasing heights at night and from sunrise to 1000 hr in both growing and dormant seasons. Effects of resolution and configuration in a profiling system on the accuracy of CO2 storage estimation are evaluated by comparing subset profiles to the 12-level benchmark profile. It is demonstrated that the effectiveness of a profiling system in estimating CO2 storage is not only determined by its number of sampling levels but, more importantly, by its vertical configuration. To optimize a profile, one needs to balance the influence of two factors, c/ t and layer thickness, among all vertical sections within a forest. As a key contributor to the total CO2 storage, the lower canopy (with relatively large means and standard deviations of c/ t) requires a higher resolution in a profile system than the layers above. However, if the upper canopy is over-sparsely sampled relative to the lower canopy, the performance of a profile system might be degraded since, in such a situation, the influence of layer thickness dominates over that of c/ t. We also find that, because of different level of complexity in canopy structure, more sampling levels are necessary at our site in order to achieve the same level of accuracy as at a boreal aspen site. These results suggest that, in order to achieve an adequate accuracy in CO2 storage measurements, the number of sampling levels in a profile and its design should be subject to the site properties, e.g., canopy architecture and the resulted thermodynamic and flow structures. If CO2 density from a single profile is averaged in time and then used in assessing CO2 storage to make this measurement more spatially representative, biases associated with this averaging procedure become inevitable. Generally, larger window sizes used in averaging CO2 density generate poorer estimates of CO2 storage. If absolute errors are concerned, it appears that the more significant the CO2 storage is during a period (nighttime and early morning hours versus late morning and afternoon, peak growing season versus early growing season), the larger effects the averaging procedure has.

Yang, Bai [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part II: Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the recent ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Departmental Research Initiative, an aircraft was instrumented to carry out direct turbulent flux measurements in the high wind boundary layer of a hurricane. ...

William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Cyril McCormick; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Correcting eddy-covariance flux underestimates over a grassland.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent measurements of the major energy balance flux components are not often consistent with the principle of conservation of energy. This is referred to as a lack of closure of the surface energy balance. Most results in the literature have shown the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes measured by eddy covariance to be less than the difference between net radiation and soil heat fluxes. This under-measurement of sensible and latent heat fluxes by eddy-covariance instruments has occurred in numerous field experiments and among many different manufacturers of instruments. Four eddy-covariance systems consisting of the same models of instruments were set up side-by-side during the Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment and all systems under-measured fluxes by similar amounts. One of these eddy-covariance systems was collocated with three other types of eddy-covariance systems at different sites; all of these systems under-measured the sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The net radiometers and soil heat flux plates used in conjunction with the eddy-covariance systems were calibrated independently and measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux showed little scatter for various sites. The 10% absolute uncertainty in available energy measurements was considerably smaller than the systematic closure problem in the surface energy budget, which varied from 10 to 30%. When available-energy measurement errors are known and modest, eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes should be adjusted for closure. Although the preferred method of energy balance closure is to maintain the Bowen-ratio, the method for obtaining closure appears to be less important than assuring that eddy-covariance measurements are consistent with conservation of energy. Based on numerous measurements over a sorghum canopy, carbon dioxide fluxes, which are measured by eddy covariance, are underestimated by the same factor as eddy covariance evaporation measurements when energy balance closure is not achieved.

Twine, T. E.; Kustas, W. P.; Norman, J. M.; Cook, D. R.; Houser, P. R.; Meyers, T. P.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Wesely, M. L.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; DOE; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationoratory

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

Depinning of flux lines and AC losses in magnet-superconductor levitation system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The AC loss characteristics of a magnet-superconductor system were studied with the magnet fixed to the free end of an oscillating cantilever located near a stationary melt-textured YBCO pellet. Below a threshold AC field amplitude {approx}2Oe, the dissipation of the oscillator is amplitude-independent, characteristic of a linear, non-hysteretic regime. Above threshold,dissipation increases with amplitude, reflecting the depinning and hysteretic motion of flux lines. The threshold AC field is an order of magnitude higher than that measured for the same YBCO material via AC susceptometry in a uniform DC magnetic field, A partial lock-in of flux lines between YBCO ab planes is proposed as the mechanism for the substantial increase of the depinning threshold.

Terentiev, A. N.; Hull, J. R.; De Long, L. E.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1989-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Lidar Scanning of Momentum Flux in and above the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to measure the vertical flux of horizontal momentum using both continuous wave and pulsed Doppler lidar profilers are evaluated. The lidar measurements are compared to momentum flux observations performed with sonic anemometers over flat ...

J. Mann; A. Peña; F. Bingöl; R. Wagner; M. S. Courtney

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow and the vibration of nuclear reactor components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a twophase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe. Measured momentum flux data has been machine processed by standard random vibration techniques ...

Yih, Tien Sieh

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mapping Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared camera technique designed for remote sensing of air–water heat flux has been developed. The technique uses the differential absorption of water between 3.817 and 4.514 microns. This difference causes each channel’s radiance to ...

Walt McKeown; Richard Leighton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Nordholt, Jane E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Linear electric field mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer is described having a low weight and low power requirement, for use in space. It can be used to analyze the ionized particles in the region of the spacecraft on which it is mounted. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically sysmetric linear electric field.

McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Heat Flux Measurement - Requirements, Characterization, and Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Furnace tube failures in utility boilers have persistently been the largest contributor to forced outages on coal-fired generation. Given their impact, the industry has spent considerable resources in understanding their failure modes and developing technology to try to eliminate or at least mitigate the problems they present. In contrast to the historically low emphasis placed on boiler cleaning, there has been substantial interest over the last decade on sootblowing equipment and strategies to mitigate...

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modelling non-linear exposure-disease relationships in a large individual participant meta-analysis allowing for the effects of exposure measurement error  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of exposures whether it be the measure- ment of biological exposures such as serum creatinine [27], or blood glucose [28]; environmen- tal exposures such as radon [29] or air pollution [30]; dietary exposures such as energy intake [31] or alcohol consumption... cause of death in almost all countries in the world. CHD caused approximately 1 out of every 6 deaths in the United States in 2006; an average of 1 death every 38 seconds [4]. In the United Kingdom cardiovascular disease is the main cause of mortality...

Strawbridge, Alexander Daniel

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

235

Underground particle fluxes in the Soudan mine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of our knowledge of the underground particle fluxes in the vicinity of Soudan 2 and of the future MINOS detector. It includes a brief description of the measured muon fluxes and of the gamma ray spectra deduced from measurements of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations in the rock. Counting rates in gaseous and scintillation detectors are estimated. Some data on what is known about the chemical composition of the local rocks are included; these are relevant to an understanding of the underground muon rates and also to a calculation of low energy neutron fluxes. 1 Introduction As plans for the MINOS detector and for the excavation of a new detector hall progress, some people have begun asking what is known of the fluxes of various particles underground. The muon flux is relevant for possibly calibrating and certainly for monitoring the long term behavior of the detector. It will likely be the determining factor in the eventual trigger rate if the MINOS det...

Keith Ruddick; Keith Ruddick; Th

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Linear collider: a preview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

Wiedemann, H.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Linear phase compressive filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase linear filter for soliton suppression is in the form of a laddered series of stages of non-commensurate low pass filters with each low pass filter having a series coupled inductance (L) and a reverse biased, voltage dependent varactor diode, to ground which acts as a variable capacitance (C). L and C values are set to levels which correspond to a linear or conventional phase linear filter. Inductance is mapped directly from that of an equivalent nonlinear transmission line and capacitance is mapped from the linear case using a large signal equivalent of a nonlinear transmission line.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Detroit as linear city.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Detroit is a city in decline. Through strategic withdrawal into a linear city its main artery -Woodward Avenue- becomes an assembly line that holds different… (more)

Kuys, J.I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Focusing in Linear Accelerators  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Review of the theory of focusing in linear accelerators with comments on the incompatibility of phase stability and first-order focusing in a simple accelerator.

McMillan, E. M.

1950-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

Linear Graphene Plasmons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coupling of the plasmon spectra of graphene and a nearby thick plasma is examined here in detail. The coupled modes include linear plasmons. Keywords: Graphene, plasmons, surface

N. J.M. Horing

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Feedbacks between Eddy Heat Fluxes and Radiative Heating in an Energy-Balance Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of midlatitude temperature structure to changes in radiative forcing is examined in an analytical energy-balance model that includes parameterized eddy heat fluxes and linear radiative heating. The characteristics of heat-...

Lee E. Branscome; Enda O'Brien

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Empirical Models of the Eddy Heat Flux and Vertical Shear on Short Time Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between the eddy heat flux and vertical shear in the extratropical atmosphere is studied by developing various linear stochastic models fitted to the observed January and July Northern Hemispheric data. Models are univariate or ...

Steven J. Ghan

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Inverse Analysis Adjustment of the SOC Air–Sea Flux Climatology Using Ocean Heat Transport Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from a linear inverse analysis of the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) air–sea flux climatology using 10 hydrographic ocean heat transport constraints distributed throughout the Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans. A ...

Jeremy P. Grist; Simon A. Josey

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The Role of Momentum Fluxes in Shaping the Life Cycle of a Baroclinic Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wide disparities in baroclinic wave development between spherical and Cartesian geometry are investigated with the purpose of assessing the role of the eddy momentum fluxes. Differences are already significant at the linear stage, as momentum ...

G. Balasubramanian; Stephen T. Garner

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to ?vert = (3.10 +0.05 ?0.07) 10?7 s ?1 cm ?2 sr ?1.

E. -i. Esch A; T. J. Bowles A; A. Hime A; A. Pichlmaier A; R. Reifarth A; H. Wollnik B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Electroslag remelting with used fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Laboratory experiments aimed at evaluating gas flux sampling methods The value of using the noble gas suite in transport studies is made obvious by the eight-fold enrichment in 4Her132Xe observed in the 80% CO sample (Table 2 1), relative to abundancies in air. Our results at least show that gas samples collected by either sudden pre-evacuated container or gradual gas pump. Removal of tens of cm3 of gas through an access pipe appear to reflect steady-state values. On-site measurements other than CO2 flux could

251

Sensible Heat Flux-Radiometric Surface Temperature Relationship for Eight Semiarid Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of sensible heat flux, radiometric surface temperature, air temperature, and wind speed made at eight semiarid rangeland sites were used to investigate the sensible heat flux-aerodynamic resistance relationship. The individual sites ...

J. B. Stewart; W. P. Kustas; K. S. Humes; W. D. Nichols; M. S. Moran; H. A. R. de Bruin

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gradiometric flux qubits with tunable gap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For gradiometric three-Josephson-junction flux qubits, we perform a systematic study on the tuning of the minimal transition frequency, the so-called qubit gap. By replacing one of the qubit's Josephson junctions by a dc SQUID, the critical current of this SQUID and, in turn, the qubit gap can be tuned in situ by a control flux threading the SQUID loop. We present spectroscopic measurements demonstrating a well-defined controllability of the qubit gap between zero and more than 10 GHz. In the future, this enables one to tune the qubit into and out of resonance with other superconducting quantum circuits, while operating the qubit at its symmetry point with optimal dephasing properties. The experimental data agree very well with model calculations based on the full qubit Hamiltonian. From a numerical fit, we determine the Josephson coupling and the charging energies of the qubit junctions. The derived values agree well with those measured for other junctions fabricated on the same chip. We also demonstrate the biasing of gradiometric flux qubits near the symmetry point by trapping an odd number of flux quanta in the gradiometer loop. In this way, we study the effect of the significant kinetic inductance, thereby obtaining valuable information for the qubit design.

M. J. Schwarz; J. Goetz; Z. Jiang; T. Niemczyk; F. Deppe; A. Marx; R. Gross

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nonferromagnetic linear variable differential transformer for accurately measuring mechanical displacements in the presence of high magnetic fields is provided. The device utilizes a movable primary coil inside a fixed secondary coil that consists of two series-opposed windings. Operation is such that the secondary output voltage is maintained in phase (depending on polarity) with the primary voltage. The transducer is well-suited to long cable runs and is useful for measuring small displacements in the presence of high or alternating magnetic fields.

Ellis, James F. (Powell, TN); Walstrom, Peter L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tightening Constraints from the Lyman Alpha Forest with the Flux Probability Distribution Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of the Lyman-alpha forest of absorption lines in quasar spectra has emerged as a potentially powerful technique to constrain the linear matter power spectrum. In most previous work, the amplitude of the ionizing background was fixed by calibrating simulations to match the observed mean transmitted flux in the Lyman-alpha forest. This procedure is undesirable in principle as it requires the estimation of the unabsorbed quasar continuum level, a difficult undertaking subject to various sources of systematic error and bias. We suggest an alternative approach based on measuring the one-point probability distribution function (pdf) of the fluctuations in the flux about the mean, relative to the mean, i.e. the pdf of delta_f = (f - )/. This statistic, while sensitive to the amplitude of the ionizing background, has the virtue that its measurement does not require an estimate of the unabsorbed continuum level. We present a measurement of the pdf of delta_f from seven Keck HIRES spectra, spanning a redshift range of z = 2.2 - 4.4. To illustrate that our method is useful, we compare our measurements of the pdf of delta_f, and measurements of the flux power spectrum from Croft et al. (2002) at z = 2.72, with cosmological simulations. From this comparison, we obtain constraints on the mean transmission in the Lyman-alpha forest, the slope of the temperature-density relation, as well as the amplitude and slope of the mass power spectrum. Our methodology will be useful for obtaining more precise constraints with larger data samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).

Adam Lidz; Katrin Heitmann; Lam Hui; Salman Habib; Michael Rauch; Wallace L. W. Sargent

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Linear Motor Powered Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

Thornton, Richard D.

256

North Linear Accelerator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Linear Accelerator North Linear Accelerator Building Exterior Beam Enclosure Level Walk to the North Spreader North Recombiner Extras! North Linear Accelerator The North Linear Accelerator is one of the two long, straight sections of Jefferson Lab's accelerator. Electrons gain energy in this section by passing through acceleration cavities. There are 160 cavities in this straightaway, all lined up end to end. That's enough cavities to increase an electron's energy by 400 million volts each time it passes through this section. Electrons can pass though this section as many as five times! The cavities are powered by microwaves that travel down the skinny rectangular pipes from the service buildings above ground. Since the cavities won't work right unless they are kept very cold, they

257

Edges and linearization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with how grammar determines the phonological consequence of syntactic dislocation. It centers on a hypothesis regarding the linearization of movement chains - the Edge Condition on Copy Deletion, ...

Trinh, Tue H. (Tue Huu)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Interpretation of Flux-Profile Observations at ITCE (1976)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At an International Turbulence Comparison Experiment (ITCE) in Australia (1976), wind, temperature and humidity profiles, plus vertical fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat were measured for a limited range of unstable conditions, ...

R. J. Francey; J. R. Garratt

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Momentum flux in two-phase flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The average momentum flux at a section of a pipe with twophase upflow has been measured by the impulse technique. Steamwater and air-water mixtures were tested in one-inch and onehalf inch nominal pipes. Homogeneous ...

Andeen, Gerry B.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Differential evolution and its application to metabolic flux analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metabolic flux analysis with measurement data from 13C tracer experiments has been an important approach for exploring metabolic networks. Though various methods were developed for 13C positional enrichment or isotopomer modelling, ...

Jing Yang; Sarawan Wongsa; Visakan Kadirkamanathan; Stephen A. Billings; Phillip C. Wright

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

Top-of-Atmosphere Radiance-to-Flux Conversion in the SW Domain for the ScaRaB-3 Instrument on Megha-Tropiques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earth radiation budget (ERB) is the difference between the solar absorbed flux and the terrestrial emitted flux. These fluxes are calculated from satellite measurements of outgoing shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiances using empirical or ...

Michel Viollier; Carsten Standfuss; Olivier Chomette; Arnaud Quesney

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 08//00 5 08//00 Study of Beam Energy Spectrum Measurement in the NLC Extraction Line August 2000 Yuri Nosochkov and Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA Abstract: The NLC extraction line optics includes a secondary focal point with a very small _- function and 2 cm dispersion which can be used for measurement of outgoing beam energy spread. In this study, we performed tracking simulations to transport the NLC disrupted beam from the Interaction Point (IP) to the extraction line secondary focus (the IP image), `measure' the transverse beam pro_le at the IP image and reconstruct the beam energy spectrum. The resultant distribution was compared with the original energy spectrum at the IP. Study of Beam Energy Spectrum Measurement

264

A Stochastic Linear Theory of Mesoscale Circulation Induced by the Thermal Heterogeneity of the Land Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a three-dimensional stochastic linear model of the mesoscale circulation induced by the variability of turbulent sensible heat flux over land surface. The primitive equations relating wind field, geo-potential, and potential ...

Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bars; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kunkel, K.E. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part I: Momentum Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important outcome from the ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Hurricane Program is the first-ever direct measurements of momentum flux from within hurricane boundary layers. In 2003, a specially instrumented NOAA P3 ...

Jeffrey R. French; William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLUX PREDICTION FOR A DISH CONCENTRATOR CAVITY RECEIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the boiling region in a steam receiver [1][2]. Measurement of the three dimensional flux distribution-dimensional flux distribution in the focal region, in particular as an aid to receiver design. Inputs to the ray a two-dimensional flux distribution which was used to calibrate the ray tracing models

272

Detection of the Neutrino Fluxes from Several Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is considered the detection of neutrinos moving from the opposite directions. The states of the particle of the detector interacting with the neutrinos are connected with the P-transformation. Hence only a half of neutrinos gives contribution into the superposition of the neutrino states. Taking into account the effect of the opposite neutrino directions the total neutrino flux from several sources are in the range 0.5--1 of that without the effect. The neutrino flux from nuclear reactors measured in the KamLAND experiment is $0.611\\pm 0.085 {\\rm (stat)} \\pm 0.041 {\\rm (syst)} $ of the expected flux. Calculations for the conditions of the KamLAND experiment yield the neutrino flux taking into account the effect of the opposite neutrino directions, 0.555, of that without the effect that may account for the neutrino flux observed in the KamLAND experiment.

D. L. Khokhlov

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

273

Next Linear Collider Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to the Next Linear Collider NLC Home Page If you would like to learn about linear colliders in general and about this next-generation linear collider project's mission,...

274

Obtaining the Probability Vector Current Density in Canonical Quantum Mechanics by Linear Superposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quantum mechanics status of the probability vector current density has long seemed to be marginal. On one hand no systematic prescription for its construction is provided, and the special examples of it that are obtained for particular types of Hamiltonian operator could conceivably be attributed to happenstance. On the other hand this concept's key physical interpretation as local average particle flux, which flows from the equation of continuity that it is supposed to satisfy in conjunction with the probability scalar density, has been claimed to breach the uncertainty principle. Given the dispiriting impact of that claim, we straightaway point out that the subtle directional nature of the uncertainty principle makes it consistent with the measurement of local average particle flux. We next focus on the fact that the unique closed-form linear-superposition quantization of any classical Hamiltonian function yields in tandem the corresponding unique linear-superposition closed-form divergence of the probability vector current density. Because the probability vector current density is linked to the quantum physics only through the occurrence of its divergence in the equation of continuity, it is theoretically most appropriate to construct this vector field exclusively from its divergence -- analysis of the best-known "textbook" special example of a probability vector current density shows that it is thus constructed. That special example in fact leads to the physically interesting "Ehrenfest subclass" of probability vector current densities, which are closely related to their classical peers.

Steven Kenneth Kauffmann

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

Theory and experiment testing flux-line cutting physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss predictions of five proposed theories for the critical state of type-II superconductors accounting for both flux cutting and flux transport (depinning). The theories predict different behaviours for the ratio E{sub y}/E{sub z} of the transverse and parallel components of the in-plane electric field produced just above the critical current of a type-II superconducting slab as a function of the angle of an in-plane applied magnetic field. We present experimental results measured using an epitaxially grown YBCO thin film favouring one of the five theories, i.e. the extended elliptic critical-state model. We conclude that when the current density J is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the local magnetic flux density B, both flux cutting and flux transport occur simultaneously when J exceeds the critical current density J{sub c}, indicating an intimate relationship between flux cutting and depinning. We also conclude that the dynamical properties of the superconductor when J exceeds J{sub c} depend in detail upon two nonlinear effective resistivities for flux cutting ({rho}{sub c}) and flux flow ({rho}{sub f}) and their ratio r = {rho}{sub c}/{rho}{sub f}.

Clem, John R.; Weigand, Marcus; Durrell, J. H.; Campbell, A. M.

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Portable Linear Accelerator Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Minac-3, a miniaturized linear accelerator system. It covers the current equipment capabilities and achievable modifications, applications information for prospective users, and technical information on high-energy radiography that is useful for familiarization and planning. The design basis, development, and applications history of Minac are also summarized.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Constructing Uncertainty Sets for Robust Linear Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a methodology for constructing uncertainty sets within the framework of robust optimization for linear optimization problems with uncertain parameters. Our approach relies on decision maker risk preferences. Specifically, we ... Keywords: coherent risk measures, distortion risk measures, robust optimization, uncertainty sets

Dimitris Bertsimas; David B. Brown

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Molecular isotopic effects on coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes  

SciTech Connect

A full quantum treatment shows that coupled electronic and nuclear fluxes exhibit a strong sensitivity to a small mass change in a vibrating molecule. This has been exemplified with the existing isotopes of H{sub 2}{sup +} as well as few fictitious ones. We find that the fluxes undergo a significant change as one goes from one isotope of reduced mass {mu} to another. Other well-defined observables are likewise affected. It turns out that as a general rule, the heavier the isotope, the larger the flux, the smaller the dispersion, and the longer the revival period. While we were able to confirm analytically that the time at the first turning point scales as {radical}({mu}) and that the revival period changes linearly with {mu}, the mechanism of other observables remains subtle as the result of quantum interference highlighted by the pronounced difference observed on the dispersion pattern.

Kenfack, A.; Paulus, B. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Barth, I. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Marquardt, F. [Visualisierung und Datenanalyse, Zuse Institut Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Fachbereich Mathematik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advective Flux in Relation to Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange at the NIWOT Ridge Ameriflux Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes final progress made on measurements of advective CO2 flux to the overall forest carbon budget at the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site in Colorado.

Russell K. Monson

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Reticle stage based linear dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector to measure EUV intensity employs a linear array of photodiodes. The detector is particularly suited for photolithography systems that includes: (i) a ringfield camera; (ii) a source of radiation; (iii) a condenser for processing radiation from the source of radiation to produce a ringfield illumination field for illuminating a mask; (iv) a reticle that is positioned at the ringfield camera's object plane and from which a reticle image in the form of an intensity profile is reflected into the entrance pupil of the ringfield camera, wherein the reticle moves in a direction that is transverse to the length of the ringfield illumination field that illuminates the reticle; (v) detector for measuring the entire intensity along the length of the ringfield illumination field that is projected onto the reticle; and (vi) a wafer onto which the reticle imaged is projected from the ringfield camera.

Berger, Kurt W. (Livermore, CA)

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

283

Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

Kopp, Manfred K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Valentine, Kenneth H. (Lenoir City, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The TESLA superconducting linear collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the present status of the studies for a superconducting Linear Collider (TESLA).

R. Brinkmann; the TESLA Collaboration

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Linear induction accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

Donna P. Guillen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Linear Solar Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new approach to study the properties of the sun. We consider small variations of the physical and chemical properties of the sun with respect to Standard Solar Model predictions and we linearize the structure equations to relate them to the properties of the solar plasma. By assuming that the (variation of) the present solar composition can be estimated from the (variation of) the nuclear reaction rates and elemental diffusion efficiency in the present sun, we obtain a linear system of ordinary differential equations which can be used to calculate the response of the sun to an arbitrary modification of the input parameters (opacity, cross sections, etc.). This new approach is intended to be a complement to the traditional methods for solar model calculation and allows to investigate in a more efficient and transparent way the role of parameters and assumptions in solar model construction. We verify that these Linear Solar Models recover the predictions of the traditional solar models with an high...

Villante, F L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO2 emission rates. EC CO2 fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m- 2 d- 1 (mean = 1346 g m- 2 d- 1). Using footprint modeling, EC CO2 fluxes were compared to CO2 fluxes measured by

289

Optical linear algebra  

SciTech Connect

Many of the linear algebra operations and algorithms possible on optical matrix-vector processors are reviewed. Emphasis is given to the use of direct solutions and their realization on systolic optical processors. As an example, implicit and explicit solutions to partial differential equations are considered. The matrix-decomposition required is found to be the major operation recommended for optical realization. The pipelining and flow of data and operations are noted to be key issues in the realization of any algorithm on an optical systolic array processor. A realization of the direct solution by householder qr decomposition is provided as a specific case study. 19 references.

Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s{sup -2} to 320 km s{sup -1}, thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 {mu}T, 6 R{sub Sun} above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} Wb (1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day{sup -1} and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Wb yr{sup -1} (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx yr{sup -1}) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to {approx} - 0.2 nT yr{sup -1} change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 03/12/99 2 03/12/99 PEP-II RF Cavity Revisited December 3, 1999 R. Rimmer, G. Koehler, D. Li, N. Hartmann, N. Folwell, J. Hodgson, B. McCandless Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Berkeley, CA, USA Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall

293

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

294

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

Piecewise Linear Modeling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Piecewise Linear Modeling and Analysis explains in detail all possible model descriptions to efficiently store piecewise linear functions starting with the Chua descriptions. Detailed explanation on how the model parameter can be obtained ...

Domine M. W. Leenaerts; Wim M. Van Bokhoven

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

History of Proton Linear Accelerators  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Some personal recollections are presented that relate to the author`s experience developing linear accelerators, particularly for protons. (LEW)

Alvarez, L. W.

1987-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

297

Linearized Additive Classifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the additive model learning literature and adapt a penalized spline formulation due to Eilers and Marx, to train additive classifiers efficiently. We also propose two new embeddings based two classes of orthogonal basis with orthogonal derivatives, which can also be used to efficiently learn additive classifiers. This paper follows the popular theme in the current literature where kernel SVMs are learned much more efficiently using a approximate embedding and linear machine. In this paper we show that spline basis are especially well suited for learning additive models because of their sparsity structure and the ease of computing the embedding which enables one to train these models in an online manner, without incurring the memory overhead of precomputing the storing the embeddings. We show interesting connections between B-Spline basis and histogram intersection kernel and show that for a particular choice of regularization and degree of the B-Splines, our proposed learning algorithm closely appr...

Maji, Subhransu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Trapped-flux superconducting memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory cell based on trapped flux in superconductors has been built and tested. The cell is constructed entirely by vacuum evaporation of thin films and can be selected by coincident current or by other techniques, with drive-current requirements less ...

J. W. Crowe

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Boardman Regional Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible-and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy ...

J. C. Doran; J. M. Hubbe; R. R. Kirkham; W. J. Shaw; C. D. Whiteman; F. J. Barnes; D. Cooper; W. Porch; R. L. Coutler; D. R. Cook; R. L. Hart; W. Gao; T. J. Martin; J. D. Shannon; T. L. Crawford; D. D. Baldocchi; R. J. Dobosy; T. P. Meyers; L. Balick; W. A. Dugas; R. Hicks; L. Fritschen; L. Hipps; E. Swiatek; K. E. Kunkel

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Antarctic Zone Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In winter the eastern Weddell Sea in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean hosts some of the most dynamic air-ice-sea interactions found on earth. Sea ice in the region is kept relatively thin by heat flux from below, maintained by upper-...

M. G. McPhee; S. F. Ackley; P. Guest; T. P. Stanton; B. A. Huber; D. G. Martinson; J. H. Morison; R. D. Muench; L. Padman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modification of flux profiles using a faceted concentrator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of a faceted solar concentrator allows for some flexibility in aiming strategy and in the intensity of the resulting flux profile at the target. This can be an advantage when considering applications that do not necessarily require maximum concentration, particularly emerging, new applications in solar processed advanced materials. This paper will describe both an analysis of predicted flux profiles for several different aiming strategies using the SOLFUR computer code and experiments to characterize the actual flux profiles realized with a selected aiming strategy. The SOLFUR code models each of the furnace components explicitly. Aim points for each facet can be specified. Thus many strategies for adjusting aim points can be easily explored. One strategy calls for creating as uniform a flux over as large an area as possible. We explored this strategy analytically and experimentally. The experimental data consist of flux maps generated by a video imaging system calibrated against absolute flux measurements taken with circular foil calorimeters. Results from the analytical study and a comparison with the experimental data indicate that uniform profiles can be produced over fairly large areas.

Lewandowski, A; Scholl, K; Bingham, C

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

On the Chaotic Flux Dynamics in a Long Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux dynamics in an annular long Josephson junction is studied. Three main topics are covered. The first is chaotic flux dynamics and its prediction via Melnikov integrals. It turns out that DC current bias cannot induce chaotic flux dynamics, while AC current bias can. The existence of a common root to the Melnikov integrals is a necessary condition for the existence of chaotic flux dynamics. The second topic is on the components of the global attractor and the bifurcation in the perturbation parameter measuring the strength of loss, bias and irregularity of the junction. The global attractor can contain co-existing local attractors e.g. a local chaotic attractor and a local regular attractor. In the infinite dimensional phase space setting, the bifurcation is very complicated. Chaotic attractors can appear and disappear in a random fashion. Three types of attractors (chaos, breather, spatially uniform and temporally periodic attractor) are identified. The third topic is ratchet effect. Ratchet effect can be achieved by a current bias field which corresponds to an asymmetric potential, in which case the flux dynamics is ever lasting chaotic. When the current bias field corresponds to a symmetric potential, the flux dynamics is often transiently chaotic, in which case the ratchet effect disappears after sufficiently long time.

Z. C. Feng; Y. Charles Li

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparison of Heat Fluxes from Summertime Observations in the Suburbs of Four North American Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous measurements of urban energy balances have been restricted to a small number of cities. This paper presents directly measured energy balance fluxes for suburban areas in four cities within the United States: Tucson, Sacramento, Chicago, ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Quality Control and Tilt Correction Effects on the Turbulent Fluxes Observed at an Ocean Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates atmospheric factors influencing the quality and the postprocessing (e.g., tilt correction) of fast-response measurements of turbulent fluxes for difficult open-sea measurements over an offshore platform. The data were ...

Hyun-Mi Oh; Kyung-Eak Kim; Kyung-Ja Ha; Larry Mahrt; Jae-Seol Shim

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Comparison of Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Calculations Using the Bowen Ratio and Aerodynamic Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis technique is outlined that calculates the sensible and latent heat fluxes by the Bowen ratio and aerodynamic methods, using profile measurements at any number of heights. Field measurements at two sites near Churchill, Manitoba, ...

David H. Halliwell; Wayne R. Rouse

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Source-intrinsic near-infrared properties of Sgr A*: Total intensity measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive data description for Ks-band measurements of Sgr A*. We characterize the statistical properties of the variability of Sgr A* in the near-infrared, which we find to be consistent with a single-state process forming a power-law distribution of the flux density. We discover a linear rms-flux relation for the flux-density range up to 12 mJy on a timescale of 24 minutes. This and the power-law flux density distribution implies a phenomenological, formally non-linear statistical variability model with which we can simulate the observed variability and extrapolate its behavior to higher flux levels and longer timescales. We present reasons why data with our cadence cannot be used to decide on the question whether the power spectral density of the underlying random process shows more structure at timescales between 25 min and 100 min compared to what is expected from a red noise random process.

Witzel, G; Bremer, M; Zamaninasab, M; Shahzamanian, B; Valencia-S., M; Schödel, R; Karas, V; Lenzen, R; Marchili, N; Sabha, N; Garcia-Marin, M; Buchholz, R M; Kunneriath, D; Straubmeier, C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Linear induction pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electromagnetic linear induction pump for liquid metal which includes a unitary pump duct. The duct comprises two substantially flat parallel spaced-apart wall members, one being located above the other and two parallel opposing side members interconnecting the wall members. Located within the duct are a plurality of web members interconnecting the wall members and extending parallel to the side members whereby the wall members, side members and web members define a plurality of fluid passageways, each of the fluid passageways having substantially the same cross-sectional flow area. Attached to an outer surface of each side member is an electrically conductive end bar for the passage of an induced current therethrough. A multi-phase, electrical stator is located adjacent each of the wall members. The duct, stators, and end bars are enclosed in a housing which is provided with an inlet and outlet in fluid communication with opposite ends of the fluid passageways in the pump duct. In accordance with a preferred embodiment, the inlet and outlet includes a transition means which provides for a transition from a round cross-sectional flow path to a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow path defined by the pump duct.

Meisner, John W. (Newbury Park, CA); Moore, Robert M. (Canoga Park, CA); Bienvenue, Louis L. (Chatsworth, CA)

1985-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

1953-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solving linear program as linear system in polynomial time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physically concise polynomial-time iterative-cum-non-iterative algorithm is presented to solve the linear program (LP) Minc^txsubject toAx=b,x>=0. The iterative part-a variation of Karmarkar projective transformation algorithm-is essentially due to ... Keywords: Barnes algorithm, Error-free computation, Linear program, Linear system, Matlab program, Polynomial-time iterative-cum-non-iterative algorithm

Syamal K. Sen; Suja Ramakrishnan; Ravi P. Agarwal

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Morphology and dynamics of three interacting kink-unstable flux ropes in a laboratory magnetoplasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flux ropes are ubiquitous in space and solar plasmas. Multiple adjacent flux ropes are commonly observed both in the solar corona and in the earth's magnetotail. The interaction of adjacent flux ropes is often dynamic and can lead to magnetic reconnection. In this paper, the interaction of three flux ropes is studied in a low {beta} background laboratory magnetoplasma. The magnetic structure of the flux rope is produced by the poloidal field of a field-aligned finite sized current which adds to the guide magnetic field and creates the typical helical field line structure. Each rope produces magnetic fields on the order of a few percent of the guide field. Volumetric magnetic field data were acquired and the magnetic field structure and dynamics of the flux ropes can thus be reconstructed. The flux ropes are found to propagate at the Alfven speed. Merging and bouncing of the flux ropes have been observed. The ropes twist and writhe as they propagate through the plasma. They are line tied and clearly separate at the cathode end but further away they merge into one extended rope. The steady state of the flux ropes is characterized by a rotation of the three flux ropes as a whole. At the same time, the flux ropes are twisting around each other. Time resolved density and temperature measurements from Langmuir probe data exhibit the same dynamics as the magnetic field data.

Van Compernolle, B.; Gekelman, W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, 1000 Veteran Avenue, Suite 15-70, California 90095 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Measurement of parallel ion energy distribution function in PISCES plasma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PISCES facility is used to conduct controlled plasma-surface interaction experiments. Plasma parameters typical of those found in the edge plasmas of major fusion confinement experiments are produced. In this work, the energy distribution of the ion flux incident on a material surface is measured using a gridded energy analyzer in place of a material sample. The full width at half maximum energy distribution of the ion flux is found to vary from 10 eV to 30 eV both hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Helium plasmas have a much lower FWHM energy spread than hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. The FWHM ion energy spread is found to be linearly related to the electron temperature. The most probable ion energy is found to be linearly related to the bias applied to the energy analyzer. Other plasma parameters have a weak influence upon the energy distribution of the ion flux. Two possible physical mechanisms for producing the observed results are introduced and suggestions for further work are made. The impact of the reported measurements on the materials experiments conducted in the PISCES facility are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made. 11 refs., 13 figs.

Tynan, G.R.; Goebel, D.M.; Conn, R.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The dynamics of non-linear optical absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On traversing materials with absorbing dyes, weak optical beams develop a Beer (exponential) profile, while intense beams develop a spatially initially linear and then finally an exponential profile. This anomalous, deep penetration due to photo-bleaching of surface layers is important for heavy dye-loading and intense beams, for instance in photo-actuation. We address the problem of the evolution in time from initial Beer's Law to deeply penetrating optical profiles in dyes. Our solution of the coupled, non-linear, partial differential equations governing the spatio-temporal decay of the Poynting flux and the non-linear dynamics of the \\textit{trans-cis} conversion is applicable to general systems of photo-active molecules under intense irradiation, for instance in biology, in spectroscopy and in opto-mechanical devices.

D. Corbett; C. L. van Oosten; M. Warner

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

When Are Eddy Tracer Fluxes Directed Downgradient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the direction of eddy tracer fluxes are examined using eddy-resolving isopycnic experiments for a cyclic zonal channel. Eddy fluxes are directed downgradient on average when either (i) there is a Lagrangian increase in ...

Chris Wilson; Richard G. Williams

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Surface Radiative Fluxes in Sub-Sahel Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports results of observations of radiative fluxes measured in sub-Sahel Africa during a 2-yr period (1992–94). Shortwave radiation in the solar spectrum (0.2–4.0 ?m), photosynthetically active radiation (0.4–0.7 ?m), and longwave ...

F. Miskolczi; T. O. Aro; M. Iziomon; R. T. Pinker

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Linear Accelerator | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrons emitted from a cathode heated to 1100 C. The electrons are accelerated by high-voltage alternating electric fields in a linear accelerator (linac; photo below)....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High-flux solar photon processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Maximizing Buoyancy Flux across Layered Geostrophic Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For layered analogues of the ocean stratification, the problem of maximizing buoyancy flux across a section with zero mass flux is considered. The two layer situation on an f-plane is particularly simple and it is shown that the buoyancy flux is ...

Nelson G. Hogg; Henry M. Stommel

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 27, NO. 2, JUNE 2012 489 Modeling of a Complementary and Modular Linear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Modular Linear Flux-Switching Permanent Magnet Motor for Urban Rail Transit Applications Ruiwu Cao-switching permanent magnet (MLFSPM) motor is investi- gated, in which both the magnets and armature windings incorporates the high power density of a linear permanent magnet synchronous motor and the simple structure

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

324

Underestimation of oxygen deficiency hazard through use of linearized temperature profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The failure mode analysis for any cryogenic system includes the effects of a large liquid spill due to vessel rupture or overfilling. The Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) analysis for this event is a strong function of the estimated heat flux entering the spilled liquid. A common method for estimating the heat flux is to treat the surface on which the liquid spills as a semi-infinite solid. This note addresses the effect of linearizing the temperature profile in this form of analysis, and shows it to cause the calculated flux to be underestimated by more than a factor of two. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Kerby, J.

1989-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

ANN Models for Steam Turbine Power Output Toward Condenser Circulating Water Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aimed the costliness and the complex process of performance test for steam turbine power output toward circulating water flux and in view of the non—linear advantage about neural network, it brings forward predicting the performance using artificial ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, steam turbine power output, performance prediction

Jia Ruixuan; Xu Hong

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Color Flux Tube as an Effective String  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the low-energy regime of the confining string connecting color sources in Yang-Mills theory. First, we present results of the Monte Carlo measurement of the width of the flux tube between two static quarks in the fundamental representation both at zero and at finite temperature. Then we consider the confining flux tube connecting color sources in larger representations of the gauge group. For stable string - the k-strings - we study the Luscher term; for unstable strings we investigate their decay as the distance between the static sources is increased.

Pepe, Michele [INFN, Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Edificio U2, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

327

Estimation of the Impact of Sampling Errors in the VOS Observations on Air–Sea Fluxes. Part II: Impact on Trends and Interannual Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the same approach as in Part I, here it is shown how sampling problems in voluntary observing ship (VOS) data affect conclusions about interannual variations and secular changes of surface heat fluxes. The largest uncertainties in linear ...

Sergey Gulev; Thomas Jung; Eberhard Ruprecht

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Chromo-Electric flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profiles of the chromo-electric field generated by static quark-antiquark, $Q{\\bar Q}$ and three-quark, $QQQ$ sources are calculated in Coulomb gauge. Using a variational ansatz for the ground state, we show that a flux tube-like structure emerges and combines to the ``Y''-shape field profile for three static quarks. The properties of the chromo-electric field are, however, not expected to be the same as those of the full action density or the Wilson line and the differences are discussed.

Patrick O. Bowman; Adam P. Szczepaniak

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

330

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Design of Sampling Strategies to Detect CO2 Emissions From Hidden Geothermal Systems, Lewicki, Oldenburg and Kennedy. The objective of this project is to investigate geothermal CO2 monitoring in the near surface as a tool to discover hidden geothermal reservoirs. A primary goal of this project is to develop an approach that places emphasis on cost and time-efficient near-surface exploration methods and yields results to guide and focus more cost-intensive geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids. To this end, we present (1) the physical properties of CO2 key to its transport in the

331

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

332

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Remote high temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in high temperature environments. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet light. The luminescence emitted by the two thermographic-phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, B.W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Spatial Heterogeneity of Air–Sea Energy Fluxes over a Coral Reef—Heron Reef, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal environment of a coral reef is moderated by complex interactions of air–sea heat and moisture fluxes, local to synoptic-scale weather and reef hydrodynamics. Measurements of air–sea energy fluxes over coral reefs are essential to ...

Mellissa C. MacKellar; Hamish A. McGowan; Stuart R. Phinn

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions, an issue that has been largely neglected so far. We the representation of biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We

337

The Sensitivity of Surface Fluxes to Soil Water Content in Three Land Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporative fraction (EF; the ratio of latent heat flux to the sum of the latent plus sensible heat fluxes) can be measured in the field to an accuracy of about 10%. In this modeling study, the authors try to determine to what accuracy soil ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Fanrong J. Zeng; Agnès Ducharne; Jean C. Morrill; Randal D. Koster

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluating the JULES Land Surface Model Energy Fluxes Using FLUXNET Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface energy flux measurements from a sample of 10 flux network (FLUXNET) sites selected to represent a range of climate conditions and biome types were used to assess the performance of the Hadley Centre land surface model (Joint U.K. Land ...

Eleanor Blyth; John Gash; Amanda Lloyd; Matthew Pryor; Graham P. Weedon; Jim Shuttleworth

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Seasonal and Diurnal Fluxes of Radiation, Heat, Water Vapor, and Carbon Dioxide over a Suburban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on 1 yr of field measurements, the diurnal, seasonal, and annual fluxes of energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) at a residential area of Tokyo, Japan, are described. The major findings are as follows. 1) The storage heat flux G in the daytime ...

R. Moriwaki; M. Kanda

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Implementing Distributed Systems Using Linear Naming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linear graph reduction is a simple computational model in which the cost of naming things is explicitly represented. The key idea is the notion of "linearity". A name is linear if it is only used once, so with linear ...

Bawden, Alan

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

LINEAR AND NONLINEAR CORRECTIONS IN THE RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS.  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed to measure operationally the linear and non-linear effects of the interaction region triplets, that gives access to the multipole content through the action kick, by applying closed orbit bumps and analysing tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been extensively tested and used during the RHIC operations in 2001. Measurements were taken at 3 different interaction regions and for different focusing at the interaction point. Non-linear effects up to the dodecapole have been measured as well as the effects of linear, sextupolar and octupolar corrections. An analysis package for the data processing has been developed that through a precise fit of the experimental tune shift data (measured by a phase lock loop technique to better than 10{sup -5} resolution) determines the multipole content of an IR triplet.

PILAT,F.; CAMERON,P.; PTITSYN,V.; KOUTCHOUK,J.P.

2002-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Remote Sensing of Hail with a Dual Linear Polarization Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for the remote sensing of hail with an S-band dual linear polarization radar is described. The method employs a new hail signal HDR, which is derived from disdrometer measurements of raindrop size distributions. Experimental ...

K. Aydin; T. A. Seliga; V. Balaji

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A generalized flux function for three-dimensional magnetic reconnection  

SciTech Connect

The definition and measurement of magnetic reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic fields with multiple reconnection sites is a challenging problem, particularly in fields lacking null points. We propose a generalization of the familiar two-dimensional concept of a magnetic flux function to the case of a three-dimensional field connecting two planar boundaries. In this initial analysis, we require the normal magnetic field to have the same distribution on both boundaries. Using hyperbolic fixed points of the field line mapping, and their global stable and unstable manifolds, we define a unique flux partition of the magnetic field. This partition is more complicated than the corresponding (well-known) construction in a two-dimensional field, owing to the possibility of heteroclinic points and chaotic magnetic regions. Nevertheless, we show how the partition reconnection rate is readily measured with the generalized flux function. We relate our partition reconnection rate to the common definition of three-dimensional reconnection in terms of integrated parallel electric field. An analytical example demonstrates the theory and shows how the flux partition responds to an isolated reconnection event.

Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Multi-scale comparative spectral analysis of satellite total solar irradiance measurements from 2003 to 2013 reveals a planetary modulation of solar activity and its non-linear dependence on the 11-year solar cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Herein we adopt a multi-scale dynamical spectral analysis technique to compare and study the dynamical evolution of the harmonic components of the overlapping ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3, SOHO/VIRGO and SORCE/TIM total solar irradiance (TSI) records during 2003.15 to 2013.16 in solar cycles 23 and 24. The three TSI time series present highly correlated patterns. Significant power spectral peaks are common to these records and are observed at the following periods: 0.070 year, 0.097 year, 0.20 year, 0.25 year, 0.30-0.34 year, 0.39 year. Less certain spectral peaks occur at about 0.55 year, 0.60-0.65 year and 0.7-0.9 year. Four main frequency periods at 24.8 days (0.068 year), 27.3 days (0.075 year), at 34-35 days (0.093-0.096 year) and 36-38 days (0.099-0.104 year) characterize the solar rotation cycle. The amplitude of these oscillations, in particular of those with periods larger than 0.5 year, appears to be modulated by the 11-year solar cycle. Similar harmonics have been found in other solar indices. The observed periodicities are found highly coherent with the spring, orbital and synodic periods of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Jupiter. We conclude that solar activity is likely modulated by planetary gravitational and electromagnetic forces acting on the sun. The strength of the sun's response to planetary forcing depends non-linearly on the state of internal solar dynamics: planetary-sun coupling effects are enhanced during solar activity maxima and attenuated during minima.

Nicola Scafetta; Richard C. Willson

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

345

Phase and amplitude detection system for the Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system to measure and stabilize the rf power sources in the Stanford Linear Accelerator is described. This system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 microsecond 2856 MHz rf pulse and will be used for phase feedback control and for amplitude and phase jitter detection. This paper discusses the measurement system performance requirements for the operation of the Stanford Linear Collider, and the design and implementation of the phase and amplitude detection system. The fundamental software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

Fox, J.D.; Schwarz, H.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

If sterile neutrinos exist, how can one determine the total solar neutrino fluxes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 8B solar neutrino flux inferred from a global analysis of solar neutrino experiments is within 11% (1 sigma) of the predicted standard solar model value if only active neutrinos exist, but could be as large as 1.7 times the standard prediction if sterile neutrinos exist. We show that the total 8B neutrino flux (active plus sterile neutrinos) can be determined experimentally to about 10% (1 sigma) by combining charged current measurements made with the KamLAND reactor experiment and with the SNO CC solar neutrino experiment, provided the LMA neutrino oscillation solution is correct and the simulated performance of KamLAND is valid. Including also SNO NC data, the sterile component of the 8B neutrino flux can be measured by this method to an accuracy of about 12% (1 sigma) of the standard solar model flux. Combining Super-Kamiokande and KamLAND measurements and assuming the oscillations occur only among active neutrinos, the 8B neutrino flux can be measured to 6% (1 sigma); the total flux can be measured to an accuracy of about 9%. The total 7Be solar neutrino flux can be determined to an accuracy of about 28% (1 sigma) by combining measurements made with the KamLAND, SNO, and gallium neutrino experiments. One can determine the total 7Be neutrino flux to a one sigma accuracy of about 11% or better by comparing data from the KamLAND experiment and the BOREXINO solar neutrino experiment provided both detectors work as expected. The pp neutrino flux can be determined to about 15% using data from the gallium, KamLAND, BOREXINO, and SNO experiments.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Pena-Garay

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

348

The Boundary Layer of Mars: Fluxes, Stability, Turbulent Spectra, and Growth of the Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectra of wind from high-frequency measurements in the Martian atmospheric surface layer, along with the diurnal variation of the height of the mixed surface layer, are calculated for the first time for Mars. Heat and momentum fluxes, stability, ...

James E. Tillman; Lars Landberg; Søren E. Larsen

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Can Surface-Cover Tiles Be Summed to Give Neighborhood Fluxes in Cities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper addresses the question of whether the modeling practice of summing separate land-cover tiles to give urban fluxes at the neighborhood scale has merit. A central-city site in Basel, Switzerland, was instrumented to measure turbulent ...

J. A. Salmond; M. Roth; T. R. Oke; A. Christen; J. A. Voogt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Surface Energy Fluxes of Arctic Winter Sea Ice in Barrow Strait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface energy balance of sea ice was measured during degree one-week periods in November, January, and February of 1980?81 in the Barrow Strait, Northwest Territories, Canada. Turbulent fluxes were derived with the bulk aerodynamic transfer ...

Konrad Steffen; Ted deMaria

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes Tested over the Western Pacific Warm Pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent flux measurements from five flights of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Electra aircraft during the Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) are used to test convective ...

Lawrence Greischar; Roland Stull

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Two Experiments on Using a Scintillometer to Infer the Surface Fluxes of Momentum and Sensible Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A traditional use of scintillometry is to infer path-averaged values of the turbulent surface fluxes of sensible heat Hs and momentum ? (, where ? is air density and u* is the friction velocity). Many scintillometer setups, however, measure only ...

Edgar L Andreas

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Parameterization of Surface Heat Fluxes above Forest with Satellite Thermal Sensing and Boundary-Layer Soundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-derived surface temperature measurements can be used in conjunction with temperature and wind soundings in the boundary layer to determine the surface sensible heat flux from forests at the regional scale. The underlying formulation is ...

Wilfried Brutsaert; A. Y. Hsu; Thomas J. Schmugge

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Microstructure Estimates of Turbulent Salinity Flux and the Dissipation Spectrum of Salinity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct determination of the irreversible turbulent flux of salinity in the ocean has not been possible because of the complexity of measuring salinity on the smallest scales over which it mixes. Presented is an analysis of turbulent salinity ...

Jonathan D. Nash; James N. Moum

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Determining Turbulent Vertical Velocity, and Fluxes of Heat and Salt with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors show that vertical turbulent fluxes in the upper ocean can be measured directly with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). A horizontal profile of vertical water velocity is obtained by applying a Kalman smoother to AUV motion data. ...

Daniel R. Hayes; James H. Morison

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mixtures of Gaussians for Uncertainty Description in Bivariate Latent Heat Flux Proxies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new probabilistic approach for describing uncertainty in the ensembles of latent heat flux proxies. The proxies are obtained from hourly Bowen ratio and satellite-derived measurements, respectively, at several locations in ...

R. Wójcik; Peter A. Troch; H. Stricker; P. Torfs; E. Wood; H. Su; Z. Su

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A New Shipborne Microwave Refractometer for Estimating the Evaporation Flux at the Sea Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After a brief description of humidity measurement and a short presentation of methods of microwave refractometry for evaporation flux, a new X-band refractometer system is presented. Based on a new design and a new material for the microwave ...

J.-Y. Delahaye; C. Guerin; J. P. Vinson; H. Dupuis; A. Weill; H. Branger; L. Eymard; J. Lavergnat; G. Lachaud

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mechanisms Driving the Time-Dependent Salt Flux in a Partially Stratified Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subtidal salt balance and the mechanisms driving the downgradient salt flux in the Hudson River estuary are investigated using measurements from a cross-channel mooring array of current meters, temperature and conductivity sensors, and cross-...

James A. Lerczak; W. Rockwell Geyer; Robert J. Chant

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

An Air–Soil Layer Coupled Scheme for Computing Surface Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air–soil layer coupled scheme is developed to compute surface fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat from data collected at the Oklahoma Atmospheric Radiation Measurement–Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM–CART) stations. This new scheme ...

Qin Xu; Binbin Zhou; Stephen D. Burk; Edward H. Barker

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasma sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field is not to just change the plasma flux distribution but rather to increase the measured (electrical) ion current

Oks, Efim M.; Savkin, Konstantin P.; Yushkov, Georgiu Yu.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.; Anders, A.; Brown, Ian G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Predicting Low Flux High - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High flux can access high fluence, but such TTS data is under-predicted by current ... on Defect Migration and Void Formation using the Phase Field Method.

362

Flux: for brass quintet with analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper will examine the piece Flux: for Brass Quintet, completed in the spring of 2010 by Robert DeVet. It will first examine the system… (more)

Devet, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

364

Vector Representation of Trade Cumulus Thermodynamic Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vector representation of the BOMEX thermodynamic budget data is presented which shows graphically the relationship of the fluxes and the mean layer structure.

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

366

Constructions of fault tolerant linear compressors and linear decompressors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — The constructions of optical buffers is one of the most critically sought after optical technologies in all-optical packet-switched networks, and constructing optical buffers directly via optical Switches and fiber Delay Lines (SDL) has received a lot of attention recently in the literature. A practical and challenging issue of the constructions of optical buffers that has not been addressed before is on the fault tolerant capability of such constructions. In this paper, we focus on the constructions of fault tolerant linear compressors and linear decompressors. The basic network element for our constructions is scaled optical memory cell, which is constructed by a 2 × 2 optical crossbar switch and a fiber delay line. We give a multistage construction of a self-routing linear compressor by a concatenation of scaled optical memory cells. We also show that if the delays, say d1, d2,..., dM, of the fibers in the scaled optical memory cells satisfy a certain condition (specifically, the condition in (A2) given in Section I), then our multistage construction can be operated as a self-routing linear compressor with maximum delay ? M?F even after up to F of the M scaled optical memory cells fail to function properly, where 0 ? F ? M ? 1. Furthermore, we prove that our multistage construction with the fiber delays d1, d2,..., dM given by the generalized Fibonacci series of order F is the best among all constructions of a linear compressor that can tolerate up to F faulty scaled optical memory cells by using M scaled optical memory cells. Similarly results are also obtained for the constructions of fault tolerant linear decompressors. I.

Cheng-shang Chang; Tsz-hsuan Chao; Jay Cheng; Duan-shin Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Integral Fluxes, Day-Night, and Spectrum Results from SNO's 391-Day Salt Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is a 1000t heavy water Cherenkov detector observing neutrinos from the Sun and other astrophysical sources. Measurements of the integral solar neutrino fluxes of charged current, neutral current and elastic scattering events are reported for 391 days of live data from the salt phase of SNO operation. In this phase 2t of salt were dissolved in the heavy water, which enhanced and differentiated the detection of neutral current events. Day-night asymmetries in these fluxes were also determined. The measured electron spectrum from the charged-current channel is compatible with the undistorted spectrum of the solar 8B neutrino flux.

Juergen Wendland; for the SNO collaboration

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

SunShot Initiative: Linear Fresnel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Fresnel to someone by Linear Fresnel to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Linear Fresnel on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Linear Fresnel on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Linear Fresnel on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Linear Fresnel on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Linear Fresnel on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Linear Fresnel on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Parabolic Trough Linear Fresnel Power Tower Dish Engine Components Competitive Awards Staff Photovoltaics Systems Integration Balance of Systems Linear Fresnel DOE funds solar research and development (R&D) in linear Fresnel systems as one of four CSP technologies aiming to meet the goals of the SunShot Initiative. Linear Fresnel systems, which are a type of linear

369

Capacitively coupled RF voltage probe having optimized flux linkage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Non-linear image processing  

SciTech Connect

Processing of nuclear medicine images is generally performed by essentially linear methods with the non-negativity condition being applied as the only non-linear process. The various methods used: matrix methods in signal space and Fourier or Hadamard transforms in frequency or sequency space are essentially equivalent. Further improvement in images can be obtained by the use of inherently non-linear methods. The recent development of an approximation to a least-difference method (as opposed to a least-square method) has led to an appreciation of the effects of data bounding and to the development of a more powerful process. Data bounding (modification of statistically improbable data values) is an inherently non-linear method with considerable promise. Strong bounding depending on two-dimensional least-squares fitting yields a reduction of mottling (buttermilk effect) not attainable with linear processes. A pre- bounding process removing very bad points is used to protect the strong bounding process from incorrectly modifying data points due to the weight of an extreme but yet unbounded point as the fitting area approaches it. (auth)

Bell, P.R.; Dillon, R.S.; Bell, M.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface latent heat flux (LHF) plays an essential role in global energy and water cycle variability. In this study, monthly LHF over global oceans during 1992–93 are compared among Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eric Nelkin; Joe Ardizzone; Robert M. Atlas

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model and Observations During the Storm-Scale Observations Regional Measurement Program-Fronts Experiment Systems Test 1992 J. Dudhia and S. P. Oncley Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division Atmospheric Technology Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction Mesoscale model 5 (MM5) is being used as a data assimilation tool for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. There is a need to verify that the model physics is consistent with observations under a range of conditions. Surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are a particular area of uncertainty in the model owing to their dependence on surface properties, some of which are time-dependent. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

374

High flux backscattering spectrometer (HFBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... note that a larger dynamic range will result in a proportionately longer measuring time (to achieve the same counting statistics, same energy bin size ...

375

Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q? from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation ? of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results ...

Alfred J. Garrett; Robert J. Kurzeja; Eliel Villa-Aleman; James S. Bollinger; Malcolm M. Pendergast

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Transcriptional profiling and flux measurements of polyhydroxybutyrate production in Synechocystis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) to determine the CO? uptake rates and PHB production rates of strains engineered for enhanced CO? fixation and PHB production respectively.

Silva, Saliya Sudharshana, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Improving Diamagnetic Flux Temporal Resolution to Measure ELM Energy Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 130 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618525

Sieck, P.E.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

LINEAR COUNT-RATE METER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear count-rate meter is designed to provide a highly linear output while receiving counting rates from one cycle per second to 100,000 cycles per second. Input pulses enter a linear discriminator and then are fed to a trigger circuit which produces positive pulses of uniform width and amplitude. The trigger circuit is connected to a one-shot multivibrator. The multivibrator output pulses have a selected width. Feedback means are provided for preventing transistor saturation in the multivibrator which improves the rise and decay times of the output pulses. The multivibrator is connected to a diode-switched, constant current metering circuit. A selected constant current is switched to an averaging circuit for each pulse received, and for a time determined by the received pulse width. The average output meter current is proportional to the product of the counting rate, the constant current, and the multivibrator output pulse width.

Henry, J.J.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 27/05/99 6, 27/05/99 Tolerances of Random RF Jitters in X-Band Main Linacs May 27, 1999 Kiyoshi KUBO KEK Tsukuba, Japan Abstract: Tracking simulations have been performed for the main linacs of an X-band linear collider. We discuss the choice of phase of the accelerating field relative to the bunches. The tolerances of the phase and the amplitude errors are studied. Tolerances of Random RF Jitters in X-Band Main Linacs K. Kubo, KEK Abstract Tracking simulations have been performed for main linacs of X-band linear collider. We discuss about choice of the phase of the accelerating field relative to the bunches. The tolerances of the phase and the amplitude errors are studied. 1 INTRODUCTION In order to preserve the low emittance through the main linacs of future linear colliders, various effects

380

AN ESTIMATE OF THE DETECTABILITY OF RISING FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

The physics of the formation of magnetic active regions (ARs) is one of the most important problems in solar physics. One main class of theories suggests that ARs are the result of magnetic flux that rises from the tachocline. Time-distance helioseismology, which is based on measurements of wave propagation, promises to allow the study of the subsurface behavior of this magnetic flux. Here, we use a model for a buoyant magnetic flux concentration together with the ray approximation to show that the dominant effect on the wave propagation is expected to be from the roughly 100 m s{sup -1} retrograde flow associated with the rising flux. Using a B-spline-based method for carrying out inversions of wave travel times for flows in spherical geometry, we show that at 3 days before emergence the detection of this retrograde flow at a depth of 30 Mm should be possible with a signal-to-noise level of about 8 with a sample of 150 emerging ARs.

Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C. [NWRA, CoRA Division, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Fan, Y., E-mail: aaronb@cora.nwra.co [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures Fausto Cattaneo study the topology of field lines threading buoyant magnetic flux struc- tures. The magnetic structures ­ Sun: interior ­ Sun: magnetic fields ­ Stars: spots 1 Current address: Department of Mathematics

382

Skew Fluxes in Polarized Wave Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar flux due to small amplitude waves that exhibit a preferred sense of rotation or polarization is shown to consist of a component. FS, that is skewed, being everywhere orthogonal to the mean scalar gradient, Q. The skew flux is ...

John F. Middleton; John W. Loder

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

Foote, F.

1958-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

384

Linearity Testing of Photovoltaic Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic devices are rated in terms of their peak power with respect to a specific spectrum, total irradiance, and temperature. To rate photovoltaic devices, a reference detector is required whose response is linear with total irradiance. This paper describes a procedure to determine the linearity of the short-circuit current (Isc) versus the total irradiance (Etot) by illuminating a reference cell with two lamps. A device is linear if the current measured with both lamps illuminating the cell is the same as the sum of the currents with each lamp illuminating the cell. The two-lamp method is insensitive to the light spectra or spatial nonuniformity changing with irradiance. The two-lamp method is rapid, easy to implement, and does not require operator intervention to change the irradiances. The presence of room light only limits the lowest irradiance that can be evaluated. Unlike other methods, the two-lamp method does not allow the current to be corrected for nonlinear effects.

Emery, K.; Winter, S.; Pinegar, S.; Nalley D.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Investigation of the Conditional Sampling Method Used to Estimate Fluxes of Active, Reactive, and Passive Scalars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditional sampling flux measurement technique was evaluated for four scalars (temperature, water vapor, ozone, and carbon dioxide) by comparison with direct eddy correlation measurements at two sites. The empirical constant ? relating the ...

Gabriel G. Katul; Peter L. Finkelstein; John F. Clarke; Thomas G. Ellestad

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Crawford, T.L. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, F.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coulter, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Crawford, T.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Barnes, F.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coulter, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Crawford, T.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes  

SciTech Connect

In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

Doran, J.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Crawford, T.L. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

Hayes, A C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

Linearity Testing of Photovoltaic Cells (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

International PV standards require that the short-circuit current or response of the reference device be linear with total irradiance. Accredited calibration laboratories can not assume that their reference device is linear unless another accredited laboratory has performed the measurement. The NREL PV performance laboratory is ISO 17025 accredited for primary reference cell, secondary reference cell and secondary module calibrations. Limited labor resources necessitated the development of a technique to determine linearity without taking significant labor or technical skill. The two-lamp method is insensitive to the spectrum of the light or spatial nonuniformity changing as the irradiance is varied. It does assume that the temperature does not change with irradiance and that the light-source spectrum resembles the solar spectrum. This requirement is only because nonlinear mechanisms in the photo-current are wavelength dependent. A laser for example may show the same device as linear or very nonlinear with irradiance depending on the wavelength. The two-lamp method assumes that the lamp intensities when individually irradiating the sample are the same as when both lamps irradiate the sample. The presence of room light only limits the lowest irradiance that can be evaluated. Unlike other methods, the two-lamp method does not allow the current to be corrected for nonlinear effects. The most appealing aspect of the two-lamp method when compared with other methods for a high-volume calibration laboratory is that it is fast and does not require operator intervention to change the irradiances and is difficult for the operator to make mistakes that would affect the outcome.

Emery, K.; Winter, S.; Pinegar, S.; Nalley, D.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A polynomial projection algorithm for linear programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 5, 2013 ... Abstract: We propose a polynomial algorithm for linear programming. The algorithm represents a linear optimization or decision problem in the ...

394

Annual Planning Summaries: Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Annual Planning Summaries: Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Document(s) Available For Download January 11, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary...

395

Linear Circuits Designation: Required course  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

circuits. Node and mesh analysis. Operational amplifiers. Signal acquisition and conditioning. Electric, 11k). Objective 4: To acquaint students with the rudiments of electrical-to-mechanical energy) Steady-state and dynamic behavior of linear, lumped-parameter electrical circuits. Kirchoff's laws. RLC

Krstic, Miroslav

396

A road map to solar neutrino fluxes, neutrino oscillation parameters, and tests for new physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze all available solar and related reactor neutrino experiments, as well as simulated future 7Be, p-p, pep, and ^8B solar neutrino experiments. We treat all solar neutrino fluxes as free parameters subject to the condition that the total luminosity represented by the neutrinos equals the observed solar luminosity (the `luminosity constraint'). Existing experiments show that the p-p solar neutrino flux is 1.02 +- 0.02 (1 sigma) times the flux predicted by the BP00 standard solar model; the 7Be neutrino flux is 0.93^{+0.25}_{-0.63} the predicted flux; and the ^8B flux is 1.01 +- 0.04 the predicted flux. The neutrino oscillation parameters are: Delta m^2 = 7.3^{+0.4}_{-0.6}\\times 10^{-5} eV^2 and tan^2 theta_{12} = 0.41 +- 0.04. We evaluate how accurate future experiments must be to determine more precisely neutrino oscillation parameters and solar neutrino fluxes, and to elucidate the transition from vacuum-dominated to matter-dominated oscillations at low energies. A future 7Be nu-e scattering experiment accurate to +- 10 % can reduce the uncertainty in the experimentally determined 7Be neutrino flux by a factor of four and the uncertainty in the p-p neutrino flux by a factor of 2.5 (to +- 0.8 %). A future p-p experiment must be accurate to better than +- 3 % to shrink the uncertainty in tan^2 theta_{12} by more than 15 %. The idea that the Sun shines because of nuclear fusion reactions can be tested accurately by comparing the observed photon luminosity of the Sun with the luminosity inferred from measurements of solar neutrino fluxes. Based upon quantitative analyses of present and simulated future experiments, we answer the question: Why perform low-energy solar neutrino experiments?

John N. Bahcall; Carlos Pena-Garay

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Advanced Online Flux Mapping of CANDU PHWR by Least-Squares Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A least-squares method that solves both the core neutronics design equations and the in-core detector response equations on the least-squares principle is presented as a new advanced online flux-mapping method for CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The effectiveness of the new flux-mapping method is examined in terms of online flux-mapping calculations with numerically simulated true flux distribution and detector signals and those with the actual core-follow data for the Wolsong CANDU PHWRs in Korea. The effects of core neutronics models as well as the detector failures and uncertainties of measured detector signals on the effectiveness of the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are also examined.The following results are obtained. The least-squares method predicts the flux distribution in better agreement with the simulated true flux distribution than the standard core neutronics calculations by the finite difference method (FDM) computer code without using the detector signals. The adoption of the nonlinear nodal method based on the unified nodal method formulation instead of the FDM results in a significant improvement in prediction accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations. The detector signals estimated from the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are much closer to the measured detector signals than those from the flux synthesis method (FSM), the current online flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors. The effect of detector failures is relatively small so that the plant can tolerate up to 25% of detector failures without seriously affecting the plant operation. The detector signal uncertainties aggravate accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations, yet the effects of signal uncertainties of the order of 1% standard deviation can be tolerable without seriously degrading the prediction accuracy of the least-squares method. The least-squares method is disadvantageous because it requires longer CPU time than the existing FSM. Considering ever-increasing computer speed and the improved operational safety margin of CANDU reactors gained by accurate flux-mapping calculations, however, it is concluded that the least-squares method presents an effective alternative to the existing flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors.

Hong, In Seob [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Hyo [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES  

SciTech Connect

We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

Fan, Y. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity, leading in some cases to a polarity reversal while inhibiting the background dynamo from doing so in others. The emerged magnetic flux is slowly advected poleward while being diffused and assimilated by the background dynamo field.

Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S., E-mail: rui.pinto@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes LCC-0109  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 TESLA 2002-11 CBP Tech Note-269 November 2002 Alignment Stability Models for Damping Rings Andrej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA Winfried Decking Deutsches Elektron Synchrotron (DESY) Hamburg, Germany Abstract: Linear collider damping rings are highly sensitive to magnet alignment. Emittance tuning simulations for current designs of damping rings for TESLA and NLC have given encouraging results, but depend on invasive measurements of dispersion. The frequency with which such measurements must be made is therefore an operational issue, and depends on the time stability of the alignment. In this note, we consider three effects that lead to misalignment and the need to retune the damping ring: (1)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes LCC - 0018, 15/06/99 Rev B, June 2002 Correct Account of RF Deflections in Linac Acceleration June 15, 1999 G.V. Stupakov Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California Abstract: During acceleration in the linac structure, the beam not only increases its longitudinal momentum, but also experiences a transverse kick from the accelerating mode which is linear in accelerating gradient. This effect is neglected in such computer codes as LIAR and TRANSPORT. We derived the Hamiltonian equations that describe the effect of RF deflection into the acceleration process and included it into the computational engine of LIAR. By comparing orbits for the NLC main linac, we found that the difference between the two algorithms is about 10\%. The effect will be more pronounced at smaller

403

Solving Fuzzy Linear Regression with Hybrid Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy linear regression is an important tool to find the linear inexact relationship between uncertain data. We then propose a hybrid optimization method based on tabu search and harmony search as a potential way of solving fuzzy linear regression. The ... Keywords: Fuzzy linear regression, Harmony search, Hybrid optimization, Tabu search

M. H. Mashinchi; M. A. Orgun; M. Mashinchi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

Segmented rail linear induction motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

Cowan, Jr., Maynard (1107 Stagecoach Rd. SE., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Marder, Barry M. (1412 Pinnacle View Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Segmented rail linear induction motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

407

Precision linear ramp function generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Modeling the Sun's open magnetic flux and the heliospheric current sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By coupling a solar surface flux transport model with an extrapolation of the heliospheric field, we simulate the evolution of the Sun's open magnetic flux and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) based on observational data of sunspot groups since 1976. The results are consistent with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field near Earth and with the tilt angle of the HCS as derived from extrapolation of the observed solar surface field. This opens the possibility for an improved reconstruction of the Sun's open flux and the HCS into the past on the basis of empirical sunspot data.

Jiang, J; Schmitt, D; Schuessler, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

An Integrated Surface Radiation Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated surface radiation measurement system has been developed to measure the surface radiation exchange flux. The system employs upward- and downward-looking Eppley pyrgeometers and pyranometers to separately measure four components: ...

A. C. Delany; S. R. Semmer

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Computing Surface Fluxes from Mesonet Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using air–vegetation–soil layer coupled model equations as weak constraints, a variational method is developed to compute sensible and latent heat fluxes from conventional observations obtained at meteorological surface stations. This method ...

Binbin Zhou; Qin Xu

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

413

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

Intercomparison of Various Surface Latent Heat Flux Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japanese Ocean Flux Data Sets with use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO) latent heat flux field is compared with the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS), the Goddard Satellite-Based Surface ...

Masahisa Kubota; Atsuko Kano; Hidenori Muramatsu; Hiroyuki Tomita

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gravity Wave 1-leat Fluxes: A Lagrangian Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a vertically propagating, internal gravity wave on the vertical flux of potential temperature (heat) is considered by averaging the local heat flux vector over a potential temperature surface. This approach gives the wave heat flux ...

Lawrence Coy; David C. Fritts

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

RADIATION FROM COMOVING POYNTING FLUX ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with particle-in-cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison; Noguchi, Koichi [Rice University, Houston TX 77005-1892 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

417

Radiation from Comoving Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with Particle-In-Cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NON-LINEAR MODELING OF THE RHIC INTERACTION REGIONS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For RHIC's collision lattices the dominant sources of transverse non-linearities are located in the interaction regions. The field quality is available for most of the magnets in the interaction regions from the magnetic measurements, or from extrapolations of these measurements. We discuss the implementation of these measurements in the MADX models of the Blue and the Yellow rings and their impact on beam stability.

TOMAS,R.FISCHER,W.JAIN,A.LUO,Y.PILAT,F.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

419

Neutron-flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occurred. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

Kopp, M.K.; Valentine, K.H.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Electric Flux Tube in Magnetic Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study a methodical problem related to the magnetic scenario recently suggested and initiated by the authors \\cite{Liao_ES_mono} to understand the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP): the electric flux tube in monopole plasma. A macroscopic approach, interpolating between Bose condensed (dual superconductor) and classical gas medium is developed first. Then we work out a microscopic approach based on detailed quantum mechanical calculation of the monopole scattering on electric flux tube, evaluating induced currents for all partial waves. As expected, the flux tube looses its stability when particles can penetrate it: we make this condition precise by calculating the critical value for the product of the flux tube size times the particle momentum, above which the flux tube dissolves. Lattice static potentials indicate that flux tubes seem to dissolve at $T>T_{dissolution} \\approx 1.3 T_c$. Using our criterion one gets an estimate of the magnetic density $n\\approx 4.4 \\sim 6.6 fm^{-3}$ a...

Liao Jin Feng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Correlated time derivatives of current, electric field intensity, and magnetic flux density for triggered lightning at 15 m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlated time derivatives of current, electric field intensity, and magnetic flux density current and its time derivative correlated with the corresponding electric field intensity and magnetic. The measured current derivative waveform and the return stroke portion of the magnetic flux density derivative

Florida, University of

422

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System Available online 12 June 2011 Keywords: Salton Sea Geothermal System hydrothermal seeps gas and water geochemistry flux measurements mantle The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible

Mazzini, Adriano

423

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

424

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details...

425

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and...

426

Comparisons of sensible and latent heat fluxes using surface and aircraft data over adjacent wet and dry surfaces  

SciTech Connect

In June 1991, a field study of surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over heterogeneous surfaces was carried out near Boardman, Oregon (Doran et al., 1992). The object of the study was to develop improved methods of extrapolating from local measurements of fluxes to area-averaged values suitable for use in general circulation models (GCMs) applied to climate studies. A grid element in a GCM is likely to encompass regions whose fluxes vary significantly from one surface type to another. The problem of integrating these fluxes into a single, representative value for the whole element is not simple, and describing such a flux in terms of flux-gradient relationships, as is often done, presents additional difficulties.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Shaw, W.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Baldocchi, D.D.; Crawford, T.L.; Dobosy, R.J.; Meyers, T.J. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Linearized gyro-kinetic equation  

SciTech Connect

An ordering of the linearized Fokker-Planck equation is performed in which gyroradius corrections are retained to lowest order and the radial dependence appropriate for sheared magnetic fields is treated without resorting to a WKB technique. This description is shown to be necessary to obtain the proper radial dependence when the product of the poloidal wavenumber and the gyroradius is large (k rho much greater than 1). A like particle collision operator valid for arbitrary k rho also has been derived. In addition, neoclassical, drift, finite $beta$ (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure), and unperturbed toroidal electric field modifications are treated. (auth)

Catto, P.J.; Tsang, K.T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy and potential enstrophy flux constraints in quasi-geostrophic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate an inequality constraining the energy and potential enstrophy flux spectra in two-layer and multi-layer quasi-geostrophic models. Its physical significance is that it can diagnose whether any given multi-layer model that allows co-existing downscale cascades of energy and potential enstrophy can allow the downscale energy flux to become large enough to yield a mixed energy spectrum where the dominant $k^{-3}$ scaling is overtaken by a subdominant $k^{-5/3}$ contribution beyond a transition wavenumber $k_t$ situated in the inertial range. The validity of the flux inequality implies that this scaling transition cannot occur within the inertial range, whereas a violation of the flux inequality beyond some wavenumber $k_t$ implies the existence of a scaling transition near that wavenumber. This flux inequality holds unconditionally in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence, however, it is far from obvious that it continues to hold in multi-layer quasi-geostrophic models, because the dissipation rate spectra for energy and potential enstrophy no longer relate in a trivial way, as in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes. We derive the general form of the energy and potential enstrophy dissipation rate spectra for a generalized symmetrically coupled multi-layer model. From this result, we prove that in a symmetrically coupled multi-layer quasi-geostrophic model, where the dissipation terms for each layer consist of the same Fourier-diagonal linear operator applied on the streamfunction field of only the same layer, the flux inequality continues to hold. It follows that a necessary condition to violate the flux inequality is the use of asymmetric dissipation where different operators are used on different layers. etc.

Eleftherios Gkioulekas

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Integrated framework for the flux calculation of neutral species inside trenches and holes during plasma etching  

SciTech Connect

An integrated framework for the neutral flux calculation inside trenches and holes during plasma etching is described, and a comparison between the two types of structure in a number of applications is presented. First, a detailed and functional set of equations for the neutral and ion flux calculations inside long trenches and holes with cylindrical symmetry is explicitly formulated. This set is based on early works [T. S. Cale and G. B. Raupp, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 8, 1242 (1990); V. K. Singh et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 10, 1091 (1992)], and includes new equations for the case of holes with cylindrical symmetry. Second, a method for the solution of the respective numerical task, i.e., one or a set of linear or nonlinear integral equations, is described. This method includes a coupling algorithm with a surface chemistry model and resolves the singularity problem of the integral equations. Third, the fluxes inside trenches and holes are compared. The flux from reemission is the major portion of the local flux at the bottom of both types of structure. The framework is applied in SiO{sub 2} etching by fluorocarbon plasmas to predict the increased intensity of reactive ion etching lag in SiO{sub 2} holes compared to trenches. It is also applied in deep Si etching: By calculating the flux of F atoms at the bottom of very high aspect ratio (up to 150) Si trenches and holes during the gas chopping process, the aspect ratio at which the flux of F atoms is eliminated and etching practically stops is estimated.

Kokkoris, George; Boudouvis, Andreas G.; Gogolides, Evangelos [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki 15310 (Greece); School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou Campus, Attiki 15780 (Greece); Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki 15310 (Greece)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Potential Magnetic Field around a Helical Flux-rope Current Structure in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the potential magnetic field associated with a helical electric line current flow, idealizing the near-potential coronal field within which a highly localized twisted current structure is embedded. It is found that this field has a significant axial component off the helical magnetic axis where there is no current flow, such that the flux winds around the axis. The helical line current field, in including the effects of flux rope writhe, is therefore more topologically complex than straight line and ring current fields sometimes used in solar flux rope models. The axial flux in magnetic fields around confined current structures may be affected by the writhe of these current structures such that the field twists preferentially with the same handedness as the writhe. This property of fields around confined current structures with writhe may be relevant to classes of coronal magnetic flux rope, including structures observed to have sigmoidal forms in soft X-rays and prominence magnetic fields. For example, ``bald patches'' and the associated heating by Parker current sheet dissipation seem likely. Thus some measurements of flux rope magnetic helicities may derive from external, near-potential fields. The predicted hemispheric preference for positive and negative magnetic helicities is consistent with observational results for prominences and sigmoids and past theoretical results for flux rope internal fields.

G. J. D. Petrie

2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Next Linear Collider Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To use the left side navigation on this page, you will need to turn on To use the left side navigation on this page, you will need to turn on Javascript. You do not need JavaScript to use the text-based navigation bar at the bottom of the page. The Next Linear Collider at SLAC Navbar MISSION: Scientists expect research at this facility to answer fundamental questions about the behavior of matter and the origins of the Universe. NLC 8-Pack on the Drawing Board What's New In the Next Linear Collider: • NLC Newsletter October, 2001 • NLC Snowmass report 2001 • NLC All Hands Talk, August 2001 Upcoming Events: • Fall 2001 Working Sessions, Oct. 22-23, 2001 • Pulse Compression Workshop, Oct. 22-24, 2001 • Machine Advisory Committee Mtg., Oct. 24-26, 2001 • ISG-7 at KEK, Nov. 12-15, 2001 • LC' 02 at SLAC, Feb. 4-8, 2002 NLC Website Search: Entire SLAC Web | Help |

432

ARM - Measurement - Horizontal wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsHorizontal wind govMeasurementsHorizontal wind ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Horizontal wind The horizontal wind in terms of either speed and direction, or the zonal (u) and meridional (v) components. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer

433

ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVertical velocity govMeasurementsVertical velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Vertical velocity The component of the velocity vector, along the local vertical. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System KAZR : Ka ARM Zenith Radar MMCR : Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar SODAR : Mini Sound Detection and Ranging

434

Angular momentum transport modeling: achievements of a gyrokinetic quasi-linear approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QuaLiKiz, a model based on a local gyrokinetic eigenvalue solver is expanded to include momentum flux modeling in addition to heat and particle fluxes. Essential for accurate momentum flux predictions, the parallel asymmetrization of the eigenfunctions is successfully recovered by an analytical fluid model. This is tested against self-consistent gyrokinetic calculations and allows for a correct prediction of the ExB shear impact on the saturated potential amplitude by means of a mixing length rule. Hence, the effect of the ExB shear is recovered on all the transport channels including the induced residual stress. Including these additions, QuaLiKiz remains ~10 000 faster than non-linear gyrokinetic codes allowing for comparisons with experiments without resorting to high performance computing. The example is given of momentum pinch calculations in NBI modulation experiments.

Cottier, P; Camenen, Y; Gurcan, O D; Casson, F J; Garbet, X; Hennequin, P; Tala, T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 6 Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities. 6.0.1 Energy Current Density The energy current density is given by the Poynting vector S = E Ã? H (6.1) where all quantities are real. The Poynting vector gives the instantaneous lo- cal energy current density

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

436

Cosmic Ray Sun Shadow in Soudan 2 Underground Muon Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. We report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a $3.3\\sigma$ shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

Soudan 2 Collaboration

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

437

Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Linear concentrating solar power (CSP) collectors capture the sun's energy with large mirrors that reflect and focus the sunlight onto a linear receiver tube. The receiver contains a fluid that is...

438

A polynomial projection algorithm for linear programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a linear optimization or decision problem in the form of a system of linear ... we understand the number of arithmetic and the other elementary operations ..... where M is a diagonal matrix whose entries on the main diagonal are non-

439

Proof Synthesis and Reflection for Linear Arithmetic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents detailed implementations of quantifier elimination for both integer and real linear arithmetic for theorem provers. The underlying algorithms are those by Cooper (for Z) and by Ferrante and Rackoff ... Keywords: Linear arithmetic, Proof synthesis, Reflection

Amine Chaieb; Tobias Nipkow

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

New architecture for RF power amplifier linearization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power amplifier linearization has become an important part of the transmitter system as 3G and developing 4G communication standards require higher linearity than ever before. The thesis proposes two power amplifier ...

Boo, Hyun H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Linear Stability of Modons on a Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear stability of two stationary dipolar modon solutions of the nondivergent barotropic vorticity equation on a rotating sphere is investigated. A numerical normal mode analysis of the linearized equation is performed by solving the ...

E. C. Neven

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

PLATO: a new piecewise linear simulation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the basic concepts of a new piecewise linear circuit simulation program called PLATO. Piecewise linear modeling is a very generic and powerful approach to the modeling of electronic components. It allows for the use of macro modeling ...

M. T. van Stiphout; J. T. J. van Eijndhoven; H. W. Buurman

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

DESPIKING OF SPACECRAFT ENERGETIC PROTON FLUX TO STUDY GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY MODULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Galactic cosmic ray (GCR) is usually assumed as a stable 'background', with solar influence considered as a modulation. The violent solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with solar activities change particle fluxes by several orders of magnitude in a few minutes. Thus, the flux observation of GCR provided by satellites may be heavily contaminated by spurious spikes due to SEPs, and that provided by ground-based neutron monitors (NMs) may be contaminated by the system error spikes and the ground level enhancement effect. To obtain the 'pure' background GCR flux for modulation research, the removal of multifarious spikes is necessary. In this article, we use a robust automatic despiking algorithm based on the Poincare map thresholding method provided by Goring and Nikora for 'purification' of the time-series GCR flux observations. We can show that the algorithm is good at cleaning up the heavily contaminated GCR intensity rates measured by both spacecraft and NMs without artificial parameters. In addition, using the algorithm to despike the spacecraft observations of relatively lower energetic proton flux, we get both 11 year and 27 day period cycles comparable to the much higher energy GCR flux data measured by the ground-based NMs.

Qin, G.; Zhao, L.-L. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Chen, H.-C., E-mail: gqin@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: llzhao@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: chchao@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Laboratory of Geophysical experiment, Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

445

Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the Spatially Distributed CO2, Sensible, and Latent Heat Fluxes Over the Southern Great Plains Berry, Joseph Carnegie Inst.of Washington Riley, William Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Biraud, Sebastien Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Torn, Margaret Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Fischer, Marc Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Category: Atmospheric State and Surface Vegetation strongly influences the spatial distribution of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, and also impacts the ecosystem to atmosphere CO2 exchanges. We describe here a methodology to estimate surface energy fluxes and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of CO2 continuously over the Southern Great Plains, using (1) data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program in Oklahoma and Kansas; (2) meteorological forcing data from

446

A 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes 22-Year Dataset of Surface Longwave Fluxes in the Arctic J. Francis and J. Secora Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract Downwelling longwave fluxes (DLFs) over the Arctic surface have been generated from 22.5 years of radiances and retrievals from the TIROS (television and infrared observation satellite) operational vertical sounder (TOVS). The flux retrieval algorithm has been validated and improved using surface- based radiation and cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, and from the Surface Heat Balance of the Arctic (SHEBA) field program (1997-98) in the Beaufort Sea. The DLF product is presented on a 100 x

447

Eddy covariance mapping and quantification of surface CO2 leakage fluxes  

SciTech Connect

We present eddy covariance measurements of net CO{sub 2} flux (F{sub c}) made during a controlled release of CO{sub 2} (0.3 t d{sup -1} from 9 July to 7 August 2008) from a horizontal well {approx}100 m in length and {approx}2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, MT. We isolated fluxes arising from the release (F{sub cr}) by subtracting fluxes corresponding to a model for net ecosystem exchange from F{sub c}. A least-squares inversion of 611 F{sub cr} and corresponding modeled footprint functions recovered the location, length, and magnitude of the surface CO{sub 2} flux leakage signal, although high wavenumber details of the signal were poorly resolved. The estimated total surface CO{sub 2} leakage rate (0.32 t d{sup ?1}) was within 7% of the release rate.

Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE ERUPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fields of the flux rope were partly opened due to magnetic reconnection. Subject headings: Sun: flares to escape with a fairly small reconnection rate in the vertical current sheet created below. Magnetic flux an interesting flux rope eruption model for fast CMEs, in which a flux rope is in a specific sling-shot field

449

Heterotic type IIA duality with fluxes - towards the complete story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the heterotic type IIA duality when fluxes are turned on. We show that many of the known fluxes are dual to each other and claim that certain fluxes on the heterotic side require that the type IIA picture is lifted to M or even F-theory compactifications with geometric fluxes.

Andrei Micu

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

Using remotely sensed planetary boundary layer variables as estimates of areally averaged heat flux  

SciTech Connect

Homogeneity across the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is an issue of importance to all facets of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. The degree to which measurements at the central facility can be used to verify, improve, or develop relationships in radiative flux models that are subsequently used in Global Circulation Models (GCMs), for example, is tied directly to the representativeness of the local measurements at the central facility for the site as a whole. The relative variation of surface energy budget terms over a 350- km X 400km domain such as the SGP CART site can be extremely large. The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) develops as a result of energy inputs from widely varying surfaces. The lower atmosphere effectively integrates the local inputs; measurements of PBL structure can potentially be used for estimates of surface heat flux over scales on the order of tens of kilometers. This project is focusing on two PBL quantities that are intimately tied to the surface heat flux: (1) the height of the mixed layer, z, that grows during daytime due to sensible heat flux input from the surface; and (2) the convective velocity scale, normally a scaling parameter defined by the product of the sensible heat flux and z, but in this case defined by coherent structures that connect the surface layer and the capping inversion that defines z.

Coulter, R.L.; Martin, T.J.; Holdridge, D.J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Energy Basics: Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

452

Summary of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...in this Volume."Stress Intensity Factors"A brief summary of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) concepts

453

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 10/03/00 4, 10/03/00 Luminosity for NLC Design Variations March 10, 1999 K.A. Thompson and T.O. Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: In this note we give Guineapig simulation results for the luminosity and luminosity spectrum of three baseline NLC designs at 0.5~TeV and 1.0~TeV and compare the simulation results with analytic approximations. We examine the effects of varying several design parameters away from the NLC-B-500 and NLC-B-1000 designs, in order to study possible trade-offs of parameters that could ease tolerances, increase luminosity, or help to optimize machine operation for specific physics processes. Luminosity for NLC Design Variations K.A. Thompson and T.O.Raubenheimer INTRODUCTION In this note we give Guineapig [l] simulation results for the luminosity and

454

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 May 2001 Lattice Description for NLC Damping Rings at 120 Hz Andrzej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract: We present a lattice design for the NLC Main Damping Rings at 120 Hz repe tition rate. A total wiggler length of a little over 46 m is needed to achieve the damping time required for extracted, normalized, vertical emittance below 0.02 mm mrad. The dynamic aperture (using a linear model for the wiggler) is in excess of 15 times the injected beam size. The principal lattice parameters and characteristics are presented in this note; we also outline results of studies of alignment and field quality tolerances. CBP Tech Note-227 LCC-0061 Lattice Description for NLC Main Damping Rings at 120 Hz Andrzej Wolski Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

455

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 April 2001 Rev.1 July 2003 Guide to LIBXSIF, a Library for Parsing the Extended Standard Input Format of Accelerated Beamlines Peter G. Tenenbaum Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Stanford, CA Abstract: We describe LIBXSIF, a standalone library for parsing the Extended Standard Input Format of accelerator beamlines. Included in the description are: documentation of user commands; full description of permitted accelerator elements and their attributes; the construction of beamline lists; the mechanics of adding LIBXSIF to an existing program; and "under the hood" details for users who wish to modify the library or are merely morbidly curious. Guide to LIBXSIF, a Library for Parsing the Extended Standard Input Format of

456

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NLC Home Page NLC Technical SLAC The LCC Tech Note series was started in July 1998 to document the JLC/NLC collaborative design effort. The notes are numbered sequentially and may also be given a SLAC, FNAL, LBNL, LLNL and/or KEK publication number. The LCC notes will be distributed through the Web in electronic form as PDF files -- the authors are responsible for keeping the original documents. Other document series are the NLC Notes that were started for the SLAC ZDR, the KEK ATF Notes, and at some future time there should be a series of Technical (NLD) Notes to document work on detector studies for the next-generation linear collider. LCC-0001 "Memorandum of Understanding between KEK and SLAC," 2/98. LCC-0002 "Transparencies and Summaries from the 1st ISG meeting: January 1998," G. Loew, ed., 2/98.

457

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes LCC - 0038 29/04/00 CBP Tech Note - 234 Transverse Field Profile of the NLC Damping Rings Electromagnet Wiggler 29 April 2000 17 J. Corlett and S. Marks Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory M. C. Ross Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA Abstract: The primary effort for damping ring wiggler studies has been to develop a credible radiation hard electromagnet wiggler conceptual design that meets NLC main electron and positron damping ring physics requirements [1]. Based upon an early assessment of requirements, a hybrid magnet similar to existing designs satisfies basic requirements. However, radiation damage is potentially a serious problem for the Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet material, and cost remains an issue for samarium cobalt magnets. Superconducting magnet designs have not been

458

On the equivalence of linear complementarity problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the Extended Linear Complementarity Problem (ELCP) can be recast as a standard Linear Complementarity Problem (LCP) provided that the surplus variables or the feasible set of the ELCP are bounded. Since many extensions of the LCP are special ... Keywords: Complementarity problems, Integer programming, Linear complementarity problem, Nonlinear algorithms, Optimization

B. De Schutter; W. P. M. H. Heemels; A. Bemporad

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics approach to optimization of thermoelectric devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of thermoelectric systems in terms of performance and range of applications relies on progress in materials science and optimization of device operation. In this chapter, we focuse on optimization by taking into account the interaction of the system with its environment. For this purpose, we consider the illustrative case of a thermoelectric generator coupled to two temperature baths via heat exchangers characterized by a thermal resistance, and we analyze its working conditions. Our main message is that both electrical and thermal impedance matching conditions must be met for optimal device performance. Our analysis is fundamentally based on linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics using the force-flux formalism. An outlook on mesoscopic systems is also given.

Ouerdane, H; Apertet, Y; Michot, A; Abbout, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Variations of Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes from a Great Lakes Buoy and Associated Synoptic Weather Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of sensible and latent heat fluxes and their relation to synoptic weather events was performed using hourly meteorological measurements from National Data Buoy Center buoy 45003, located in northern Lake Huron, during April–...

Neil F. Laird; David A. R. Kristovich

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linear measured flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cloudiness and Marine Boundary Layer Dynamics in the ASTEX Lagrangian Experiments. Part II: Cloudiness, Drizzle, Surface Fluxes, and Entrainment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analysis of the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Lagrangians started in Part I is continued, presenting measurements of sea surface temperature, surface latent and sensible heat fluxes from bulk aerodynamic formulas, cloud ...

Christopher S. Bretherton; Philip Austin; Steven T. Siems

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Application of an Artificial Neural Network Simulation for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from CERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) provides top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux estimates from shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiance measurements by applying empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) for scene ...

Konstantin Loukachine; Norman G. Loeb

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhäsalmi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

M. Sajjad Athar; M. Honda; T. Kajita; K. Kasahara; S. Midorikawa

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

464

FLUX SENSOR EVALUATIONS AT THE ATR CRITICAL FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the ATR Critical (ATRC) facilities lack real-time methods for detecting thermal neutron flux and fission reaction rates for irradiation capsules. Direct measurements of the actual power deposited into a test are now possible without resorting to complicated correction factors. In addition, it is possible to directly measure minor actinide fission reaction rates and to provide time-dependent monitoring of the fission reaction rate or fast/thermal flux during transient testing. A joint Idaho State University /Idaho National Laboratory ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project was recently initiated to evaluate new real-time state-of-the-art in-pile flux detection sensors. Initially, the project is comparing the accuracy, response time, and long duration performance of French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)-developed miniature fission chambers, specialized self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) by the Argentinean National Energy Commission (CNEA), specially developed commercial SPNDs, and back-to-back fission (BTB) chambers developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). As discussed in this paper, specialized fixturing and software was developed by INL to facilitate these joint ISU/INL evaluations. Calculations were performed by ISU to assess the performance of and reduce uncertainties in flux detection sensors and compare data obtained from these sensors with existing integral methods employed at the ATRC. Ultimately, project results will be used to select the detector that can provide the best online regional ATRC power measurement. It is anticipated that project results may offer the potential to increase the ATRC’s current power limit and its ability to perform low-level irradiation experiments. In addition, results from this effort will provide insights about the viability of using these detectors in the ATR. Hence, this effort complements current activities to improve ATR software tools, computational protocols and in-core instrumentation under the ATR Modeling, Simulation and V&V Upgrade initiative, as well as the work to replace nuclear instrumentation under the ATR Life Extension Project (LEP) and provide support to the ATR NSUF.

Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; David Nigg; George Imel; Jason Harris; Eric Bonebrake

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

BEAM-BASED NON-LINEAR OPTICS CORRECTIONS IN COLLIDERS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, that gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 4 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non-linear correction techniques.

PILAT, R.; LUO, Y.; MALITSKY, N.; PTITSYN, V.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

467

Estimation of Global Ground Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of a previously published algorithm for estimating ground heat flux (GHF) at the global scale. The method is based on an analytical solution of the diffusion equation for heat transfer in a soil layer and has been ...

William B. Bennett; Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bras

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a boundary layer in free convection where turbulent thermal structures communicate information between the surface and the interior of the mixed layer, it is hypothesized that the surface momentum flux can be parameterized by u*2 = bDwBMML, ...

Roland B. Stull

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

470

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Power Incorporated Flux Power Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name Flux Power Incorporated Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product California-based FLux Ppower was created in late-2009 to provide monitoring, diagnostics and charging technology aimed at extending the life of lithium-ion batteries. The company signed a supply deal with Wheego in January 2010. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

471

Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

Pinnau, Ingo (Austin, TX); Koros, William J. (Austin, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Measurements of Enhanced Turbulent Mixing near Highways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August and September of 2010, measurements of turbulent fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy were made on highways in the Toronto area (Ontario, Canada). In situ turbulence measurements were made with a mobile laboratory while driving on the ...

Mark Gordon; Ralf M. Staebler; John Liggio; Paul Makar; Shao-Meng Li; Jeremy Wentzell; Gang Lu; Patrick Lee; Jeffrey R. Brook

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Linearized Functional Minimization for Inverse Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Heterogeneous aquifers typically consist of multiple lithofacies, whose spatial arrangement significantly affects flow and transport. The estimation of these lithofacies is complicated by the scarcity of data and by the lack of a clear correlation between identifiable geologic indicators and attributes. We introduce a new inverse-modeling approach to estimate both the spatial extent of hydrofacies and their properties from sparse measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head. Our approach is to minimize a functional defined on the vectors of values of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head fields defined on regular grids at a user-determined resolution. This functional is constructed to (i) enforce the relationship between conductivity and heads provided by the groundwater flow equation, (ii) penalize deviations of the reconstructed fields from measurements where they are available, and (iii) penalize reconstructed fields that are not piece-wise smooth. We develop an iterative solver for this functional that exploits a local linearization of the mapping from conductivity to head. This approach provides a computationally efficient algorithm that rapidly converges to a solution. A series of numerical experiments demonstrates the robustness of our approach.

Wohlberg, Brendt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tartakovsky, Daniel M. [University of California, San Diego; Dentz, Marco [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, Barcelona, Spain

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

474

Thermal evaluation of uranium silicide miniplates irradiated at high heat flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL)-1 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to assess corrosion performance of proposed booster fuel at heat flux levels ~30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density (4.8 g U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 to 593 W/cm2. No adverse impacts to the miniplates were observed at these high heat flux levels. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective ATR south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant–hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average hydroxide thickness on each miniplate measured during post-irradiation examination. The purpose of this study was to obtain a best estimate of the as-run experiment temperatures to aid in establishing acceptable heat flux levels and designing fuel qualification experiments for this fuel type.

Donna P. Guillen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Reduction of intensity variations on the absorbers of ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

Although ideal concentrators such as the compound parabolic concentrator have the property that concentrated flux is uniformly distributed on the absorber when the angular acceptance is filled by the incident flux, the instantaneous flux distribution may be very nonuniform when illuminated by a point source. These nonuniformities may be reduced by texturing the surface with small distortions. The necessary reduction of concentrator throughput is small enough to allow such texture concentrators to accommodate a wide range of tolerances in concentrator efficiency and uniformity of the flux distribution. In particular, the suitability of such concentrators for some space applications is discussed. Results of measurements on a test model are presented that demonstrate the effective reduction of flux nonuniformities by reflectors that have been textured by a simple process. Two-stage concentrators for attaining high concentration ratios are shown to distribute the concentrated flux fairly uniformly across the absorber when illuminated by point sources within the field of view. Again the remaining nonuniformities may be removed by texturing the reflecting surfaces (entailing some reduction in concentrator efficiency).

Greenman, P.

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide