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1

Beijing LN Green Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LN Green Power Company LN Green Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing LN Green Power Company Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100000 Sector Vehicles Product Attempting to transfer their experience in electric vehicles to fuel cells. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Phase equilibria and crystal structure of the complex oxides in the Ln-Ba-Co-O (Ln=Nd, Sm) systems  

SciTech Connect

The phase equilibria in the Ln-Ba-Co-O (Ln=Nd, Sm) systems were systematically studied at 1100 deg. C in air. The homogeneity ranges and crystal structure of the solid solutions: Ln{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (0Ln=Nd and 0Ln=Sm), Nd{sub 3-y}Ba{sub y}Co{sub 2}O{sub 7} (0.70{<=}y{<=}0.80), BaCo{sub 1-z}Sm{sub z}O{sub 3-{delta}} (0.1{<=}z{<=}0.2) were determined by X-ray diffraction of quenched samples. The values of oxygen content (5+{delta}) for slowly cooled LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}} (Ln=Nd, Sm) samples were estimated as 5.73 for Ln=Nd, and 5.60 for Ln=Sm. The unit cell parameters were refined using Rietveld full-profile analysis. It was shown that NdBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.73} possesses tetragonal structure and SmBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.60} - orthorhombic structure. The projections of isothermal-isobaric phase diagrams for the Ln-Ba-Co-O (Ln=Nd, Sm) systems to the compositional triangle of metallic components were presented. - Graphical Abstract: Projections of isobaric isothermal phase diagrams of the Nd-Ba-Co-O system and Sm-Ba-Co-O system. Highlights: > Phase equilibria in the Ln-Ba-Co-O systems (Ln=Nd, Sm). > The homogeneity range for Nd{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} solid solutions at studied conditions 0 The homogeneity range for Sm{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} solid solutions at studied conditions 0 Nd{sub 3-y}Ba{sub y}Co{sub 2}O{sub 7} solid solutions within the range 0.7{<=}y{<=}0.8. > BaCo{sub 1-z}Sm{sub z}O{sub 3-{delta}} solid solutions within the range 0.1{<=}z{<=}0.2.

Gavrilova, L.Ya.; Aksenova, T.V.; Volkova, N.E.; Podzorova, A.S. [Department of Chemistry, Ural State University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Cherepanov, V.A., E-mail: Vladimir.Cherepanov@usu.ru [Department of Chemistry, Ural State University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Structural and physical properties of layered oxy-arsenides LnRuAsO (Ln=La, Nd, Sm, Gd)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrystalline samples of LaRuAsO, NdRuAsO, SmRuAsO, and GdRuAsO have been synthesized and studied using powder x-ray diffraction, electrical transport, magnetization, and heat capacity measurements. Variations in structural properties across the series reveal a trend toward more ideal tetrahedral coordination around Ru as the size of the rare earth element is reduced. The lattice parameters of these Ru compounds show a more anisotropic response to variation in Ln than their Fe analogs, and significant anisotropy in thermal expansion is also observed. Transport measurements show metallic behavior, and carrier concentrations near 10{sup 21}-10{sup 22} electrons per cm{sup 3} are inferred from simple analysis of Hall effect measurements. Anomalies in resistivity, magnetization, and heat capacity indicate antiferromagnetic ordering of rare earth moments at 5 K for GdRuAsO, 4.5 K for SmRuAsO, and heat capacity of LaRuAsO, NdRuAsO, SmRuAsO, and GdRuAsO. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental investigation of LaRuAsO, NdRuAsO, SmRuAsO, and GdRuAsO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisotropic lattice response to changing Ln radius and temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ru coordination becomes more ideal as Ln radius is reduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport measurements reveal metallic conduction dominated by electrons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic measurements indicate antiferromagnetic ordering Nd, Sm, and Gd moments.

McGuire, Michael A., E-mail: McGuireMA@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

The critical bias for the Hamiltonicity game is n / ln n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that in the biased (1: b) Hamiltonicity Maker-Breaker game, ( played on the edges of the complete graph Kn, Maker has a winning strategy for b(n) ? 1 ? 30 ln1/4) n n ln n, for all large enough n. 1

Michael Krivelevich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The critical bias for the Hamiltonicity game is (1 + o(1))n / ln n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that in the biased (1: b) Hamiltonicity Maker-Breaker game, ( played on the edges of the complete graph Kn, Maker has a winning strategy for b(n) ? 1 ? 30 ln1/4) n n ln n, for all large enough n. 1

Michael Krivelevich

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ln=La, Nd & Sm; n=1 & 2 - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, SrLnnAlnO3n+1 (Ln=La, Nd & Sm; n=1 & 2) Microwave ... n=1 & 2) ceramics with Ruddlesden-Popper structures were proposed and...

7

High-temperature crystal structure and transport properties of the layered cuprates Ln{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Ln=Pr, Nd and Sm  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature crystal structure of the layered cuprates Ln{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Ln=Pr, Nd and Sm with tetragonal T'-structure was refined using X-ray powder diffraction data. Substantial anisotropy of the thermal expansion behavior was observed in their crystal structures with thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) along a- and c-axis changing from TEC(a)/TEC(c){approx}1.37 (Pr) to 0.89 (Nd) and 0.72 (Sm). Temperature dependence of the interatomic distances in Ln{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} shows significantly lower expansion rate of the chemical bond between Pr and oxygen atoms (O1) belonging to CuO{sub 2}-planes (TEC(Pr-O1)=11.7 ppm K{sup -1}) in comparison with other cuprates: TEC (Nd-O1)=15.2 ppm K{sup -1} and TEC (Sm-O1)=15.1 ppm K{sup -1}. High-temperature electrical conductivity of Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} is the highest one in the whole studied temperature range (298-1173 K): 0.1-108 S/cm for Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, 0.07-23 S/cm for Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and 2x10{sup -4}-9 S/cm for Sm{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The trace diffusion coefficient (D{sub T}) of oxygen for Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} determined by isotopic exchange depth profile (IEDP) technique using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) varies in the range 7.2x10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/s (973 K) and 3.8x10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s (1173 K) which are in between those observed for the manganese and cobalt-based perovskites. -- Graphical abstract: Anomaly anisotropic thermal expansion behavior was observed for Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} in comparison with Ln{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Ln=Pr and Nd having tetragonal T'-structure with thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) along a- and c-axis changing from TEC(a)/TEC(c){approx}1.37 (Pr) to 0.89 (Nd) and 0.72 (Sm). It was found that the trace diffusion coefficient (D{sub T}) of oxygen in Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) varies in the range 7.2x10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/s (973 K) and 3.8x10{sup -10} cm{sup 2}/s (1173 K) which are in between those observed for the manganese and cobalt-based perovskites. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Anisotropic high-temperature thermal expansion behavior of T'-Ln{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Ln=Pr, Nd and Sm. {yields} Anomalous expansion behavior of Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} in comparison with Ln{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Ln=Nd and Sm. {yields} High-temperature electrical conductivity of Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} is higher in comparison with other T'-Ln{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. {yields} Values of the oxygen trace diffusion coefficient for Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} are between those reported for the Mn- and Co-based perovskites.

Kaluzhskikh, M.S.; Kazakov, S.M.; Mazo, G.N. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Istomin, S.Ya., E-mail: istomin@icr.chem.msu.r [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Antipov, E.V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gippius, A.A. [Department of Physics, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fedotov, Yu.; Bredikhin, S.I. [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Liu, Yi; Svensson, G.; Shen, Z. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LASL LAND PARCELS A, B, C, E, K, LN, PL (NM.07 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Los Alamos County , New Mexico NM.07-2 Evaluation Year: 1986 NM.07-1 Site Operations: No specific operations identified for these tracts of land. NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria. Declared as surplus real property and offered for public sale in 1972. NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Indicated NM.07-1 NM.07-2 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Specifically Indicated Radiological Survey(s): Yes NM.07-2 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

9

Deliverable for F?ST project: Ln Resin based PLE  

SciTech Connect

This memo describes the fabrication of a polymer ligand extractant based on Eichrom's LN-1 resin. This work has been in support of the Fast Alpha Spectrometry Tool (F{alpha}ST) project. The first part of LANL's role in this project is to evaluate new extractants for use in polymer ligand extractants (PLEs). The first new extractant evaluated is Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), which is an effective metal extractant. It has very efficient chelating properties for a wide variety of metal ions. HDEHP is an amphiphillic molecule with two long hydrocarbon chains and a polar end with a phosphoryl oxygen (P=O) and an acidic -OH group as shown in Figure 1. HDEHP has shown effectiveness in extracting lanthanides, selective actinides, and other trivalent elements. Several authors have reported that lanthanides and elements with +3 oxidation state have similar extraction behavior in nitric acid. The distribution ratio for lanthanides rapidly decreases at lower nitric concentration then start to increase at higher concentration as shown in. The trivalent americium, curium, and yttrium exhibit similar trend as trivalent lanthanides. This extraction trend can be also observed from hydrogen chloride solution. This work describes the use of this ligand in a PLE to extract plutonium from solution. Polymer ligand films were prepared by dissolving HDEHP ligands and polystyrene beads in THF. The solution was directly deposited onto a 40 mm diameter stainless steel substrate using an automated pipette. HDEHP based PLEs with direct stippling method are shown in Figure 2. The solution was air dried at room temperature overnight to ensure complete evaporation of THF. The plutonium tracer solution was prepared in 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 8M nitric solutions to study the effect of nitric concentration in plutonium extraction. 0.1667 Bq {sup 239}Pu tracer solution was directly stippled on each PLE and was allowed to equilibrate for 3 hours before removing the solution. The plutonium activity of each sample was measured by direct alpha counting to quantify the plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE. The alpha spectra from alpha spectroscopy are shown in Figure 3. 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 PLEs had sharp peak with low tailing. 1:2 had an extremely long tail, which is a possible indication that a large amount of ligands caused the film to not form a smooth surface. Also, it can be noted that 1:2 ratio PLE surface was not as rigid as the other ratio PLEs and it was prone to scratching during sample handing. The resolution of alpha spectra was quantified by measuring Full Width at Half of the Maximum (FWHM) using Bortels equation. The tailing component of the peak was also measured along with FWHM. The peak resolutions and tailing measurements for 0.1M nitric solution samples are given in Table 1. The best resolution was achieved with 1:5 PLE and worst was given by 1:2 PLE. The plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE was dependent on both nitric concentration and ligand to polymer ratio. 1:2 PLE consistently had the highest recovery followed by 1:5 as shown in Figure 4. It should be noted that 1:2 ratio PLEs consistently had long tailing and the ROI of the spectrum had to be increased to encompass total counts from the tracer. 1:10 and 1:20 PLEs had close to zero percent recovery in all nitric concentration except for 0.01M. The highest plutonium recovery was observed for 0.1M nitric acid. 1:5 PLE gave the best combination of alpha spectroscopy resolution and plutonium recovery. Radiography image of samples were generated to study the plutonium distribution on the PLE surface. Samples were placed on an imaging plate (Fujifilm BAS-TR 2025) for 24 hours and the plate was scanned using GE Typhoon FLA 7000 system. The radiography image in Figure 5 shows uneven distribution with hot spots along the edge and in the center of the samples. These hot spots may be the result of highly localized concentration of ligands or surface defects that were observed in SEM. This unevenness in distribution may cause inaccurate activity measurement by alpha spectroscopy due to a bias in the

Peterson, Dominic S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armenta, Claudine E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rim, Jung H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

10

Deliverable for F?ST project: Ln Resin based PLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo describes the fabrication of a polymer ligand extractant based on Eichrom's LN-1 resin. This work has been in support of the Fast Alpha Spectrometry Tool (F{alpha}ST) project. The first part of LANL's role in this project is to evaluate new extractants for use in polymer ligand extractants (PLEs). The first new extractant evaluated is Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), which is an effective metal extractant. It has very efficient chelating properties for a wide variety of metal ions. HDEHP is an amphiphillic molecule with two long hydrocarbon chains and a polar end with a phosphoryl oxygen (P=O) and an acidic -OH group as shown in Figure 1. HDEHP has shown effectiveness in extracting lanthanides, selective actinides, and other trivalent elements. Several authors have reported that lanthanides and elements with +3 oxidation state have similar extraction behavior in nitric acid. The distribution ratio for lanthanides rapidly decreases at lower nitric concentration then start to increase at higher concentration as shown in. The trivalent americium, curium, and yttrium exhibit similar trend as trivalent lanthanides. This extraction trend can be also observed from hydrogen chloride solution. This work describes the use of this ligand in a PLE to extract plutonium from solution. Polymer ligand films were prepared by dissolving HDEHP ligands and polystyrene beads in THF. The solution was directly deposited onto a 40 mm diameter stainless steel substrate using an automated pipette. HDEHP based PLEs with direct stippling method are shown in Figure 2. The solution was air dried at room temperature overnight to ensure complete evaporation of THF. The plutonium tracer solution was prepared in 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 8M nitric solutions to study the effect of nitric concentration in plutonium extraction. 0.1667 Bq {sup 239}Pu tracer solution was directly stippled on each PLE and was allowed to equilibrate for 3 hours before removing the solution. The plutonium activity of each sample was measured by direct alpha counting to quantify the plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE. The alpha spectra from alpha spectroscopy are shown in Figure 3. 1:5, 1:10, and 1:20 PLEs had sharp peak with low tailing. 1:2 had an extremely long tail, which is a possible indication that a large amount of ligands caused the film to not form a smooth surface. Also, it can be noted that 1:2 ratio PLE surface was not as rigid as the other ratio PLEs and it was prone to scratching during sample handing. The resolution of alpha spectra was quantified by measuring Full Width at Half of the Maximum (FWHM) using Bortels equation. The tailing component of the peak was also measured along with FWHM. The peak resolutions and tailing measurements for 0.1M nitric solution samples are given in Table 1. The best resolution was achieved with 1:5 PLE and worst was given by 1:2 PLE. The plutonium recovery by HDEHP PLE was dependent on both nitric concentration and ligand to polymer ratio. 1:2 PLE consistently had the highest recovery followed by 1:5 as shown in Figure 4. It should be noted that 1:2 ratio PLEs consistently had long tailing and the ROI of the spectrum had to be increased to encompass total counts from the tracer. 1:10 and 1:20 PLEs had close to zero percent recovery in all nitric concentration except for 0.01M. The highest plutonium recovery was observed for 0.1M nitric acid. 1:5 PLE gave the best combination of alpha spectroscopy resolution and plutonium recovery. Radiography image of samples were generated to study the plutonium distribution on the PLE surface. Samples were placed on an imaging plate (Fujifilm BAS-TR 2025) for 24 hours and the plate was scanned using GE Typhoon FLA 7000 system. The radiography image in Figure 5 shows uneven distribution with hot spots along the edge and in the center of the samples. These hot spots may be the result of highly localized concentration of ligands or surface defects that were observed in SEM. This unevenness in distribution may cause inaccurate activity measurement by alpha spectroscopy due to a bias in the

Peterson, Dominic S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armenta, Claudine E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rim, Jung H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lattice distortions in layered type arsenides LnTAs{sub 2} (Ln=La-Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb; T=Ag, Au): Crystal structures, electronic and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect

The lanthanide coinage-metal diarsenides LnTAs{sub 2} (Ln=La, Ce-Nd, Sm; T=Ag, Au) have been reinvestigated and their structures have been refined from single crystal X-ray data. Two different distortion variants of the HfCuSi{sub 2} type are found: PrAgAs{sub 2}, NdAgAs{sub 2}, SmAgAs{sub 2}, GdAgAs{sub 2}, TbAgAs{sub 2}, NdAuAs{sub 2} and SmAuAs{sub 2} crystallize as twofold superstructures in space group Pmcn with the As atoms of their planar layers forming zigzag chains, whereas LaAgAs{sub 2}, CeAgAs{sub 2} and PrAuAs{sub 2} adopt a fourfold superstructure (space group Pmca) with cis-trans chains of As atoms. The respective atomic positions can be derived from the HfCuSi{sub 2} type by group-subgroup relations. The compounds with zigzag chains of As atoms exhibit metallic behaviour while those with cis-trans chains are semiconducting as measured on powder pellets. The majority of the compounds including 4f elements show antiferromagnetic ordering at T{sub N}<20 K. - Text3: Zigzig vs. cis-trans.

Rutzinger, D.; Bartsch, C. [Anorganische Chemie, Fachrichtung Chemie und Lebensmittelchemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Doerr, M. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Rosner, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Neu, V. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer metallische Werkstoffe, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Doert, Th., E-mail: thomas.doert@chemie.tu-dresden.d [Anorganische Chemie, Fachrichtung Chemie und Lebensmittelchemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Ruck, M. [Anorganische Chemie, Fachrichtung Chemie und Lebensmittelchemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Evaluation of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Containing Metallic Solutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Room temperature cavitation tests of vacuum annealed type 316LN stainless steel were performed in pure Hg and in Hg with various amounts of metallic solute to evaluate potential mitigation of erosion/wastage. Tests were performed using an ultrasonic vibratory horn with specimens attached at the tip. All of the solutes examined, which included 5 wt% In, 10 wt% In, 4.4 wt% Cd, 2 wt% Ga, and a mixture that included 1 wt% each of Pb, Sn, and Zn, were found to increase cavitation-erosion as measured by increased weight loss and/or surface profile development compared to exposures for the same conditions in pure Hg. Qualitatively, each solute appeared to increase the post-test wetting tenacity of the Hg solutions and render the Hg mixture susceptible to manipulation of droplet shape.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cavitation-erosion resistance of 316LN stainless steel in mercury containing metallic solutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Room temperature cavitation tests of vacuum annealed type 316LN stainless steel were performed in pure mercury and in mercury with various amounts of metallic solute to evaluate potential mitigation of erosion/wastage. Tests were performed using an ultrasonic vibratory horn with specimens attached at the tip. All of the solutes examined, which included 5 wt% In, 10 wt% In, 4.4 wt% Cd, 2 wt% Ga, and a mixture that included 1 wt% each of Pb, Sn, and Zn, were found to increase cavitation-erosion as measured by increased weight loss and/or surface profile development compared to exposures for the same conditions in pure mercury. Qualitatively, each solute appeared to increase the tenacity of the post-test wetting of the Hg solutions and render the Hg mixture susceptible to manipulation of droplet shape. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Examination of Compatibility of Potentially Cavitation-Resistant Modifications of Type 316LN Stainless Steel with Mercury in a Thermal Convection Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 316L stainless steel thermal convection loop (TCL) containing a variety of stainless steel coupons circulated mercury for 2000 h. The TCL conditions included a maximum temperature of 307 C, a maximum temperature gradient of 90 C, and a Hg velocity of about 1.4 m/min. In addition to mill-annealed/surface-ground 316LN coupons serving as the baseline material, other coupons included 316LN that was 50% cold-worked, 316LN that was given a proprietary surface hardening treatment termed ''kolsterizing,'' and Nitronic 60. The purpose of this test was to examine Hg compatibility with these modest variations of annealed 31 6LN stainless steel that are considered potential improvements over annealed 31 6LN for cavitation-erosion resistance in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) target containment system. The results indicated negligible weight change for each coupon type, no significant indication of attack or surface roughening, and generally no interaction with Hg.

Pawel, SJ

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of two unusual pillared-layer 3d-4f Ln-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two unusual pillared-layer 3d-4f Ln-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers, {l_brace}[Ln{sub 2}Cu{sub 5}Br{sub 4}(IN){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}].H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} (Ln=Eu (1) and Gd (2), HIN=isonicotinic acid), have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, thermal analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure determination reveals that 1 and 2 are isostructural and feature a novel three-dimensional pillared-layer hetrometallic structure built upon the linkages of one-dimensional (1D) linear Ln-carboxylate chains, zero-dimensional (0D) Ln-carboxylate Ln{sub 2}(IN){sub 8} dimers, rare 1D zigzag [Cu{sub 5}Br{sub 4}]{sub n} inorganic chains and IN{sup -} pillars. In both 3D structures, there are Ln-carboxylate layers resulted from the connections of 1D Ln-carboxylate chains and 0D Ln{sub 2}(IN){sub 8} dimers through O-H...O hydrogen bondings. The luminescent properties of 1 have been investigated. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have also been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two unusual pillared-layer Eu (Gd)-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers have been hydrothermally synthesized. The luminescent properties of Eu-Cu compound and magnetic properties of both compounds are investigated. Highlights: > Two unusual 3D pillared-layer Eu (Gd)-Cu heterometallic coordination polymers have been synthesized. > 1D and 0D Ln-carboxylate motifs construct layers by O-H...O hydrogen bondings. > In both the structures, there are rare 1D zigzag Cu/Br inorganic chains. > Luminescent properties of Eu-Cu compound and magnetic properties of both the compounds are investigated.

Fan Leqing, E-mail: lqfan@hqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China); Wu Jihuai, E-mail: jhwu@hqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China); Huang Yunfang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory for Functional Materials of Fujian Higher Education, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, Fujian 361021 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Trends in Ln(III) Sorption to Quartz Assessed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Laser Induced Flourescence Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to examine trends in trivalent lanthanide [Ln(III)] sorption to quartz surface SiOH0 and SiO- sites across the 4f period. Complementary laser induced fluorescence studies examined Eu(III) sorption to quartz at varying ionic strength such that the surface sorbed species could be extrapolated at zero ionic strength, the conditions under which the simulations are performed. This allowed for direct comparison of the data, enabling a molecular understanding of the surface sorbed species and the role of the ion surface charge density upon the interfacial reactivity. Thus, this combined theoretical and experimental approach aids in the prediction of the fate of trivalent radioactive contaminants at temporary and permanent nuclear waste storage sites. Potential of mean force molecular dynamics, as well as simulations of pre-sorbed Ln(III) species agrees with the spectroscopic study of Eu(III) sorption, indicating that strongly bound inner-sphere complexes are formed upon sorption to an SiO- site. The coordination shell of the ion contains 6-7 waters of hydration and it is predicted that surface OH groups dissociate from the quartz and bind within the inner coordination shell of Eu(III). Molecular simulations predict less-strongly bound inner2 sphere species in early lanthanides and more strongly bound species in late lanthanides, following trends in the ionic radius of the 4f ions. The participation of surface dissociated OHgroups within the inner coordination shell of the Ln(III) ion is, however, consistent across the series studied. Sorption to a fully protonated quartz surface is not predicted to be favorable by any Ln(III), except perhaps Lu.

Kuta, Jadwiga; Wander, Matthew C F.; Wang, Zheming; Jiang, Siduo; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

19

A new continuous two-step molecular precursor route to rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S  

SciTech Connect

A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway is designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu). This new route involves a first oxidation step leading to the rare-earth oxysulfate Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} which is subsequently reduced to the rare-earth oxysulfide Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S by switching to a H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere. The whole process occurs at a temperature significantly lower than usual solid state synthesis (T{<=}650 Degree-Sign C) and avoids the use of dangerous sulfur-based gases, providing a convenient route to the synthesis of the entire series of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S. The molecular precursors consist in heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(phen)] and [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(bipy)] (Et{sub 2}dtc=N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; phen=1,10-phenanthroline; bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine) and were synthesized by a new high yield and high purity synthesis route. The nature of the molecular precursor determines the minimum synthesis temperature and influences therefore the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase. - Graphical abstract: A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway was designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu), starting from heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes. The influence of the nature of the molecular precursor on the minimum synthesis temperature and on the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase is discussed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new high yield and high purity synthesis route of rare earth dithiocarbamates is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds are used as precursors in a continuous process leading to rare-earth oxysulfides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxysulfides are obtained under much more moderate conditions than previously described.

De Crom, N. [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences/MOST, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Louis Pasteur, 1, L4.01.03, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Devillers, M., E-mail: michel.devillers@uclouvain.be [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences/MOST, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Louis Pasteur, 1, L4.01.03, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Comparison of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Carburized and Carburized-Plus-Nitrided 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Annealed type 316LN stainless steel in the (1) carburized and the (2) carburized plus nitrided conditions was evaluated for cavitation-erosion resistance in ambient temperature mercury using a vibratory horn method. The results indicated that, relative to the specimens receiving only the carburizing treatment, the specimens that received both surface treatments exhibited substantially greater weight loss, general thinning, and profile development as a function of sonication time - with all observed degradation limited to the nitrided layer. Further, the nitride layer was observed to be susceptible to extensive cracking (occasionally leading to spallation), but the cracking was never observed to penetrate into the carburized layer. These screening test results suggest there is no improvement in cavitation-erosion resistance associated with augmentation of the carburizing treatment with plasma nitriding.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of 316LN Stainless Steel Following a Nitro-Carburizing Surface Treatment  

SciTech Connect

A nitro-carburizing surface treatment known domestically as the Melonite process was applied to type 316LN stainless steel test pieces and exposed to sonication conditions in mercury using a vibratory horn technique. Cavitation-erosion damage was evaluated for extended exposures and compared to other surface treatments on the same substrate alloy. The results indicate that the Melonite process substantially retards weight loss and crater development for extended periods, but gradually is eroded/destroyed leading to exposure of the substrate and cavitation-erosion behavior similar to untreated specimens. Compared with other surface treatments, cavitation-erosion results indicate that specimens treated with Melonite perform similarly to specimens treated with a simple nitriding process. Neither the simple nitriding nor the Melonite treatment is quite as effective as a previously evaluated low temperature carburizing treatment, the latter being about a factor of three better than Melonite in terms of weight loss during sonication in mercury.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Synthesis and Evaluation of Conformationally Restricted N4-Tetradentate Ligands for Implementation in An(III)/Ln(III) Separations  

SciTech Connect

The previous literature demonstrates that donor atoms softer than oxygen are effective for separating trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) from trivalent actinides (An(III)) (Nash, K.L., in: Gschneider, K.A. Jr., et al. (eds.) Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, vol. 18-Lanthanides/Actinides Chemistry, pp. 197-238. Elsevier Science, Amsterdam, 1994). It has also been shown that ligands that 'restrict' their donor groups in a favorable geometry, appropriate to the steric demands of the cation, have an increased binding affinity. A series of tetradentate nitrogen containing ligands have been synthesized with increased steric 'limits'. The pK a values for these ligands have been determined using potentiometric titration methods and the formation of the colored copper(II) complex has been used as a method to determine ligand partitioning between the organic and aqueous phases. The results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted amine ligands are encouraging, but the results for the 2-methylpyridyl-substituted diimines indicate that these ligands are unsuitable for implementation in a solvent extraction system due to hydrolysis.

Mark D. Ogden; G. Patrick Meier; Kenneth L. Nash

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Synthesis and structure of a new family of 3d-4f heterometallic compounds Rb{sub 7}LnFe{sub 6}O{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 8} (Ln=Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy): Magnetic properties of the Sm-, Gd-, Dy-derivatives  

SciTech Connect

A new family of mixed lanthanide(III) and iron(III) oxo-phosphate phases, Rb{sub 7}LnFe{sub 6}O{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 8} (Ln=Sm 1, Eu 2, Gd 3, Dy 4), was isolated by using a high-temperature, solid-state method in molten-salt media. The X-ray single-crystal structure analysis shows that these isomorphic derivatives crystallize in a triclinic space group P-1 (no. 2); Z=1. The 3-D framework of these 3d-4f oxo-phosphates are comprised of LnO{sub 6} octahedral, FeO{sub 5} trigonal bipyramidal (tbp), and {mu}{sub 3}-oxo [Fe{sub 4}O{sub 18}] tetrameric units interconnected through PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The preliminary results of the temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements for selected compounds (1, 3, 4) reveal antiferromagnetic-like behavior. 1 shows a weak antiferromagnetric ordering at T{sub N}={approx}7 K while others show little evidence of long-range magnetic order down to 2 K. All three compounds have measured magnetic moments significantly smaller than the expected values. - Graphical abstract: The extended framework is described by the connectivity of three distinct types of paramagnetic units. The temperature-dependent, lower than expected effective magnetic moments are reported. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new family of mixed lanthanide(III) and iron(III) oxo-phosphates is isolated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Features PO{sub 4}-linked paramagnetic units of LnO{sub 6}, FeO{sub 5}, and {mu}{sub 3}-oxo [Fe{sub 4}O{sub 18}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sm-derivative orders at T{sub N}{approx}7 K while Gd- and Dy-derivatives show absence of order.

Sanjeewa, Liurukara D.; Palmer West, J. [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); Hwu, Shiou-Jyh, E-mail: shwu@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

The concrete theory of numbers : New Mersenne conjectures. Simplicity and other wonderful properties of numbers $L(n) = 2^{2n}\\pm2^n\\pm1$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Mersenne conjectures. The problems of simplicity, common prime divisors and free from squares of numbers $L(n) = 2^{2n}\\pm2^n\\pm1$ are investigated. Wonderful formulas $gcd $ for numbers $L (n) $ and numbers repunit are proved.

Boris V. Tarasov

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Triple Ion-Beam Studies of Radiation Damage Effects in a 316LN Austenitic Alloy for a High Power Spallation Neutron Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup 2}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of {approx} 1 {micro}m. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss.

Lee, EH

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

aps_safey_notice_LN2.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all PPE and cryogenic equip- ment prior to use. 2. Wear safety glasses and a face shield. 3. Wear waterproof, loose-fitting, cryo- genic gloves. 4. Wear cuffless pants and...

27

j : r " , r { ' , : . r ' . ' . r : r ,r , r r r , l\\ , r l r r l i r e V r j r r t " : , \\ , : r t l r r r r i c ,rry'.,n:. ,rii,r r ln( y' r ainQ uallr v-/ t ' lllSAf : / r r  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a \\i \\/{ t t t , l r , t . j : r " , r { ' , : . r ' . ' . r : r ,r , r r r , l\\ , r l r r l i r e V r j r r t " : , \\ , : r t l r r r r i c ,rry'.,n:. ,rii,r r ln( y' r ainQ uallr v- / t ' lllSAf : / r r I r r , i r . t .l . r r l : / t . 1 : 1 . . [.t.,h',.; r lVr r! L: ( ] . \\ l] r . l) . L: . \\ x

Short, Daniel

28

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Greer Comm of Public Works",90 4500013523,01,013,1,1830371,"SC 13590","Newberry City of",90 4500013523,01,014,1,552070,"SC 14300","Newberry City of",90...

29

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Greer Comm of Public Works",92 4500013523,01,001,1,7425262,"SC 10610","Newberry City of",92 4500013523,01,003,1,3801080,"SC 10897","Newberry City of",92...

30

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Greer Comm of Public Works",91 4500013523,01,013,1,2046718,"SC 13590","Newberry City of",91 4500013523,01,014,1,793018,"SC 14300","Newberry City of",91...

31

Juniper Networks LN1000 Mobile Secure Router Security ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The module is completely enclosed in a rectangular nickel or clear zinc coated, cold rolled steel, plated steel and brushed aluminum enclosure. ...

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","FL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAROFDAT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Sheboygan Falls City of",98 5500018312,01,001,1,1,000016519548,"WI 10610","Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm",98 5500018312,01,002,1,1,000001111652,"WI 10620","Sun...

33

Ion irradiation-induced structural transitions in orthorhombic Ln2TiO5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Radiation Effects in Oxide Ceramics and Novel LWR Fuels. Presentation Title...

34

Optical Materials Activated With Nanoparticles of Ce(IV):Ln Oxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

35

First-Order Algorithm with O(ln(1/?)) Convergence for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved. LPs are enormous and unsolvable via standard algorithms such as the simplex or interior-point methods.

36

Bipolaron Model of the Superconductivity of an Iron-Based Layered Compound LnO_{1-x}F_xFePn (Ln =La, Sm, Nd, Pr, Ce, Pn=P, As)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bipolaron model is proposed as a superconductivity mechanism for iron-based superconductivity. The results are consistent with the experiments.

Liang-You Zheng; Bo-Cheng Wang; Shan T. Lai

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

37

Patterns of Pass-through of Commodity Price Shocks to Retail Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1) Chicken Ln(Flour/PPI) Ln(ChicFeed/PPI) Ln(Wheat/PPI) Ln(Index. Ln(Flour/PPI) Ln(ChicFeed/PPI) Ln(Wheat/PPI) Ln(Corn/feed and flour), and upstream commodities (corn and wheat).

Berck, Peter; Leibtag, Ephraim S.; Villas-Boas, Sofia B.; Solis, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Complex and Multi-Faceted Nature of School Construction Costs: Factors Affecting California. A Report to the American Institute of Architects California Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost (ln) and Cost per Square Foot (ln). The coefficientsdependent variable, Cost per Square Foot (ln). Consistentin our data. Measuring cost per square foot, however, yields

Vincent, Jeffrey M; McKoy, Deborah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

PII: 50022-1910(96)00021-2 ./. ln.sectPhvsiol.Yol.42, No. 7, pp. 633 6'12, 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occurred frequently among reproductives,in contrast to migrants which survived sub- zero exposure until ice- mental parameters such as temperature, moisture, and solar radiation (e.g. Calverl et al., 1983; Weiss er crys- tallization temperature - the temperature at which internal ice formation occurs

Lee Jr., Richard E.

40

SSRLUOEC Minutes 2/03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

being investigated for critical equipment. LN monos are particularly sensitive to long power outages. Some DOE funding is being provided for the first phase of an LN distribution...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PET 424304 2013 Exercises 1+2 of 4 12 Feb + 14 Feb 2013 1. ideal gas: s = s2-s1 = cpln(T2/T1) -R ln(p2/p1) (T << Tcrit; p << pcrit)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be 93% (see a.), effectiveness = 21/93 = 23% c. Heat from boiler to surroundings: 50,2 ··(7834 ­ 3004 = 11,5 kW/K Losses: collector 4,77 MW ­ 4,45 MW = 0,32 MW = 6,7% boiler radiation 1,05 MW = 22,0% Power

Zevenhoven, Ron

42

PET 424304 2011 Exercises 2 of 2 17Feb2011 1. ideal gas: s = s2-s1 = cpln(T2/T1) -R ln(p2/p1) (T << Tcrit; p << pcrit)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condenser = liquid Lo G1 = Lo + D. & energy balance G1·HG1 = D·H´D +(G-D)·HLo G1 = D· (H'D-HLo)/(HG1-HLo dc c RL dx dT T L XLXLJ and dx dc c RL dx dT T L XLXLJ :givesThisA).pureforpotentialchemical( c c RTlnRTlnypotentialchemicalwith (Onsager)LL, dx T d X, dx T 1 d Xwhere dx dc D dx dT DXLXLJ and dx dc D

Zevenhoven, Ron

43

A Unified approach to NNLO soft and virtual corrections in electroweak, Higgs, QCD, and SUSY processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ? (2CF ? CA) ln ( tu sQ2 ) , (3.20) and c1 = CF [ ?3 2 + ln ( tu Q4 )] ln ( 2F s ) + ?0 4 ln ( 2R s ) . (3.21) These are in agreement with the NLO result in [30]. 14 3.6.2 qg ? qV Here tq = u, tg = t, and Re?? (1) S = CF ln(?u/s) + CF + (CA/2) ln... (t/u) + CA/2 [19]. The NLO soft and virtual corrections are ?(1)qg?qV = ? B qg?qV ?s(2R) pi {c3D1(s2) + c2D0(s2) + c1?(s2)} (3.22) with c3 = CF + 2CA, c2 = ? 3 4 CF ? (CF + CA) ln ( 2F Q2 ) ? CA ln ( tu sQ2 ) , (3.23) and c1 = [ ??0 4 ? 3 4 CF + CF ln...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos

44

NNLO soft and virtual corrections for electroweak, Higgs, and SUSY processes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

q. Finally we study squark-gluino production, qg ? qg. Here xth = s4 = s+ t + u?mq ?mg, c3 = 2(CF + CA), c2 = ?CF ? CA ? 2CF ln(?u1/m2)? 2CA ln(?t1/m2)? (CF + CA) ln(2F /s), and c 1 = ln( 2 F /s)[CF ln(?u1/m2) + CA ln(?t1/m2)? 3CF /4? ?0...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos

45

Explanation of Codes Used in Imports Database Files  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R_S_ZIP: importing company zip code: SF_NAME: processing facility name: SF_ADD_LN1: processing facility address line 1: SF_ADD_LN2: processing facility address line 2 ...

46

Influence of Niobium on Steady-State Creep Behaviour of Ni ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n = P LnG /d Ln 0 JTzconst. (2). Both the experimental methods of varying o(T= const.) and varying T(o=const.) with single specimen were utilized to measure 6...

47

Next-to-next-to-leading order soft gluon corrections in direct photon production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) , (2.4) where F is the factorization scale, CA = Nc, and ?0 = (11CA ? 2nf )/3, with nf the number of quark flavors. We also define for use below T qq2 = ?(?0/4) + 2CF ln(p2T/s) and T qg 2 = ?(3/4)CF + (CF + CA) ln(p2T/s). Finally we write c fifj 1 = c... fifj 1 + T fifj 1 . For qq ? ?g we have c qq1 = CF [ ?3 2 ? ln ( p2T s )] ln ( 2F s ) + ?0 4 ln ( 2R s ) , (2.5) and T qq1 = CF [3/2+ln(p2T/s)] ln(p 2 T/s)?(?0/4) ln(2R/s)+c? qq 1 where c ?qq 1 is defined in Eq. (3.11) of Ref. [5]. For qg...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Owens, J F

48

THERMODYNAMIC TABLES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION, V.1: AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DATABASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albuquerque, New Mexico (Ln preparation, 1987). D.Langrnuir: "Techniques of Estimating Thermodynamic Properties for some Aqueous Complexes

Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Silvester, L.F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Noise Analysis of Statham Temperature Chamber  

SciTech Connect

A procedure is described to subdue the noise made by the LN2 control valve on a Statham Temperature Chamber.

Mielke, R. L.

1973-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Free energy reconstruction from irreversible single- molecule pulling experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. WHAMH. plot WHAM twoD.m . . . . . . . . . . . .histogram analysis method (WHAM) [17]. F (z) = ?? ?1 ln ??W

Minh, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

17 October 2000 PROC. ENTOMOL. SOC. WASH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Solera (9 USNM ENT 00037961 USNM); Belen, San Antonio, 950 m, LN 218800 516175, 8 Aug 1996, M. A. Zumbado

Mathis, Wayne N.

52

Submitted to Annales de l'ISUP FUNCTIONAL SUPERVISED CLASSIFICATION WITH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discussion and an updated list of references, we refer the reader to the monographs of Ramsay and Silverman of functions to be classified, Biau, Bunea, and Wegkamp [4] propose to use first Fourier filtering on each to the training sequence, ^Ln,m(g) is an unbiased es- timate of Ln(g), we expect that Ln+m(^g) is close to infg

Gaïffas, Stéphane

53

Does Incentive Regulation Provide the Correct Incentives?: Stochastic Frontier Evidence from the US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of individual programs on the technical efficiency of a large set of coal and natural gas generator units + O ln Oili (4) +1 ln V intage + 2 (ln V intage) 2 + i + vi A similar specification for natural gas of natural gas paid by IOUs for each state to obtain an estimate of the volume of fuel used. 15 For coal

California at Berkeley. University of

54

The Causes of Trade Globalization: A Political-Economy and World-Systems Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption ? Hegemony ln Great War Intensity ? GDP per capita ? Democracy Countries WDI IndicatorEnergy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ln Great War Intensity ? GDP per capita ? Democracy Countries WDI IndicatorEnergy consumption ? GATT / WTO Membership ln Great War Intensity ? GDP per capita ? Democracy Countries WDI Indicator

Kwon, Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

PERIODIC CRYO REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRYO REPORT CRYO REPORT TIME: Jan 11 2014 11:29:09:000PM LN2 tank pressure, psi 63.00 LN2 main tank level,inch 48.05 LN2 resv tank level,inch 179.00 Cryostat pressure, psi 0.01 LN2 sump level, inch 0.00 LN2 pump speed, rpm 0.27 LN2 pump pressure, psi 0.00 Scanner OK DIBORANE SYSTEM CRYBOR CONC1 OK CRYBOR CONC2 OK CRYBOR INST1 OK CRYBOR INST2 OK RESISTANCE COIL TEMPERATURES, deg C EF1U, deg C 34.66 EF1L 21.94 EF2U 26.93 EF2L 21.70 EF3U 41.54 EF3L 36.42 EFCU 18.28 EFCL 8.16

56

Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the World Bank and International Energy Agency, prior toEnergy Use Per Capita, 2005 ln epc Data Source: World Bank,

Lawrence, Kirk Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Enabling the Nuclear Renaissance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... Glass Development for the Combined Cs + LN + TM Fission Products from the Advanced Fuel...

58

FINAL REPORT ON THE EXPERIMENTAL SUPER, CONDUCTING SYNCHROTRON (ESCAR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operating costs for electrical power, LN feed, maintenance,distribution, refrigerator, electrical power supplies, andhad substantial electrical power, control and instrumentat:

Lambertson, G.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Rappoport9Apeloig, Greenblatt f Solvolysis of 9-(c~-Bromoarylidene)anthrones 3837 aqueous EtOH" is misleading since "TFE-EtOH" should be reserved for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

normalize 1Cl,(t) at all times by [Tr pe(tf)]-ln= ewf) IMf) >- 1'2, the square root of the total population

Apeloig, Yitzhak

60

Chapter 37 Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Contact Contact Name Anthony Hatton (Director) Department Department for Environmental Protection Division Division of Waste Management Address 200 Fair Oaks Ln.,...

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61

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

200 Fair Oaks Ln., 2nd Floor, Frankfort, KY, 40601 + IncentiveContDept Department for Environmental Protection + IncentiveContDiv Division of Waste Management + Incentive...

62

Chapter 30 Waste Management: General Administrative Procedures...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or disposed of, or otherwise managed. Policy Contact Department Department for Environmental Protection Division Division of Waste Management Address 200 Fair Oaks Ln.,...

63

Database Development for Modeling Emissions and Control ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2 ln 5.0 exp )( b t t atS p a, b, tp = empirical coefficients Wet material emissions 3 Page 9. ...

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

64

Microsoft PowerPoint - ImplementationCeriumModel_APS2009.ppt...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The - phases are modeled as a solid solution of both phases. The Gibbs energy function for the mixture is represented with the following equation: (1 ) (1 ) ( ln...

65

Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

checking the document effective date on the PS Training website. Brookhaven National Laboratory Photon Sciences Directorate Subject: Photon Sciences TECH PROC LN2 Manual Fill...

66

Publications Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... http://www.nist.gov/manuscript-publication-search.cfm?pub_id=911090 2. Early LNG Program and LN2 Cryogenic Flow Measurement Facility at ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Early LNG Program and LN2 Cryogenic Flow Measurement Facility at NIST. Published: April 04, 2011. ... Citation: LNG metrology workshop. ...

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

2006 NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for AnLn Separations Washington State University University of Tennessee Development of Acetic Acid Removal Technology for the UREX+ Process Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

69

Properties of IN-100 Processed by Powder Metallurgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PROPERTIES OF IN-100 PROCESSED. BY POWDER METALLURGY. L.N. Moskowitz,. R.M. Pelloux and N.J. Grant. Department of Metallurgy and Materials.

70

MML Microscopy Facility Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Precision ion-polishing system (PIPS); XLA2000 low angle ion mill (w/cold stage, ion termination); Duo ion mill (w/LN2 cold ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Quantum Corrections to the Thermodynamic Properties of Liquids, with Application to Neon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantum correction has been expressed as a deviation ? from lnQc where Qc is the classical partition function. Changes in volume

O. K. Rice

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Essays on Institutions and Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ii) lnCAPINT: the capital intensity of firms (log book valuevariable interacting capital intensity and patent intensityof the interaction of capital- and patent-intensity on the

Hegde, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

DSA Validation List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... all hash lengths are not applicable to all (L,N) pairs ... Shaun Lee TEL: 44 ... 713, Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions 333 Palladium Drive Kanata ...

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

PC II fr Biochemiker Eberhard-Karls-Universitt Tbingen, Institut fr Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Prof. Dr. J. Enderlein, http://www.joerg-enderlein.de  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretische Chemie, Prof. Dr. J. Enderlein, http://www.joerg-enderlein.de ln lnB j j B j U S k p p k Z Theoretische Chemie, Prof. Dr. J. Enderlein, http://www.joerg-enderlein.de Isotherme Expansion eines idealen, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Prof. Dr. J. Enderlein, http

Enderlein, Jörg

75

Spurious Signals in TRMM/VIRS Reflectance Channels and Their Effect on Aerosol Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical depths, ?1 and ?2, and the ngstrm exponent ? = ln(?1/?2)/ln(?1/?2), are retrieved from daytime measurements (sun zenith angle ?o < 60) over ocean in reflectance bands 1 (?1 = 0.63 m) and 2 (?2 = 1.61 m) of the five-channel ...

Alexander Ignatov

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Estimating the Correlation Dimension of Atmospheric Time Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correlation dimension D is commonly used to quantify the chaotic structure of atmospheric time series. The standard algorithm for estimating the value of D is based on finding the slope of the curve obtained by plotting ln C(r) versus ln r, ...

Hampton N. Shirer; Christian J. Fosmire; Robert Wells; Laurentia Suciu

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Universitatsbibliothek Heidelberg Plock 107-109 Postfach 105749  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in die historischen Hilfswissenschaften / hrsg. von Friedrich Beck .... - Köln ; Weimar ; Wien : Böhlau : fachsprachlicher Wortschatz mit Hinweisen zum Geschichtsstudium in Frankreich / hrsg. von Heike Drummer-Theorien / Christina von Braun ... (Hrsg.). - Köln ; Weimar ; Wien : Böhlau. - (UTB ; 2584 : Gender

Heermann, Dieter W.

78

Hochschulbibliografie 2010 (Weihnachtsbibliografie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Hrsg ; Tieniu N. Tan Editors. - London : Springer 2009 LN-U 10-15145 Agent technology and e / Roman Pichler ... (Hrsg.). - Heidelberg : Dpunkt- Verl. 1. Aufl. 2011 LN-U 10-16185 Agouros] / hrsg. von Ingolf Wittmann. [Geschrieben von den Experten der IBM]. - Böblingen : C & L Computer- u

Manstein, Dietmar J.

79

Online Forecast Combination for Dependent Heterogeneous Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by convexity of l (y, p) with respect to p. Recall that D (w, u) := P k wk ln (wk/uk), and define zk := ??l0 (y, hw, xi)xk. Then, D (u,w)?D (u,w0) = KX k=1 uk ln (w0k/wk) = KX k=1 uk " ln wk exp {zk}PK l=1wl exp {zl} ? lnwk # ? KX k=1 ukzk ? ln KX l=1 wl exp... {zl} ! [because ? lnwk is non-negative] = KX k=1 (uk ? wk) zk ? ln KX l=1 wl exp ( zl ? KX k=1 wkzk )! ? KX k=1 (uk ? wk) zk ? |z|2? 8 , using Hoeffdings inequality (e.g. Devroye et al., 1996) for the moment generating function of bounded random...

Sancetta, Alessio

80

ROTATION OF MERCURY: THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMICS OF A RIGID ELLIPSOIDAL PLANET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory ROTATION OF MERCURY: THEDRETICAL ANALYSIS OF THEW -7405-eng-48 ROTATION OF MERCURY: THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OFfor the rotation of Mercury is sho'ln to imply locked-in

Laslett, L. Jackson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR AN ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that ln conventlOnal power transformers .. However , se~eralpower per passenger car: 20 kW Source conductor current: 1000 A Core Material: Transformerpower. This is in contrast to situations in which a transformer

Bolger, J.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction & Compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEPARATION PLANTS NITROGEN OXYGEN INDUSTRIAL AREA GALVESTON BAY GULF OF MEXICO BAYTOWN MONT BELVIEU Refrigeration GN2 to N2 Liquefier To Feed H2 Flash Compressor H2 Recycle Compressor LN2 Add. To Storage/Fill #12

83

CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR ABANDONED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controls for a Commercial Oil Shale In~try, Vol. I, An En~in Second Briefing on In-Situ Oil Shale Technology, LawrenceHeley, Water Management ln Oil Golder Associates, Kirkland,

Persoff, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lighting: 1.50bulb (32 watts) Delamping: 1.20-1.50ln. ft. or 0.05rated fixture watt Relamping: 1 - 1.25 Lighting Sensors: 15-60sensor, 0.04connected watt for...

85

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Hawaii) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

35 - 75unit Custom Lighting: 0.10 - 0.15kWh; plus demand reduction incentives LED Refrigerated Lighting: 30 - 75ln. ft. LED Non-Dimmable Lamp: 2.50 - 12.50unit (New...

86

The Marketing/Operations Management Interface:Toward a Science of Delivering Value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L) q ln the time of the maximum demand rate for Bass p + q pd(t) is from (2.23). The maximum demand rate occurs at T maximum demand rate for p + q p q(1 ?

Li, Shan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evidence of a Shift in the Short-Run Price Elasticity of Gasoline Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

j and year t, lnG jt is given by consumption in the previouslnG t-12 refer to 1 and 12 month lags of the dependent variable, per capital gasoline consumption

Hughes, Jonathan; Knittel, Christopher R; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

BAC-FISH assays delineate complex chromosomal rearrangements in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer *D. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature 1992;359:21-22. [LN. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature [4] Gembicki M,

Kwan, Johnson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature 1992; 359: 21-22.LN. Thyroid cancer after Chernobyl. Nature 5. Nikiforov YE.of children after the Chernobyl reactor accident. Int J

Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

J5: Electrical Conductivity of Diesel-Biodiesel Blends Evaluated by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

91

H7: Synthesis and Electrochemical Performance of SiOC-Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

92

Multiphysics Computational Study of Tubular Piezoelectric Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

93

C6: Thermodynamic Modeling of the La2O3-TiO2 Pseudo-Binary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

94

G3: Tribological Properties of MoS2-Ti Coated Steel in Vacuum and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

95

A4: Viscoelastic and Mechanical properties of Polylactide Based Bio ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

96

E15: Study of Grain Boundaries across a Fracture Surface Using X ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

97

B12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

98

D11: Thermodynamic and Electrochemical Properties of the Mg-Mn ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

99

A17: Morphology Variations of GaN Nanowires and Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

100

B45: Preparation of Organically-Modified Borosiloxane Copolymers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

B15: Microwave Sintering of Carbide and Oxide Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

102

C22: The Influence of Rare-Earth Additives on Batio3Ceramics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

103

B26: Uniform Melt State Process For The Production Of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

104

B23: Sonochemical Methods for Ceria and Zirconia Colloid Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

105

D4: MAX Phase Response to Neutron Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

106

E14: Grain Boundary Misorientation Statistics in Polycrystalline Ni-Bi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

107

E10: First-Principles Calculations of Oxygen Diffusion Coefficients in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

108

C4: Stability and Topological Transformations of Liquid Droplets on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

109

B33  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

110

Rare Earth Based Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient emission at such small size is provided by doping Ln3+-ions into a fluoride matrix. Therefore, NaGdF4:Er3+,Yb3+ nanoparticles are synthesized by...

111

Alcator C-Mod Upper Divertor Cryopump Quarterly Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system works well Easy to operate - 1 technician LHe Dewar PLC Rack stepper control valve heat exchanger LHe line LN2 line Alcator C-Mod Recent Accomplishments Cryopump Startup...

112

Section 74  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

" VIS % b 2 " 2 VIS % b 3 ln(1 0 ) Session Papers 317 (1) Narrowband-to-Broadband Conversion: Do Clouds Have Anomalous Absorption in the Visible Band? Z. Li and A. Trishchenko...

113

Learning with Uncertainty Gaussian Processes and Relevance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-score > 6.0) but not by all three other methods, PROSITE, PROFILESEARCH and the keyword search. Sequences 41..........K-.Q......IYAIKYV.NLe...EA.D..........NQ.T.LDS.........Y.R.NE......IAY..LN.KL....Qqh.S... 7 PKC

114

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...parameter ln natural logarithm (base e ) LNG liquefied natural gas log common logarithm (base 10) LPCVD low pressure chemical vapor deposition LT long transverse (direction) m meter M f temperature at which martensite formation

115

Abbreviations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...parameter ln natural logarithm (base e ) LNG liquefied natural gas log common logarithm (base 10) m meter mA milliampere MC metal carbide MeV megaelectronvolt M f temperature at which martensite formation finishes during

116

REMF*?%?:?B?j?*FxJK?g$>*3c$\\d?0Y ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... l?*'* >P#4m??z*?j@*P*{??. ?*?^**???*?*`W*{?T*? ??ut|lnG;*=(. ?2n? ƻp5-d?O?e?n ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effect of fuel on the Photoluminescence properties of Gd2O3 nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research on Ln2O3-type oxide nanomaterials provide challenges to both fundamental and breakthrough development of technologies in various areas such as electronics, photonics, display, lasing, detection, optical amplification, ... Keywords: combustion, gadolinium, nanoparticles, oxides, phosphor, photoluminescence

B. Rudraswamy; N. Dhananjaya

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Sandia National Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Arts Building 600 Fairview Ln., Ste. F Espanola, NM 87532 The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH) and collaborators have been funded by the DOE to...

119

Sampling Turbulence in the Stratified Ocean: Statistical Consequences of Strong Intermittency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulence and turbulent mixing in the ocean are strongly intermittent in amplitude, space and time. The degree of intermittency is measured by the intermittency factor ?2, defined as either ?2ln?, the variance of the logarithm of the viscous ...

Mark A. Baker; Carl H. Gibson

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Relational Grounding Facilitates Development of Scientifically Useful Multiscale Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular automata, agent-based models h (ABM), and actornodes (LN-ODE), and an agent-based model (ABM) of granulomathat, in effect, the agent-based model depends intricately

Hunt, C Anthony; Ropella, Glen EP; Lam, Tai; Gewitz, Andrew D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nucleation and Characteristics of Liquid Nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments on a refrigerating catalyst?liquid nitrogen (LN)?in different cloud chambers and their results. The nucleation threshold temperature of liquid nitrogen is 0C, and when the temperature less than ?2C, the ice ...

Cao Xuecheng; Wang Weimin

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Inventory Fluctuations and Price Discrimination: The Determinants of Price Variation in Car Retailing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Pricing of Inventories with Stochastic Demand overStatistics Obs Price Inventory DaysToTurn LocalInv LotFullTable 2: Price e?ects of inventory Dep. Var. ln(price)

Zettelmeyer, Florian; Scott Morton, Fiona; Silva-Risso, Jorge

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

stat.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(or in a linear model with Gaussian errors), L has a Gaussian form and ln L is (hyper)parabolic. In this case, it can be seen that a numerically equivalent way of determining...

124

Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene,respectively). With propane and n-butane, all the Ln 2+ ionsof La 2+ with propane and n-butane, and the absence of their

Gibson, John K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Distribution of Ramsey Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the number of integers in the interval [0,x] that are non-trivial Ramsey numbers r(k,n) (3 order of magnitude (x ln x)**(1/2).

Clark, Lane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

RF CAVITY PERFORMANCE in the ISAC-II SUPERCONDUCTING HEAVY ION...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonic Buncher Tandem Accelerator Super Buncher Linac-1 Linac-2 Linac-3 Re- Buncher SM-1 SM-2 HES SC1 SC2 LHe & LN 2 Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi Pelletron...

127

TecnaiDLFinal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contact numbers are posted Know how NCEM staff for support can be contact Wear face shield and gloves when handling LN, check if screen is covered Instrument Preparation Show...

128

Rainfall Response in Northeast Brazil from Ocean Climate Variability during the Second Half of the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigated the rainfall variability response in northern Northeast Brazil (NNEB) from El Nio/La Nia (EN/LN) events and from the meridional sea surface temperature gradient (MGRAD) over the tropical Atlantic during the period 1948...

Daisy Beserra Lucena; Jacques Servain; Manoel Francisco Gomes Filho

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

FEBRUARY 1980SEISMIC RESPONSE OF LIGHT ATTACHMENTS TO BUILDINGS By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..L:..l .!..J\\l. '..L "-, ng University of'-Il'.A.J..~-. U b ln01S r ana, Illinois 61801 UILU-ENG 80-Z006

Reference Ro; Roberto Villaverde; Nathan M. Newmark; Roberto Villaverde; Nathan M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of land-surface interaction in ECMWF and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis models over grassland (FIFE) and boreal forest (BOREAS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site in 1996 near Thompson, Manitoba. Some aspects of the98.484W near Thompson, Manitoba. Some aspects of the40 ln west of Thompson, Manitoba (designated TF-3 for tower

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dynamics of a Submesoscale Surface Ocean Density Front  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

609-625. Thomas, L.N. , Tandon, A. , and Mahadevan, A. 2007.C1): Mahadevan, A. , and Tandon, A. 2006. An analysis ofpp. 397405. Nagai, T. , Tandon, A. , and Rudnick, D.L.

Abramczyk, Marshall

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

LIDAR, Camera and Inertial Sensors Based Navigation Techniques for Advanced Intelligent Transportation System Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the vision sensor and LIDAR system development makes thisvehicle carries one camera and two IBEO ALASCA XT LIDARLIDARs. (a) SICK LMS200 LIDAR, (b) HOKUYO UXM-30LN LIDAR, (

Huang, Lili

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

An Investigation of the Compatibility of Nickel-Based Single Crystal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roger C. Reed, Kenneth A. Green, Pierre Caron, Timothy P. Gabb, Michael G. Fahrmann, Eric S. ..... E.P. Busso, L. Wright, H.E. Evans, L.N. McCartney, S.R.J..

134

Approximating the traffic grooming problem in tree and star networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of grooming paths in all-optical networks with tree topology so as to minimize the switching cost, measured by the total number of used ADMs. We first present efficient approximation algorithms with approximation factor of 2ln(@d@?g)+o(ln(@d@?g)) ... Keywords: Add-drop multiplexer (ADM), Optical networks, Traffic grooming, Tree networks, Wavelength division multiplexing (WDM)

Michele Flammini; Gianpiero Monaco; Luca Moscardelli; Mordechai Shalom; Shmuel Zaks

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Tracking quintessence and k-essence in a general cosmological background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive conditions for stable tracker solutions for both quintessence and k-essence in a general cosmological background, H^2 \\propto f(\\rho). We find that tracker solutions are possible only when \\eta = d ln f /d ln \\rho is constant, aside from a few special cases, which are enumerated. Expressions for the quintessence or k-essence equation of state are derived as a function of \\eta and the equation of state of the dominant background component.

Rupam Das; Thomas W. Kephart; Robert J. Scherrer

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Influence of the defect structure of {gamma}-La{sub 2(1-x)}Nd{sub 2x}S{sub 3} crystals on their spectroscopic properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The photoluminescence and Raman scattering of undoped {gamma}-Ln{sub 2}S{sub 3} single crystals (Ln is a rare earth ion) and the decay kinetics of the {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} level of Nd ions in these crystals have been investigated. The distortion of the decay curve of the Nd {sup 4}F{sub 3/2} level upon excitation by light with {lambda} = 0.53 {mu}m is explained.

Mamedov, A. A., E-mail: tedd33@mail.ru [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Calculation in MD Simulation #12;Basic Thermodynamics Helmoholtz free energy A = U ­ TS + i Ni dA = wrev (reversible, const N V T) eq (22.9) McQuarrie & Simon Gibbs free energy G = U;Implication of Free Energy A B Keq = [A]/[B] Keq = exp (-G0 /RT) G0 = -RT ln Keq G = G0 + RT ln Q G > 0

Nielsen, Steven O.

138

Khesbn no. 26-27 - October 1961 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t! tf! N P'9yDDy ']yl prh rtD J]R J t N l"t JlD llst'5y "'IiluDl j:Sn olNtJDlt 't.I il"rtD ''r J']N l]N DIBIJD'| ''r .l'n{ lyhlP DSn lypy"ltJ'ti|D n)rtD )'t llD lylD','i :- :-n *

Admin, LAYCC

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

MHH Forschungsbericht 200468 Abteilung Rheumatologie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. hrsg. von Rüdiger Faust. - Weinheim : Wiley-VCH 2., vollst. überarb. und erw. Aufl 2006 LN-S 1 / hrsg. von M. Baerns ... ; 1) 2., durchges. Aufl. 1992 LN-S 1-6145 Steht auch LSN K-DE 052 Bard, Allen J Mediziner : mit 38 Tabellen / hrsg. von Christian Benz .... - Stuttgart : Wiss. Verl.- Ges. 2., völlig neu

Manstein, Dietmar J.

140

Baseline Glass Development for Combined Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

Borosilicate glass was selected as the baseline technology for immobilization of the Cs/Sr/Ba/Rb (Cs), lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) waste steams as part of a cost benefit analysis study.[1] Vitrification of the combined waste streams have several advantages, minimization of the number of waste forms, a proven technology, and similarity to waste forms currently accepted for repository disposal. A joint study was undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop acceptable glasses for the combined Cs + Ln + TM waste streams (Option 1) and Cs + Ln combined waste streams (Option 2) generated by the AFCI UREX+ set of processes. This study is aimed to develop baseline glasses for both combined waste stream options and identify key waste components and their impact on waste loading. The elemental compositions of the four-corners study were used along with the available separations data to determine the effect of burnup, decay, and separations variability on estimated waste stream compositions.[2-5] Two different components/scenarios were identified that could limit waste loading of the combined Cs + LN + TM waste streams, where as the combined Cs + LN waste stream has no single component that is perceived to limit waste loading. Combined Cs + LN waste stream in a glass waste form will most likely be limited by heat due to the high activity of Cs and Sr isotopes.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Lang, Jesse B.; Marra, James C.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Effect of rare earth ions on the phase transition of Na sub 2 SO sub 4 crystals  

SciTech Connect

The V {r reversible} I phase transition of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} crystals was investigated on a sample of pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and on rare-earth ion (Ln{sup 3+} = La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+})-doped Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} samples in various ambient gases (O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}) with high temperature X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. On heating in N{sub 2} flow, the initiating temperature for the V {yields} I transition was lowered by doping with Ln{sup 3+} ion and the doping effect was enhanced by an increase in the ionic size ratio r{sub Ln{sup 3+}}/r{sub Na{sup +}}. The low temperature form of the solid solution (LSS) Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and rare earth sulfate, which was a by-product in the preparation of the Ln{sup 3+}-doped samples, transformed to a high temperature form (HSS) after the V {yields} I transition, and the initiating temperature for the LSS {yields} HSS transition was highest in the Eu{sup 3+}-doped sample (r{sub Ln{sup 3+}}/r{sub Na{sup +}} {approx equal} 1).

Ohta, Masatoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakazu (Niigata Univ. (Japan))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

General Electric Appliances ) Case Number: 201 0-CE-2 1 13 General Electric Appliances ) Case Number: 201 0-CE-2 1 13 (Dehumidifiers) ) 1 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: September 8,201 0 Number of alleged violations: 5 Maximum possible assessment: $252,140 Proposed civil penalty: $36,500 The Office of the General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) alleges that General Electric Appliances (GE) violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. 6201 et seq., 10 C.F.R. Part 430, or both. Specifically, DOE alleges: 1. GE manufactures or privately labels a variety of dehumidifiers, including models ADER30LN; ADER40LN; ADERSOLN; and ADER65LN. 2. These models have been in distribution in the U.S. for at least 365 days. 3. The dehumidifiers referenced in paragraph 1 are "covered products" as defined by

143

Oxycarbonitride phosphors and light emitting devices using the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a novel family of oxycarbidonitride phosphor compositions and light emitting devices incorporating the same. Within the sextant system of M--Al--Si--O--N--C--Ln and quintuplet system of M--Si--O--N--C--Ln (M=alkaline earth element, Ln=rare earth element), the phosphors are composed of either one single crystalline phase or two crystalline phases with high chemical and thermal stability. In certain embodiments, the disclosed phosphor of silicon oxycarbidonitrides emits green light at wavelength between 530-550 nm. In further embodiments, the disclosed phosphor compositions emit blue-green to yellow light in a wavelength range of 450-650 nm under near-UV and blue light excitation.

Li, Yuanqiang; Romanelli, Michael Dennis; Tian, Yongchi

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Variable-flavor number scheme for NNLO.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

k ( 2) ? q(g)nfk (2). (4) At NLO, i.e. first order in ?S, the non-trivial contributions are (h+ h)(2) = ?S 4pi P 0qg ? gnf (Q2) ln(2/m2H), gnf+1(2) = ( 1? ?S 6pi ln(2/m2H) ) gnf (2), (5) where h(x, 2) is the heavy quark parton distribution... not influence the VFNS up to NNLO. 2The scheme has previously been outlined in a very brief form in [4]. 3 At O(?S) eq.(9) becomes, for example, for the structure function F2(x,Q2) CFF,12,g (Q 2/m2H) = C V F,0 2,HH(Q 2/m2H)? P 0qg ln(2/m2H) + C V F,1 2,g (Q 2/m...

Thorne, Robert S

145

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors 4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology EIA-Code(s) Reduction Factor Advanced Overfire Air AA 30% Alternate Burners BF 20% Flue Gas Recirculation FR 40% Fluidized Bed Combustor CF 20% Fuel Reburning FU 30% Low Excess Air LA 20% Low NOx Burners LN 30% Other (or Unspecified) OT 20% Overfire Air OV 20% Selective Catalytic Reduction SR 70% Selective Catalytic Reduction With Low Nitrogen Oxide Burners SR and LN 90% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction SN 30% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction With Low NOx Burners SN and LN 50% Slagging SC 20% Notes: Starting with 1995 data, reduction factors for Advanced Overfire Air, Low NOx Burners, and Overfire Air were reduced by 10 percent.

146

Biased Games On Random Boards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze biased Maker-Breaker games and Avoider-Enforcer games, both played on the edge set of a random board G ? G(n, p). In Maker-Breaker games there are two players, denoted by Maker and Breaker. In each round, Maker claims one previously unclaimed edge of G and Breaker responds by claiming b previously unclaimed edges. We consider the Hamiltonicity game, the perfect matching game and the k-vertexconnectivity game, where Makers goal is to build a graph which possesses the relevant property. Avoider-Enforcer games are the reverse analogue of Maker-Breaker games with a slight modification, where the two players claim at least 1 and at least b previously unclaimed edges per move, respectively, and Avoider aims to avoid building a graph which possesses the relevant property. Maker-Breaker games are known to be bias-monotone, that is, if Maker wins the (1, b) game, he also wins the (1, b ? 1) game. Therefore, it makes sense to define the critical bias of a game, b ? , to be the breaking point of the game. That is, Maker wins the (1, b) game whenever b ? b ? and loses otherwise. An analogous definition of the critical bias exists for Avoider-Enforcer games: here, the critical bias of a game b ? is such that Avoider wins the (1, b) game for every b> b ? , and loses otherwise. ln n We prove that, for every p = ?( n), G ? G(n, p) is typically such that the critical bias for all the aforementioned Maker-Breaker games is asymptotically b ? = np ln n. We also ln n prove that in the case p = ?( n), the critical bias is b ? = ? ( np ln n). These results settle a conjecture of Stojakovi? and Szab. For Avoider-Enforcer games, we prove that for p = ?( ln n n), the critical bias for all the aforementioned games is b ? = ? ( np ln n). 1

Asaf Ferber; Roman Glebov; Michael Krivelevich; Alon Naor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation  

SciTech Connect

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Presented at: 4th ASM International Surface Engineering Congress & 19th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxidation reaction: M(s) + x 2 O2(g) MOx(s) (1) for which K1 = aMOx aMp x/2 O2 (2a) and GR(1) = -RT ln K1, respectively, for reaction (1). Eqs. (2a) and (2b) can be combined and simplified to give: pO2(M/MOx) = exp 2 of the oxide, MOx. A plot of pO2 or ln pO2 versus temperature, gives the contour of the path of the M/MOx

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

150

Production and identification of the ion-temperature-gradient instability  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce and study the ion-temperature-gradient instability, the Columbia Linear Machine has been modified to yield a peaked ion temperature and flattish density profiles. Under these conditions the parameter {eta}{sub {ital i}} (={ital d} ln{ital T}{sub {ital i}}/{ital d} ln{ital N}) exceeded the critical value and a strong instability has been observed. Further identification has been based on observation of the azimuthal and axial wavelengths, and the real frequency, appropriate for the mode.

Sen, A.K.; Chen, J.; Mauel, M. (Plasma Research Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (US))

1991-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

The jamming surface of granular matter determined from soil mechanics results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical soil mechanics results are used to propose the equation of the jamming transition surface in the (stress, specific volume) space. Taking axis-ymmetric conditions, labelling q the deviatoric stress and p' the mean pressure applied on the granular skeleton, and considering normal range of pressure (10 kPa-10MPa) the equation of the surface of jamming transition is v = vo-m ln(p'/p'o)+ md ln(1+q q/(M' M' p' p')); M' is related to the friction angle, m and md are two constants which depend on soil characteristics; p'o is a "unit" pressure.

P. Evesque

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

152

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal Salak, Jakarta 10270, Indonesia 2. Chevron Energy Technology Company, Houston TX 77002, USA e, he assumed a steady-state radial flow inside the acid bank and the pressure response can be expressed from Darcy's law as: +=- s wr br kh qB rpwfp ln 2.141 µ , (1) where br is the acid bank radius

Stanford University

153

Approximating the traffic grooming problem in tree and star networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of grooming paths in all-optical networks with tree topology so as to minimize the switching cost, measured by the total number of used ADMs. We first present efficient approximation algorithms with approximation factor of 2 ln ... Keywords: add-drop multiplexer (ADM), optical networks, traffic grooming, tree networks, wavelength division multiplexing (WDM)

Michele Flammini; Gianpiero Monaco; Luca Moscardelli; Mordechai Shalom; Shmuel Zaks

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fitting an Exponential Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exponential distributions of the type N = N0 exp(??t) occur with a high frequency in a wide range of scientific disciplines. This paper argues against a widely spread method for calculating the ? parameter in this distribution. When the ln ...

Roberto Fraile; Eduardo Garca-Ortega

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The NRS Transect 5:1 (fall 1986)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

j WOlJ put? 'SpJ! qt? as }0 ~OIO;>a uOHnllOd al{l }0 Sa! pn:u01lnIOAa put? 'J01At? l{aq I~OIO;>a pJ! qaJOl{S Aeg uoysS!

UC Natural Reserve System

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Recommended Operating Procedures for the Oxford 10 T Spectromag System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a diffusion pump, make sure that the cold trap is always filled with LN (otherwise pump oil could backsteam (located on the top of the magnet). 3. Pump on the outer vacuum chamber (OVC) for at least 24 hrs. If using and the the siphon tube. These are labelled in Fig. 1. 2. Close needle valve. Pump out the LHe reservoir

McCombe, Bruce D.

157

CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

158

"I shall love you up to the death" (Marie-Antoinette to Axel von Fersen)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HY M& NP OQ RU K AL BO CP DG ER FS HU IX KY MZ N& QT L AM BZ CD EG FI HK LN OR PS QU TY X& M AN BO CP-256. [3] David Kahn, The Code-Breakers, Scribner 1996. [4] Evelyne Lever, Marie-Antoinette Correspondance

International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

159

Cuprate-titanate superconductor and method for making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new copper oxide superconductor of the formula Ln{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 3{minus}y}Ti{sub y}O{sub 7+{delta}} is disclosed, and exhibits a {Tc} of 60 K with deviations from linear metallic behavior as high as 130 K. 2 Figs.

Toreki, R.; Poeppelmeier, K.; Dabrowski, B.

1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Finite Difference Methods for the Heat Equation MATH 418, PDE LAB Spring 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite Difference Methods for the Heat Equation MATH 418, PDE LAB Spring 2013 Lab #5 We seek numerical solutions of the heat equation u t = c2 2 u x2 , 0 0 (1) with boundary conditions u(0) Here x = L/(N + 1). The collection of points (4), (5) is called the computational grid. The matrix-grid

Bardsley, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

TMS e-News: The monthly electronic newsletter for TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring of DOE Nuclear Programs Recommended ... down to Be and resolution stability up to 200Kcps in a reliable LN2 free environment. .... In a review of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy, the National ... Domestic waste management, security, and fuel supply needs are not adequate to...

162

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...temperature LDPE low-density polyethylene LEED low-energy electron diffraction ln natural logarithm (base e ) log common logarithm (base 10) LPCVD low-pressure chemical vapor deposition LSI large-scale integrated (circuit) LT long transverse (direction) m meter m constant shear, or frictional...

163

The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the precombustion removal of sulfur from coal. Microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal; however, the removal of organic sulfur from coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal samples for subsequent biodesulfurization. During this quarter tests were performed involving prolonged (7 day) exposure to chemical comminution agents followed by explosive comminution. Combined chemical plus physical comminution yielded only minor differences between the chemical treatments tested (0.lN NAOH, methanol plus 0.lN NAOH, isopropanol plus 0.lN NAOH, and ammonia vapor) as regards particle size distribution. The densities of treated products varied somewhat with 0.lN NaOH and ammonia yielding the lowest and highest densities respectively. Biodesulfurization tests indicate that pre-grown IGTS8 biocatalysts can be used to desulfurized chemically treated IBC-107 coal.

Srivastava, V.J.; Kilbane, J.J. II

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Khesbn no. 51 - April-June 1968 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

f tf{ - ltr*tlt/.1''f ,ly:l"ttl? s /,r'rl l? ytt ? $t lyn .liill,i! '1't) )-1 ! llN ..Ttl -bpyrru llD l:"r-lyi2 'l'N T.N llBtl ,-1rD? ll9-i? ttl llrj? Dnt

Admin, LAYCC

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Khesbn no. 71-72 - April 1973 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trlg tjih tJlr",rynNt t. ,l}ttl, os,l] -,Nf l,yblll) lylllh . ]lN) fUltP:yly;7, lty? ttl tt'1h btfybyf lln l)'! ]ylN i7! ilrS:! 1t1 yt ! '1tr tTl ,:tN -lylnyiz ! t? y,,ryF'D,

Admin, LAYCC

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A New Reduction Scheme for MultiSpecies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · chemical species in the ground water · (bio-)chemical reactions (kinetic and equilibrium) · (de = L1c1... Lncn with L1 = L2 = ... = Ln, Lici = - · (D ci - qci) , q: fluid (=water) content and flow¨at Erlangen #12;2. Available solution/reduction methods State-of-the-Art: Available reduction methods · Yeh

Kraeutle, Serge

167

Arsenic and antimony in laundry aids by instrumental neutron activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

>The measurement of trace amounts of arsenic and antimony in laundry aids by neutron activation analysis is described. The results for arsenic are compared with those obtained by other analytical techniques. The concentratlons ln the various laundry aids tested ranged from 5 to 51 ppM of arsenic and from 1 to 8 ppM of antimony. (auth)

Tanner, J.T.; Friedman, M.H.; Holloway, G.E.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

in construction Munger Graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Auxiliary Library (SAL) Dining Services340 315 Cobb Track & Angell Field Varian Physics Sequoia Hall William Lou Henry Hoover House Vaden Health Center Bing Nursery School Stanford Community Recreation CAMPUSDREAST SERRA ST ROTH WY NELSO N M ALL LAN E B LANEC STANFORD AVE LASUENMALL PINE HILL RD NE PAM PAS LN

Gross, James J.

169

Micro-and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro- and nanoscale domain engineering in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate Vladimir Ya. Shur investigation of the domain evolution in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate during backswitched electric sources based on quasi-phase matching.11 Lithium niobate LiNbO3 (LN) and lithium tantalate LiTaO3 (LT

Byer, Robert L.

170

Thin-film Lithium Niobate Contour-mode Resonators Renyuan Wang and Sunil A. Bhave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin-film Lithium Niobate Contour-mode Resonators Renyuan Wang and Sunil A. Bhave School Micro Devices, Inc. Greensboro, North Carolina, USA Abstract--This paper presents Lithium Niobate (LN this platform, we demonstrate, on a black Y136 cut Lithium Niobate thin-film, one-port high-order width

Afshari, Ehsan

171

Integrated Photon Pair Sources, Quantum Memories, and Lasers in Lithium Niobate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Photon Pair Sources, Quantum Memories, and Lasers in Lithium Niobate W. Sohler1 , H developments in the field of integrated quantum optics [1] exploiting lithium niobate (LN) waveguide technology: single photon pair sources with Ti:PPLN (periodically poled lithium niobate) waveguide, quantum memories

172

The ,Bonn` Frozen Spin Target -status and new perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physikalisches Institut Universität Bonn JR8-05 Miltenberg 1 #12;The ,Bonn` Frozen Spin Target - status and new concepts · conclusions JR8-05 Miltenberg 2 #12;Luminosity L General aspects = d d LN counting rate3429 10310 -L JR8-05 Miltenberg 3 #12;`Figure of Merit' General aspects Measurement of a polarization

Dutz, Hartmut

173

Completeness of an exponential system in weighted Banach spaces and closure of its linear span  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a real multiplicity sequence @L={@l"n,@m"n}"n"="1^~, that is, a sequence where {@l"n} are distinct positive real numbers satisfying 0 Keywords: 30B50, 30B60, Closure, Completeness, Minimality, Taylor--Dirichlet series

E. Zikkos

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

275.ps.gz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de ections in the search directions which ensure that the total step points towards ... based, however, on infeasible algorithms [5, 10, 19, 22] which may enter and .... term. P. i2I. ln(si ) in the merit function (2:4). In section 6 we show that a trust...

175

Abbreviations and Symbols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...embrittlement ln natural logarithm (base e ) LNG liquefied natural gas log common logarithm (base 10) LPR linear polarization resistance LSI Langelier saturation index LTCTF long-term corrosion test facility LTHC low-temperature hot corrosion LVBR low-velocity atmospheric pressure burner rig m...

176

A Simple Formula for Estimation of the Roughness Length for Heat Transfer over Partly Vegetated Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple formula for computation of the effective roughness length z0Heff for heat transfer or rather for the parameter kB?1eff [=ln(z0Meff/z0Heff) with z0Meff = roughness length for momentum], which are needed in single-source models for evaluating ...

K. Blmel

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Association for Students and Postdocs at BNL, ASAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CrossTalks Sign up here if you would like to present a CrossTalk: https:docs.google.comformsd1ln4jyX4SkdyhAs4BFlJ6H1Jmy2fdHCAKCumr-qKr0Boviewform "Designing and Giving a Good...

178

Sensors and Actuators B 119 (2006) 384391 Fine-tuning of ceramic-based chemical sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy of formation of the oxide, MOx. A plot of 2Op or 2 ln Op vs. temperature, gives the contour of the path of the M/MOx coexistence. Using reliable Gibbs energy data [2-3], the loci of 210log Op that established by virtue of thermodynamic equilibrium between M and MOx or between MOx and MOy, this allows

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

179

Published by Blackwell Publishing for the American Ceramic Society www.ceramics.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the oxide, MOx. A plot of 2Op or 2 ln Op vs. temperature, gives the contour of the path of the M/MOx by virtue of thermodynamic equilibrium between M and MOx or between MOx and MOy, this allows the formation

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

180

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & RADIOLOG SC BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 6000BSE RG 6412 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING no exceptions here) RG 6521 NUCLEAR ENGINEERING AND RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESIDENCY, GPA REQUIREMENTS Effective

Shyy, Wei

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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181

ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy supply may be required. decision making in the California energy industry energy conservation potential for boilers and steam supply equipment l'n manufacturing plants and for the cement industry. ,Industry of Energy Conservation Potential in California: Boilers and Steam Supply

Various, Various,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Abbreviations, Symbols, and Tradenames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...ratio LDPE low-density polyethylene LED light-emitting diode LEFM linear-elastic fracture mechanics LFM liquid-film migration LIM liquid injection molding LLDPE linear low-density polyethylene ln natural logarithm (base e) log common logarithm (base 10) LOI limiting oxygen index LPS liquid-phase sintering...

183

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...e ) ln linear-elastic fracture mechanics LEFM light-emitting diode LED length-to-diameter ratio L / D life cycle analysis (or assessment) LCA pound-force lbf pound lb length L liter; longitudinal direction; liquid L mean free path; length l kilowatt kW kilovolt kV kips (1000 lb) per square inch ksi kilopascal kPa...

184

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...e ) ln linear-elastic fracture mechanics LEFM light-emitting diode LED length-to-diameter ratio L/D life cycle analysis (or assessment) LCA pound-force lbf pound lb length L liter; longitudinal direction; liquid L mean free path; length l kilowatt kW kilovolt kV kips (1000 lb) per square inch ksi kilopascal kPa...

185

Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

186

THE COLUMN DENSITY VARIANCE IN TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIA: A FRACTAL MODEL APPROACH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractional Brownian motion structures are used to investigate the dependency of column density variance ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN}) in the turbulent interstellar medium on the variance of three-dimensional density ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub ln{rho}}) and the power-law slope of the density power spectrum. We provide quantitative expressions to infer the three-dimensional density variance, which is not directly observable, from the observable column density variance and spectral slope. We also investigate the relationship between the column density variance and sonic Mach number (M{sub s}) in the hydrodynamic (HD) regime by assuming the spectral slope and density variance to be functions of sonic Mach number, as obtained from the HD turbulence simulations. They are related by the expression {sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN} = A{sigma}{sub ln{rho}} {sup 2} = Aln (1 + b {sup 2} M{sup 2}{sub s}), suggested by Burkhart and Lazarian for the magnetohydrodynamic case. The proportional constant A varies from Almost-Equal-To 0.2 to Almost-Equal-To 0.4 in the HD regime as the turbulence forcing parameter b increases from 1/3 (purely solenoidal forcing) to 1 (purely compressive forcing). It is also discussed that the parameter A is lowered in the presence of a magnetic field.

Seon, Kwang-Il, E-mail: kiseon@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Astronomy and Space Science Major, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

Liquid Nitrogen-Cooled Fourier Transform Spectrometer System for Measuring Atmospheric Emission at High Altitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cryogenically cooled FTS system capable of a spectral resolution of 0.06 cm?1 is described. The entire interferometer is operated at LN2 temperature with the exception of the Ge:Cu detector, which is cooled to below 10 K. In order to maintain ...

Frank H. Murcray; Frank J. Murcray; David G. Murcray; James Pritchard; George Vanasse; Hajime Sakai

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

------~~~T~~"~cr~~s~-~~a-r~~~C-~~:~"'4r:~~~?4F~~n-I~~~U i~)-----`----------------r~~~t' 1O NCOT T MATCHING OF A FREE PISTON STIRLING ENGINE COUPLED WITH A FREE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine D 2009; published 30 April 2009 A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has s : 02.70.Ns, 05.70.Ln, 47.61. k The Stirling engine, an external combustion engine in- vented almost two

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

189

Universitatsbibliothek Heidelberg Plock 107-109 Postfach 105749  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Aufl. / hrsg. von Hermann P. T. Ammon 2004 LN-P 1-8946::(9) Steht auch LSN Med-QV 713-001 und LSA Med : Grundlagen und Anwendung ; mit ... 171 Tabellen / hrsg. von Ulrich Jaehde ... Autoren: Jürgen Baumann-007 Lehrbuch der klinischen Pharmazie : mit 89 Tabellen / hrsg. von Ulrich Jaehde ... Unter Mitarb. von Jürgen

Heermann, Dieter W.

190

Modul: 3 Modultitel: Forschungsmethoden 1 Epidemiologie und Demographie Modulverantwortlicher: Dr. Maren Dreier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LN-A 1-13998 Bachelor statt Burnout : entspannt studieren - wie geht das? / hrsg. von Rosaria Chirico-Praxis : mit Methode zu neuen Perspektiven / hrsg. von Ingeborg Sachsenmeier. Mit Beitr. von Regina Mahlmann : Schlüsselkompetenzen) 2010 LA-A 1-26182 Steht auch LSA Al-HG 118 Die Diplomarbeit / Stefan Engel ... [Hrsg

Manstein, Dietmar J.

191

Identification of low penetrance alleles for lung cancer: The GEnetic Lung CAncer Predisposition Study (GELCAPS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in European and African populations. Nat Genet 2006, 38(6):652-658. 26. Haiman CA, Patterson N, Freedman ML, Myers SR, Pike MC, Walisze- wska A, Neubauer J, Tandon A, Schirmer C, McDonald GJ, Greenway SC, Stram DO, Le Marchand L, Kolonel LN, Frasco M, Wong D...

Eisen, Tim; Matakidou, Athena; Consortium, Gelcaps; Houlston, Richard

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

192

Angelique Jarry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Electrolyte, A. Jarry, E. Quarez, O. Joubert, talk, SSI-18, July 2011, Varsaw, Poland Rare earth effects on conductivity and stability properties of BaIn0.6 Ti0.2Ln0.2O2.6...

193

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 0 10 20 60 80 100 Co(II)EDTA2- Co(III)EDTA- Co sorb Dissociation Hanford (ERDF fines of contaminant migration. Identical experiments utilizing 20 different sediments from the Hanford region were at Hanford. Ln [Mn (g kg-1 ) of sediments] -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 Co(III)EDTA-production(%) 0 20 40 60 80 100 y = 20

194

XIN CAO LOI, A HET CHO AU XE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... i ROBERT J. FLORES Ch? Th??ng Nghi?p LUCILLE KRING ... ngn kho?n ? trong ti nguyn c?a ti?u ... 66-Cc Gi?i H?n V? Lu?t "Ba L?n Ph?m ...

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

Quantum Search on the Spatial Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores Quantum Search on the two dimensional spatial grid. Recent exploration into the topic has devised a solution that runs in O(sqrt(n*ln(n))). This paper explores a new algorithm that gives promise for the O(sqrt(n)) result that is the lower bound off of the grid.

Matthew Falk

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

196

Influence of Bull Traits and Bull to Female Ratio on Reproductive Perfromance in Beef Females and of Nutrition During Gestation on Calving Difficulty in Primiparous Beef Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments that were conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde, TX (semi-arid environment) from 2006 to 2008. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls ( n = 39; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous Bonsmara and Bonsmara-influenced females (n = 1013) during a 90-day breeding season in 2006, 2007, and 2008 to quantify the effects of a reduction in bull to female ratio on reproductive performance. Bulls were also placed with primiparous beef females ( n = 142). Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, social rank, serving capacity, and seminal traits to one of two bull to female (BFR) treatments: Low (1:30-1:45; n = 10 pastures) or Conventional (1:16-1:26; n = 12 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.36), calving date (P = 0.24), and calving rate (P = 0.25) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. The current experiment demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without negatively affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, Bonsmara heifers (3/4, 7/8, and full bloods) were exposed to Bonsmara bulls from April 15 to July 15 during each of the two years. Heifers were weighed, rectally palpated for pregnancy, and scored for BCS (1 thin - 9 fat) and frame score (1 short - 9 tall) in December (end of second trimester) during years 1 and 2. Heifers were stratified on expected calving date and randomly allotted to one of two levels of nutrition for the remainder of gestation. In year 1, heifers were allotted to range forage (n=31, low nutrition, LN) or to non-irrigated oat pasture (n=31, high nutrition, HN). In year 2, heifers were placed onto the same range environment as in year 1 (n=31, LN) or onto irrigated ryegrass pasture (n=31,HN). Heifers in the LN groups were supplemented with 20% CP cubes at the rate of 0.9 kg/heifer/day from January 2 until calving while HN heifers were not supplemented. Within 4 hr of birth, calves were weighed, and calf vigor and calving difficulty scores were recorded. Heifers were weighed within 72 hours of parturition. From treatment initiation through calving, HN heifers gained 48.6 kg whereas the LN females lost 15 kg. Twice as many HN heifers required major assistance at calving as compared to LN heifers. Calves born to the HN females weighed 3.7 kg more at birth than those born to LN females. These differences resulted in HN heifers having (P = 0.005) more calving difficulty than LN heifers (mean calving difficutly of 2.3 for HN and 1.6 for LN). The calves of the HN females were also less vigorous (P = 0.005) after birth than the calves from LN females (calf vigor score of 2.2 for HN and 3.3 for LN). Consequently, the level of nutrition during the third trimester of gestation can affect calving difficulty, calf vigor, and female weight.

Bloomberg, Blake David

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Publications from Research Conducted at WAND | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at WAND Publications from Research Conducted at WAND 2013 Publications Durand A. M., Belanger D. P., Booth C. H., Ye F., Chi S., Fernandez-Baca J. A., Bhat M., "Magnetism and phase transitions in LaCoO3", Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 25, 382203 (2013). Kobayashi R., Kaneko K., Wakimoto S., Chi S., Sanada N., Watanuki R., Suzuki K., "Powder neutron diffraction study of HoCoGa", Journal of the Korean Physical Society 63, 337-340 (2013). Retuerto M., Li M. R., Ignatov A., Croft M., Ramanujachary K. V., Chi S., Hodges J. P., Dachraoui W., Hadermann J., Tran T. T., Halasyamani P. S., Grams C. P., Hemberger J., Greenblatt M., "Polar and magnetic layered A-site and rock salt B-site-ordered NaLnFeWO6 (Ln = La, Nd) perovskites", Inorganic Chemistry 52, 12482-12491 (2013).

198

Cryoshow for Scientists  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cryoshow for Scientists Cryoshow for Scientists Outline Guide with (Hints) NOTE: Safety is always of primary concern so if you are not comfortable doing any particular part safely then don't do it. Safety goggles should always be worn and gloves when necessary. Clothing is to be consider since LN2 spilled on table will splash on you. Loose fitting or an apron should be considered. Proper shoes should also be considered since spills can get on socks. Also if you use the cannon and it fails, proper footwear could be important. I. Introduction Science is all around us and we use it every day Fermilab Particle Acc. Vs TV's (Do they own a Particle Accelerator?) II. Basic Show Concepts A. Showing the LN2 (Use a Large Zip Lock Bag-not closed and cryo glove to demonstrate boiling) B. What Temperature

199

Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site February 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Metals Plant is shown before workers removed panels from the structure ln 2012. The Metals Plant is shown before workers removed panels from the structure ln 2012. Workers remove panels from the Metals Plant in September 2012. Workers remove panels from the Metals Plant in September 2012. About half of the complex was demolished by the end of December 2012, ahead of schedule. About half of the complex was demolished by the end of December 2012, ahead of schedule. An ultra-high-reach demolition machine — similar to equipment used to demolish Yankee Stadium — cuts into upper portions of the building’s last standing section late last month.

200

Disneyland's Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disneyland's Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade Disneyland's Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade Disneyland's Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade March 16, 2011 - 2:58pm Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? In three hours, enough energy is recovered from the TMC to heat 15 loads of water for L&N's largest-capacity washing machine, and enough water is recovered to fill 1-1/2 loads of that same machine. As the provider of laundry and dry cleaning services for Disneyland Resort's costumes and hospitality supply items, L&N Costume and Linen Service knows a little something about both quantity and quality. Now, with the help of the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and the Department of Energy, this forward-looking enterprise is embracing new, clean energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Publications from Research Conducted at TOPAZ | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at TOPAZ Publications from Research Conducted at TOPAZ 2013 Publications Janssen Y., Santhanagopalan D., Qian D., Chi M., Wang X., Hoffmann C., Meng Y. S., Khalifah P. G., "Reciprocal salt flux growth of LiFePO4 single crystals with controlled defect concentrations", Chemistry of Materials 25, 4574-4584 (2013). 2012 Publications Phelan W. A., "Challenges in the discovery and characterization of magnetic intermetallics", Louisiana State University , (2012). Phelan W. A., Kangas M. J., McCandless G. T., Drake B. L., Haldolaarachchige N., Zhao L. L., Wang J. K., Wang X. P., Young D. P., Morosan E., Hoffmann C., Chan J. Y., "Synthesis, structure, and physical properties of Ln(Cu,Al,Ga)13-x (Ln = La-Pr, and Eu) and Eu(Cu,Al)13-x", Inorganic Chemistry 51, 10193-10202 (2012).

202

High temperature vapor pressure and the critical point of potassium  

SciTech Connect

The vapor pressure of potassium was experimentally determined from 2100 deg F up to-its critical temperature. An empirical equation of the form ln P = A + B/T + C ln T + DT/sup 1.5/ was found to best fit the data. A critical pressure of 2378.2 plus or minus 4.0 psia (161.79 plus or minus 0.27 ata) was measured. The corresponding critical temperature, extrapolated from the pressure-- temperature curve, is 4105.4 plus or minus 5 deg R (2280.8 plus or minus 3 deg K). The technique employed was tae pressure tube method developed earlier in this laboratory and used for determining the vapor pressure of rubidium and cesium. This method measures tae critical pressure directly, as well as the vapor pressure st lower temperatures. (4 tables, 6 figures, 26 references) (auth)

Jerez, W.R.; Bhise, V.S.; Das Gupta, S.; Bonilla, C.F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Operator renewal theory and mixing rates for dynamical systems with infinite measure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a theory of operator renewal sequences in the context of infinite ergodic theory. For large classes of dynamical systems preserving an infinite measure, we determine the asymptotic behaviour of iterates $L^n$ of the transfer operator. This was previously an intractable problem. Examples of systems covered by our results include (i) parabolic rational maps of the complex plane and (ii) (not necessarily Markovian) nonuniformly expanding interval maps with indifferent fixed points. In addition, we give a particularly simple proof of pointwise dual ergodicity (asymptotic behaviour of $\\sum_{j=1}^nL^j$) for the class of systems under consideration. In certain situations, including Pomeau-Manneville intermittency maps, we obtain higher order expansions for $L^n$ and rates of mixing. Also, we obtain error estimates in the associated Dynkin-Lamperti arcsine laws.

Melbourne, Ian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Preparation and composition of superconducting copper oxides based on Ga-O layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature superconducting material with the general formula GaSr.sub.2 Ln.sub.1-x MxCu.sub.2 O.sub.7.+-.w wherein Ln is selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pt, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Y and M is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr, 0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.4 and w is a small fraction of one. A method of preparing this high temperature superconducting material is provided which includes heating and cooling a mixture to produce a crystalline material which is subsequently fired, ground and annealed at high pressure and temperature in oxygen to establish superconductivity.

Dabrowski, Bogdan (Bolingbrook, IL); Vaughey, J. T. (Houston, TX); Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Rotating-filaments-pairs in a hexagonal superlattice state in dielectric barrier discharge  

SciTech Connect

Rotating-filaments-pairs in a hexagonal superlattice state (HSS) are studied in a dielectric barrier discharge system. The evolution and phase diagrams of HSS are given. The wavelength of HSS and the mean diameter of the two rotating filaments all decrease with the increase of applied voltage. The instantaneous orientations of rotating-filaments-pairs are equal probability approximately. There is a larger peak and a smaller one in both the probability density functions of the rotation speed ({omega}) of rotating filaments and that of the distance (D) between two rotating filaments. According to the fitting curves of ln{omega}{sup 2} vs. lnD, {omega}{sup 2} is inversely proportional to D{sup 7}. The rotation of filaments is discussed theoretically by the force among surface charges.

Dong Lifang; Yang Yujie; Li Ben; Fan Weili; Song Qian [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China) and Hebei Key Laboratory of Optic-electronic Information Materials, Baoding 071002 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

A note on the quantization of a multi-horizon black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the quasinormal spectrum of a charged scalar field in the (charged) Reissner-Nordstrom spacetime, which has two horizons. The spectrum is characterized by two distinct families of asymptotic resonances. We suggest and demonstrate the according to Bohr's correspondence principle and in agreement with the Bekenstein-Mukhanov quantization scheme, one of these resonances corresponds to a fundamental change of Delta A=4hbar ln2 in the surface area of the black-hole outer horizon. The second asymptotic resonance is associated with a fundamental change of Delta Atot=4hbar ln3 in the total area of the black hole (in the sum of the surface areas of the inner and outer horizons), in accordance with a suggestion of Makela and Repo.

Hod, Shahar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A note on the quantization of a multi-horizon black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the quasinormal spectrum of a charged scalar field in the (charged) Reissner-Nordstrom spacetime, which has two horizons. The spectrum is characterized by two distinct families of asymptotic resonances. We suggest and demonstrate the according to Bohr's correspondence principle and in agreement with the Bekenstein-Mukhanov quantization scheme, one of these resonances corresponds to a fundamental change of Delta A=4hbar ln2 in the surface area of the black-hole outer horizon. The second asymptotic resonance is associated with a fundamental change of Delta Atot=4hbar ln3 in the total area of the black hole (in the sum of the surface areas of the inner and outer horizons), in accordance with a suggestion of Makela and Repo.

Shahar Hod

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

208

Inflationary paradigm after Planck 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models of cosmic inflation posit an early phase of accelerated expansion of the universe, driven by the dynamics of one or more scalar fields in curved spacetime. Though detailed assumptions about fields and couplings vary across models, inflation makes specific, quantitative predictions for several observable quantities, such as the flatness parameter ($\\Omega_k = 1 - \\Omega$) and the spectral tilt of primordial curvature perturbations ($n_s - 1 = d \\ln {\\cal P}_{\\cal R} / d \\ln k$), among others---predictions that match the latest observations from the {\\it Planck} satellite to very good precision. In the light of data from {\\it Planck} as well as recent theoretical developments in the study of eternal inflation and the multiverse, we address recent criticisms of inflation by Ijjas, Steinhardt, and Loeb. We argue that their conclusions rest on several problematic assumptions, and we conclude that cosmic inflation is on a stronger footing than ever before.

Guth, Alan H; Nomura, Yasunori

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Variable flavor number scheme at NNLO.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

guar- antee the correct evolution for both descriptions. At LO, i.e. zeroth order in ?S, the relationship between the two descriptions is trivial q(g)n f +1k (Q2) ? q(g) n f k (Q2). At NLO, i.e. first order in ?S (h+(Q2) = (h+ h)(Q2)), h+(Q2) = ?S 4... pi P0qg?gn f (Q2) ln ( Q2 m2H ) , gn f +1(Q2) = ( 1? ?S6pi ln ( Q2 m2H )) gn f (Q2), i.e. the heavy flavour evolves from zero at Q2 = m2H and the gluon loses corresponding momentum. It is natural to choose Q2 = m2H as the transition point. At NNLO, i...

Thorne, Robert S

210

W Boson production at large transverse momentum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the NNLO softgluon corrections are presented in the MS scheme as given in Ref. [10]. Here we show the formulae for the qg ?? Wq subprocess. The qq ??Wg subprocess is calculated in a similar way [10]. The NLO soft and virtual corrections for qg ?Wq are EQ... d?(1)qg?Wq d3Q = FBqg?Wq ?s(2R) pi { cqg3 [ ln(s2/Q2T ) s2 ] + + cqg2 [ 1 s2 ] + + cqg1 ?(s2) } , where FBqg?Wq is the Born term. The LL [ln(s2/Q 2 T )/s2]+ term and the NLL [1/s2]+ term are the soft gluon corrections. The ?(s2) term gives...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Sabio Vera, Agustin

211

FLUORINE CELL ANODE ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved anode assembly is deslgned for use in electrolytlc cells ln the productlon of hydrogen and fluorlne from a moIten electrolyte. The anode assembly comprises a copper post, a copper hanger supported by the post, a plurality of carbon anode members, and bolt means for clamplng half of the anode members to one slde of the hanger and for clamplng the other half of the anode members to the other slde of the hanger. The heads of the clamplng bolts are recessed withln the anode members and carbon plugs are inserted ln the recesses above the bolt heads to protect the boIts agalnst corroslon. A copper washer is provided under the head of each clamplng boIt such that the anode members can be tightly clamped to the hanger with a resultant low anode jolnt resistance. (AEC)

Cable, R.E.; Goode, W.B. Jr.; Henderson, W.K.; Montillon, G.H.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program EPUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Custom Industrial Project: 70% of incremental project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Clothes Washer: $75 - $180 Lighting: Varies, see program worksheet on web site Custom Industrial Projects: $0.25/kWh of verified energy savings Energy Smart Grocer Program Auto-Closers: $25 - $170 Gaskets: $35 - $70 Cases: $30 - $173.25 +Case Lighting: $12.75 - $22.50/lamp or $5 - $25/ln ft Motion Sensors: $2/ln ft Refrigerators/Freezers: $100 - $700

213

Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Butt, Darryl (Gainesville, FL); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias (Neckarsulm, DE); Cutler, Raymond Ashton (Bountiful, UT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6{degrees}K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier facility  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6 K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

SEPARATION OF NEPTUNIUM FROM PLUTONIUM BY CHLORINATION AND SUBLIMATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating neptunium from plutonium. The method consists in chlorinating a mixture of the oxides of Np and Pu by contacting the mixture with carbon tetrachloride at about 500 icient laborato C. ln this manner the Np is converted to the tetrachlorlde and the Pu converted to the trichloride. Since NpCl/sub 4/ is more latile than PuCl/sub 3/, the separation ls effected by vaporing sad subsequently condenslng the NpCl/sub 4/.

Fried, S.M.

1958-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Practice test for exam ff1 in MA135 In addition to problems on this sheet, students should study webwork problems, assigned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,t ' a- " -3L #12;2 9. A manufacturer of light bulbs estimates that the fraction F(t) of b as many bulbs are burning after 5 weeks as after 9 weeks. a. Find k and determine the fraction of bulbs still burning after 7 weeks. L= \\lnZ ,b. What fraction of the bulbs burn out before 10 weeks? t - * $i

Ferry, Steve

219

Materials for spallation sources topics from IWSMTtopics from IWSMT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface investigation were performed on Au and Pt alloys irradiated on STIP-II in order to know designThermal desorption behavior of light gases from STIP samples Hydrogen isotpoes He4~375 °C He4 ~1100°C Oliver, Dai at lower temperature compared EC316LN STIP I i di d l 9th International Workshop on Spallation Materials

McDonald, Kirk

220

Evaluation of experiences in long-term radon and radon-daughter measurements  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing side-by-side measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations using several instruments and techniques, and is comparing these measurements with side-by-side measurements made by other investigators at other locations. The standard deviation of the differences between the (natural) logarithms of the Terradex Track Etch radon concentrations and the logarithms of the Radon Progency Integrating Sampling Units (RPISU) radon daughter concentrations (S.D.-ln) measured in 50 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, was 0.37. Using this S.D.-ln, it can be calculated that if the Track Etch radon daughter concentration is 0.010 WL there should be only a 14% probability that the RPISU average would be greater than 0.015 WL, and only a 3% probability tht the RPISU average would be greater than 0.020 WL. If buildings had been cleared from remedial action when the Track Etch averages were less than 0.10 WL, then about 61% of the buildings would have been cleared from remedial action, and only a few percent of these buildings would have actually had average RPISU concentrations greater than 0.015 WL. The S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements made by ALARA at Grand Junction, the PERM radon measurements and the MOD-225 radon daughter measurements made by Mound Facility at Canonsburg and Middlesex, and the PERM and Track Etch radon measurements made by Mound Facility at Salt Lake City were similar to the S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements at Edgemont.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Khesbn no. 54 - January-March 1969 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

u? NturllN]. .llllutl] l..n I'tR-tTl N u'n t.n 1"1N li? ti?1:tg I'R lizyt'ltlr.r "ttl! J'11t, t'N b}l1] ,)uyurulbl/ -r,tuBf, DyT l]D //Et,rE$ttl! ND ty? b'p$t,, ! i r,l, t

Admin, LAYCC

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Khesbn no.109 - Spring 1987 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t'r .t'iltN trrD DSlNUylt ttl ! l']N tl:,Vrb'}yD lrp'tbyl ''I'N D"D 'l'rN 1! rpu oy .ly)ttl lyl 11 ,lE! t3 y.1ylty E::'lx 'yr yl$ J:Sit t''l ,t''ttl! il pr1 p:71 r1);1 ? lNil )

Admin, LAYCC

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Khesbn no. 25 - may 1961 - journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tr iljPlnn .g . ' J'lH ii;J];ttl$f ,*p! i:Di''iE"tN '"1 ? 'I$f, ryu? X '''11,*'T ttl ,l'lb"il! $ll5 lPl'1JbrlPD 'r-tgbI''N iy''}:r. '"lN 1:1 !" ls'l l}ttl -rbgr urn lyn,lP0"l''tN

Admin, LAYCC

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

EuropeanJournalof Control(2007)13:134-151 DOI:10.3166/EJC.13.134-15I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with storage T and supply rate Qt. This corresponds to conservationof energy.We also have $ln T > Q'lT, leading, with the My's reaT symmetric matrices, deduced from the system and supply rate parameter matrices (A, B, R, S models the rate of supply absorbed by the system, while the component Z: lR - lRmodels the supply stored

225

Bing Concert Hall, Under Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AV M ARIPOSA AV L DR M IRAM ONTE AV M ADRO NO AV AMBAR W Y ESCO BITA AV M ELVILLE AV PO RTO LA AV W PANAMA ST ARGUELLOWY CAMPUSDR SERRA ST ESCONDIDO MALL ROTH WY NELSO N M ALL OAK RD LASUENST SERRA MALL PAS LN ARBORETUM RD BO NAIR SIDING HULME CT GOVERNOR'S AVE SOUTH VALP ARAISO ST SAM M ACDO NALD M ALL

Prinz, Friedrich B.

226

PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

1949-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

Recent advances in 2+1-dimensional simulations of the pattern-forming Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of recent advances in numerical simulations of the 2+1-dimensional Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, describing the flame-front deformation in a combustion experiment. Algorithmic development includes a second-order unconditionally ... Keywords: 02.60.Cb, 02.70.-c, 05.45.-a, 05.70.Ln, 47.11.+j, 47.54.+r, Cellular flames, Distributed approximating functionals, Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, Mode decomposition, Spatio-temporal pattern formation

Peter Blomgren; Antonio Palacios; Scott Gasner

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Math 310-3 Midterm Exam 1 Spring 2010 Circle your TA: Xin Jin Zhenghe Zhang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the expected number of times I will fill my gas tank in the next 60 days? (b) (10 pts) What is the probability, but you may not use a calculator or other study aids. Grading: Points Points Problem Possible Earned 1 40 trips to a gas station to refuel my car is a continuous random variable T with density fT (t) = 1 t ln

McClendon, David M.

229

WASTE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR DECEMBER 1961 AND JANUARY 1962  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and demonstration on a pilot plant scale integrated processes for treatment and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes is reported. Topics covered include: high-level waste calcination; lowlevel waste treatment; engineering, economics, and hazards evaluation; disposal ln deep wells; disposal in natural salt formations; Clinch River study; fundamental study of minerals; and White Oak Creek basin study. (M.C.G.)

Blanco, R.E.; Struxness, E.G.

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Review Articles Asymmetric Heat Conduction in the Frenkel-Kontorova Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we show numerically that there exist two opposite rectifying effects of heat flux in the one-dimensional two-segment Frenkel-Kontorova chain with certain appropriate parameters. The orientation of the rectifying effects depends on the interfacial coupling strength and the size of the chain under investigation. PACS numbers: 44.10.+i, 05.60.-k, 05.70.Ln Keywords: Frenkel-Kontorova chains, Asymmetric heat conduction

Bambi Hu; Dahai He; Yong Zhang; Lei Yang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Footnote  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...LCVD laser-induced chemical vapor deposition LED light-emitting diode L/h or l/h liter per hour LIF laser-induced fluorescence LinTrav linear traverse L/min or l/min liter per minute ln natural logarithm (base e ) log common logarithm (base 10) LOX liquid oxygen LPPS low-pressure plasma spray LPT low-pressure turbine...

232

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

Marra, J.; Billings, A.

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Journees de Statistique Marne La Vallee, January 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ec = E {c} absorption ------------ Xc n exploration ------------ Xc n+1 Absorption/killing: - Xc n obstacles T = inf {n 0 ; Xc n = c} - Absorption time Xc T+n = Xc T+n = c Feynman-Kac models (G, Xn) : n ) Nonhomogeneous models: (n, Ln, Kn) n(dy) e-nV (y) (dy), cooling schedule n , mutation s.t. n = nKn, and Law(X0

Del Moral , Pierre

234

Microsoft Word - ATFNewsletter_Oct2013.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7>(7M3(&*(*966(<345637738:(&M3( 6957(A34(L><7M5(M9?3(533<(5NKK355(O<( LN67OP63(3QP38OL3<75(9LP637O><(>A( 7M3(&*S++(P8>P>596T(965>(AO857(7357O<(>A( 7M3(<346U(988O?3R(HS;9

235

Khesbn no. 50 - January-March 1968 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lJ? {;'1 UINIUID''t] tN l1! 'rtD lsr ,t3y1r D$.1l r! 'r'1lrX UN? ]UNI .N :,ltg),ll ?.rtD' g fgD DSX l'1! { ,nRtlrn lNy:r) :yorrtt . ')rN l"N ".1! 'rtD:t'rg lltrtt"t$) DSl igiz ?

Admin, LAYCC

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Khesbn no. 98 - Autumn 1981 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1I ]l:l)I l'ry]:lxNl lrytE 'rtD .nlv'lEn rl l'10 -ytbN 'tylEt|n t! t] 'ly:rN D,:rtD"lit ''r lr$"lizyr trln ''lyb! :lI "n:! ui'l n.lnDD,, lr:rtD D$,ll ? nt? , lto on. )V! 'D'l

Admin, LAYCC

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Khesbn no. 9 - January 1957 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15 tly;S',1'1 Dy r]'l ll1i ? rtD lt'lt$ ? t! ? 'lN ,ll$l ''N11 ']yl ,D$'11 l! '1]r'l'1 ''rtD lyl ,1pr! rr; 1 Erlf t''ltlt-E'lbtt tJt$t tt'l .1yb:rtD u]ND pR'D pnx "? y:ri2z S rJ

Admin, LAYCC

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Khesbn no. 104 - Autumn 1984 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It bttllnl{E Te Flr ! ,,! rtD l1! 19Drr I! trD lytlt .y5r) 'fx 5) .vr'r$ I'x lyrlnyr 9Sn ")rtD tljM-Iltrt. :ot'rl 'rBP'.tr'r osr tllrtoy lrx lt'ot r:rtD S rlro 'l! nt DE *lnDpt!

Admin, LAYCC

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rindler type acceleration in f(R) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By choosing a fluid source in $f(R)$ gravity, defined by $f\\left(R\\right) =R-12a\\xi \\ln \\left\\ | R\\right\\ | $, where $a$ (=Rindler acceleration) and $\\xi $ are both constants, the field equations correctly yield the Rindler acceleration term in the metric. We identify domains in which the weak energy conditions (WEC) and the strong energy conditions (SEC) are satisfied.

S. Habib Mazharimousavi; M. Halilsoy

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparison of five-minute radon-daughter measurements with long-term radon and radon-daughter concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Five-minute air filter radon daughter measurements were made in 84 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, in which annual average radon daughter concentrations have been determined from six 100-hour Radon Progeny Integrating Sampling Unit (RPISU) measurements. Averaging radon concentrations were also determined in 50 of these buildings using Terradex Track Etch detectors. The standard deviation of the difference between the (natural) logarithms of the RPISU annual averages and the logarithms of the air filter measurements (SD-ln) was found to be 0.52. This SD-ln is considerably smaller than the SD-ln of 0.71 between the RPISU annual averages and the air filter measurements reported by ALARA at Grand Junction, Colorado; presumably because a considerable number of air filter measurements in Edgemont were disregarded because of short turnover times or high wind speeds. Using the SD-ln of 0.52 it can be calculated that there would only be a 5% probability in Edgemont that the RPISU annual average would be greater than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were equal to 0.010 WL. This indicates that the procedure used in Edgemont of clearing buildings from remedial action if the five-minute measurement were less than 0.010 WL was reasonable. There was about a 28% probability that the RPISU annual average would be less than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were 0.033 WL, indicating that the procedure of performing an engineering assessment if the average of two five-minute measurements was greater than 0.033 WL was also reasonable. Comparison indicates that the average of two RPISU measurements taken six months apart would provide a dependable estimate of the annual average.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Under consideration for publication in Theory and Practice of Logic Programming 1 As Time Goes By: Constraint Handling Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

established for sev- eral classes of commutative rings [Vo], [RW], [HM2]. We are thus led to ask when a map]. The natural map K(S0 p) holim n K(LnS0 p) may well be an equivalence, see [MS2]. We are thus led to study and |t|=-2. The p-completed cyclotomic trace map K(lp)p TC(lp; p) TC(l; p) identifies K

Sarna-Starosta, Beata

242

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f () is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Section 24  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lnln<T H 2 O > CK 'A 0 %A l (&ln MFRSR ) H 2 O H 2 O's H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O 0.862&µm CK MFRSR Session Papers 97 (1) Atmospheric H O, Aerosol and the Unexplained Solar 2 Absorption: A Test with Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment W. C. Conant, A. M. Vogelmann and V. Ramanathan Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction 0.94 µm - ARESE The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced The 0.94-µm band is a typical near-infrared vibration- Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) was designed to resolve a rotation band containing over 1000 lines responsible for about discrepancy between the atmospheric absorption predicted by 20% of the total absorption in the atmosphere. By first

244

Preorganized and immobilized ligands for metal ion separations. Final report, June, 1994--May, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Historically, much of the interest shown in f-element ion coordination chemistry has been driven by practical needs to devise separation schemes for lanthanide (Ln) and actinide (An) ions. However, few of the separations are completely satisfactory, and the basic chemical framework needed to achieve improvements is still poorly developed. As a result, studies of the fundamental aspects of f-element coordination chemistry are still pertinent not only to the evolution of improved separations, but also waste remediation, biological and medical applications of Ln ions, biochemistry of An ion decorporation, and new solid state materials preparations. The research objectives during the present grant period were to (1) synthesize new bifunctional and trifunctional chelating ligands, particularly in the class of new phosphonopyridine N-oxides; (2) characterize the structural features of the Ln and An coordination complexes formed by these ligands; (3) determine the extraction efficacy of these ligands; and (4) explore synthetic approaches for formation of dendritic polymers containing phosphoryl terminating groups. Some highlights of recently accomplished work and still-in-progress research are outlined.

Paine, R.T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Plutonium (iv) complexes of mixed pyridine n-oxide and phosphinoxide f-element extractants.  

SciTech Connect

Analytical and bulk scale separation and processing of aqueous acidic solution s containing f-element ions are regularly accomplished using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) methods that employ a neutral organic donor ligand dissolved in an organic phase . 1-5 Several monofunctional ligands have been used as LLE reagents, but all display one or more deficiencies1 'S due to the chemical similarity of the tri valent lanthanides (Ln) to th e trivalent actindes (An) . Since the trivalent 4f and 5f ions have identical charges, chemical separation agents for these two groups need to differentiate among these har d cations based on their size or chemical bonding preferences . This task is not easy since, as a consequence of the lanthanide and actinide contractions, the Ln and An fission products which need to be separated have similar ionic radii . In order to develop new ligands for the separation process, we must have a fundamental understanding of how these separation agents interact with both Ln and An ions on a molecular level.

Matonic, J. H. (John H.); Enriquez, A. E. (Alejandro E.); Scott, B. L. (Brian L.); Paine, R. T. (Robert T.); Neu, M. P. (Mary P.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Dynamics of some parameters of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats during cold adaptation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the combined behavior of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats at stages of long-term adaptation of the animals to moderate cold. After decapitation of male Wister rats, the corticosterone concentration in the blood plasma was determined by saturation analysis and serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The thymus was weighed and the structure of the popliteal lymph nodes (LN) was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with azure II-eosin. Morphometry of the structural components of LN was undertaken and the numbers of the various cell forms per 1000 cells were counted in different zones of LN. The increase in activity of the lymphoid tissue in the phase of adaptation may be connected with intensification of the peripheral action of thyroid hormones. During long-term adaptation, in the phase of consistently increased specific resistance, a new type of endocrine-lymphoid relation is formed, and it differs significantly both in the original state and in the acute phase of stress.

Borodin, Yu.I.; Sedova, L.A.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Shorin, Yu.P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat  

SciTech Connect

Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; /Indore, Ctr. for Advanced Tech.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Spiky strings in the Bethe ansatz at strong coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study spiky string solutions in AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 1} that are characterized by two spins S, J as well as winding m in S{sup 1} and spike number n. We construct explicitly two-cut solutions by using the SL(2) asymptotic Bethe ansatz equations at leading order in strong coupling. Unlike the folded spinning string, these solutions have asymmetric distributions of Bethe roots. The solutions match the known spiky string classical results obtained directly from string theory for arbitrary semiclassical parameters, including J=0 and any value of S, namely, short and long strings. At large spins and winding number the string touches the boundary, and we find a new scaling limit with the energy given as E-S=(n/2{pi}){radical}(1+[(4{pi}{sup 2})/n{sup 2}](J{sup 2}/ln{sup 2}S+m{sup 2}/ln{sup 2}S))lnS. This is a generalization of the known scaling for the folded spinning string.

Kruczenski, M.; Tirziu, A. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2036 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

Fortuin, Ansje S., E-mail: A.Fortuin@rad.umcn.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meijer, Hanneke J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital's, Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J. [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Urology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O. [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Initial Evaluation of a New Electromechanical Cooler for Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect

The use of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) constitutes the current state of the art in cryogenic cooling for high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, which are widely used for {gamma}-ray and characteristic X-ray spectroscopy because of their excellent energy discrimination. Use of LN{sub 2} requires a liquid nitrogen supply, cumbersome storage tanks and plumbing, and the frequent attention of personnel to be sure that nitrogen levels are sufficient to maintain the detectors at a sufficiently low operating temperature. Safety hazards also are associated with the use of LN{sub 2}, both because of the potential for severe frostbite on exposure to skin and because it displaces ambient oxygen when it evaporates in closed spaces. Existing electromechanical coolers have, until now, been more expensive to procure and maintain than LN{sub 2} systems. Performance and reliability have also been serious issues because of microphonic degradation of photon energy peak resolution and cooler failures due to compressor oil becoming entrained in the refrigerant. This report describes the results of tests of a new HPGe detector cooling technology, the PerkinElmer ORTEC{reg_sign} Products X-Cooler{trademark} that, according to the manufacturer, significantly reduces the lifetime cost of the cooling system without degradation of the output signal. The manufacturer claims to have overcome cost, performance and reliability problems of older-generation electromechanical coolers, but the product has no significant history of use, and this project is the first independent evaluation of its performance for Total cost savings for the DOE and other agencies that use HPGe systems extensively for safeguards monitoring is expected to be quite significant if the new electromechanical cooler technology is shown to be reliable and if performance characteristics indicate its usefulness for this application. The technology also promises to make HPGe monitoring, characterization and detection available for unattended or covert operation and in remote or inaccessible locations where the unavailability of LN{sub 2} and signal degradation from existing mechanical coolers prevent its use at the present time.

Coleman, RL

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

Blending Study of MgO-Based Separator Materials for Thermal Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and testing of a new technique for blending of electrolyte-binder (separator) mixes for use in thermal batteries is described. The original method of blending such materials at Sandia involved liquid Freon TF' as a medium. The ban on the use of halogenated solvents throughout much of the Department of Energy complex required the development of an alternative liquid medium as a replacement. The use of liquid nitrogen (LN) was explored and developed into a viable quality process. For comparison, a limited number of dry-blending tests were also conducted using a Turbula mixer. The characterization of pellets made from LN-blended separators involved deformation properties at 530 C and electrolyte-leakage behavior at 400 or 500 C, as well as performance in single-cells and five-cell batteries under several loads. Stack-relaxation tests were also conducted using 10-cell batteries. One objective of this work was to observe if correlations could be obtained between the mechanical properties of the separators and the performance in single cells and batteries. Separators made using three different electrolytes were examined in this study. These included the LiCl-KCl eutectic, the all-Li LiCl-LiBr-LiF electrolyte, and the low-melting LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic. The electrochemical performance of separator pellets made with LN-blended materials was compared to that for those made with Freon T P and, in some cases, those that were dry blended. A satisfactory replacement MgO (Marinco 'OL', now manufactured by Morton) was qualified as a replacement for the standard Maglite 'S' MgO that has been used for years but is no longer commercially available. The separator compositions with the new MgO were optimized and included in the blending and electrochemical characterization tests.

GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.; ANDAZOLA, ARTHUR H.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

Rapid Method for Ra-226 and Ra-228 in Water Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement of radium isotopes in natural waters is important for oceanographic studies and for public health reasons. Ra-226 (1620 year half-life) is one of the most toxic of the long-lived alpha emitters present in the environment due to its long life and its tendency to concentrate in bones, which increases the internal radiation dose of individuals. The analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in natural waters can be tedious and time-consuming. Different sample preparation methods are often required to prepare Ra-226 and Ra-228 for separate analyses. A rapid method has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory that effectively separates both Ra-226 and Ra-228 (via Ac-228) for assay. This method uses MnO{sub 2} Resin from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) to preconcentrate Ra-226 and Ra-228 rapidly from water samples, along with Ba-133 tracer. DGA Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) and Ln-Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) are employed in tandem to prepare Ra-226 for assay by alpha spectrometry and to determine Ra-228 via the measurement of Ac-228 by gas proportional counting. After preconcentration, the manganese dioxide is dissolved from the resin and passed through stacked Ln-Resin-DGA Resin cartridges that remove uranium and thorium interferences and retain Ac-228 on DGA Resin. The eluate that passed through this column is evaporated, redissolved in a lower acidity and passed through Ln-Resin again to further remove interferences before performing a barium sulfate microprecipitation. The Ac-228 is stripped from the resin, collected using cerium fluoride microprecipitation and counted by gas proportional counting. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Local-Regional Recurrence With and Without Radiation Therapy After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy for Clinically Staged T3N0 Breast Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine local-regional recurrence (LRR) risk according to whether postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) was used to treat breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy. Methodsand Materials: Clinicopathology data from 162 patients with clinical T3N0 breast cancer who received NAC and underwent mastectomy were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 119 patients received PMRT, and 43 patients did not. The median number of axillary lymph nodes (LNs) dissected was 15. Actuarial rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Results: At a median follow-up of 75 months, 15 of 162 patients developed LRR. For all patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-14%). The 5-year LRR rate for those who received PMRT was 4% (95% CI, 1%-9%) vs. 24% (95% CI, 10%-39%) for those who did not receive PMRT (p <0.001). A significantly higher proportion of irradiated patients had pathology involved LNs and were {<=}40 years old. Among patients who had pathology involved LNs, the LRR rate was lower in those who received PMRT (p <0.001). A similar trend was observed for those who did not have pathology involved LN disease. Among nonirradiated patients, the appearance of pathologic LN disease after NAC was the only clinicopathologic factor examined that significantly correlated with the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients with clinical T3N0 disease treated with NAC and mastectomy but without PMRT had a significant risk of LRR, even when there was no pathologic evidence of LN involvement present after NAC. PMRT was effective in reducing the LRR rate. We suggest PMRT should be considered for patients with clinical T3N0 disease.

Nagar, Himanshu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mittendorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Yu, Tse-Kuan, E-mail: tkyu@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) National Grid (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Custom Projects: $100,000 Energy Efficiency Engineering Study: $10,000 Steam Trap Survey: $2500 (+$2500 if complete recommended repairs) ENERGY STAR Programmable Thermostats: 5 units Boiler Reset Controls: 2 unit max Pipe Insulation: 500 ln. ft. Building Insulation: $10,000/account for roof, attic and wall insulation

256

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Ceiling Fans: 4 Smart Power Strip: 2 Pipe Wrap: 10 ln. ft. CFL Bulbs: 12 Refrigerator Recycling: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: Varies by retailer Ceiling Fan: $15 CFL Fixture: $15 LED Fixture/Downlight Kit: $20 LED Light Bulbs: $10 Smart Power Strip: $20 Room Air Conditioners: $20

257

SSRL HEADLINES Jan 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 January, 2007 7 January, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Key Component of Malaria Parasite Invasion Motor Revealed Science Highlight - On the Role of Copper Regulation in a M. tuberculosis Repressor Science Highlight - Minding the Gaps: Explaining the Behavior of a High-Temperature Superconductor XAS Course for Structural Molecular Biology Applications in March New Hard X-ray Microscope Commissioned on Beam Line 6-2 Scanning the Microworld: SSRL's New Hard X-ray Microprobe Sagittal Focusing, LN-cooled Monochromator Installed on Beam Line 7-2 Workshop on New Directions in X-ray Scattering Photon Science Job Opportunities __________________________________________________________________________

258

AEP SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®''' Central AC Replacements: $125 - $800/system Heat Pump Replacements: $125 - $825/system Insulation: $0.12-$0.25/sq. ft. Duct Sealing/Replacement: $175 - $300/home Duct Insulation: $0.50/ln. ft. AC Tune-up: $80 Air Infiltration: $100 - $150

259

Application of linear multiple model predictive control (MMPC) framework towards dynamic maximazation of oxygen yield in an elevated-pressure air separation unit  

SciTech Connect

In a typical air separation unit (ASU) utilizing either a simple gaseous oxygen (GOX) cycle or a pumped liquid oxygen (PLOX) cycle, the flowrate of liquid nitrogen (LN2) stream connecting high-pressure and low-pressure ASU columns plays an important role in the total oxygen yield. It has been observed that this yield reaches a maximum at a certain optimal flowrate of LN2 stream. At nominal full-load operation, the flowrate of LN2 stream is maintained near this optimum value, whereas at part-load conditions this flowrate is typically modified in proportion with the load-change (oxygen demand) through a ratio/feed-forward controller. Due to nonlinearity in the entire ASU process, the ratio-modified LN2 flowrate does not guarantee an optimal oxygen yield at part-load conditions. This is further exacerbated when process disturbances in form of cold-box heat-leaks enter the system. To address this problem of dynamically maximizing the oxygen yield while the ASU undergoes a load-change and/or a process disturbance, a multiple model predictive control (MMPC) algorithm is proposed. This approach has been used in previous studies to handle large ramp-rates of oxygen demand posed by the gasifier in an IGCC plant. In this study, the proposed algorithm uses linear step-response blackbox models surrounding the operating points corresponding to maximum oxygen yield points at different loads. It has been shown that at any operating point of the ASU, the MMPC algorithm, through model-weight calculation based on plant measurements, naturally and continuously selects the dominant model(s) corresponding to the current plant state, while making control-move decisions that approach the maximum oxygen yield point. This dynamically facilitates less energy consumption in form of compressed feed-air compared to a simple ratio control during load-swings. In addition, since a linear optimization problem is solved at each time step, the approach involves much less computational cost compared to a firstprinciple based nonlinear MPC. Introduction

Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.; Bequette, B. Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Gluon Green's function in N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy limit of scattering amplitudes in the N = 4 supersymmetric Yang Mills theory is studied by solving the corresponding BFKL equation in the next toleading approximation. The gluon Greens function is analysed using a newly proposed method suitable... (~ka) ??(~kb) f ( ~ka, ~kb,Y ? ln s s0 ) , (1) where s0 = |~ka||~kb| is the Regge scale. The energy dependence is determined by the universal processindependent gluon Greens function f . The impact factors, ?,??, depend on the process under study...

Andersen, Jeppe R; Sabio Vera, Agustin

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261

Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

Baptiste Guegan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Interaction of half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the asymptotic interaction between two half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. When two vortices in different components are placed at distance 2R, the leading order of the force between them is found to be (lnR/{xi}-1/2)/R{sup 3}, in contrast to 1/R between vortices placed in the same component. We derive it analytically using the Abrikosov ansatz and the profile functions of the vortices, confirmed numerically with the Gross-Pitaevskii model. We also find that the short-range cutoff of the intervortex potential linearly depends on the healing length.

Eto, Minoru [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Kasamatsu, Kenichi [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, and Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, Hiyoshi 4-1-1, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Takeuchi, Hiromitsu [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, 1-7-1, Higashi Hiroshima, 739-8521 (Japan); Tsubota, Makoto [Department of Physics, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-Ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Induced gravity and entanglement entropy of 2D black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the fact that 2D Newton constant is wholly induced by a conformal field theory, we derive a formula for the entanglement entropy of the anti-de Sitter black hole in two spacetime dimensions. The leading term in the large black hole mass expansion of our formula reproduces exactly the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy S_{BH}, whereas the subleading term behaves as ln S_{BH}. This subleading term has the universal form typical for the entanglement entropy of physical systems described by effective conformal fields theories (e.g. one-dimensional statistical models at the critical point).

Mariano Cadoni

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

An Einstein-like theory of gravity with a non-newtonian weak-field limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a model describing Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field with an exponential potential. We show that the weak-field limit of the model has static solutions given by a gravitational potential behaving for large distances as \\ln r . The Newtonian term GM/r appears only as subleading. Our model can be used to give a phenomenological explanation of the rotation curves of the galaxies without postulating the presence of dark matter. This can be achieved only by giving up at galactic scales Einstein equivalence principle.

Mariano Cadoni

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development of immobilized ligands for actinide separations. Final report, June 1991--May 1994  

SciTech Connect

Primary goals during this grant period were to (1) synthesize new bifunctional chelating ligands, (2) characterize the structural features of the Ln and An coordination complexes formed by these ligands, (3) use structural data to iteratively design new classes of multifunctional ligands, and (4) explore additional routes for attachment of key ligands to solid supports that could be useful for chromatographic separations. Some highlights of recently published work as well as a summary of submitted, unpublished and/or still in progress research are outlined.

Paine, R.T.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Reverse engineering a gene network using an asynchronous parallel evolution strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decay rate la for gene a. The half life of each protein is given by ln 2/la. The model takes account of cell division. The lengths of interphase and mitosis occur according to a well determined schedule [31], and are modelled using three rules: During... pipeline is used to extract per-nucleus concentrations and combine them into high-resolution time-series of integrated data. First, each embryo image is segmented; the posi- tion and extent of each nucleus are determined using a combination of watershed...

Jostins, Luke; Jaeger, Johannes

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

Assessing the efficient cost of sustaining Britain's rail network: perspectives based on Zonal comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The ln(DIi) term is interpreted as the one- sided inefficiency term. Equation (3) may be estimated using COLS or, with some alteration, SFA (see below). The COLS method, developed by Greene (1980)17 proceeds by estimating equation (3) using OLS... reflect a reluctance within Railtrack to prioritise investment to particular areas of the network, and that, instead, each Zone has tended to receive its ?historic? level of the company?s investment budget from year to year. COLS1 COLS2 COLS3 COLS4...

Kennedy, John; Smith, Andrew S J

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Development of Agile Titania Sensors Via High-Temperature Reductive Etching Process (HiTREPr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a hy- pothetical metal oxidation reaction: Mðs? þ x 2 O2ðg? ! MOxðs? ð1? for which K1 ¼ aMOx aM :p x=2 and sim- plified to give pO2ðM=MOx ? ¼ exp 2:DGRð1? xRT ð2c? Equation (2c) gives the thermodynamic equal to the standard Gibbs energy of formation of the oxide, MOx. A plot of pO2 or ln pO2 versus

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

269

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of Nb substituted TiN thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of Ti{sub 1-x}Nb{sub x}N (0{<=}x{<=}1) thin films were investigated as a function x. The films were deposited onto polycrystalline nuclear grade 316LN stainless steel (SS) substrate by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in 100% N{sub 2} plasma. The hardness and Young's modulus increased while the friction coefficient and wear volume decreased with increasing Nb substitution. The highest hardness achieved was 31GPa for x=0.77. At the same Nb concentration, the friction coefficient was 0.15 and the elastic recovery was 60%.

Krishna, M. Ghanashyam; Vasu, K.; Padmanabhan, K. A. [School of Physics, Centre for Nanotechnology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500 046 (India); Centre for Nanotechnology, School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500 046 (India)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cost of Capital and Regulators Preferences: Investigation into a new method of estimating regulatory bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in the north-eastern section of the United States. They also own liquefied natural gas storage facilitites in Britain and provide infrastructure services to the mobile telecom industry. PNN LN Equity: Pennon Group Plc Pennon Group Plc operates and invests... precise there. 4 Application to Regulated UK Companies In this section we report the results we obtained by computing the beta coeffi- cient for many UK regulated companies which are listed in the FTSE all share. Our time series sample comprises weekly...

Sancetta, Alessio; Satchell, Stephen E

272

Bayesian Model Selection for Electromagnetic Kaon Production on the Nucleon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a Bayesian analysis of a Regge model for K+ Lambda photoproduction. The model is based on the exchange of K+(494) and K*+(892) trajectories in the t-channel. For different prior widths, we find decisive Bayesian evidence (\\Delta ln Z ~ 24) for a K+ Lambda photoproduction Regge model with a positive vector coupling and a negative tensor coupling constant for the K+(892) trajectory, and a rotating phase factor for both trajectories. Using the chi^2 minimization method, one could not draw this conclusion from the same dataset.

L. De Cruz; D. G. Ireland; P. Vancraeyveld; J. Ryckebusch

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

Smith, Paul H. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Ryan, Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Socioeconomic Profile of the Poters in the Central Mid-Hills of Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their economiC limitation they have to survive with maize. 4. Maize serves a duel purpose: human food and livestock feed. Maize is mainly consumed In the fonn of grit. During the process of grit making (milllng3) the flour comes out as a by product which is fed... 8: Food co~n~s~umlFu~ln~.~f~th~e~"~e~"'la~(..!th~e~h=.~u~se~h~.~'d~,evef'lRamechhap SindbuU Rank- Rank- 2 3 1 2 Malze Rice Pulses (Horse gram and masyang) Millets (Flnger mille and buck wheat 7 8 7 22 ~eat 2 7 -Rank: I Most frequently used: 2...

Upadhyay, Kiran Dutta

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Khesbn no. 45-46 - January 1967 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1lt I tND Dt3ll JD)']"j "rtD llN .lJl_tb Eyl '1*l lEPxlly],i7 u'l ul)n l'N ;0lNl 'l.l 'rTd .rtsu ul? n I'N ,iuTirT I'Nl*:nu ri2"lyll lru'byB! j1N D/rtD il! IrlS'ri7 N ,t:Nry), ,

Admin, LAYCC

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Stochastic local operations and classical communication equations and classification of even $n$ qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For any even $n$ qubits we establish four SLOCC equations and construct four SLOCC polynomials (not complete) of degree $2^{n/2}$, which can be exploited for SLOCC classification (not complete) of any even $n$ qubits. In light of the SLOCC equations, we propose several different genuine entangled states of even $n$ qubits and show that they are inequivalent to the $|GHZ>$, $|W>$, or $|l,n>$ (the symmetric Dicke states with $l$ excitations) under SLOCC via the vanishing or not of the polynomials. The absolute values of the polynomials can be considered as entanglement measures.

X. Li; D. Li

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Regmi Research Series ,Year 3, December 1, 1971  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ correct.2 ' 1. Chittaranjan Nepali, Shri .5 Rnna BahadW'" Shah (King lbna Dahadur Sha tJ) , Kathmaoou: Mary Rajbhand.D. ri, 2020 (196), Chapt~r II: nShasan Snnchr.. l."ln Evam Ra jyatyag (Sarnvat 1651-18.55)," (Jlaign and Abdica.tionj 1794-1798 ) , 22... is tj:lat Ranody.t Shah was alive during a~, even af.'ter the assassination of Rana. &madur Shah. . . , '" After aMdicat1llg in lavor of Oirvanyuddha Dilcram Shah,l Rana Bahadur Shah renounced 'WC?l'ldly 'lite and accompanied by his tvo quoory...

Regmi, Mahesh C

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nearly itinerant ferromagnetism in CaNi2 and CaNi3  

SciTech Connect

Single crystals of CaNi2 and CaNi3 are successfully grown out of excess Ca. Both compounds manifest a metallic ground state with enhanced, temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility. The relatively high Stoner factors of Z=0.79 and 0.87 found for CaNi2 and CaNi3, respectively, reveal their close vicinity to ferromagnetic instabilities. The pronounced field dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of CaNi3 at low temperatures (T<25 K) suggests strong ferromagnetic fluctuations. A corresponding contribution to the specific heat with a temperature dependence of T3lnT is also observed.

Jesche, Anton; Dennis, Kevin W.; Kreyssig, Andreas; Canfield, Paul C.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Beyond Landauer erasure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In thermodynamics one considers thermal systems and the maximization of entropy subject to the conservation of energy. A consequence is Landauer's erasure principle, which states that the erasure of 1 bit of information requires a minimum energy cost equal to $kT\\ln(2)$ where $T$ is the temperature of a thermal reservoir used in the process and $k$ is Boltzmann's constant. Jaynes, however, argued that the maximum entropy principle could be applied to any number of conserved quantities which would suggest that information erasure may have alternative costs. Indeed we showed recently that by using a reservoir comprising energy degenerate spins and subject to conservation of angular momentum, the cost of information erasure is in terms of angular momentum rather than energy. Here we extend this analysis and derive the minimum cost of information erasure for systems where different conservation laws operate. We find that, for each conserved quantity, the minimum resource needed to erase 1 bit of memory is $\\lambda^{-1}\\ln(2)$ where $\\lambda$ is related to the average value of the conserved quantity. The costs of erasure depend, fundamentally, on both the nature of the physical memory element and the reservoir with which it is coupled.

Stephen M. Barnett; Joan A. Vaccaro

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Hadronic forward scattering: Predictions for the Large Hadron Collider and cosmic rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The status of hadron-hadron interactions is reviewed, with emphasis on the forward and near-forward scattering regions. From analyticity, Finite Energy Sum Rules are introduced from which new analyticity constraints are derived that exploit the many very accurate low energy experimental cross sections, i.e., they constrain the values of the asymptotic cross sections and their derivatives at low energies just above the resonance regions, allowing us new insights into duality. A new robust fitting technique is introduced in order to `clean up' large data samples that are contaminated by outliers. Using our analyticity constraints, new methods of fitting high energy hadronic data are introduced which result in much more precise estimates of the fit parameters, allowing accurate extrapolations to much higher energies. It's shown that the $\\gamma p$, $\\pi^\\pm p$ and nucleon-nucleon cross sections {\\em all} go asymptotically as $\\ln^2s$, saturating the Froissart bound, while conclusively ruling out $\\ln s$ and $s^{\\alpha}$ ($\\alpha\\sim 0.08$) behavior. Implications of this saturation for predictions of $\\sigma_{pp}$ and $\\rho_{pp}$ at the LHC and for cosmic rays p-air cross sections are given.

Martin M. Block

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

282

Microscopic diagonal entropy and its connection to basic thermodynamic relations  

SciTech Connect

We define a diagonal entropy (d-entropy) for an arbitrary Hamiltonian system as S{sub d}=-{Sigma}{sub n{rho}nn}ln{rho}{sub nn} with the sum taken over the basis of instantaneous energy states. In equilibrium this entropy coincides with the conventional von Neumann entropy S{sub n} = -Tr{rho} ln {rho}. However, in contrast to S{sub n}, the d-entropy is not conserved in time in closed Hamiltonian systems. If the system is initially in stationary state then in accord with the second law of thermodynamics the d-entropy can only increase or stay the same. We also show that the d-entropy can be expressed through the energy distribution function and thus it is measurable, at least in principle. Under very generic assumptions of the locality of the Hamiltonian and non-integrability the d-entropy becomes a unique function of the average energy in large systems and automatically satisfies the fundamental thermodynamic relation. This relation reduces to the first law of thermodynamics for quasi-static processes. The d-entropy is also automatically conserved for adiabatic processes. We illustrate our results with explicit examples and show that S{sub d} behaves consistently with expectations from thermodynamics.

Polkovnikov, Anatoli, E-mail: asp@bu.edu [Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hydrodynamics of the cascading plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cascading gauge theory of Klebanov et.al realizes a soluble example of gauge/string correspondence in a non-conformal setting. Such a gauge theory has a strong coupling scale Lambda, below which it confines with a chiral symmetry breaking. A holographic description of a strongly coupled cascading gauge theory plasma is represented by a black brane solution of type IIB supergravity on a conifold with fluxes. A characteristic parameter controlling the high temperature expansion of such plasma is 1/ln(T/Lambda). In this paper we study the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of the cascading gauge theory plasma to order 1/ln(T/Lambda)^4. We find that the bulk viscosity satisfies the bound conjectured in arXiv:0708.3459. We comment on difficulties of computing the transport coefficients to all orders in T/Lambda. Previously, it was shown that a cascading gauge theory plasma undergoes a first-order deconfinement transition with unbroken chiral symmetry at T_c=0.6141111(3) Lambda. We show here that a deconfined chirally symmetric phase becomes perturbatively unstable at T_u=0.8749(0) T_c. Near the unstable point the specific heat diverges as c_V ~ |1-T_u/T|^(-1/2).

Alex Buchel

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

An hydrodynamic shear instability in stratified disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the possibility that astrophysical accretion disks are dynamically unstable to non-axisymmetric disturbances with characteristic scales much smaller than the vertical scale height. The instability is studied using three methods: one based on the energy integral, which allows the determination of a sufficient condition of stability, one using a WKB approach, which allows the determination of the necessary and sufficient condition for instability and a last one by numerical solution. This linear instability occurs in any inviscid stably stratified differential rotating fluid for rigid, stress-free or periodic boundary conditions, provided the angular velocity $\\Omega$ decreases outwards with radius $r$. At not too small stratification, its growth rate is a fraction of $\\Omega$. The influence of viscous dissipation and thermal diffusivity on the instability is studied numerically, with emphasis on the case when $d \\ln \\Omega / d \\ln r =-3/2$ (Keplerian case). Strong stratification and large diffusivity are found to have a stabilizing effect. The corresponding critical stratification and Reynolds number for the onset of the instability in a typical disk are derived. We propose that the spontaneous generation of these linear modes is the source of turbulence in disks, especially in weakly ionized disks.

B. Dubrulle; L. Mari; Ch. Normand; D. Richard; F. Hersant; J. -P. Zahn

2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

285

Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La.sub.w Ca.sub.x Ln.sub.y Ce.sub.z MnO.sub.3, wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kuo, Lewis (Monroeville, PA); Li, Baozhen (Essex Junction, VT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

International Journal of Modern Physics D (in press, 1999) ?c World Scientific Publishing Company ON QUANTUM NATURE OF BLACK-HOLE SPACETIME: A Possible New Source of Intense Radiation *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atoms and the planets acquire their stability from the quantum mechanical incompatibility of the position and momentum measurements. This incompatibility is expressed by the fundamental commutator [x, px] = ih, or equivalently, via the Heisenbergs uncertainty principle ?x?px ? h. A further stability-related phenomenon where the quantum realm plays a dramatic role is the collapse of certain stars into white dwarfs and neutron stars. Here, an intervention of the Pauli exclusion principle, via the fermionic degenerate pressure, stops the gravitational collapse. However, by the neutron-star stage the standard quantum realm runs dry. One is left with the problematic collapse of a black hole. This essay is devoted to a concrete argument on why the black-hole spacetime itself should exhibit a quantum nature. The proposed quantum aspect of spacetime is shown to prevent the general-relativistic dictated problematic collapse. The quantum nature of black-hole spacetime is deciphered from a recent result on the universal equal-area spacing [ = ?2 P 4ln(3)] for black holes. In one interpretation of the emergent picture, an astrophysical black hole can fluctuate to ? ?/ln(3) ( ? 1.7) time its classical size, and thus allow radiation and matter to escape to the outside observers. These fluctuations I

D. V. Ahluwalia; Communicated J. Ellis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Branch-shaped NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals: Selective synthesis, and photoluminescence properties  

SciTech Connect

The branch-shaped NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized by using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent in ethylene glycol (EG) solution. The NCs were readily dispersed into water or ethanol to form a relatively stable suspension, which may facilitate their applications in biological fields. Meanwhile, the crystal structures of the NCs were tunable from the mixture of the {alpha}-(cubic) and {beta}-(hexagonal) phases to the pure {beta}-phase by varying the F{sup -}/Ln{sup 3+} molar ratio or the reaction temperature. The pure {beta}-phase NCs were obtained at relatively high F{sup -}/Ln{sup 3+} molar ratio and reaction temperature. In addition, the Eu{sup 3+}-doping concentration-dependent optical properties of the NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} NCs were investigated in detail. The result shows that the emissions from high energy level transitions (e.g., {sup 5}D{sub 1}, {sup 5}D{sub 2}, and {sup 5}D{sub 3}) are significantly impaired with increasing the Eu{sup 3+}-doping concentration due to the cross-relaxation process, and the emission at 612 nm is predominant since the doped Eu{sup 3+} ions locate in the crystal fields without inversion center.

Wang Shangbing, E-mail: wsb1978@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China); Li Qing; Pei Lizhai [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China); Zhang Qianfeng, E-mail: zhangqf@ahut.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

QCD matrix elements + parton showers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? Q Q1 dq? ?q(q?, Q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?g(q?, q)?g(Q1, q?) + ? Q Q1 dq ?q(q, Q)?g(Q1, q) ? q Q1 dq? ?f(q?)?f (Q1, q?) } (2.4) where ?q,g,f are q ? qg, g ? gg and g ? qq branching probabilities ?q(q, Q... ) = 2CF pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 3 4 ) (2.5) ?g(q, Q) = 2CA pi ?S(q) q ( ln Q q ? 11 12 ) (2.6) ?f(q) = Nf 3pi ?S(q) q , (2.7) CF = (N2c ?1)/2Nc and CA = Nc for Nc colours, Nf is the number of active flavours, and ?q,g are the quark and gluon Sudakov form...

Catani, S; Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Webber, Bryan R

289

N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid-based lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, magnetism and quantum Monte Carlo studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of lanthanide coordination polymers have been obtained through the hydrothermal reaction of N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid (H{sub 3}SIDA) and Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (Ln=La, 1; Pr, 2; Nd, 3; Gd, 4). Crystal structure analysis exhibits that lanthanide ions affect the coordination number, bond length and dimension of compounds 1-4, which reveal that their structure diversity can be attributed to the effect of lanthanide contraction. Furthermore, the combination of magnetic measure with quantum Monte Carlo(QMC) studies exhibits that the coupling parameters between two adjacent Gd{sup 3+} ions for anti-anti and syn-anti carboxylate bridges are -1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and -5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1}, respectively, which reveals weak antiferromagnetic interaction in 4. - Graphical abstract: Four lanthanide coordination polymers with N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid were obtained under hydrothermal condition and reveal the weak antiferromagnetic coupling between two Gd{sup 3+} ions by Quantum Monte Carlo studies. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four lanthanide coordination polymers of H{sub 3}SIDA ligand were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanide ions play an important role in their structural diversity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic measure exhibits that compound 4 features antiferromagnetic property. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum Monte Carlo studies reveal the coupling parameters of two Gd{sup 3+} ions.

Zhuang Guilin, E-mail: glzhuang@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Chen Wulin [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Zheng Jun [Center of Modern Experimental Technology, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Yu Huiyou [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Wang Jianguo, E-mail: jgw@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; McKay, Timothy; /Michigan U.; Hao, Jiangang; /Michigan U.; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Hansen, Sarah; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin; /New York U.; Johnston, David; /Houston U.; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Bleem, Lindsey; /Chicago U.; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

291

CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets with CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with Mo and Zr removed. Waste streams that contain Mo must be produced in reducing environments to avoid Cs-Mo oxide phase formation. Waste streams without Mo have the ability to be melt processed in air. A path forward for further optimizing the processing steps needed to form the targeted phase assemblages is outlined in this report. Processing modifications including melting in a reducing atmosphere, and controlled heat treatment schedules are anticipated to improve the targeted elemental partitioning.

Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade MFRSR Head Refurbishment, Data Logger Upgrade and Calibration Improvements Gary Hodges, CIRES/NOAA and John Schmelzer, PNL gary.hodges@noaa.gov, john.schmelzer@pnl.gov 17th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting 26-30 March 2006 Monterey, CA Head Refurbishment The Process Includes: * New filter detectors * Relocate internal thermistors * New connectors * Gain resistors moved to head * Improved insulation The Finished Heads: * Are lamp calibrated * Have filter profiles measured * Cosine characterized * Are out-of-band tested What Does This Mean For Data Users? * Fewer data gaps * Fewer DQRs * Confidence in the data * Well calibrated data Calibration Improvements 5 6 7 8 0 2 4 6 Airmass ln Direct Data will now be calibrated by the Langley method Extrapolate to TOA to get V 0 Benefits of Langley vs. Lamp calibrations:

293

BEAMLINE 4-1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Environmental / Materials / Chemistry / Biology % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 20-pole, 2.0-Tesla Wiggler, 0.75 mrad, side station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range grating type resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance unfocused 5,500-38,000eV 10-4 4x18mm 0.75 mrad OPTICS: M0 mirror: Flat, bent vertically collimating, 1 m, Si, Rh-coated, cutoff 9-23 keV, LN2-cooled monochromator. Energies over 22keV are run with the mirror out. MONOCHROMATOR: Si(220) f=0° or Si(220) f=90° double-crystal, non-fixed exit slit Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library

294

P I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- - P I c I c - L - c Ln - II LI C c w ^C +-j-L (, i) c ORNL/RASA-92/14i OAK RIDGE NATiONAL LABORATORY Results of the Radiological Survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Properties, Oxford, Ohio (0x0001) M. E. Murray IS. S. Brown R. k Mathis MAWAGED BY MARTIM MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNfTED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Techni- cal Information, P.O. Box 62. Oak Ridge, TN 37831; prices available from (615) 576-8401, FTS 626-8401. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. 1 I I This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of

295

,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O' P.ear. I have determiaed Volume If, Design sad ProcurePent Ehtoq of Nanford Enginaar works and ClAnton Semi-Works, may be declaseified. Aomrdingly, by my authority, Volume II is declassified effeotive Hay 4, 1964. Volume II h& bean deterdaed to contdn~ Section148 infonzation~ however, olswe lthasnotbeenreviewed

296

Poudre Valley REA - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (Colorado) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (Colorado) Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (Colorado) Poudre Valley REA - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Commercial Lighting Retrofit: 50% of equipment cost, $20,000 LED Street Lighting/Induction Street Lighting: $20,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount LED Refrigerated Case Lighting (Top Lighting): $60 per ln ft LED Refrigerated Case Lighting (Case Lighting): $60 per door LED Street Lighting: $44 - $475 per fixture Induction Street Lighting: $33 - $355 per fixture Commercial Lighting Retrofit: $250 per kW saved Provider Poudre Valley REA Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association (PVREA), a Touchstone Energy

297

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mattel' of: ) Mattel' of: ) ) ) ) *DigwaJl Entel'l>dses, Inc. (freezers) Case Number: 2013-SE-1412 COMPROMISE AGREEMENT The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE,,) Office of the Genernl Counsel initiated case m1mber 20 l 3-SE- L 412 against BigwaJI Enterprises, Inc. (Respondent,,) after DOE testing revealed that-freezer ln1sic model-. distributed in the United States by Respondent as Basic Model Weltingtou W l CFl 06, may not meet tbe applicable energy conservation standflrd. See J 0 C.F.R. § 430.32(a). Respondent and DOE, by their authorized representatives, hereby enter into this Compromise Agreement for the plll'pose of settling this specific enforcement action. I. DEFINITIONS For the purposes of this Compromise Agreement, the following definitions shall apply:

298

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 17, 2011 March 17, 2011 CX-005396: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - California-City-Escondido CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 03/17/2011 Location(s): Escondido, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 17, 2011 CX-005395: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - California-City-Compton CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/17/2011 Location(s): Compton, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 16, 2011 Disneyland's Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade As the provider of laundry and dry cleaning services for Disneyland Resort's costumes and hospitality supply items, L&N Costume and Linen Service knows a little something about both quantity and quality.

299

Questar Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maximum Rebate Maximum Rebate Limit of two rebates per appliance type Program Info Start Date 3/1/2011 State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: $200 - $400 Gas Storage Water Heater: $50-$100 Gas Condensing Water Heater: $350 Gas Boiler: $400 -$600 Tankless Gas Water Heater: $350 Clothes Washer: $50 Windows: $0.95/sq. ft. Insulation (Wall): $0.30/sq. ft. Insulation (Floor): $0.20/sq. ft. Insulation (Attic): $0.07 - $0.25/sq. ft. Duct Sealing/Insulation: $100 + $5.25/ln. ft. Air Sealing: $100 + $.20/sq. ft. Programmable Thermostat: $30 In-Home Energy Audit: Discounted to $25 Provider Questar Gas Questar Gas provides rebates for energy efficient appliances and heating equipment, and certain weatherization measures through the ThermWise program. This equipment includes clothes washers, water heaters, furnaces,

300

BL 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BL 11-2 Status and Scheduling Information BL 11-2 Status and Scheduling Information Third Run 2001 BL 11-2 user commissioning is in full swing. March and April activities have centered around debugging and characterizing major electromechanical and optical systems of the beam line (motors, mirrors, and the 11-2 LN-cooled monochromator). We are now preparing for the upcoming run, of which 5 1/2 weeks are scheduled for user beam. Further commissioning work and new system testing will be interspersed between user beam periods. Notably, this work will include feasibility tests using metal microcapillary microfocusing optics (2 to 10 mm range) and system tests on the BL 11-2 grazing-incidence XAS spectrometer. Several instrumental capabilities are still in the process of being brought on-line. We anticipate that the BL 11-2 monochromator will

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301

the Y-12 Times, a newsletter for employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buttons, Buttons, pg. 2 Buttons aren't only for the clothing industry. STEM, pg. 8 Y-12's contributions to Knoxville's L&N STEM Academy are a sound investment. Film crews from national television stations don't usually go on classified missions. How- ever, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow was granted special access to report on the successful removal of highly enriched uranium from Mexico's National Institute for Nuclear Research in February. Y-12 was tasked by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction (more commonly known as the Global Threat Reduction Initiative or GTRI) to support the packaging and removal of fresh HEU from Mexico's Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics (or TRIGA) II Research Reactor, located south of Mexico City. This

302

3010DLFinal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Core Status: new users must complete 2 trouble-free training sessions and pass a sample exchange exam to work independently during Core sessions. Flex Status: core users must complete 4 "trouble-free" sessions and pass a driving test to work independently during Flex sessions To reserve a 3010 session, go to www/ncem.lbl.gov, click on "Microscope Scheduling", use proposal number and password to log in. You may only sign up for 2 Core sessions and 1 Flex session at a time. To cancel a session, email your request to the technical staff in charge of the microscope. CORE LICENSE Safety  Understand emergency shut down procedure  Know emergency contact numbers  Know where LN protective equipment is Instrument Preparation  Set from "DP" to "Normal" mode.

303

BEAMLINE 9-3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9-3 9-3 CURRENT STATUS: Closed (Down-pending mirror repair) SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: X-ray absorption spectroscopy Single crystal x-ray absorption spectroscopy MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Structural Biology % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 16-pole, 2-Tesla wiggler, 2 mrad beam BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size (fwhm) flux* angular acceptance focused 5000-30000 eV 1 x 10-4 0.4 x 3 mm2 ~2 x 1012 2.0 mrad *ph/sec @100 mA / 9 keV w 1x4 mm aperture OPTICS: M0 mirror: Flat, bent, vertically collimating, 1 m, Si, Rh-coated, LN2-cooled monochromator M1 mirror: Bent, cylindrical, 1.2 m, Zerodur, Rh-coated MONOCHROMATOR: Si(220) phi=0°, Si(220) phi=90° double-crystal,

304

Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives Ameren Illinois (Gas) - Cooking and Heating Business Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate General: $600,000 Program Info Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $1.20/therm saved/yr Steamers: $300-$1200 Fryer: $400 Griddle: $50/ln. ft. Ovens: custom Storage Water Heaters: $150/unit Tankless Water Heater: $300/unit Gas Boiler/Furnace Replacement: $400 - $6,000

305

Section 51  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

v v ' B L 8 / [*(d) µ o E 8 P(µ o ,µ,N), " b ' 0.101 % 0.853 " v & 0.130 " 2 v % 0.042 ln(1/µ o ). Session Papers 219 (1) (2) Figure 1. Correlation of GOES-6 visible and ERBS shortwave albedos over the Southern Great Plains. Cloud Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Satellite and Surface Data During the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment P. Minnis, C. H. Whitlock, T. P. Charlock, G. L. Schuster Atmospheric Sciences Division NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia W. L. Smith, Jr. and L. Nguyen Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction Cloud absorption of solar radiation has been the focus of sev- eral recent studies and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Absorption Experiment (ARESE). One of the methods for studying cloud absorption has employed the analysis of

306

Eufinium Finance Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eufinium Finance Ltd Eufinium Finance Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Eufinium Finance Ltd Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip EC1M 3LN Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Eufinium specialises in the equity financing of Wind Power, Marine Renewables and Hydrogen Technologies. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

307

B3.11 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- 1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components Introduction .A .. s defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same nln 1 (\

308

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 7880 of 29,416 results. 71 - 7880 of 29,416 results. Download Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/uranium-leasing-program-draft-peis-public-comment-period-extended-may-31-2013 Download CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination Response to Increasing Turbine Cut-ln Speed at the Sheffield Wind Farm, Vermont CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.3 Date: 01/30/2012 Location(s): Vermont Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007915-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006669: Categorical Exclusion Determination ESP Shuttle B CX(s) Applied: B5.12 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC

309

APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program APS - Multifamily Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Lighting in Dwellings: Free Energy Design Incentive: 50% of study cost, up to $5,000 Energy Assessments: Free T8 and T5 Fluorescents: $5-$12/unit Delamping: $5 - $10 LED Exit Signs/Traffic Signals: $25/unit LED Lamps: $10 - $15 LED Signage: $3/ln ft Refrigerated Case LED Lamps: $25 - $30 Occupancy Sensors: $0.12/connected watt Daylighting Controls: $0.30/connected watt

310

Section 71  

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9 9 ' 12 µm * 8 µm F 89 8 d 8 ' 6 ' i ' 1 F 89 i *8 PCLoS (2) ' (1 & N) exp (&b tan 2); b ' & 2$ ln (1 & N) B (Z i , Z j , 2) Z i Z j (Z i , Z j , 2). Session Papers 309 (1) (3) Window-Region Longwave Fluxes: Accounting for Cloud Scattering E.E. Takara and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The longwave radiative transfer models used in many general circulation models (GCMs) assume that broken cloud fields consist of flat black plates. This neglects individual cloud geometry and cloud optical properties (i.e., single scattering albedo). The error due to neglecting cloud geometry has been well documented (Ellingson 1982; Harshvardhan and Weinman 1982; Killen and Ellingson 1994). Recently, Takara and Ellingson (1996) showed that cloud longwave

311

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 17540 of 28,905 results. 31 - 17540 of 28,905 results. Download CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination Response to Increasing Turbine Cut-ln Speed at the Sheffield Wind Farm, Vermont CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.3 Date: 01/30/2012 Location(s): Vermont Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007915-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-009680: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Cleanup Actions CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 12/14/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-009680-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Independent Activity Report, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- March 2013 Follow-up of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste

312

BEAMLINE 7-3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: X-ray absorption spectroscopy MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Structural Biology % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 20-pole, 2-Tesla wiggler, 0.8 mrad beam, side station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size (fwhm) flux* angular acceptance unfocused 4600-37000 eV 1 x 10-4 2 x 15 mm2 ~1 x 1012 0.8 mrad *ph/sec @100 mA / 9 keV w 2x15 mm aperture OPTICS: M0 mirror: Flat, bent, vertically collimating, 1 m, Si, Rh-coated, LN2-cooled monochromator MONOCHROMATOR: Si(220) phi=0°, Si(220) phi=90° double-crystal, non-fixed exit slit Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library Crystal changes need to be scheduled and coordinated in advance with BL

313

Texas Solar Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power Company Solar Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Solar Power Company Name Texas Solar Power Company Address 1703 W Koenig Ln Place Austin, Texas Zip 78756 Sector Solar Product Design, sales and installation of renewable energy equipment and systems Website http://www.txspc.com/ Coordinates 30.332798°, -97.736025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.332798,"lon":-97.736025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

314

CABLE AOORIs*. HICRONIZER. MOORLblOWN. NEW ,SRIEY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NEW ALBANY ROAD . MOORESTOWN . NEW ]ERSEY NEW ALBANY ROAD . MOORESTOWN . NEW ]ERSEY CABLE AOORIs*. HICRONIZER. MOORLblOWN. NEW ,SRIEY be returned further obliga- may desire any patent protection, provi#ed; however, that the costa in connectSo& with the pregaration;~~fillrig nnd prosecution of the same shall be entirely: at ?SG,~~e~enS.e ,of our..company. This provision, how- ever, ls.' subJect:to eny.~prlor'arra~cmont between your Institu- tion and the government with respect to inventions and p?j,tents. ,.: 3,ri 'I :: .:v:ri :!:!p, +lo.~nl.~~! ( '.'I! &f :, > ,>,' :'It'r*i&: sltibr~!the understandfng that your Instttution will ca,rry such insurance as you'may deem ndvi~able~ln aonoec- tion with this m ill or its use ~lhile :kt the UnivsF@#b v' "t -' . ' - IN,TERNATI.ONAL PULVERIZING c0RP0RAi.1~

315

INSTALLATION MAG~NiX.ILRI DIVI8ION, CAN.fAN,CONN.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

INSTALLATION INSTALLATION MAG~NiX.ILRI DIVI8ION, CAN.fAN,CONN. .PERI,jD Aiq~+ 1, i950 TO: August 31, 195 .:\,.:. ,,., WORK SHEET FOR: I b WSIGNOR I. v DowChemical Go. Velasco, Texas ., Azlterprise Meetala cc Brooklyn, New York Meili $Worthin&m Hatboro, ?'a. LOT NO. '... I [ATERIAL SYnB,fJL KEASURED' NET WT. 100,007~ ( 4;020 I ! 19 ~, ANALYBIS % METAL/100 r, Noi. 23) METAL CONTENT INSTRUCTIONS: This sheet% will be Used.ln.preDarlng Haterlal Balance. 'The totals from the various ltams listed above ~111 be Inserted on the Material Balance Summary Sheet. Shipments ~111 he llated on this Work'Sheet separately With the-ConsIgnor and Consignee of each Shipment noted; Copies Of thls sheet ~111 accompany the naterlal Balance Summary Sheet at the end of the'month.

316

R K  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IS,,f 4I6*REI{,OUSS1..,,,,,,,,.,,,,.,.,,,,,. IS,,f 4I6*REI{,OUSS1..,,,,,,,,.,,,,.,.,,,,,. ) R K , , : ' ' : j ' : ' , ,'6ryB,t;:.tr..UOt-*:...,, ,.,.,'..'.'',.'.:.:'.':.,l.',.,,.',,,,,,,, ,,,,,.,,,. il Restoration' ,.,, ,, ,, ' } l t . - i J " . ' f : ' i ) i t - r . t l : it+,47,. l'.,,'.'.'.'N' ib'. !.'',,., .-t'd .:rir: ::i:iiij ,"tLi:::ilit:ii l ii; , . . : ) * : : l : : oRfsE 92tE-41 VERIFICATION SIJRVEY OF THE BAKER AI\D WILLIAMS WAREIIOUS$ BI]ILDING 52L.527 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by J.D. Berger, P.R. Cotten and J.L. Payne Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Project Staff S. F. Barnett T. D. Herrera D. A. Gibson M. A. Laudeman Prepared for Department of EnergY Office of Environmental Restoration FINAL REPORT

317

CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

563: Categorical Exclusion Determination 563: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/18/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office Temple University would utilize DOE and cost share funds to develop an integrated set of tools to monitor the evolution of permeability and fluid flow within an enhanced geothermal system (EGS) during both the stimulation and production phases to infer the location, geometry and pore pressure distribution within the subsurface fracture network. CX-007563.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination

318

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR Home Builder Incentive: $1500 ENERGY STAR Manufactured Home (Electrically Heated): $500 Air Sealing/Duct Sealing: $0.30/ln ft Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Floor Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Light Fixtures: Discounts; see program web site Clothes Washers: $50

320

Microsoft Word - Daum-PH.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Spectral Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Effects of Spectral Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions on Radiative Properties of Clouds and Dispersion Forcing P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Atmospheric Sciences Division Upton, New York Introduction Most studies of the indirect aerosol effect on cloud radiative properties have considered only changes in N caused by increasing the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration. In such studies, it is assumed that the change in r e , due to the increase in N, can be calculated from the simple relation r e = [3/(4πρ w )] 1/3 (L/N) 1/3 (1) where L is the liquid water content, and ρ w is the density of water. In effect, these studies implicitly assume the only effect of aerosols on cloud microphysical properties is to increase N, and r

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

BEAMLINE 7-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7-2 7-2 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: X-ray scattering X-ray diffraction MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Materials / Environmental % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 20-pole, 2-Tesla Wiggler ID End Station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance focused 4600 - 16500 eV 0.12 x 0.50 mm 0.4 mrad OPTICS: Bent cylinder, single crystal Si, Rh-coated M0 mirror Radii: 2945 m (adjustable) x 56.1 mm Mean angle of incidence: 3.81 mrad Cut off energy: 17.7 keV Magnification: 1.0 MONOCHROMATOR: LN2-cooled, sagitally focusing, double crystal Si(111) Upward reflecting Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library Crystal changes need to be scheduled and coordinated in advance with BL

322

Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting 11/06/2007 Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols Sugars and Sugar Alcohols * * Problem: Problem: Need Need to develop renewable to develop renewable hydrogen production technologies using hydrogen production technologies using diverse diverse feedstocks feedstocks 10 15 20 CH 4 : C 6 H 14 ln(P) * * Description: Description: The BioForming The BioForming TM TM process uses process uses aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively aqueous phase reforming to cost effectively produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, produce hydrogen from a range of feedstocks, including glycerol and sugars. The key including glycerol and sugars. The key breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that breakthrough is a proprietary catalyst that

323

Microsoft PowerPoint - C-Mod_quarterly_intro.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q3 Q3 21 July 2009 Developing the steady state, high-Z wall, high-field tokamak for ITER and beyond FY09 Q3 Status and Plans * Alternator Recertified (April, 2009) - Now in service and operating normally * Disassembly, inspection, TF refurbishment complete - Also improved LN2 systems, vessel heaters, etc. * Lower Hybrid Launcher - Delayed by combination of redeployment of engineering resources to deal with alternator and unexpected technical issues - Installation after end of FY09 campaign * Advanced ICRF antenna - Aimed at strong reduction of RF sheath induced impurity generation - Design progressing well, schedule can be accelerated with ARRA incremental funding FY09 Q3 Status and Plans * Successful Ideas Forum (April, 2009) - >130 presentations, including strong student,

324

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HTRL Isotope Separation and General R&D HTRL Isotope Separation and General R&D Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Labs 133 and 145 are laboratories used by Hydrogen Technology Section (HTS) for hydrogen related R&D activities. These activities include making gas mixtures, technology development for hydrogen isotopes separation, hydrogen purification and storage, and for stable nitrogen isotope separation. Activities also included are development of instrumentation for experimental and plant use such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and data acquisition. A variety of gases for calibrating instruments and developing analytical methods will be mixed and used and cryogenics will lbe used either from dewars or the bulk LN2 system B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects

325

WaveCatcher Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WaveCatcher Inc WaveCatcher Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name WaveCatcher Inc Address 2307 Robincrest Ln Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2006 Phone number 1-847-764-9106 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=WaveCatcher_Inc&oldid=678511" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863326429 Varnish cache server

326

shukurov-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 On Aerosol and Molecular Extinction of Solar Radiation in Transparency "Window" ν = 750 - 1250 cm -1 from Atmospheric Measurements K. A. Shukurov, A. Kh. Shukurov, and G. S. Golitsyn Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction In investigations of variations of optical depth of the vertical column of atmosphere τ = - ln P, where P = transmittance of the atmosphere, in intervals ∆ν i of transparency "microwindows" i in range of wavenumbers ν = 750 - 1250 cm -1 , one of the most difficult problems is to separate the contributions of an aerosol and water vapor in τ (spectral position of "microwindows" i (see Figure 1 under numbers i = 1 - 22). Optical depth τ (m, w), measured at air mass m

327

BEAMLINE 4-3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4-3 4-3 CURRENT STATUS: Open SUPPORTED TECHNIQUES: X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy MAIN SCIENTIFIC DISCIPLINES: Environmental / Materials / Biology % TIME GENERAL USE: 100% SCHEDULING: Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures Current SPEAR and Beam Line Schedules SOURCE: 20-pole, 2.0-Tesla wiggler, 0.75 mrad, side station BEAM LINE SPECIFICATIONS: energy range resolution DE/E spot size flux angular acceptance unfocused 2400-14000 eV 10-4 3 x 16 mm 0.75 mrad OPTICS: M0 mirror: Flat, bent vertically collimating, 1 m, Si, Rh-coated, cutoff 4-14 keV, LN2-cooled monochromator MONOCHROMATOR: Si(111) f=0° or Si(111) f=90° double-crystal, non-fixed exit slit Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library Crystal changes need to be scheduled and coordinated in advance with BL

328

Section 85  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i ' -ln I i I 0 i *µ%c i µ, c i Wm &2 c i NO 2 O 3 NO 2 c i c i NO 2 Session Papers 379 (1) Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol Size Distribution Parameters, Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide Column Amounts from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data M. Alexandrov, A. A. Lacis, B. E. Carlson and B. Cairns National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction The MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) (Harrison and Michalsky 1994a, 1994b) measures atmospheric column extinction of the direct solar beam and the diffuse radiation intensity at six wavelengths. Located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, the instrument has six spectral channels at 415, 501, 616, 672, 870, and 940

329

Index of /research/alcator/documentation/2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [DIR] 20110208 bus change/ 09-Feb-2011 08:51 - [DIR] 20110214 LN2 vaporiser/ 01-May-2012 12:50 - [DIR] 20110218 T3 Anode trouble/ 20-Dec-2011 08:20 - [DIR] 20110310 Rui/ 10-Mar-2011 08:26 - [DIR] 20110323 strap 1!/ 05-Aug-2013 09:43 - [DIR] 20110406 basement/ 06-Apr-2011 13:37 - [DIR] 20110407 cell/ 07-Apr-2011 09:16 - [DIR] 20110412_DNB_Calorimeter/ 25-May-2011 13:47 - [DIR] 20110418_DNB_Calorimeter/ 25-May-2011 13:46 - [DIR] 20110419_camera_on_pole_inspection/ 19-Apr-2011 11:19 - [DIR] 20110421TF3 Breaker/ 03-Dec-2013 11:17 - [DIR] 20110421 Tuppen/ 05-Aug-2013 10:14 - [DIR] 20110506_2nd_gas_jet_tube_view/ 03-Dec-2013 11:17 -

330

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CdZnTe room temperature gamma-ray detectors CdZnTe room temperature gamma-ray detectors Paul Luke Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract: Ge detectors provide excellent energy resolution and are routinely used in many gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. However, they require cryogenic (LN) cooling due to the small band-gap of Ge. Because of that, substantial effort has been expended in the past several decades on the search and development of wide-band-gap high-Z semiconductors as room-temperature replacement of Ge detectors. CdZnTe emerged as the most promising material to date. A fortuitous combination of the charge transport properties of this material and the coplanar-grid charge sensing technique permits the production of reasonably large detectors with good energy resolution, and the possibility of achieving performance rivaling that of Ge detectors has

331

T  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

l D +;$ Iohn !Y. Ruch, Dlrector Feed Msterlal€ Dlvtslon - OR A. J, Breglla, Dlrector Ilsalth Prot€e$on Engtneerlng Dlv1slon, EASL. lnf CoIIIIMINAUON SLRVEY Ar FTACTwE MEtl\LS, INC., SETMOUR, ?HNEcT"Yt IfSH:AIB fiurnmafv Accompanted bf lr{r. A. Grella of tleactlve lrtetals, on Octcber 2l , 1964e l vtetted the Selnaour t'aclllty, Iorurerly occupled by Reactlve l\'tetals, to perforn ttre gunrey reguesied ln your telagram to Dr. Sartey

332

RECIPIENT: NREL u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lA lA ' OJ ) RECIPIENT: NREL u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page 1 of3 STATE: VT PROJECT TITL.E: Response to Increasing Turbine Cut· ln Speed at the Sheffield Wind Farm, Vermont, NREL Tracking No. 12-002 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number NREl-12-OO2 G010337 Based on my review oflbc information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Omcer (authorized under DOE Order 451 .IA), I have made the following detennination: ex, [A, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 3.3 Research related to conservation of fish, wildlife, and cultural resources Field and laboratory research, inventory, and information collection activities that are directly' related to the conservation of fish

333

up_to_air_060606.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Task Task Responsible People Major Projects: Cryopump installation Vieira, Pierson, LaBombard Tungsten Tile installation Vieira, Blip New lower hybrid couplers Vieira, Parker Rotate DNB Scott, Vieira Repair ICRF antennas/feeds as required Wuktich, Vieira Complete installation of FFT on E-Port Wukitch, Binus Continue Upgrades to LH fault protection Terry Finalize design of new 4-Strap Antenna Vieira, Wukitch Continue design of 2nd launcher Vieira, Parker General Ops: Alternator High-Pot and minor inspection Rowell Service Liquid Nitrogen System Dekow Service LN2 vent duct Dekow, Pfeiffer Service Power System Cochran Sparker Development Irby Service/Repair PFCs Vieira, Blip, LaBombard Replace HEAT TC Scanner Burke Replace HV reed relays in TF Scanner Burke Real-Time TF Voltage Tap Monitors?

334

POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

Dwyer, O.E.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

Early Tracking Behavior in Small-field Quintessence Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study several quintessence models which are singular at Q=0, and use a simple initial constraint $Q_i\\ge H_{inflation}/2\\pi$ to see when they enter tracking regime, disregarding the details of inflation. We find it can give strong constraints for the inverse power-law potential $V=V_0Q^{-\\alpha}$, which has to enter tracking regime for ${\\rm ln}z \\sim 10$. While for the supergravity model $V=V_0Q^{-\\alpha}{\\rm exp}(kQ^2/2)$, the constraint is much weakened. For another kind inverse power-law potential $V=V_0{\\rm exp}(\\lambda/Q)$, it exhibits no constraints.

Wei Wang; Bo Feng

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

336

Tracking Quintessence Would Require Two Cosmic Coincidences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Good tracking requires that the quintessence energy fraction slowly increase while the roll $\\lambda\\equiv -d\\ln V/\\varkappa d\\phi$ slowly decreases, but is not yet truly slow-rolling. The supernova bound on the present quintessence equation of state requires either (1) a cosmological constant or other fine-tuned "crawling quintessence" or (2) "roll-over quintessence" that tracked until recently, but now became slow rolling, because of a sharp increase in potential curvature. Thus, fine-tuning is required by constant equation of state and inverse power potentials, but can be avoided by the SUGRA and Skordis-Albrecht potentials and other good trackers, provided quintessence energy domination and slow roll {\\em both} began only recently. This makes the time in which we live special in {\\em two} respects.

Sidney Bludman

2004-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Measurement of instantaneous shut-in pressure in crystalline rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is defined which was found useful, not only for determining the instantaneous shut-in pressure (ISIP) during fracture creation, but also for determining the pressure inside the fracture, near the exit and entrance wellbores, when a circulation of fluid through a fracture is taking place. The basic assumption of the Muskat method is that, after a short transient period, the shut-in pressure approaches an asymptotic value, Pa, in an exponential fashion, i.e., if Pa is subtracted from P at each time, t, and the result is plotted, ln (P-Pa) vs t will be a straight line. Various values of Pa are tried until the best straight line fit is found. Two Muskat analyses are shown. (MHR)

Aamodt, L.; Kuriyagawa, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Defect Based Spin Mediation in Delta-Phase Plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We earlier reported the measured decrease of electrical resistivity during isochronal-annealing of ion irradiation damage that was accumulated at low-temperature (10 or 20K), and the temperature dependence of the resistance of defect-populations produced by low-temperature damage-accumulation and annealing in a stabilized {delta}-phase plutonium alloy, Pu(3.3 at%Ga)[1]. We noted that the temperature dependence of the resistance of defects resulting from low-temperature damage accumulation and subsequent annealing exhibits a -ln(T) temperature dependence suggestive of a Kondo impurity. A discussion of a possible ''structure-property'' effect, as it might relate to the nature of the {delta}-phase of Pu, is presented.

Fluss, M J; Wirth, B D; Wall, M; Felter, T E; Caturla, M J; Kubota, A; Diaz de la Rubia, T

2003-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

Vorticity scaling and intermittency in drift-interchange plasma turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of spatially varying magnetic field strength on the scaling properties of plasma turbulence, modelled by an extended form of Hasegawa-Wakatani model, are investigated. We study changes in the intermittency of the velocity, density, and vorticity fields, as functions of the magnetic field inhomogeneity C=-{partial_derivative} ln B/{partial_derivative}x. While the velocity fluctuations are always self-similar and their scaling is unaffected by the value of C, the intermittency levels in density and vorticity change with parameter C, reflecting morphological changes in the coherent structures due to the interchange mechanism. Given the centrality of vorticity in conditioning plasma transport, this result is of interest in scaling the results of transport measurements and simulations in tokamak edge plasmas, where drift-interchange turbulence in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is likely to occur.

Dura, P. D.; Hnat, B.; Robinson, J.; Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Selective adsorption of uranium on activated charcoal from electrolytic aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of uranium onto various solids is important from purification, environmental, and radioactive waste disposal points of view. Adsorption of uranium on activated charcoal has been studied as a function of shaking time, amount of adsorbent, pH, concentration of adsorbate, and temperature. Uranium adsorption obeys the Langmuir isotherm. {Delta}H{degrees} and {Delta}S{degrees} were calculated from the slope and intercept of plots ln K{sub D} vs 1/T. The influence of different anions and cations on uranium adsorption has been examined. The adsorption of other metal ions on activated charcoal has been studied under specified conditions to check its selectivity; consequently, uranium was removed from Cs, Ba, Zn, and Co. More than 98% adsorbed uranium on activated charcoal can be recovered with 65 ml of 3 M HNO{sub 3} solution. A wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used for measuring uranium concentration.

Saleem, M.; Afzal, M. (Quaid-I-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)); Qadeer, R.; Hanif, J. (Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Elpasolite scintillators.  

SciTech Connect

This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research to develop elpasolite materials, with an emphasis on high-atomic-number rare-earth elpasolites for gamma-ray spectrometer applications. Low-cost, high-performance gamma-ray spectrometers are needed for detection of nuclear proliferation. Cubic materials, such as some members of the elpasolite family (A2BLnX6; Ln-lanthanide and X-halogen), hold promise due to their high light output, proportionality, and potential for scale-up. Using both computational and experimental studies, a systematic investigation of the composition-structure-property relationships of these high-atomic-number elpasolite halides was performed. The results reduce the barrier to commercialization of large single crystals or transparent ceramics, and will facilitate economical scale-up of elpasolites for high-sensitivity gamma-ray spectroscopy.

Doty, F. Patrick; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Yang, Pin; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Positronium Hyperfine Splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Positronium is an ideal system for the research of QED in the bound state. The hyperfine splitting of positronium (Ps-HFS: about 203 GHz) is a good tool to test QED and also sensitive to new physics beyond the Standard Model. Previous experimental results show 3.9\\,$\\sigma$ (15 ppm) discrepancy from the QED $\\mathrm{O}\\left(\\alpha ^3 \\ln{1/\\alpha}\\right)$ prediction. We point out probable common systematic errors in all previous experiments. I measure the Ps-HFS in two different ways. (1) A prototype run without RF system is described first. (2) I explain a new direct Ps-HFS measurement without static magnetic field. The present status of the optimization studies and current design of the experiment are described. We are now taking data of a test experiment for the observation of the direct transition.

Akira Miyazaki

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus utilized in introducing tritium gas into envelope of a gas discharge device for the purpose f maintaining the discharge path in ionized condition is described. ln addition to the cathode and anode, the ischarge device contains a zirconium or tantalum ilament arranged for external excitation and a metallic seed containing tritium, and also arranged to have a current passed through it. Initially, the zirconium or tantalum filament is vaporized to deposit its material adjacent the main discharge region. Then the tritium gas is released and, due to its affinity for the first released material, it deposits in the region of the main discharge where it is most effective in maintaining the discharge path in an ionized condition.

Jefferson, S.

1958-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

Aleksandrov-Bakelman-Pucci Type Estimates For Integro-Differential Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we provide an Aleksandrov-Bakelman-Pucci type estimate for a certain class of fully nonlinear elliptic integro-differential equations and generalizations of both the Monge-Amp\\`ere operator and the convex envelope to a nonlocal, fractional-order setting. This particular elliptic family under consideration is large enough to capture the second order theory as the order of the integro-differential equations tends to 2. Moreover, our estimate is uniform in the order of the equations, resulting in a genuine generalization of the existing ABP estimate. This result also gives a new comparison theorem for viscosity solutions of such equations which only depends on the $L^\\infty$ and $L^n$ norms of the right hand side, in contrast to previous comparison results which utilize the continuity of the right hand side for their conclusions. These results appear to be new even for the linear case of the relevant equations.

Guillen, Nestor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

D-Zero Colling Loops  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the necessary sizing for the LN{sub 2} cooling coils in the D-Zero cryostats. Natural convection from finned tubes will be the means of cooling the cryostats and their contents until such time as liquid can be made by condensing. Each cryostat will contain three separate cooling runs. Two runs will be cooldown and the other steady state. These runs will be placed in each cryostat as shown in figure 3, 4a and 4b. By assuming a 100 K tube wall temperature, tube diameter (3/4-inch) and wall thickness (0.065-inch) and the total length of tube (2 x 2940-inch + 1463-inch), the heat transfer can be calculated. Table 1 was calculated from relations in 'Handbook of Heat transfer Fundamentals' for free convection, pages 6-34 through 6-40.

Peterson, T.; Wintercorn, S.; /Fermilab

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

Entanglement entropy of two-dimensional Anti-de Sitter black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we derive a formula for the entanglement entropy of the anti-de Sitter black hole in two spacetime dimensions. The leading term in the large black hole mass expansion of our formula reproduces exactly the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy S_{BH}, whereas the subleading term behaves as ln S_{BH}. This subleading term has the universal form typical for the entanglement entropy of physical systems described by effective conformal fields theories (e.g. one-dimensional statistical models at the critical point). The well-known form of the entanglement entropy for a two-dimensional conformal field theory is obtained as analytic continuation of our result and is related with the entanglement entropy of a black hole with negative mass.

Mariano Cadoni

2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products  

SciTech Connect

Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance characteristics of the waste form more predictable/flexible. However, in the future, the glass phase still needs to be accurately characterized to determine the effects of waste loading and additives on the glass structure. Initial investigations show a borosilicate glass phase rich in silica. Second, the normalized concentrations of elements leached from the waste form during static leach testing were all below 0.6 g/L after 28d at 90 C, by the Product Consistency Test (PCT), method B. These normalized concentrations are on par with durable waste glasses such as the Low-Activity Reference Material (LRM) glass. The release rates for the crystalline phases (oxyapatite and powellite) appear to be lower (more durable) than the glass phase based on the relatively low release rates of Mo, Ca, and Ln found in the crystalline phases compared to Na and B that are mainly observed in the glass phase. However, further static leach testing on individual crystalline phases is needed to confirm this statement. Third, Ion irradiation and In situ TEM observations suggest that these crystalline phases (such as oxyapatite, ln-borosilicate, and powellite) in silicate based glass ceramic waste forms exhibit stability to 1000 years at anticipated doses (2 x 10{sup 10}-2 x 10{sup 11} Gy). This is adequate for the short lived isotopes in the waste, which lead to a maximum cumulative dose of {approx}7 x 10{sup 9} Gy, reached after {approx}100 yrs, beyond which the dose contributions are negligible. The cumulate dose calculations are based on a glass-ceramic at WL = 50 mass%, where the fuel has a burn-up of 51GWd/MTIHM, immobilized after 5 yr decay from reactor discharge.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Managing the risks of extreme events and disasters to advance climate change adaptation. Special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)  

SciTech Connect

This Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) has been jointly coordinated by Working Groups I (WGI) and II (WGII) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report focuses on the relationship between climate change and extreme weather and climate events, the impacts of such events, and the strategies to manage the associated risks. This Special Report, in particular, contributes to frame the challenge of dealing with extreme weather and climate events as an issue in decision making under uncertainty, analyzing response in the context of risk management. The report consists of nine chapters, covering risk management; observed and projected changes in extreme weather and climate events; exposure and vulnerability to as well as losses resulting from such events; adaptation options from the local to the international scale; the role of sustainable development in modulating risks; and insights from specific case studies. (LN)

Field, C.B.; Barros, V.; Stocker, T.F. (and others)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Light-by-Light Scattering Effect in Light-Cone Supergraphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a relatively simple explanation of the light-cone supergraph prediction for the UV properties of the maximally supersymmetric theories. It is based on the existence of a dynamical supersymmetry which is not manifest in the light-cone supergraphs. It suggests that N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory is UV finite and N=8 supergravity is UV finite at least until 7 loops whereas the $n$-point amplitudes have no UV divergences at least until $L=n+3$. Here we show that this prediction can be deduced from the properties of light-cone supergraphs analogous to the light-by-light scattering effect in QED. A technical aspect of the argument relies on the observation that the dynamical supersymmetry action is, in fact, a compensating field-dependent gauge transformation required for the retaining the light-cone gauge condition $A_+=0$.

Renata Kallosh; Pierre Ramond

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

Flipped SU(5) Predicts $?T/T$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss hybrid inflation in supersymmetric flipped SU(5) model such that the cosmic microwave anisotropy $\\delta T/T$ is essentially proportional to $(M /M_{P})^2$, where $M$ denotes the symmetry breaking scale and $M_{P}$ ($=2.4\\times 10^{18}$ GeV) is the reduced Planck mass. The magnitude of $M$ determined from $\\delta T/T$ measurements can be consistent with the value inferred from the evolution of SU(3) and SU(2) gauge couplings. In other words, one could state that flipped SU(5) predicts (more precisely `postdicts') $\\delta T/T$. The scalar spectral index $n_s = 0.993\\pm 0.007$, the scalar to tensor ratio satisfies $r \\lapproxeq 10^{-6}$, while $dn_s/d{\\rm ln}k \\lapproxeq 4\\times 10^{-4}$.

Bumseok Kyae; Qaisar Shafi

2005-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

The final stage of gravitational collapse for high density fluid medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High density high density fluids can be represented by a stiff matter state equation P={rho} and also by the Hagedorn state equation. The first is constructed using a lagrangian that allows bare nucleons to interact attractively via scalar meson exchange, and repulsively by a more massive vector meson exchange; the second consider that for large mass the spectrum of hadrons grows exponentially, namely {rho}(m) {approx}exp(m/T{sub H}), where T{sub H} is the Hagedorn temperature, resulting the state equation P = P{sub 0}+{rho}{sub 0}ln({rho}/{rho}{sub 0}). We study the gravitational collapse for a high density fluid, considering a Hagedorn state equation in a presence of a vacuum component.

Souza, R. G. [Physics Department , Roraima Federal University, 69304-000 Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); De Campos, M. [Physics Department, Roraima Federal University, 69304-000 Boa Vista, RR (Brazil) and Astronomy Department, Sao Paulo University, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

RATIO COMPUTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic computer circuit is described for producing an output voltage proportional to the product or quotient of tbe voltages of a pair of input signals. ln essence, the disclosed invention provides a computer having two channels adapted to receive separate input signals and each having amplifiers with like fixed amplification factors and like negatlve feedback amplifiers. One of the channels receives a constant signal for comparison purposes, whereby a difference signal is produced to control the amplification factors of the variable feedback amplifiers. The output of the other channel is thereby proportional to the product or quotient of input signals depending upon the relation of input to fixed signals in the first mentioned channel.

Post, R.F.

1958-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

353

Uncertainties in parton related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the form ?ns lnn?1(1/x) and ?ns ln2n?1(1? x) in the perturbative expansion. This means that renormalization and factorization scale variation are not a reliable way of estimating higher order effects, e.g., at small x P 1qg ? ?S(2) P 2qg ? ?s(2) x (28... ) whereas Pnqg ? ?nS(2) lnn?2(1/x) x . (29) and scale variations of P 1qg, P 2qg never give an indication of these terms. Hence, in order to investigate the true theoretical error we must consider some way of performing correct large and small x...

Thorne, Robert S

354

Parton distributions for the LHC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.01 ep? jet +X ??g ? qq g 0.01 . x . 0.1 pp? jet +X gg, qg, qq? 2j g, q 0.01 . x . 0.5 pp? (W ? ??)X ud?W, ud?W u, d, u, d x & 0.05 pp? (Z ? ?+??)X uu, dd? Z d x & 0.05 Table 1: The main processes included in the current global PDF analysis... , for example, at O(?S) gives for F2(x,Q2): CFF,n,(1)2,g (Q2/m2H) = C VF,n+1,(0) 2,HH (Q2/m2H)? P (0)qg ln(Q2/m2H) + C VF,n+1,(1) 2,g (Q2/m2H). (22) The GM-VFNS coefficient functions, CVF,nfi,j , are constrained to tend to the massless limits for Q2 ? m2H...

Martin, A D; Stirling, W James; Thorne, Robert S; Watt, G

355

W hadroproduction at large transverse momentum beyond next-to-leading order.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the MS scheme throughout. 3.1 The qg ?? Wq subprocess The Born differential cross section for this process is EQ d?Bqg?Wq d3Q = FBqg?Wq ?(s2) , (3.1) where FBqg?Wq = ??s(2R)CF s(N2c ? 1) Aqg ? f |Lffa |2 , (3.2) Aqg = ? ( s t + t s + 2uQ2 st ) , with L... ) with Nc = 3 the number of colors. We can write the NLO soft and virtual corrections for qg ?? Wq in single-particle inclusive kinematics as EQ d?(1)qg?Wq d3Q = FBqg?Wq ?s(2R) pi { cqg3 [ ln(s2/Q2T ) s2 ] + + cqg2 [ 1 s2 ] + + cqg1 ?(s2) } . (3.3) 4 Note...

Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Sabio Vera, Agustin

356

Structure function of the nucleus in the perturbative QCD with $N_c\\to\\infty$ (BFKL pomeron fan diagrams)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equation for the sum of BFKL pomeron fan diagrams is rederived by direct summation and solved numerically for rapidities $y\\leq 50$. At high rapidities y>20 the resulting cross-sections for the scattering of a longitudinally polarized $q\\bar q$ pair on the nucleus cease to depend on its transverse dimension and tend to a constant limit 0.1768 $R_A^2$, which corresponds to scattering of a colour dipole on a black disk. Thus the unitarity is restored and the singularity in the j plane is reduced to a simple pole at j=1.The nuclear structure function at small x behaves as $Q^2\\ln(1/x)$. The found gluon density has a soliton-like form in the $\\log k$ space: its form is close to Gaussian, independent of rapidity, the centermoving towards higher $\\log k$ with a nearly constant velocity as rapidity increases.

M. A. Braun

2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

High performance threaded data streaming for large scale simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a threaded parallel data streaming approach using Logistical Networking (LN) to transfer multi-terabyte simulation data from computers at NERSC to our local analysis/visualization cluster, as the simulation executes, with negligible overhead. Data transfer experiments show that this concurrent data transfer approach is more favorable compared with writing to local disk and later transferring this data to be post-processed. Our algorithms are network aware, and can stream data at up to 97Mbs on a 100Mbs link from CA to NJ during a live simulation, using less than 5 % CPU overhead at NERSC. This method is the first step in setting up a pipeline for simulation workflow and data management. 1.

Viraj Bhat; Scott Klasky; Scott Atchley; Micah Beck; Doug Mccune; Manish Parashar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Ground State Energy of a Dilute Bose Gas in Dimension n >3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a Bose gas in spatial dimension $n>3$ with a repulsive, radially symmetric two-body potential $V$. In the limit of low density $\\rho$, the ground state energy per particle in the thermodynamic limit is shown to be $(n-2)|\\mathbb S^{n-1}|a^{n-2}\\rho$, where $|\\mathbb S^{n-1}|$ denotes the surface measure of the unit sphere in $\\mathbb{R}^n$ and $a$ is the scattering length of $V$. Furthermore, for smooth and compactly supported two-body potentials, we derive upper bounds to the ground state energy with a correction term $(1+\\gamma)8\\pi^4a^6\\rho^2|\\ln(a^4\\rho)|$ in dimension $n=4$, where $0<\\gamma\\leq C\\|V\\|_{\\infty}^{1/2}\\|V\\|_1^{1/2}$, and a correction term which is $\\mathcal{O}(\\rho^2)$ in higher dimensions.

Anders Aaen

2014-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermodynamics of quantum informational systems - Hamiltonian description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is often claimed, that from a quantum system of d levels, and entropy S and heat bath of temperature T one can draw kT(ln d -S) amount of work. However, the usual arguments based on Szilard engine are not fully rigorous. Here we prove the formula within Hamiltonian description of drawing work from a quantum system and a heat bath, at a cost of entropy of the system. We base on the derivation of thermodynamical laws and quantities in [R. Alicki, J. Phys. A, 12, L103 (1979)] within a weak coupling limit. Our result provides fully physical scenario for extracting thermodynamical work from quantum correlations [J. Oppenheim et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 180402 (2002)]. We also derive Landauer principle as a consquence of second law within the considered model.

Robert Alicki; Michal Horodecki; Pawel Horodecki; Ryszard Horodecki

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermodynamics of apparent horizon and modified Friedman equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, $dE=T_hdS_h+WdV$, at apparent horizon of a FRW universe, and assuming that the associated entropy with apparent horizon has a quantum corrected relation, $S=\\frac{A}{4G}-\\alpha \\ln \\frac{A}{4G}+\\beta \\frac{4G}{A}$, we derive modified Friedmann equations describing the dynamics of the universe with any spatial curvature. We also examine the time evolution of the total entropy including the quantum corrected entropy associated with the apparent horizon together with the matter field entropy inside the apparent horizon. Our study shows that, with the local equilibrium assumption, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

Ahmad Sheykhi

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Bayesian model selection for electromagnetic kaon production on the nucleon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a Bayesian analysis of a Regge model to describe the background contribution for K+ Lambda and K+ Sigma0 photoproduction. The model is based on the exchange of K+(494) and K*+(892) trajectories in the t-channel. We utilise the Bayesian evidence Z to determine the best model variant for each channel. The Bayesian evidence integrals were calculated using the Nested Sampling algorithm. For different prior widths, we find decisive Bayesian evidence (\\Delta ln Z ~ 24) for a K+ Lambda photoproduction Regge model with a positive vector coupling and a negative tensor coupling constant for the K*+(892) trajectory, and a rotating phase factor for both trajectories. Using the chi^2 minimisation method, one could not draw this conclusion from the same dataset. For the K+ Sigma0 photoproduction Regge model, on the other hand, the difference between the evidence integrals is insufficient to pinpoint one model variant.

L. De Cruz; D. G. Ireland; P. Vancraeyveld; J. Ryckebusch

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the field of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, also known simply as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). MRI and MRS are particularly useful in medical research and diagnosis. MRI may be used in addition to x-ray imaging. This invention concerns a family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 2 figs.

Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

1989-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

363

Chromosomal instability determines taxane sensitivity - supplementary materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n D ise as e? fre e S urv ivin g CIN_survival_genes=Expression CIN_survival_genes=Suppression HR = 0.44 (0.20 ? 0.97) logrank P = 0.037 5 Reference [1] Carter SL, Eklund AC, Kohane IS, Harris LN, Szallasi Z. A signature of chromosomal instability... GU 57 25 III ductal sinister 0/2 JD07 aGS 63 30 II ductal sinister 0/0 JD08 dGS 86 10 ND lobular sinister 0/0 JD09 dGS 61 ND II ductal sinister 0/0 JD10_33 aGU 85 45 III comedo dexter 0/3 JD11 aGS 88 20 III ductal sinister 0/0 JD12 aGU 55 40 III ductal...

Swanton, Charles; Nicke, Barbara; Schuett, Marion; Eklund, Aron C; Ng, Charlotte; Li, Qiyuan; Hardcastle, Thomas; Lee, Alvin; Roy, Rajat; East, Philip; Kschischo, Maik; Endesfelder, David; Wylie, Paul; Kim, Se Nyun; Chen, Jie-Guang; Howell, Michael; Ried, Thomas; Habermann, Jens K; Auer, Gert; Brenton, James D; Szallasi, Zoltan; Downward, Julian

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

364

Mesoscopic fluctuations and intermittency in aging dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The configurational de-correlation in an aging system is attributed to irreversible intermittent rearrangements, which are described as a Poisson process with average $\\propto \\ln(1 + t/t_w)$, where $t$ is the observation time and $t_w$ is the age [P. Sibani and H.J. Jensen, Europhys. Lett. 69, 2005]. On this basis, we obtain a simple model for the off-equilibrium aging behavior of the autocorrelation: the average autocorrelation decays algebraically, and its shifted and rescaled probability density function (PDF) has a Gumbel-like shape which approaches a Gaussian at large times and becomes sharp in the thermodynamic limit. The model properties are tested against simulations of the Edwards-Anderson spin glass, and are in reasonable agreement with other available data.

Paolo Sibani

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 14090 of 31,917 results. 81 - 14090 of 31,917 results. Download Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review- Power Electronics Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to power... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/energy-storage-systems-2007-peer-review-power-electronics-presentations Download Audit Report: OAS-RA-12-10 The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Washington State Energy Program http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-ra-12-10 Article Disneyland's Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade As the provider of laundry and dry cleaning services for Disneyland Resort's costumes and hospitality supply items, L&N Costume and Linen

366

Microsoft PowerPoint - Development of High Temperature_Chen_Chonglin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature/High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor PhD Students: Erik Enriquez, Shanyong Bao, & Brennan Mace PhD Awarded: Dr. Chunrui Ma (UK) & Dr. Gregory Collins (WVU) PIs: Patrick Nash (retired 2012) and Chonglin Chen (PI) Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249-1644 Phone: 210-458-6427, Email: cl.chen@utsa.edu Grant Number: DE-FE0003780 Project Manager: Dr. Susan M. Maley Performance Period: 09/01/2010-8/31/2013 * Introduction * Mixed Ionic/Electronic Conductive LnBaCo 2 O 5.5 Oxides * Full Scale Chemical Sensor Development * Summary OBJECTIVES & GOALS * The objective of this research is: - investigate and understand the mechanisms of mixed ionic electronic conductive LaBaCo 2 O 5+ highly epitaxial

367

CM200DL-Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CM200 CM200 Core Status: new users must complete 2 trouble free training sessions and pass the drivers test to work independently during Core sessions. Flex Status: core users must complete 5 trouble free sessions to work during Flex sessions. To reserve a CM200 session, go to www/ncem.lbl.gov, click on "Microscope Scheduling", use proposal number and password to log in. You may only sign up for one Core session at a time. To cancel a session, email your request to the technical staff in charge of the microscope. CORE LICENSE TEST Safety  Understand emergency shut down procedure  Know emergency contact numbers  Know where LN protective equipment is  Find updated operating instruction and notice (?) Instrument Preparation  Check V7 closed and SSC on and in cooling

368

LS-  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The submitted manuscript has been author€- by a contractor of the U. S. Governme: under contract No. W-31-'09-ENG-3 Accordingly, the U. S. Government rets'lnS nonexclusive. royalty-free license to public or reproduce the published form of th contribution, or allow others to do so, f. U. S. Government purposes. W. Chou Jan 20, 1989 (Rev. September 4, 1990) 3-D Computer Simulations of EM Fields in the APS Vacuum Chamber - Part 2: Time-Domain Analysis In Ref. [1], we analyze the RF modes of the 1-meter-long sector of the APS vacuum chamber in the frequency-domain. This note is a parallel analysis in the time-domain. There are quite a few measurements completed on this 1-meter-long sector. [2] In or- der to understand these experimental results, in particular, the cause of the strong peak

369

CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination Response to Increasing Turbine Cut-ln Speed at the Sheffield Wind Farm, Vermont CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.3 Date: 01/30/2012 Location(s): Vermont Offices(s): Golden Field Office Under this proposed project, the subcontractor would: (1) conduct a field assessment to determine the difference in bat fatality rates at turbines with different changes in the cut-in speed relative to fully operational turbines; and 2) ascertain the actual economic costs of the study and estimated costs for the entire project area under different curtailment prescriptions and timeframes. The project would begin in April 2012 with the experimental monitoring phase starting in June and continuing through

370

Beamline Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperatures Temperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV Current: 493.2242 mA Date: 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 Beamline Temperatures Energy 3.0000 GeV Current 493.2 mA 11-Jan-2014 21:40:00 LN:MainTankLevel 124.4 in LN:MainTankPress 56.9 psi SPEAR-BL:B120HeFlow 15.4 l/min SPEAR-BL:B131HeFlow 22.2 l/min BL 4 BL02:LCW 0.0 ℃ BL02:M0_LCW 31.5 ℃ BL 4-1 BL04-1:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom1 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:Bottom2 47.0 ℃ BL04-1:Lower 32.0 ℃ BL04-1:Moly 46.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:ChinGuard2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalA -167.0 ℃ BL04-1:FirstXtalB -172.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad1 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:Pad2 31.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalA -177.0 ℃ BL04-1:SecondXtalB -175.0 ℃ BL 4-2 BL04-2:BasePlate -14.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom1 24.0 ℃ BL04-2:Bottom2 25.0 ℃

371

The dynamical viability of scalar-tensor gravity theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We establish the dynamical attractor behavior in scalar-tensor theories of dark energy, providing a powerful framework to analyze classes of theories, predicting common evolutionary characteristics that can be compared against cosmological constraints. In the Jordan frame the theories are viewed as a coupling between a scalar field, \\Phi, and the Ricci scalar, R, F(\\Phi)R. The Jordan frame evolution is described in terms of dynamical variables m \\equiv d\\ln F/d\\ln \\Phi and r \\equiv -\\Phi F/f, where F(\\Phi) = d f(\\Phi)/d\\Phi. The evolution can be alternatively viewed in the Einstein frame as a general coupling between scalar dark energy and matter, \\beta. We present a complete, consistent picture of evolution in the Einstein and Jordan frames and consider the conditions on the form of the coupling F and \\beta required to give the observed cold dark matter (CDM) dominated era that transitions into a late time accelerative phase, including transitory accelerative eras that have not previously been investigated. We find five classes of evolutionary behavior of which four are qualitatively similar to those for f(R) theories (which have \\beta=1/2). The fifth class exists only for |\\beta| < \\sqrt{3}/4, i.e. not for f(R) theories. In models giving transitory late time acceleration, we find a viable accelerative region of the (r,m) plane accessible to scalar-tensor theories with any coupling, \\beta (at least in the range |\\beta| \\leq 1/2, which we study in detail), and an additional region open only to theories with |\\beta| < \\sqrt{3}/4.

Nishant Agarwal; Rachel Bean

2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

372

THE COLUMN DENSITY VARIANCE-M{sub s} RELATIONSHIP  

SciTech Connect

Although there is a wealth of column density tracers for both the molecular and diffuse interstellar medium, there are few observational studies investigating the relationship between the density variance ({sigma}{sup 2}) and the sonic Mach number (M{sub s}). This is in part due to the fact that the {sigma}{sup 2}-M{sub s} relationship is derived, via MHD simulations, for the three-dimensional (3D) density variance only, which is not a direct observable. We investigate the utility of a 2D column density {sigma}{sub {Sigma}/{Sigma}0}{sup 2}-M{sub s} relationship using solenoidally driven isothermal MHD simulations and find that the best fit follows closely the form of the 3D density {sigma}{sub {rho}/{rho}0}{sup 2}-M{sub s} trend but includes a scaling parameter A such that {sigma}{sub ln({Sigma}/{Sigma}o)} = A x ln(1+b{sup 2} M{sub s}{sup 2}), where A = 0.11 and b = 1/3. This relation is consistent with the observational data reported for the Taurus and IC 5146 molecular clouds with b = 0.5 and A = 0.16, and b = 0.5 and A = 0.12, respectively. These results open up the possibility of using the 2D column density values of {sigma}{sup 2} for investigations of the relation between the sonic Mach number and the probability distribution function (PDF) variance in addition to existing PDF sonic Mach number relations.

Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N. Charter St., WI 53706 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode--electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, the oxygen exchange kinetics of a P2 composition are described in detail. The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) have been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

Allan J. Jacobson

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations  

SciTech Connect

The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form high level liquid wastes and a general actinide clean-up procedure. The selectivity of the standard extractant for tetravalent actinides, (N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide (CMPO), was markedly improved by the attachment of three CMPO-like functions onto a triphenoxymethane platform, and a ligand that is both highly selective and effective for An(IV) ions was isolated. A 10 fold excess of ligand will remove virtually all of the 4+ actinides from the acidic layer without extracting appreciable quantities of An(III) and Ln(III) unlike simple CMPO ligands. Inspired by the success of the DIAMEX industrial process for extractions, three new tripodal chelates bearing three diglycolamide and thiodiglycolamide units precisely arranged on a triphenoxymethane platform have been synthesized for an highly efficient extraction of trivalent f-element cations from nitric acid media. A single equivalent of ligand will remove 80% of the Ln(III) ion from the acidic layer since the ligand is perfectly suited to accommodate the tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry preferred by the metal center. The ligand is perhaps the most efficient binder available for the heavier lanthanides and due to this unique attribute, the extraction event can be easily followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy confirming the formation of a TPP complex. The most lipophilic di-n-butyl tris-diglycolamide was found to be a significantly weaker extractant in comparison to the di-isopropyl analogs. The tris-thiodiglycolamide derivative proved to be an ineffective chelate for f-elements and demonstrated the importance of the etheric oxygens in the metal binding. The results presented herein clearly demonstrate a cooperative action of these three ligating groups within a single molecule, confirmed by composition and structure of the extracted complexes, and since actinides prefer to have high coordination numbers, the ligands should be particularly adept at binding with three arms. The use of such an extractant permits the extraction of metal ions form highly acidic environment through the ability

Scott, M.J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Final Project Report: DOE Award FG02?04ER25606 Overlay Transit Networking for Scalable, High Performance Data Communication across Heterogeneous Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

As the flood of data associated with leading edge computational science continues to escalate, the challenge of supporting the distributed collaborations that are now characteristic of it becomes increasingly daunting. The chief obstacles to progress on this front lie less in the synchronous elements of collaboration, which have been reasonably well addressed by new global high performance networks, than in the asynchronous elements, where appropriate shared storage infrastructure seems to be lacking. The recent report from the Department of Energy on the emerging 'data management challenge' captures the multidimensional nature of this problem succinctly: Data inevitably needs to be buffered, for periods ranging from seconds to weeks, in order to be controlled as it moves through the distributed and collaborative research process. To meet the diverse and changing set of application needs that different research communities have, large amounts of non-archival storage are required for transitory buffering, and it needs to be widely dispersed, easily available, and configured to maximize flexibility of use. In today's grid fabric, however, massive storage is mostly concentrated in data centers, available only to those with user accounts and membership in the appropriate virtual organizations, allocated as if its usage were non-transitory, and encapsulated behind legacy interfaces that inhibit the flexibility of use and scheduling. This situation severely restricts the ability of application communities to access and schedule usable storage where and when they need to in order to make their workflow more productive. (p.69f) One possible strategy to deal with this problem lies in creating a storage infrastructure that can be universally shared because it provides only the most generic of asynchronous services. Different user communities then define higher level services as necessary to meet their needs. One model of such a service is a Storage Network, analogous to those used within computation centers, but designed to operate on a global scale. Building on a basic storage service that is as primitive as possible, such a Global Storage Network would define a framework within which higher level services can be created. If this framework enabled a variety of more specialized middleware and supported a wide array of applications, then interoperability and collaboration could occur based on that common framework. The research in Logistical Networking (LN) carried out under the DOE's SciDAC program tested the value of this approach within the context of several SciDAC application communities. Below we briefly describe the basic design of the LN storage network and some of the results that the Logistical Networking community has achieved.

Micah Beck; Terry Moore

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

PRELIMINARY STUDY OF CERAMICS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE REPROCESSING WASTES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a series of ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of Cesium/Lanthanide (CS/LN) and Cesium/Lanthanide/Transition Metal (CS/LN/TM) waste streams anticipated to result from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites (particularly BaTiO{sub 3}), pyrochlores, zirconolite, and other minor metal titanate phases. Identification of excess Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in the first series of compositions led to a Phase II study, with significantly reduced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations and increased waste loadings. Three fabrication methodologies were used, including melting and crystallizing, pressing and sintering, and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. XRD and SEM/EDS results showed that the partitioning of the waste elements in the sintered materials was very similar, despite varying stoichiometry of the phases formed. The Phase II compositions generally contained a reduced amount of unreacted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as identified by XRD, and had phase assemblages that were closer to the initial targets. Chemical composition measurements showed no significant issues with meeting the target compositions. However, volatilization of Cs and Mo was identified, particularly during melting, since sintering of the pressed pellets and SPS were performed at lower temperatures. Partitioning of some of the waste components was difficult to determine via XRD. SEM/EDS mapping showed that those elements, which were generally present in small concentrations, were well distributed throughout the waste forms. Initial studies of radiation damage tolerance using ion beam irradiation at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) showed little if any modification of the material after irradiation. Additional study in this area is needed. Chemical durability was briefly studied using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Most of the elements measured were retained by the ceramic waste forms, indicating good chemical durability. Cs, Mo, and Rb were released at somewhat higher rates as compared to the matrix components, although benchmark compositions and additional characterization are needed in order to qualify the PCT results.

Fox, K.; Billings, A.; Brinkman, K.; Marra, J.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Development of Pillared M(IV) Phosphate Phosphonate Inorganic Organic Hybrid Ion Exchange Materials for Applications in Separations found in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on key intergroup and intragroup separations found in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, specifically americium from lanthanides and americium from other actinides, most importantly americium from curium. Our goal is to implement a liquid-solid separation process to reduce waste and risk of contamination by the development of metal(IV) phosphate phosphonate inorganic organic hybrid ion exchange materials with the ideal formula of M(O6P2C6H4)0.5(O3POA) * nH2O, where M = Zr or Sn, A = H or Na. These materials have previously shown to have high affinity for Ln, this work will expand on the previous studies and provide methods for the above target separation, exploiting oxidation state and ion charge to drive the separation process. The optimum hydrothermal reaction conditions were determined by adjusting parameters such as reaction temperature and time, as well as the phosphonate to phosphate (pillarto-spacer) ligands ratio. Following these results four bulk syntheses were performed and their ion exchange properties were thoroughly examined. Techniques such as inductively coupled mass spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting were used to determine the affinity of the materials towards Na+, Cs+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ni2+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Ho3+, Yb3+, NpO2+, Pu4+, PuO22+, Am3+, AmO2+, and Cm3+. Separation factors in the thousands have been observed for intergroup separations of the Ln from the alkali, alkaline earth, and low valent transition metals. A new method for Am oxidation was developed, which employed Na2S2O8 as the oxidizing agent and Ca(OCl)2 as the stabilizing agent for AmO2+ synthesis. Separation factors of 30-60 for Nd3+ and Eu3+ from AmO2+, as well as 20 for Cm3+ from AmO2+ were observed at pH 2. The work herein shows that a liquid-solid separation can be carried out for these difficult separations by means of oxidation and ion exchange.

Burns, Jonathan

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Image  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AM!;NDMENT OFSOI.ICFl'ATlONlMPDIFICATION OF CONTRACT AM!;NDMENT OFSOI.ICFl'ATlONlMPDIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMt;N.DMENT/MOD!FICATION' NO, S', EFFECTIVE DAlE 179 See Bl'ock 16C 6.ISSUEUBY COPE 00518 Oak Ridge U~S. Departmerit of Erergy P,Q. Box. 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME ANDADOR6S$ OF CONTRACTOR (No" Wrw/. ;JOWl/y. stllffl IiWJ ZIP Code) AK RIDGE ASSOCIA'rED UNIVERSITIES, o p .0. BOX 117 o 11K RIDGE TN 37830-6.218 INC. j 1. CONTRACT 10 CqDE I PAGE Of PAGES 11 5 ' 4, HEQUlSrTlONIPURCHASE ,REO:. NO. r PROJECT NO, flf applfcabla) lCSCOO8480 7. ADMINISTEREO BY (If QllletlharJ ltein 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridg", U.S. ~partment of Energy P.O. Box 200;1. Oak Ridge 'l'N 37831 1:2 GA. AMENDMENT OHlOLICjTAT10N NO. 98. DATED '(SEE ITEM 11) x H}A, \l400IFICATION {)FCO>":'lu,AC,TrORDER NQ,

379

Image  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT SOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT 2< AMENDMt;NT/MODIFfCAnON NO, 3.'EFFEC1fVE DArE 202 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge 'l'N 37831 8. N~MEAND ADDRE~ OF CONTRACTOR INc..,~, emmly, SUlf9andljpCode} AK RIDGE Q P Q .0. BOX AKRIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. 117 TN 37830-6218 1" CONlRACTIP WDE I PAG!±: OF PAGES 1 I 1 4. Re:aUiS!ilON:!PURCHASE REQ. NQ. IS. PROJECT NO. (lfspp/kJabfe) 10SCQ0874 7 Itt0tl'\ 5 7. ADMINlSTEf{EO BY (If otn"!f th$tf Item 6) COOE 100518 Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 .\'Q ';SA. AMENDMENT OF SOUq.ITATION NO . 9S~ DATED (SEE ITEM tt) x fOA. MQD1F1CAT)ON 'OF cemMer/ORDER NO, DE-AC05-

380

Microsoft PowerPoint - CY12 Annual Report Presentation - final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 2 Rocky Flats Stewardship Council June 3, 2013 2 Surface Water Monitoring Calendar Year 2012 3 RFLMA Surface Water Monitoring Locations " ) " ) # * # * # * # * ! ( ! ( ! ( Indiana Street W al nu t C re ek W o m a n C r e e k W om an C re ek N . W a ln u t C r e e k S . W a l n u t C r e e k C e n t r a l O U B o u n d a r y PLFTS Pond C-2 Pond A-4 Pond B-5 GS03 GS01 GS10 SW093 SW027 GS59 WOMPOC WALPOC Present Landfill Original Landfill Performance Monitoring at Original and Present Landfills  Original Landfill (OLF) * During CY 2012 all sampling results met water quality standards  Present Landfill (PLF) * During CY 2012 increased sampling frequency was temporarily required for arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) 4 4 5 5 Point of Evaluation Monitoring - GS10  Reportable 12-month rolling average values for americium, plutonium, and uranium at GS10

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381

Freewatt Ltd formerly Lincolnshire Windpower Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freewatt Ltd formerly Lincolnshire Windpower Ltd Freewatt Ltd formerly Lincolnshire Windpower Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Freewatt Ltd (formerly Lincolnshire Windpower Ltd) Place Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom Zip LN9 5JF Sector Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Lincolnshire-based firm specialising in the installation of renewable energy apparatus such as wind turbines, solar photovoltaic/thermal panels and heat pumps. Coordinates 38.22516°, -85.620464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.22516,"lon":-85.620464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

382

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NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

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383

Shoal, Dribble, Gnome, Gasbuggy,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'1 '1 ~(3JlpV Project Proposal - Evaluation of Tritium and Other Radionuclides in Groundwater in the Areas Surrounding the Sites of Projects Shoal, Dribble, Gnome, Gasbuggy, and :Rulison . . ' > * HGS 6 P R ' O J E C T P R O P O S A L I/ VALUATION OF TRITIUM AND OTHER ' . . I N GROUNDWATER I N 'I T H E SITES OF ' ! PROJECTS SHOAL, D R I B B ~ E , . GNOME, E~SBUGGY, AND RULISON - :I .*,* . . . . 3 'I. .. . :,. .: .a. ' .2 . T . ; P R O J E C T P R O P O S A ' L EVALUATION OF T R I T ~ AND ' OTHER RAD IONUCLIDES I N GROUNDWATER LN THE AREAS SURROUNDING THE SITES. OF PROJECTS SHOAL, DRIBBLE, GNOME, GASBUGGY, 'AND' RULISON I. ~ r o p i o ' y j I , It 3$roposed t h a f a p r o j e c t be i n i t i a t e d t o p r o v i d e U f o r t h e a n a l y s i s o f groundwad27 (used f o r d o m e s t i c p u r p o s e s ) f o r t r i t i u m and long- l i v e d 6: r a d i o n u c l i es i

384

Microsoft PowerPoint - CY11 Annual Report Presentation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 Rocky Flats Stewardship Council June 4, 2012 2 Surface Water Monitoring and Operations Calendar Year 2011 Calendar Year 2011 3 Selected Surface Water Monitoring Locations Indiana Street W al nu t Cr ee k W o m a n C r e e k W om an Cr ee k N . W a ln u t C r e e k S . W a l n u t C r e e k C e n t r a l O U B o u n d a r y Pond C-2 Landfill Pond Pond A-3 Pond A-4 Pond B-5 GS31 GS11 GS08 GS03 GS01 GS10 SW093 SW027 WOMPOC WALPOC 4 4 Pond Operations - Calendar Year 2011  Terminal Pond Discharges: * Ponds A-4 and B-5  March 24 through March 30, 2011 (3.5 MG)  Started flow-through operations September 12, 2011 * Pond C-2  Started flow-through operations November 7, 2011  Transfers: * Pond A-3 to A-4  Flow-through operations January 1 through October 12, 2011  Pond A-3 'offline' for dam breach for the reminder of CY 2011  Pond Levels:

385

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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386

BNL | ATF Beam Diagnostics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detectors Detectors Detector Response (V/W=V*ps/pJ) Noise Eq. Power (NEP, W/Hz1/2) Wavelength Liquid He Bolometer 2.73E+5 1.87E-13 > 15 um Golay Cell ~1500 @ 10 THz w/15 Hz modulation ~1E-10 0.2 THz to 20 THz (1.5 mm to 15 um) LN2 (blue) cooled HgCdTe >10,000 ~4E-30 2 um to 24 um Te (red) cooled HgCdTe N/A ~2.5E-10 2 um to 9 um Silicon detector for X-ray (PDF) Liquid He Bolometer Manual (PDF) Rapid Scanning Imaging Spectrograph/Monochromator Manual (PDF) Shad-o-snap 1024 X-ray Camera The Shad-o-Snap 1024 x-ray camera is part of the new product line of easy-to-use, "smart" USB cameras developed by Rad-icon Imaging Corp. This microprocessor based camera offers simple timing control combined with new readout modes and easy image transfers as TIFF or raw integer image files.

387

L E C W S ON ZHIRAL SYMMETRIES AND SOFT PICN PROCESSES* Yoichiro Nambu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C C W S ON ZHIRAL SYMMETRIES AND SOFT PICN PROCESSES* Yoichiro Nambu The Ehrico Fermi ' I n s t i t u t e f o r Nuclear S t u d i e s and Department of Physics The U n i v e r s i t y of Chicago, Chicago, I l l i n o i s ( L e c t u r e s given a t t h e I s t a n b u l Summer School, August 1966) L E G A L N O T I C E This refart Y E S prepared as 811 a c p ~ ~ ~ l i of Garemmem s p ~ s o r e d -rL. Seither t h United SulLes. mor the Commission. nor m~ persot a e l i x 03 beetall of tke Comml&m: A . Makes MY aarrary or represenleti03. expressed or implied. m i t b respec1 t o &e a m - racy. completeness. or usefulness of the Wormador, -- ID Lb/s repon. or lhni rhc - of any informailon. apparatus. method. o r p-em d i s r l d Ln this r e p n m a y mi infringe privawly owned rlghrs: or B. A8sunies an? llsblllties wrth respffi to the u ~

388

The ground state and the long-time evolution in the CMC Einstein flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let (g,K)(k) be a CMC (vacuum) Einstein flow over a compact three-manifold M with non-positive Yamabe invariant (Y(M)). As noted by Fischer and Moncrief, the reduced volume V(k)=(-k/3)^{3}Vol_{g(k)}(M) is monotonically decreasing in the expanding direction and bounded below by V_{\\inf}=(-1/6)Y(M))^{3/2}. Inspired by this fact we define the ground state of the manifold M as "the limit" of any sequence of CMC states {(g_{i},K_{i})} satisfying: i. k_{i}=-3, ii. V_{i} --> V_{inf}, iii. Q_{0}((g_{i},K_{i}))state) the ground state is equivalent to the Thurston geometrization of M. Ground states classify naturally into three types. We provide examples for each class, including a new ground state (the Double Cusp) that we analyze in detail. Finally consider a long time and cosmologically normalized flow (\\g,\\K)(s)=((-k/3)^{2}g,(-k/3))K) where s=-ln(-k) is in [a,\\infty). We prove that if E_{1}=E_{1}((\\g,\\K))state if V --> V_{inf}.

Martin Reiris

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

Blow-up criterion, ill-posedness and existence of strong solution for Korteweg system with infinite energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the study of the initial boundary value problem for a general isothermal model of capillary fluids derived by J.E Dunn and J.Serrin (1985), which can be used as a phase transition model. We will prove the existence of strong solutions in finite time with discontinuous initial density, more precisely $\\ln\\rho_{0}$ is in $B^{\\N}_{2,\\infty}(\\R^{N})$. Our analysis improves the results of \\cite{fDD} and \\cite{fH1}, \\cite{fH2} by working in space of infinite energy. In passing our result allow to consider initial data with discontinuous interfaces, whereas in all the literature the results of existence of strong solutions consider always initial density that are continuous. More precisely we investigate the existence of strong solution for Korteweg's system when we authorize jump in the pressure across some hypersurface. We obtain also a result of ill-posedness for Korteweg system and we derive a new blow-up criterion which is the main result of this paper. More precisely we show that if we ...

Haspot, Boris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Optically trapped quasi-two-dimensional Bose gases in a random environment: Quantum fluctuations and superfluid density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a dilute Bose gas confined in a tight one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice plus a superimposed random potential at zero temperature. Accordingly, the ground-state energy, quantum depletion, and superfluid density are calculated. The presence of the lattice introduces a crossover to the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) regime, where we analyze asymptotically the 2D behavior of the system, particularly the effects of disorder. We thereby offer an analytical expression for the ground-state energy of a purely 2D Bose gas in a random potential. The obtained disorder-induced normal fluid density n{sub n} and quantum depletion n{sub d} both exhibit a characteristic 1/ln(1/n{sub 2D}a{sub 2D}{sup 2}) dependence. Their ratio n{sub n}/n{sub d} increases to 2 compared to the familiar 4/3 in lattice-free three-dimensional (3D) geometry, signifying a more pronounced contrast between superfluidity and Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensions. The conditions for possible experimental realization of our scenario are also proposed.

Zhou Kezhao; Liang Zhaoxin; Zhang Zhidong [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, and International Centre for Materials Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Hu Ying [Department of Physics, Centre for Nonlinear Studies, and Beijing-Hong Kong-Singapore Joint Centre for Nonlinear and Complex Systems (Hong Kong), Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

CRYOGENIC LIFETIME TESTS ON A COMMERCIAL EPOXY RESIN HIGH VOLTAGE BUSHING  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices operating in liquid nitrogen frequently require high-voltage bushings to carry the current leads from the superconducting windings to the room temperature grid connections. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems, SuperPower, and Southern California Edison to develop and demonstrate an HTS utility power transformer. Previous dielectric high voltage tests in support of this program have been carried out in test cryostats with commercial epoxy resin bushings from Electro Composites Inc. (ECI). Though the bushings performed well in these short-term tests, their long-term operation at high voltage in liquid nitrogen needs to be verified for use on the utility grid. Long-term tests are being carried out on a sample 28-kV-class ECI bushing. The bushing has a monolithic cast, cycloaliphatic resin body and is fire- and shatter-resistant. The test cryostat is located in an interlocked cage and is energized at 25 kVac around the clock. Liquid nitrogen (LN) is automatically refilled every 9.5 hours. Partial discharge, capacitance, and leakage resistance tests are periodically performed to check for deviations from factory values. At present, over 2400 hours have been accumulated with no changes in these parameters. The tests are scheduled to run for four to six months.

Schwenterly, S W [ORNL; Pleva, Ed [Waukesha Electric Systems, Waukesha, WI; Ha, Tam T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamic processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.

Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Dynamic Simulation of a Helium Liquefier  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic behavior of a helium liquefier has been studied in detail with a Cryogenic Process REal-time SimulaTor (C-PREST) at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The C-PREST is being developed to integrate large-scale helium cryogenic plant design, operation and maintenance for optimum process establishment. As a first step of simulations of cooldown to 4.5 K with the helium liquefier model is conducted, which provides a plant-process validation platform. The helium liquefier consists of seven heat exchangers, a liquid-nitrogen (LN2) precooler, two expansion turbines and a liquid-helium (LHe) reservoir. Process simulations are fulfilled with sequence programs, which were implemented with C-PREST based on an existing liquefier operation. The interactions of a JT valve, a JT-bypass valve and a reservoir-return valve have been dynamically simulated. The paper discusses various aspects of refrigeration process simulation, including its difficulties such as a balance between complexity of the adopted models and CPU time.

Maekawa, R.; Ooba, K.; Mito, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan); Nobutoki, M. [Nippon Sanso Co., Kawasaki, Kanagawa, 210-0861 (Japan)

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Iterated and irreducible pion-photon exchange in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the contribution to the nuclear energy density functional which arises from iterated pion-photon exchange between nucleons. In heavy nuclei, this novel charge symmetry breaking interaction leads to an additional binding of each proton by about 0.2 MeV. Compared to that the analogous effect from irreducible pion-photon exchange is negligibly small. As a possible mechanism to resolve the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly we propose the iteration of one-photon exchange with an attractive short-range NN-interaction. The corresponding energy per proton reads: $\\bar E[\\rho_p]=(2\\alpha/15\\pi^2)(\\pi^2 -3+6 \\ln2) {\\cal A}_{pp} k_p^2$ with $\\rho_p =k_p^3/ 3\\pi^2$ the proton density and ${\\cal A}_{pp}\\approx 2 $fm an effective (in-medium) scattering length. Hints for such a value of ${\\cal A}_{pp}$ come from phenomenological Skyrme forces and from the neutron matter equation of state.

N. Kaiser

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Enhancement of Diffusive Transport by Nonequilibrium Thermal Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. The steady-state diffusive flux in a finite system subject to a concentration gradient is enhanced because of long-range correlations between concentration fluctuations and fluctuations of the velocity parallel to the concentration gradient. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as \\ln(L/L_{0}) in quasi-two dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it grows as L_{0}^{-1}-L^{-1}, where L_{0} is a reference length. The predictions of a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory, closely related to second-order mode-mode coupling analysis, are compared to results from particle simulations and a finite-volume solver and excellent agreement is observed. We elucidate the direct connection to the long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function in finite systems, as well as finite-size corrections employed in molecula...

Donev, A; Bell, J B; Garcia, A L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Enhancement of Diffusive Transport by Nonequilibrium Thermal Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the contribution of advection by thermal velocity fluctuations to the effective diffusion coefficient in a mixture of two identical fluids. The steady-state diffusive flux in a finite system subject to a concentration gradient is enhanced because of long-range correlations between concentration fluctuations and fluctuations of the velocity parallel to the concentration gradient. The enhancement of the diffusive transport depends on the system size L and grows as \\ln(L/L_{0}) in quasi-two dimensional systems, while in three dimensions it grows as L_{0}^{-1}-L^{-1}, where L_{0} is a reference length. The predictions of a simple fluctuating hydrodynamics theory, closely related to second-order mode-mode coupling analysis, are compared to results from particle simulations and a finite-volume solver and excellent agreement is observed. We elucidate the direct connection to the long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function in finite systems, as well as finite-size corrections employed in molecular dynamics calculations. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the nonlinear advective terms need to be retained in the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics when modeling transport in small-scale finite systems.

A. Donev; A. de la Fuente; J. B. Bell; A. L. Garcia

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

397

Magnetic surfaces in an axisymmetric torus  

SciTech Connect

A method is developed for specifying the boundary equilibrium magnetic surface in an axially symmetric torus by using the absolute values of the magnetic field B = B{sub s}({theta}) and the gradient of the poloidal flux vertical bar vertical bar {nabla}{Psi} vertical bar = vertical bar {nabla}{Psi} vertical bar {sub s}({theta}) in a special flux coordinate system. By setting two surface constants (e.g., the safety factor q and dp/d{Psi}) and matching the absolute values of the magnetic field and the flux gradient on a closed magnetic surface, it is possible to find all equilibrium magnetic functions (including n {center_dot} {nabla} ln B and the local shear s) and all constants (including the toroidal current J and the shear d{mu}/d{Psi}) on this surface. Such a non-traditional formulation of the boundary conditions in solving the stability problem in an axisymmetric torus allows one to impose intentional conditions on plasma confinement and MHD stability at the periphery of the system.

Skovoroda, A. A., E-mail: skovorod@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Observation of Geo-Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geo-neutrinos, electron anti-neutrinos produced in beta decays of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes in the Earth, are a unique direct probe of our planet's interior. We report the first observation at more than 3$\\sigma$ C.L. of geo-neutrinos, performed with the Borexino detector at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Anti-neutrinos are detected through the neutron inverse beta decay reaction. With a 252.6 ton-yr fiducial exposure after all selection cuts, we detected 9.9^{+4.1}_{-3.4}(^{+14.6}_{-8.2}) geo-neutrino events, with errors corresponding to a 68.3%(99.73%) C.L. From the $\\ln{\\cal{L}}$ profile, the statistical significance of the Borexino geo-neutrino observation corresponds to a 99.997% C.L. Our measurement of the geo-neutrinos rate is 3.9^{+1.6}_{-1.3}(^{+5.8}_{-3.2}) events/(100ton-yr). This measurement rejects the hypothesis of an active geo-reactor in the Earth's core with a power above 3 TW at 95% C.L. The observed prompt positron spectrum above 2.6 MeV is compatible with that expected from european nuclear reactors (mean base line of approximately 1000 km). Our measurement of reactor anti-neutrinos excludes the non-oscillation hypothesis at 99.60% C.L.

Borexino Collaboration

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The probability distribution of the number of electron-positron pairs produced in a uniform electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The probability-generating function of the number of electron-positron pairs produced in a uniform electric field is constructed. The mean and variance of the numbers of pairs are calculated, and analytical expressions for the probability of low numbers of electron-positron pairs are given. A recursive formula is derived for evaluating the probability of any number of pairs. In electric fields of supercritical strength |eE| > \\pi m^2/ \\ln 2, where e is the electron charge, E is the electric field, and m is the electron mass, a branch-point singularity of the probability-generating function penetrates the unit circle |z| = 1, which leads to the asymptotic divergence of the cumulative probability. This divergence indicates a failure of the continuum limit approximation. In the continuum limit and for any field strength, the positive definiteness of the probability is violated in the tail of the distribution. Analyticity, convergence, and positive definiteness are restored upon the summation over discrete levels of electrons in the normalization volume. Numerical examples illustrating the field strength dependence of the asymptotic behavior of the probability distribution are presented.

M. I. Krivoruchenko

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

400

Photon parton distributions in nuclei and the EMC effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photons as well as quarks and gluons are constituents of the infinite momentum frame (IMF) wave function of an energetic particle. They are mostly equivalent photons whose amplitude follows from the Lorentz transformation of the particle rest frame Coulomb field into the IMF and from the conservation of the electromagnetic current. We evaluate in a model independent way the dominant photon contribution \\propto \\alpha_{em}(Z^2/A^{4/3})\\ln(1/R_{A}m_{N}x) to the nuclear structure functions as well as the term \\propto \\alpha_{em}Z/A. In addition we show that the definition of x consistent with the exact kinematics of eA scattering (with exact sum rules) works in the same direction as the nucleus field of equivalent photons. Combined, these effects account for the bulk of the EMC effect for x\\le 0.5 where Fermi motion effects are small. In particular for these x the hadronic mechanism contribution to the EMC effect does not exceed \\sim 3% for all nuclei. Also the A-dependence of the hadronic mechanism of the EMC effect for x > 0.5 is significantly modified.

Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Study of the top quark electric charge at the CDF experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb{sup -1} of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis.

Bartos, Pavol; /Comenius U.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gravity Dual Corrections to the Heavy Quark Potential at Finite-Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply gauge/gravity duality to compute $1/N^2_c$ corrections to the heavy quark potentials of a quark--anti-quark pair ($Q\\bar Q$) and of a quark--quark pair ($QQ$) immersed into the strongly coupled N = 4 SYM plasma. On the gravity side these corrections come from the exchanges of supergravity modes between two string worldsheets stretching from the UV boundary of AdS space to the black hole horizon in the bulk and smeared over $S^5$. We find that the contributions to the $Q\\bar Q$ potential coming from the exchanges of all of the relevant modes (such as dilaton, massive scalar, 2-form field, and graviton) are all attractive, leading to an attractive net $Q\\bar Q$ potential. We show that at large separations $r$ and/or high-temperature $T$ the potential is of Yukawa-type, dominated by the graviton exchange, in agreement with earlier findings. On the other hand, at small-$r T$ the $Q\\bar Q$ potential scales as $\\sim (1/r) \\ln (1/rT)$. In the case of $QQ$ potential the 2-form contribution changes sign and becomes repulsive: however, the net $QQ$ potential remains attractive. At large-$r T$ it is dominated by the graviton exchange, while at small-$r T$ the $QQ$ potential becomes Coulomb-like.

Hovhannes R. Grigoryan; Yuri V. Kovchegov

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Reionization History in the Lognormal Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the evolution of baryonic gas before the reionization in the lognormal (LN) model of cosmic clustering. We show that the thermal history of the universe around the reionization can roughly be divided into three epochs: 1) cold dark age $z>z_r$, in which baryon gas is neutral, and opaque to Ly$\\alpha$ photons; 2) hot dark age $z_r > z> z_{gp}$, in which a predominant part of baryon gas is ionized and hot, but it is still opaque to Ly$\\alpha$ photons; 3) bright age $zhistory naturally yields a high optical depth to the CMB $\\tau_e \\simeq 0.12 - 0.19$ observed by the TE polarization of the WMAP, and a low redshift $z_{gp}$ of the appearance of the Ly$\\alpha$ Gunn-Peterson trough $z_{gp} \\simeq 6 - 8$ in QSO's absorption spectra. The reason why the universe stays long in an ionized, yet Ly$\\alpha$ opaque, stage is because the first photo-ionization heats the intergalactic gas effectively and has balanced the gravitational clustering a long period of time. Therefore, the result of a high $\\tau_e$ and low $z_{gp}$ is a common feature of all the models considered. Besides the cosmological parameters, the only free parameter we used in the calculation is $N_{ion}$, the mean ionization photons produced by each baryon in collapsed objects. We take it to be 40 - 80 in the calculation.

Ji-Ren Liu; Li-Zhi Fang; Long-Long Feng; Hong-Guang Bi

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 6, 7-20 December 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]bLj'sf ufFpn]x?n] dfcf]jfbL x'F eGb} rGbf c;'Ng] Ps gSsnL dfcf]jfbLnfO{ kqmfp u/L ;'/Iff kmf}hnfO{ a'emfP . @@ jlif{o lagf]b vjf; gfdsf lt o'jfn] :yfgLo laBfnosf k|wfgfWofks l8NnL/d0f a/fn / lai0f' /fO{nfO{ @% xhf/ gub dfu u/]sf lyP . To; cl3 ^ sft... 'xn] 38L, ;ft ;o gub / Ps tf]nf ;'gsf] cf}7L+ n'6]/ nusf] lyof] . dfcf]jfbLsf] gfd lnP/ rGbf dfu ug]{ lu/f]x k'jL{ If]qdf clxn] lgs} a9]sf] 5 . dfcf]jfbL eg]k5L rf8} dflg;x? 8/fpg] / s]xL dflg; tyf pBf]uL Aofkf/Lx? af6} *!) nfv ?k}of c;'Ng ;lsg] e...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

405

Transverse spin diffusion in strongly interacting Fermi gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute spin diffusion in a dilute Fermi gas at arbitrary temperature, polarization and strong interaction in the normal phase using kinetic theory. While the longitudinal spin diffusivity depends weakly on polarization and diverges for small temperatures, the transverse spin diffusivity D_\\perp has a strong polarization dependence and approaches a finite value for T->0 in the Fermi liquid phase. For a 3D unitary Fermi gas at infinite scattering length the diffusivities reach a minimum near the quantum limit of diffusion \\hbar/m in the quantum degenerate regime and are strongly suppressed by medium scattering, and we discuss the importance of the spin-rotation effect. In two dimensions, D_\\perp attains a minimum at strong coupling -1 < ln(kFa2D) < 1 and reaches D_\\perp~0.2...0.3\\hbar/m at large polarization. These values are consistent with recent measurements of two-dimensional ultracold atomic gases in the strong coupling regime.

Tilman Enss

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

Number of degrees of freedom of two-dimensional turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive upper bounds for the number of degrees of freedom of two-dimensional Navier--Stokes turbulence freely decaying from a smooth initial vorticity field $\\omega(x,y,0)=\\omega_0$. This number, denoted by $N$, is defined as the minimum dimension such that for $n\\ge N$, arbitrary $n$-dimensional balls in phase space centred on the solution trajectory $\\omega(x,y,t)$, for $t>0$, contract under the dynamics of the system linearized about $\\omega(x,y,t)$. In other words, $N$ is the minimum number of greatest Lyapunov exponents whose sum becomes negative. It is found that $N\\le C_1R_e$ when the phase space is endowed with the energy norm, and $N\\le C_2R_e(1+\\ln R_e)^{1/3}$ when the phase space is endowed with the enstrophy norm. Here $C_1$ and $C_2$ are constant and $R_e$ is the Reynolds number defined in terms of $\\omega_0$, the system length scale, and the viscosity $\

Chuong V. Tran; Luke Blackbourn

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

High-performance, lattice-mismatched InGaAs/InP monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs)  

SciTech Connect

High performance, lattice-mismatched p/n InGaAs/lnP monolithic interconnected module (MIM) structures were developed for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. A MIM device consists of several individual InGaAs photovoltaic (PV) cells series-connected on a single semi-insulating (S.I.) InP substrate. Both interdigitated and conventional (i.e., non-interdigitated) MIMs were fabricated. The energy bandgap (Eg) for these devices was 0.60 eV. A compositionally step-graded InPAs buffer was used to accommodate a lattice mismatch of 1.1% between the active InGaAs cell structure and the InP substrate. 1x1-cm, 15-cell, 0.60-eV MIMs demonstrated an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 5.2 V (347 mV per cell) and a fill factor of 68.6% at a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 2.0 A/cm{sup 2}, under flashlamp testing. The reverse saturation current density (Jo) was 1.6x10{sup {minus}6} A/cm{sup 2}. Jo values as low as 4.1x10{sup {minus}7} A/cm{sup 2} were also observed with a conventional planar cell geometry.

Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Stan, Mark S.; Weizer, Victor G.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Khan, Osman S.; Murray, Christopher S.; Scheiman, David; Brinker, David

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Assessment of End-of-Life Behavior of the Surface Modification to Improve Cavitation-Erosion Resistance in the Mercury Target at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The cavitation-erosion resistance of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer on annealed or cold-worked substrates of 316LN stainless steel has been examined in mercury using a vibratory horn technique and extended exposure periods intended to expose 'end-of-life' performance characteristics. The Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer tends to remain protective--as evidenced by modest steady-state weight loss and surface roughness increases, only isolated pitting, and limited wetting by mercury--until the protective layer has been thinned by general erosion to about 15-20 {micro}m. Prior to that amount of erosion, the cavitation-erosion resistance of both types of specimens appears defined by the properties of the protective layer. However, after thinning to such a degree, initial breakdown of the protective layer is characterized by increases in both the surface roughness and the number/depth of individual pits across the surface at a rate that is strongly dependent on the substrate condition, with annealed substrates significantly more prone to damage. However, even as the protective properties of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer decrease, both weight change and profile development as a function of sonication time suggest a gradual reversion to cavitation-erosion behavior similar to that of untreated substrates.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Cryogenic System for the Panda-X Dark Matter Search Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Panda-X is a liquid xenon dual-phase detector for the Dark Matter Search. The first modestly-sized module will soon be installed in the China JinPing Deep Underground Laboratory in Sichuan province, P.R. China. The cryogenics system is designed to handle much larger detectors, even the final version in the ton scale. Special attention has been paid to the reliability, serviceability, and adaptability to the requirements of a growing experiment. The system is cooled by a single Iwatani PC150 Pulse Tube Refrigerator. After subtracting all thermal losses, the remaining cooling power is still 82W. The fill speed was 9 SLPM, but could be boosted by LN2 assisted cooling to 40 SLPM. For the continuous recirculation and purification through a hot getter, a heat exchanger was employed to reduce the required cooling power. The recirculation speed is limited to 35 SLPM by the gas pump. At this speed, recirculation only adds 18.5 W to the heat load of the system, corresponding to a 95.2 % efficiency of the heat exchanger.

Zhao Li; Karl Ludwig Giboni; Haowei Gong; Xiangdong Ji; Andy Tan

2012-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Synthesis and Coordination Properties of Trifluoromethyl Decorated Derivatives of 2,6-Bis[(diphenylphosphinoyl)methyl]pyridine N-Oxide Ligands with Lanthanide Ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphinoyl Grignard-based substitutions on 2,6-bis(chloromethyl)pyridine followed by N-oxidation of the intermediate 2,6-bis(phosphinoyl)methyl pyridine compounds with mCPBA give the target trifunctional ligands 2,6-bis[bis-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine 1-oxide (2a) and 2,6-bis[bis-(3,5-bis-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-phosphinoylmethyl]-pyridine 1-oxide (2b) in high yields. The ligands have been spectroscopically characterized, the molecular structures confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods and the coordination chemistry surveyed with lanthanide nitrates. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses are described for the coordination complexes Nd(2a)(NO3)3, Nd(2a)(NO3)3 (CH3CN)0.5, Eu(2a)(NO3)3 and Nd(2b)(NO3)3 (H2O)1.25; in each case the ligand binds in a tridentate mode to the Ln(III) cation. These structures are compared with the structures found for lanthanide coordination complexes of the parent NOPOPO ligand, [Ph2P(O)CH2]2C5H3NO.

Pailloux, Sylvie [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Shirima, Cornel Edicome [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Ray, Alicia D. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Duesler, Eileen N. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Paine, Robert T. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Klaehn, John D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); McIlwain, Michael E [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method and apparatus for measuring surface density of explosive and inert dust in stratified layers  

SciTech Connect

A method for determining the surface density of coal dust on top of rock dust or rock dust on top of coal dust is disclosed which comprises directing a light source at either a coal or rock dust layer overlaying a substratum of the other, detecting the amount of light reflected from the deposit, generating a signal from the reflected light which is converted into a normalized output (V), and calculating the surface density from the normalized output. The surface density S.sub.c of coal dust on top of rock dust is calculated according to the equation: S.sub.c =1/-a.sub.c ln(V) wherein a.sub.c is a constant for the coal dust particles, and the surface density S.sub.r of rock dust on top of coal dust is determined by the equation: ##EQU1## wherein a.sub.r is a constant based on the properties of the rock dust particles. An apparatus is also disclosed for carrying out the method of the present invention.

Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Perlee, Henry E. (Bethel Park, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Outgassing rate of the copper-plated beam tube for ISABELLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultrahigh vacuum system of the intersecting storage accelerator, ISABELLE, will consist of two interlaced rings of stainless steel beam tubes with a circumference 2-1/2 miles each. To obtain a good heat conduction during bakeout and to reduce the resistive wall instability during beam operation, a lmm thick copper coating will be electroplated to the outer surface of this 1.5 mm thick beam tube. To minimize the beam loss due to beam-gas collision, the pressure inside the beam tube is required to be 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr (N/sub 2/ equivalent) or less. To achieve this ultrahigh vacuum, the outgassing rate of the 304 LN stainless steel tubes has been reduced to approx. 1 x 10/sup -13/ Torr. l/cm/sup 2/. sec by vacuum firing at 950/sup 0/C for one hour. However, during acid-bath electroplating of copper, significant amount of hydrogen will be reintroduced and trapped in stainless steel which will substantially increase the outgassing rate (to approx. 2 x 10/sup -12/ Torr . l/cm/sup 2/ sec). The outgassing characteristics of these copper-plated beam tubes are studied and discussed within the scope of diffusion and energy of activation. Methods to reduce the outgassing rate to an acceptable level (approx. 1 x 10/sup -13/ Torr . l/cm/sup 2/ . sec) are also given.

Hseuh, H.C.; Gaudet, E.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Vacuum chamber of the injector synchrotron for the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 40 chambers of the 368 m, 7-GeV injector synchrotron of the Advanced Photon Source are made from 1 mm-thick, 316LN stainless steel tubing. Tubes are cold-drawn to an elliptical shape with inside major and minor axes of 6 cm and 3.7 cm, respectively. This results in a thin metallic chamber without corrugations, which allows maximum beam space in the magnets and withstands atmospheric pressure. Sections of the chamber are bent to match the radius of curvature (33.3 m) of the beam over the entire effective length of the dipole magnets. A modified orbital welder is used to join sections of tubing. The chambers and the pumping system required to achieve a pressure of 10{sup {minus}9} Torr are described. A straight section of chamber tubing was tested under external pressure up to 60 psig. At 15 psig, the resulting deflection at the minor half axis was 0.2mm and a maximum compressive stress of 13,500 psi was measured. Tube deformation remained in the elastic region up to {approximately}38 psig. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Benaroya, R.; Dortwegt, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Improved zircon fission-track annealing model based on reevaluation of annealing data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal recovery (annealing) of mineral structure modified by the passage of fission fragments has long been studied by the etching technique. In minerals like apatite and zircon, the annealing kinetics are fairly well constrained from the hour to the million-year timescale and have been described by empirical and semi-empirical equations. On the other hand, laboratory experiments, in which ion beams interact with minerals and synthetic ceramics, have shown that there is a threshold temperature beyond which thermal recovery impedes ion-induced amorphization. In this work, it is assumed that this behavior can be extended to the annealing of fission tracks in minerals. It is proposed that there is a threshold temperature, T0, beyond which fission tracks are erased within a time t0, which is independent of the current state of lattice deformation. This implies that iso-annealing curves should converge to a fanning point in the Arrhenius pseudo-space (ln t vs. 1/T). Based on the proposed hypothesis, and laboratory and geological data, annealing equations are reevaluated. The geological timescale estimations of a model arising from this study are discussed through the calculation of partial annealing zone and closure temperature, and comparison with geological sample constraints found in literature. It is shown that the predictions given by this model are closer to field data on closure temperature and partial annealing zone than predictions given by previous models.

Guedes, Sandro [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Unicamp, Brazil; Moreira, Pedro A.F.P. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Sao Paulo; Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Weber, William J [ORNL; Hadler, Julio C [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Unicamp, Brazil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The entropic cost to tie a knot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate by Monte Carlo simulations the configurational entropy of $N$-steps polygons in the cubic lattice with fixed knot type. By collecting a rich statistics of configurations with very large values of $N$ we are able to analyse the asymptotic behaviour of the partition function of the problem for different knot types. Our results confirm that, in the large $N$ limit, each prime knot is localized in a small region of the polygon, regardless of the possible presence of other knots. Each prime knot component may slide along the unknotted region contributing to the overall configurational entropy with a term proportional to $\\ln N$. Furthermore, we discover that the mere existence of a knot requires a well defined entropic cost that scales exponentially with its minimal length. In the case of polygons with composite knots it turns out that the partition function can be simply factorized in terms that depend only on prime components with an additional combinatorial factor that takes into account the statistical property that by interchanging two identical prime knot components in the polygon the corresponding set of overall configuration remains unaltered. Finally, the above results allow to conjecture a sequence of inequalities for the connective constants of polygons whose topology varies within a given family of composite knot types.

Marco Baiesi; Enzo Orlandini; Attilio L. Stella

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN{sub 2} and LH{sub 2}. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liu-Jin; /Fermilab

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NMR line shapes of a gas of nuclear spin-1/2 molecules in fluctuating nano-containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reported in this paper is the impact of the fluctuations of the geometry of the nano-meter gas containers in the medium on the NMR line shape of the gas inside of the nano-containers. We calculate exactly the NMR line shape of the gas of spin-1/2 carrying molecules for two typical dynamics of the nano-container volume and the orientation with respect to the external magnetic field: (i) for a Gaussian stochastic dynamics, and (ii) for the regular harmonic vibrations. For the Gaussian ensemble of static disordered containers having an infinite correlation time, $\\tau_{\\sf c} \\to \\infty $, the overall line shape is shown to obey a logarithmic low frequency asymptotics, $ I(\\omega) = {const} \\times \\ln (\\frac{1}{\\omega})$, at $\\omega \\to 0$, and exponentially decaying asymptotics in a high frequency domain. For the Gaussian ensemble of the rapidly fluctuating containers of a finite $\\tau_{\\sf c}$, the overall line shape has a bell-shaped profile with $\\sim \\omega^{-4}$ far wing behaviour. In addition, we calculate exactly a satellite structure of the NMR line shape when the nano-bubbles in a liquid are affected by the harmonic deformations due to the acoustic waves.

E. B. Fel'dman; M. G. Rudavets

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

Nonequilibrium transport in superconducting tunneling structures.  

SciTech Connect

We derive the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of far from equilibrium superconducting tunneling arrays and find that the energy relaxation ensuring the charge transfer occurs in two stages: (i) the energy exchange between charge carriers and the intermediate bosonic agent, environment, and (ii) relaxing the energy further to the (phonon) thermostat, the bath, provided the rate of the environmental modes-phonon interactions is slower than their energy exchange rate with the tunneling junction. For a single junction we find I {proportional_to} (V/R)ln({Lambda}/V), where R is the bare tunnel resistance of the junction and {Lambda} is the high energy cut-off of the electron-environment interaction. In large tunneling arrays comprised of macroscopic number of junctions, low-temperature transport is governed by the cotunneling processes losing energy to the electron-hole environment. Below some critical temperature, T*, the Coulomb interactions open a finite gap in the environment excitations spectrum blocking simultaneously Cooper pair and normal excitations currents through the array; this is the microscopic mechanism of the insulator-to-superinsulator transition.

Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baturina, T. I. (Materials Science Division); (Moscow Inst. Physics and Technology); (Inst. Semiconductor Physics)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in CO oxidation by Ag  

SciTech Connect

In the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over silver wool the {sup 13}C kinetic isotope effects in the 343--453 K temperature range were experimentally determined and the following temperature dependence was found: 100 ln(k{sub 12}/k{sub 13}) = (3.398--630/T) {+-} 0.083. A reaction CO/O{sub 2}gas mixture of 1:2 ratio was used in a static system with initial pressures ranging from 20 to 40 kPa. Under these conditions the reaction is of order 1 with respect to CO and order 0 with respect to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} pressure. The apparent activation energy is 59.3 {+-} 1.7 kJ/mol. In the authors theoretical interpretation of the experimental data various geometries of (CO{sub 2})* and (CO{sub 3})* transition states were applied, and only a (CO{sub 2})* with an interbond angle of 110{degree} and CO stretching force constants of 1,700 and 1,000--1,400 N/m, respectively, with an asymmetric reaction coordinate was found to be acceptable.

Kobal, I.; Burghaus, U.; Senegacnik, M.; Ogrinc, N.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

CPT1{alpha} over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1{alpha} (CPT1{alpha}). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1{alpha} transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1{alpha} over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1{alpha}, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo.

Jambor de Sousa, Ulrike L. [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Koss, Michael D. [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Fillies, Marion [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Gahl, Anja [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Scheeder, Martin R.L. [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Cardoso, M. Cristina [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Leonhardt, Heinrich [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Department of Biology II, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Geary, Nori [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Langhans, Wolfgang [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Leonhardt, Monika [Institute of Animal Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: monika.leonhardt@inw.agrl.ethz.ch

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Entanglement Entropy in Scalar Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the dependence of entanglement entropy on the renormalized mass in quantum field theories can provide insight into phenomena such as quantum phase transitions, since the mass varies in a singular way near the transition. Here we perturbatively calculate the entanglement entropy in interacting scalar field theory, focussing on the dependence on the field's mass. We study lambda phi^4 and g phi^3 theories in their ground state. By tracing over a half space, using the replica trick and position space Green's functions on the cone, we show that space-time volume divergences cancel and renormalization can be consistently performed in this conical geometry. We establish finite contributions to the entanglement entropy up to two-loop order, involving a finite area law. The resulting entropy is simple and intuitive: the free theory result in d=3 (that we included in an earlier publication) Delta S ~ A m^2 ln(m^2) is altered, to leading order, by replacing the bare mass m by the renormalized mass m_r eva...

Hertzberg, Mark P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Nepali Aawaz Volume 1, Issue 7, 23 December 2005 - 3 January 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

af]Ng'ePsf] lyof] . cfd;efdf hg ufos ?ljg uGwe{, h]jL 6'x'/], gGbs[i0f hf]zL, /fds[i0f b'jfn cfbLn] lg/+s'ztGq la?4 uLt ufpbf pk:yLt hgtf gfr]sf lyP . g]skf Pdfn] sf]zL c~rn ;dGjo ;dLtLsf] cfof]hgfdf ;DkGg ;f] lazfn cfd ;efdf Ps nfv eGbf a9L... {ssf] Wofg dxf]T;j lt/ tfgL/ x]sf5g . pgLx? ;+u} dxf]T;jsf] d~rdf /fli6o tyf :yfgLo VoftL k|fKt ufos ufoLsf xfF:o snfsf/x? k|:t't ePsflyP . dxf]T;j cjwLe/ b}lgs ?kdf ;Fem b'O{ 306f ;Dd x'g] dgf]/~hgfTds sfo{qmddf km]zg zf], ;fFuLtLs sfo{qmd, a8L laN8L...

Shrestha, Kashish Das

423

Efficient imaging of single-hole electromagnetic data  

SciTech Connect

The extended Born, or localized nonlinear (LN) approximation, of integral equation (IE) solution has been applied to inverting single-hole electromagnetic (EM) data using a cylindrically symmetric model. The extended Born approximation is less accurate than a full solution but much superior to the simple Born approximation. When applied to the cylindrically symmetric model with a vertical magnetic dipole source, however, the accuracy of the extended Born approximation is shown to be greatly improved because the electric field is scalar and continuous everywhere. One of the most important steps in the inversion is the selection of a proper regularization parameter for stability. The extended Born solution provides an efficient means for selecting an optimum regularization parameter, because the Green's functions, the most time consuming part in IE methods, are repeatedly re-usable at each iteration. In addition, the IE formulation readily contains a sensitivity matrix, which can be revised at each iteration at little expense. In this paper we show inversion results using synthetic and field data. The result from field data is compared with that of a 3-D inversion scheme.

Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Wilt, Mike

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fabrication of transparent [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] from nanosize particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compaction and heat-treatment behavior of nanosize [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] powder (average diameter = 20 nm) was studied. A diamond anvil high-pressure cell was used to compact the powder at pressures up to 3 GPa, both in air at room temperature and under liquid nitrogen, followed by pressureless heat treatment at 800 C. For all conditions studied, the fabricated compacts were optically transparent. X-ray diffraction confirmed retention of the [gamma]-phase. The compacts were also characterized before and after heat treatment by microhardness measurements and by transmission electron microscopy. For both ambient and cryogenic compaction, sample hardness increased with pressure, and heat treatment resulted in about a 50% increase in hardness independent of the initial green-state value. Samples compacted in LN[sub 2] were significantly harder (up to 9.6 GPa) than those compacted in air. TEM examination revealed a random-dense-packed particle structure and interconnected porosity; interstitial void dimensions, however, were always less than the average particle diameter (20 nm). Observed effects on the increase in hardness could not be explained by microstructural changes normally attributed to increased compaction pressure or heat treatment, most notably densification. Alternative explanations are proposed.

Gallas, M.R.; Hockey, B.; Pechenik, A.; Piermarini, G.J. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

Ide, C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

The Eightfold Way: A Theory of Strong Interaction Symmetry  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A new model of the higher symmetry of elementary particles is introduced ln which the eight known baryons are treated as a supermultiplet, degenerate in the limit of unitary symmetry but split into isotopic spin multiplets by a symmetry-breaking term. The symmetry violation is ascribed phenomenologically to the mass differences. The baryons correspond to an eight-dimensional irreducible representation of the unitary group. The pion and K meson fit into a similar set of eight particles along with a predicted pseudoscalar meson X {sup o} having I = 0. A ninth vector meson coupled to the baryon current can be accommodated naturally in the scheme. It is predicted that the eight baryons should all have the same spin and parity and that pseudoscalar and vector mesons should form octets with possible additional singlets. The mathematics of the unitary group is described by considering three fictitious leptons, nu , e {sup -}, and mu {sup -}, which may throw light on the structure of weak interactions. (D. L.C.)

Gell-Mann, M.

1961-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Finite Heat conduction in 2D Lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a 2D hamonic lattices model with missing bond defects, when the capacity ratio of defects is enough large, the temperature gradient can be formed and the finite heat conduction is found in the model. The defects in the 2D harmonic lattices impede the energy carriers free propagation, by another words, the mean free paths of the energy carrier are relatively short. The microscopic dynamics leads to the finite conduction in the model. PACS numbers: 44.10. +I, 05.45.Jn, 05.60.-k, 05.70.Ln The study of heat conduction in models of insulating solids is a rather old and debated problem, and the more general problem is one of understanding the nonequilibrium energy current carrying state of a many body system. The most of the work on heat conduction investigated the process of heat transport in 1D lattices. The different models have been studied for obtaining Fouriers law, several kinds of factors have been taken into account in the models, such as the nonlinearity, on-site potentials, mass disorder and etc. Then the typical 1D lattices Hamiltonian is

Lei Yang; Yang Kongqing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Fundamental Principle of Information-to-Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equivalence of 1 bit of information to entropy was given by Landauer in 1961 as kln2, k the Boltzmann constant. Erasing information implies heat dissipation and the energy of 1 bit would then be (the Landauers limit) kT ln 2, T being the ambient temperature. From a quantum-cosmological point of view the minimum quantum of energy in the universe corresponds today to a temperature of 10^(-29) degrees K, probably forming a cosmic background of a Bose condensate [1]. Then, the bit with minimum energy today in the Universe is a quantum of energy 10^(-45)ergs, with an equivalent mass of 10^(-66)g. Low temperature implies low energy per bit and, of course, this is the way for faster and less energy dissipating computing devices. Our conjecture is this: the possibility of a future access to the CBBC (a coupling/channeling?) would mean a huge jump in the performance of these devices.

Alfonso-Faus, Antonio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fundamental Principle of Information-to-Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equivalence of 1 bit of information to entropy was given by Landauer in 1961 as kln2, k the Boltzmann constant. Erasing information implies heat dissipation and the energy of 1 bit would then be (the Landauers limit) kT ln 2, T being the ambient temperature. From a quantum-cosmological point of view the minimum quantum of energy in the universe corresponds today to a temperature of 10^(-29) degrees K, probably forming a cosmic background of a Bose condensate [1]. Then, the bit with minimum energy today in the Universe is a quantum of energy 10^(-45)ergs, with an equivalent mass of 10^(-66)g. Low temperature implies low energy per bit and, of course, this is the way for faster and less energy dissipating computing devices. Our conjecture is this: the possibility of a future access to the CBBC (a coupling/channeling?) would mean a huge jump in the performance of these devices.

Antonio Alfonso-Faus

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cryogenic system design of 11 GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer superconducting magnets at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The design of the cryogenic system for the 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is presented. A description of the cryogenic control reservoir and the cryogenic transfer line is given. Details of the cryogenic control reservoirs, cryogenic transfer lines, and pressure piping are summarized. Code compliance is ensured through following the requirements of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code and Pressure Piping Code. An elastic-plastic-analysis-based combined safety factor approach is proposed to meet the low stress requirement of ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 so that Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact testing can be avoided through analysis. Material toughness requirements in ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 are adopted as CVN impact testing rules of stainless steel 304 piping at 4.2 K and 77 K. A formula-based combined safety factor approach for pressure piping is also proposed to check whether the impact testing can be avoided due to low stress. Analysis and calculation have shown that no CVN impact testing of base metal and heat affected zones is required for the helium reservoir, nitrogen reservoir, and their relevant piping. Total heat loads to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are studied also. The total heat load to LHe for SHMS is estimated to be 137 W, and the total load to LN2 is calculated to be 420 W.

Eric Sun, Paul Brindza, Steven Lassister, Mike Fowler

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Gauge/String-Gravity Duality and Froissart Bound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gauge/string-gravity duality correspondence opened renewed hope and possibility to address some of the fundamental and non-perturbative QCD problems in particle physics, such as hadron spectrum and Regge behavior of the scattering amplitude at high energies. One of the most fundamental and long-standing problem is the high energy behavior of total cross-sections. According to a series of exhaustive tests by the COMPETE group, (1). total cross-sections have a universal Heisenberg behavior in energy corresponding to the maximal energy behavior allowed by the Froissart bound, i.e., $A + B ln^2 (s/s_0)$ with $B \\sim 0.32 mb$ and $s_0 \\sim 34.41 GeV^2$ for all reactions, and (2). the factorization relation among $\\sigma_{pp, even}, \\sigma_{\\gamma p}, and \\sigma_{\\gamma \\gamma}$ is well satisfied by experiments. I discuss the recent interesting application of the gauge/string-gravity duality of $AdS/CFT$ correspondence with a deformed background metric so as to break the conformal symmetry that can lead to the Heisenberg behavior of rising total cross-sections, and present some preliminary results on the high energy QCD from Planckian scattering in $AdS$ and black-hole production.

Kyungsik Kang

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

Prufer Transformations for the Normal Modes in Ocean Acoustics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1926 Prufer introduced a method of transforming the second order Sturm-Liouville (SL) equation into two nonlinear first order differential equations for the phase oe and ''magnitude'', |oe{sup 2}+oe{sup 2}| for a Poincare phase space representation, (oe,oe). The useful property is the phase equation decouples from the magnitude one which leads to a nonlinear, two point boundary value problem for the eigenvalues, or SL numbers. The transformation has been used both theoretically, e.g. Atkinson, [1960] to prove certain properties of SL equations as well as numerically e.g Bailey [1978]. This paper examines the utility of the Prufer transformation in the context of numerical solutions for modes of the ocean acoustic wave equation. (Its use is certainly not well known in the ocean acoustics community.) Equations for the phase, oe, and natural logarithm of the ''magnitude'', ln(|oe{sup 2}+oe{sup 2}|) lead to same decoupling and a fast and efficient numerical solution with the SL eigenvalues mapping to the horizontal wavenubers. The Prufer transformation has stabilty problems for low order modes at high frequecies, so a numerically stable method of integrating the phase equation is derived. This seems to be the first time the these stability issues have been highlighted to provide a robust algorthim for the modes.

Baggeroer, Arthur B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

433

DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY TEST OF THE 1500 MHZ NSLS-II PASSIVE SUPERCONDUCTING RF CAVITY  

SciTech Connect

NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. Earlier work described the design alternatives and the geometry selected for a copper prototype. We subsequently have iterated the design to lower the R/Q of the cavity and to increase the diameter of the beam pipe ferrite HOM dampers to reduce the wakefield heating. A niobium cavity and full cryomodule including LN2 shield, magnetic shield and insulating vacuum vessel have been fabricated and installed. A passive SRF 3rd harmonic cavity consisting of two tightly coupled cells has been designed and fabricated for NSLS-II. Initial cold tests of this cavity are very promising. These tests have verified that the cavity frequency and mode separation between the 0 and {pi}-modes can be set at manufacture. Further, the frequency separation can be maintained over wide tuning ranges necessary for operation. Future work includes HOM damper and motorized tuner development.

Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Kosciuk, B.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, B.; Sharma, S.; Towne, N.; Grimm, T.L.; Boulware, C.H.; Krizmanich, C.; Kuhlman, B.; Miller, N.; Siegel, B.; Winowski, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

ETX-I: First-generation single-shaft electric propulsion system program: Volume 2, Battery final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research and development program was to advance ac powertrain technology for electric vehicles (EV). The program focused on the design, build, test, and refinement of an experimental advanced electric vehicle powertrain suitable for packaging in a Ford Escort or equivalent-size vehicle. A Mercury LN7 was subsequently selected for the test bed vehicle. Although not part of the initial contract, the scope of the ETX-I Program was expanded in 1983 to encompass the development of advanced electric vehicle batteries compatible with the ETX-I powertrain and vehicle test bed. The intent of the battery portion of the ETX-I Program was to apply the best available battery technology based on existing battery developments. The battery effort was expected to result in a practical scale-up of base battery technologies to the vehicle battery subsystem level. With the addition of the battery activity, the ETX-I Program became a complete proof-of-concept ''ac propulsion system'' technology development program. In this context, the term ''propulsion system'' is defined as all components and subsystems (from the driver input to the vehicle wheels) that are required to store energy on board the vehicle and, using that energy, to provide controlled motive power to the vehicle. This report, Volume II, describes the battery portion of the ETX-I Program. The powertrain effort is reported in Volume I.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

LARGE SCALE METHOD FOR THE PRODUCTION AND PURIFICATION OF CURIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large-scale process for production and purification of Cm/sup 242/ is described. Aluminum slugs containing Am are irradiated and declad in a NaOH-- NaHO/sub 3/ solution at 85 to 100 deg C. The resulting slurry filtered and washed with NaOH, NH/sub 4/OH, and H/sub 2/O. Recovery of Cm from filtrate and washings is effected by an Fe(OH)/sub 3/ precipitation. The precipitates are then combined and dissolved ln HCl and refractory oxides centrifuged out. These oxides are then fused with Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and dissolved in HCl. The solution is evaporated and LiCl solution added. The Cm, rare earths, and anionic impurities are adsorbed on a strong-base anfon exchange resin. Impurities are eluted with LiCl--HCl solution, rare earths and Cm are eluted by HCl. Other ion exchange steps further purify the Cm. The Cm is then precipitated as fluoride and used in this form or further purified and processed. (T.R.H.)

Higgins, G.H.; Crane, W.W.T.

1959-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

A high temperature neutron diffraction study of the double perovskite Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect

Ba{sub 2}LnMoO{sub 6} double perovskites have been recently shown to display a wide range of interesting magnetic and structural properties; Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6} exhibits simultaneous antiferromagnetic order and a Jahn-Teller distortion. Here we report a high temperature neutron diffraction study of Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6} from 353 to 877 K. The results evidence a tetragonal to cubic phase transition at 423 K. Above this temperature the thermal displacement parameters of the oxygen atoms are modelled anisotropically as a result of a transverse vibration of the bridging oxygen. A smooth increase in the cell parameter a is observed with temperature for Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6}. - Graphical abstract: The high temperature crystal structure of Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6} evidencing a transverse oxygen vibration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high temperature neutron diffraction study has been performed on an isotopically enriched sample of Ba{sub 2}{sup 154}SmMoO{sub 6}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cubic-tetragonal phase transition occurs below 423 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal displacement parameters of the bridging oxygens are modelled anisotropically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a transverse vibration of the bridging oxygen.

Wallace, Thomas K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mclaughlin, Abbie C., E-mail: a.c.mclaughlin@abdn.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen, Meston Walk, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY PRINCETON NEW JERSEY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY PRINCETON NEW JERSEY ry'ovPn'c?r 11, 1947 Yr. F. ::. L ::LJo;:z 'J. s. C.toriic Lnerg;S- Co!:;!nisFiOn P. C. Box 42, VurrEr;' Wil Ztrtl3,.': 3 0';' u- 'Zork 16, N. p. Zear l' r. Eelmore: In sccor&nce vlth our recent telegkane ccn- vcrsation, 1 wish to advise you th*zt the ln- vcntory cf urpKiun+beerlnE ctzterlels in thic c"r'ice his rmsln5d st.+tic since Cecember 31, 194c. I enclss e p Ijrlef stfiteaent of mftterifil T.0' 4,' Gn kl?ne. I &all try to remember to dupl-i- cnte tlbfr Etc-txent on the first of each month until such time ns the mgtcritrtl is disposed of. Sir.cerely youre, 19. H. Furman Professor of Chcmifitry !XF : ma Encl. C~AsSlFlCATlON CANCELLEO 0~ CHANGED TO -------- --__I--

438

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Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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439

ORNL/RASA-86/ L9  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Qq {8 Qq {8 oL'/7 8.-uf*t^* l/fii ORNL/RASA-86/ L9 COMPREHENSIVE MDIOLOGICAL $JRVEY OF OFF-SITE PROPERTY O NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE LEWISTON, NE}J YORK Access to the lnformatlon ln this report ls llmlted to those l n d l c a t e d o n t h e d l s t r l b u t l o n l l s t a n d t o D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y and Departnent of Energy Contractors Thi! roport w!! preprtcd a! an account of wott lponlot€d by an agency ot the Unatcd Stttos Govrrnmant. Naithcr thcU nited StltttGovcrnmrnt nor any agrncy thercot, nor any ol therr cmployod. mtke3 lny wtrrrnty, expross'or implaed, or .33umc3 eny l€gd lirbility or ra3poBability fot thc eccurucy. complelcn.!9. o. usltuln6! of any informtlion, appltttu3, product or procs3! disclo3cd' or reprelant3 thst it3ut€would not inlringaprivetclyown€d tight!. Rslerenceharcan

440

A Topological Extension of General Relativity to Explore the Nature of Quantum Space-time, Dark Energy and Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Relativity is extended into the quantum domain. A thought experiment is explored to derive a specific topological build-up for Planckian space-time. The presented arguments are inspired by Feynman's path integral for superposition and Wheeler's quantum foam of Planck mass mini black holes/wormholes. Paths are fundamental and prime 3-manifolds like T^3, S^1xS^2 and S^3 are used to construct quantum space-time. A physical principle is formulated that causes observed paths to multiply: It takes one to know one. So topological fluctuations on the Planck scale take the form of multiple copies of any homeomorphically distinct path through quantum space-time. The discrete time equation of motion for this topological quantum gravity is derived by counting distinct paths globally. The equation of motion is solved to derive some properties of dark energy and inflation. The dark energy density depends linearly on the number of macroscopic black holes in the universe and is time dependent in a manner consistent with current astrophysical observations, having an effective equation of state w=-1.1 for redshifts smaller than unity. Inflation driven by mini black holes proceeds over n=55 e-foldings, without strong inhomogeneity, a scalar-to-tensor ratio r=ln(7)/n=0.036 and a spectral index n_s=1-r=0.964. A discrete time effect visible in the cosmic microwave background is suggested.

Marco Spaans

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Index of /research/alcator/facility/Procedures/OPS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPS OPS [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [TXT] BAKE_CHECKLIST.TXT 25-Oct-2000 16:13 127 [TXT] CRYO_STARTUP_AFTER_A_SHUTDOWN.HTML 20-Oct-2003 07:00 11K [TXT] Cryostat_Fiber_Glassing_Procedure.html 30-Apr-2002 14:43 1.5K [TXT] ECDC_PROCEDURE.HTML 09-Jan-2001 17:25 11K [TXT] GDC.HTML 01-Sep-2005 11:23 8.1K [TXT] GDC.OLD.HTML 09-Jan-2001 17:25 3.1K [TXT] GLOW_CHECKLIST.TXT 25-Oct-2000 16:13 421 [TXT] GLOW_START_STOP.TXT 30-Nov-2000 17:58 2.0K [DIR] INDIVIDUAL_RUN_PROCEDURES/ 22-May-2012 12:38 - [TXT] LN2_VALVE_ADJ_PROC.HTML 09-Jan-2001 17:25 3.0K [TXT] PRE_RUN_ENGINEERING_STARTUP.HTML 09-Jan-2001 17:24 2.8K [TXT] PRE_RUN_POWER_ROOM_TURN_ON_PROCEDURE.html 23-Mar-2006 16:52 12K

442

Enhancing Magnetic Properties of Molecular Magnetic Materials: The Role of Single-Ion Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable efforts are being devoted to designing enhanced molecular magnetic materials, in particular single molecule magnets (SMMs) that can meet the requirements for future technologies such as quantum computing and spintronics. A current trend in the field is enhancing the global anisotropy in metal complexes using single-ion anisotropy. The work in this dissertation is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of new building blocks of the highly anisotropic early transition metal ion V(III) with the aim of incorporating them into heterometallic molecular materials. The results underscore the importance of tuning the local coordination environments of metal ions in order to ensure enhanced single ion anisotropy. A family of mononuclear axially distorted vanadium (III) compounds, A[L_(3)VX_(3)] (3-9) (X = F, Cl or Br, A^(+) = Et_(4)N^(+), nBu_(4)N^(+) or PPN^(+) , L_(3) = Tp or Tp* (Tp = tris(-1-pyrazolyl)borohydride), Tp* = tris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borohydride)), and [Tp*V(DMF)_(3)](PF_(6))_(2) were studied. Replacement of the Tp ligand in 3 with the stronger ?-donor Tp* results in a near doubling of the magnitude of the axial zero-field splitting parameter D_(z) (D_(z) = -16.0 cm^(-1) in 3, and -30.0 cm^(-1) in 4) as determined by magnetic measurements. Such findings support the idea that controlling the axial crystal field distortion is an excellent way to enhance single-ion anisotropy. High Field-High Frequency EPR measurements on 4 revealed an even higher D value, -40.0 cm^(-1). Interestingly, compound 4 exhibits evidence for an out-of-phase ac signal under dc field. In another effort, a new series of vanadium cyanide building blocks, PPN[V(acac)_(2)(CN)_(2)]?PPNCl (13) (acac = acetylacetonate), A[V(L)(CN)_(2)] (A^(+) = Et_(4)N^(+), L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(salicylimine) (14), A = PPN^(+), L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(salicylimine) (15), L = N,N'-Phenylenebis(salicylimine) (16), and L = N,N'-Ethylenebis(2-methoxysalicylimine) (17)) were synthesized. Magnetic studies revealed moderate Dz values (-10.0, 5.89, 3.7, 4.05 and 4.36 cm^(-1) for 13-17 respectively). The first family of cyanide-bridged lanthanide containing molecules with a trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) geometry, (Et_(4)N)_(2)[(Re(triphos)(CN)_(3))_(2)(Ln(NO_(3))_(3))_(3)]-?4CH_(3)CN (19-27 with Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy and Ho) were prepared using the [(triphos)Re(CN)_(3)]^(-) building block, results that add valuable information to our database of compounds with a TBP geometry. Magnetic studies revealed diverse magnetic responses including slow relaxation of the magnetization at zero field for 25 and 26 , an indication of SMM behavior.

Saber, Mohamed Rashad Mohamed

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTALLINE CERAMICS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE REPROCESSING WASTES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is developing crystalline ceramic waste forms to incorporate CS/LN/TM high Mo waste streams consisting of perovskite, hollandite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, and powellite phase assemblages. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics. Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) activities included (i) expanding the compositional range by varying waste loading and fabrication of compositions rich in TiO{sub 2}, (ii) exploring the processing parameters of ceramics produced by the melt and crystallize process, (iii) synthesis and characterization of select individual phases of powellite and hollandite that are the target hosts for radionuclides of Mo, Cs, and Rb, and (iv) evaluating the durability and radiation stability of single and multi-phase ceramic waste forms. Two fabrication methods, including melting and crystallizing, and pressing and sintering, were used with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. An analysis of the XRD and SEM/EDS results indicates that the targeted crystalline phases of the FY11 compositions consisting of pyrochlore, perovskite, hollandite, zirconolite, and powellite were formed by both press and sinter and melt and crystallize processing methods. An evaluation of crystalline phase formation versus melt processing conditions revealed that hollandite, perovskite, zirconolite, and residual TiO{sub 2} phases formed regardless of cooling rate, demonstrating the robust nature of this process for crystalline phase development. The multiphase ceramic composition CSLNTM-06 demonstrated good resistance to proton beam irradiation. Electron irradiation studies on the single phase CaMoO{sub 4} (a component of the multiphase waste form) suggested that this material exhibits stability to 1000 years at anticipated self-irradiation doses (2 x 10{sup 10}-2 x 10{sup 11} Gy), but that its stability may be rate dependent, therefore limiting the activity of the waste for which it can be employed. Overall, these preliminary results indicate good radiation damage tolerance for the crystalline ceramic materials. The PCT results showed that, for all of the waste forms tested, the normalized release values for most of the elements measured, including all of the lanthanides and noble metals, were either very small or below the instrument detection limits. Elevated normalized release values were measured only for Cs, Mo, and Rb. It is difficult to draw further conclusions from these data until a benchmark material is developed for the PCT with this type of waste form. Calcined, simulated CS/LN/TM High Mo waste without additives had relatively low normalized release values for Cs, Mo, and Rb. A review of the chemical composition data for this sample showed that these elements were well retained after the calcination. Therefore, it will be useful to further characterize the calcined material to determine what form these elements are in after calcining. This, along with single phase studies on Cs containing crystal structures such as hollandite, should provide insight into the most ideal phases to incorporate these elements to produce a durable waste form.

Fox, K.; Brinkman, K.

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hydrogen Absorption in Fluids: An Unexplored Solution for Onboard Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Adoption of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) vehicles has been advocated for decades as an ecological ideal, capable of eliminating petroleum consumption as well as tail-pipe air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from automobiles. Storing sufficient hydrogen fuel onboard still remains a great technological challenge, despite recent advances in lightweight automotive materials, hybrid-electric drivetrains and fuel cells enabling 60-100 mpg equivalent H{sub 2}-fueled automobiles. Future onboard hydrogen storage choices will be pivotal, with lasting strategic consequences for the eventual scale, shape, security, investment requirements, and energy intensity of the H{sub 2} refueling infrastructure, in addition to impacts on automotive design, cost, range, performance, and safety. Multiple hydrogen storage approaches have been examined and deployed onboard prototype automobiles since the 1970's. These include storing H{sub 2} as a cryogenic liquid (LH{sub 2}) at temperatures of 20-25 Kelvin, compressing room temperature H{sub 2} gas to pressures as high as 10,000 psi, and reversible chemical absorption storage within powdered metal hydrides (e.g. LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, TiFeH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2}, NaAlH{sub 4}) which evolve H{sub 2} when warmed. Each of these approaches face well-known fundamental physical limits (thermal endurance, volume, and weight, respectively). This report details preliminary experiments investigating the potential of a new approach to H{sub 2} storage: absorption in fluids, specifically liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}). N{sub 2} was chosen for this study because it offers unique advantages as an inert but lightweight solvent with high hydrogen solubility and is an abundant atmospheric component. H{sub 2} absorbed in liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) can be lighter than metal hydrides, with greater thermal endurance than cryogenic H{sub 2} or LH{sub 2}, while being more compact than ambient compressed H{sub 2}. Previous researchers have examined H{sub 2} mixed with a variety of simple molecular fluids (N{sub 2}, Ar, CH{sub 4}, CO). These studies were mainly aimed at the general problem of fluid phase equilibria of H{sub 2} mixtures, and focused on identification and prediction of fluid/liquid phase boundary pressures and temperatures. In contrast, the present experiments are aimed at measuring the PVT properties of H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures with a view toward evaluating the applicability of these mixtures for onboard automotive H{sub 2} storage. To our knowledge, the experiments conducted for this project are the first systematic density measurements of H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures at cryogenic temperatures. H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures containing 50, 60, and 70% mole fraction H{sub 2} were examined at temperatures of 77 K, 87 K, and 273 K, under pressures ranging from 500 to 30,000 psi (from 34 to 2000 atm), corresponding to molar densities of 15-30 moles per liter.

Berry, G D

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM), the NRC/Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) raised numerous safety-related issues regarding elevated-temperature structural integrity criteria. Most of these issues remained unresolved today. These critical licensing reviews provide a basis for the evaluation of underlying technical issues for future advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Major materials performance issues and high temperature design methodology issues pertinent to the ARR are addressed in the report. The report is organized as follows: the ARR reference design concepts proposed by the Argonne National Laboratory and four industrial consortia were reviewed first, followed by a summary of the major code qualification and licensing issues for the ARR structural materials. The available database is presented for the ASME Code-qualified structural alloys (e.g. 304, 316 stainless steels, 2.25Cr-1Mo, and mod.9Cr-1Mo), including physical properties, tensile properties, impact properties and fracture toughness, creep, fatigue, creep-fatigue interaction, microstructural stability during long-term thermal aging, material degradation in sodium environments and effects of neutron irradiation for both base metals and weld metals. An assessment of modified versions of Type 316 SS, i.e. Type 316LN and its Japanese version, 316FR, was conducted to provide a perspective for codification of 316LN or 316FR in Subsection NH. Current status and data availability of four new advanced alloys, i.e. NF616, NF616+TMT, NF709, and HT-UPS, are also addressed to identify the R&D needs for their code qualification for ARR applications. For both conventional and new alloys, issues related to high temperature design methodology are described to address the needs for improvements for the ARR design and licensing. Assessments have shown that there are significant data gaps for the full qualification and licensing of the ARR structural materials. Development and evaluation of structural materials require a variety of experimental facilities that have been seriously degraded

Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fluid modeling of radio frequency and direct currents in a biased magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect

This model aims at simulating a magnetized plasma column connected on one side to a probe and on the other side to an ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating) antenna. This is a double probe modeling of a plasma flux tube exchanging perpendicular currents: rf polarization current and dc currents (inertia, viscous, and friction) perpendicular to the magnetic field. A self consistent solution for the rectified potential and the density is obtained under the assumptions of flute hypothesis, inertialess electrons, and no collision in parallel direction. The main effect of rf biasing on the antenna side is to shift the IV characteristic so that the floating potential can be increased up to ln(I{sub 0}(eV{sub rf}/(k{sub B}T{sub e}))), with I{sub 0} the modified Bessel function of the first kind. On the contrary, the effect of dc currents is to decrease the plasma potential and the sheath potential which can be lower than 3k{sub B}T{sub e}/e or even be negative. Experimental characteristics are well matched by the 1D fluid code and exhibit very high negative currents (more than 30 j{sub i} the ion saturation current) for high positive biasing of the probe and for long flux tube (10 m). The non-saturation of the electron current is here due to high transverse transport enhanced by convective fluxes and dc currents able to bring an amount of density around the biased flux tube. During comparisons with experiments, the floating potential measured by a reciprocating probe is recovered by the code revealing that for a 120 V measured peak potential on the probe, the rf potential on the ICRH antenna is twice this value. Finally, the density profile can be flattened or steepened as a function of the transverse dc current direction.

Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S. [IJL-P2M UMR 7198 CNRS, F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy, IJL, P2M-Faculte des Sciences, Vandoeuvre les Nancy 54506 (France); Kubic, M.; Gunn, J.; Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Coalescence kinetics in surfactant stabilized emulsions: Evolution equations from direct numerical simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice Boltzmann simulations were used to study the coalescence kinetics in emulsions with amphiphilic surfactant, under neutrally buoyant conditions, and with a significant kinematic viscosity contrast between the phases (emulating water in oil emulsions). The 3D simulation domain was large enough (256 3rd power -- 10 7th power grid points) to obtain good statistics with droplet numbers ranging from a few thousand at early times to a few hundred near equilibrium. Increased surfactant contents slowed down the coalescence rate between droplets due to the Gibbs-Marangoni effect, and the coalescence was driven by a quasi-turbulent velocity field. The kinetic energy decayed at a relatively slow rate at early times, due to conversion of interfacial energy to kinetic energy in the flow during coalescence. Phenomenological, coupled differential equations for the mean droplet diameter D(t) and the number density nd(t) were obtained from the simulation data and from film draining theories. Local (in time) power law exponents for the growth of the mean diameter (and for the concomitant decrease of nd) were established in terms of the instantaneous values of the kinetic energy, coalescence probability, Gibbs elasticity, and interfacial area. The model studies indicated that true power laws for the growth of the droplet size and decrease of the number of droplets with time may not be justified, since the exponents derived using the phenomenological model were time dependent. In contrast to earlier simulation results for symmetric blends with surfactant, we found no evidence for stretched logarithmic scaling of the formD -- [ln (ct)]a for the morphology length, or exponential scalings associated with arrested growth, on the basis of the phenomenological model.

R. Skartlien; E. Sollum; A. Akselsen; P. Meakin; B. Grimes; J. Sjoblom

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fixing the EW scale in supersymmetric models after the Higgs discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TeV-scale supersymmetry was originally introduced to solve the hierarchy problem and therefore fix the electroweak (EW) scale in the presence of quantum corrections. Numerical methods testing the SUSY models often report a good likelihood L (or chi^2=-2ln L) to fit the data {\\it including} the EW scale itself (m_Z^0) with a {\\it simultaneously} large fine-tuning i.e. a large variation of this scale under a small variation of the SUSY parameters. We argue that this is inconsistent and we identify the origin of this problem. Our claim is that the likelihood (or chi^2) to fit the data that is usually reported in such models does not account for the chi^2 cost of fixing the EW scale. When this constraint is implemented, the likelihood (or chi^2) receives a significant correction (delta_chi^2) that worsens the current data fits of SUSY models. We estimate this correction for the models: constrained MSSM (CMSSM), models with non-universal gaugino masses (NUGM) or higgs soft masses (NUHM1, NUHM2), the NMSSM and the general NMSSM (GNMSSM). For a higgs mass m_h\\approx 126 GeV, one finds that in these models (delta_chi^2)/ndf> 1.5 (approx 1 for GNMSSM), which violates the usual condition of a good fit (total chi^2/ndf approx 1) already before fitting observables other than the EW scale itself (ndf=number of degrees of freedom). This has (negative) implications for SUSY models and it is suggested that future data fits properly account for this effect, if one remains true to the original goal of SUSY. Since the expression of delta_chi^2 that emerges from our calculation depends on a familiar measure of fine-tuning, one concludes that EW fine-tuning is an intrinsic part of the likelihood to fit the data that includes the EW scale (m_Z^0).

D. M. Ghilencea

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

449

R&D ERL: Cryogenic System  

SciTech Connect

The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

Than, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Quartz dissolution and silica deposition in hot-dry-rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of quartz dissolution control the produced fluid dissolved silica concentration in geothermal systems in which the downhole residence time is finite. The produced fluid of the Phase I, Run Segment 5 experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system at Fenton Hill, NM, was undersaturated with respect to quartz in one pass through the reservoir, suggesting that the rate of granite dissolution governed the outlet dissolved silica concentration in this system. The literature data for the rate of quartz dissolution in water from 65 to 625/sup 0/C is correlated using an empirical rate law which is first order in quartz surface area and degree of undersaturation of the fluid. The Arrhenius plot (ln k vs T/sup -1/) is linear over eight orders of magnitude of the rate constant, verifying the validity of the proposed rate expression. Carefully performed quartz dissolution experiments in the present study duplicated the literature data and completed the data base in the temperature range from 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Identical experiments using crushed granite indicate that the rate of quartz dissolution in the presence of granite could be as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude faster than the rates observed in the pure quartz experiments. A temperature dependent HDR reservoir model incorporates the quartz dissolution rate law to simulate the dissolved silica behavior during the Fenton Hill Run Segment 5 experiment. For this low-permeability, fracture-dominated reservoir, the assumptions of one-dimensional plug flow through a vertically-inclined rectangular fracture and one-dimensional rock heat conduction perpendicular to the direction of flow are employed. These simplifications lead to an analytical solution for the temperature field in the reservoir.

Robinson, B.A.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Helium and Hydrogen Release Measurements on Various Alloys Irradiated in SINQ  

SciTech Connect

Three irradiations have been performed in the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) to establish a materials database for mixed proton and neutron fluxes for future spallation neutron and other accelerator sources. Materials included in the second irradiation, STIP-II, included mainly austenitic and martensitic steels. Samples of 316LN, F82H, Al, and Zircaloy-2 from STIP ?II have been analyzed for their total helium and hydrogen contents and their release characteristics. In terms of total gas content, the helium and hydrogen results are similar to those observed earlier from STIP-I. Specifically, the helium contents tended to be somewhat higher (up to 50%) than calculated for both low and high dose samples. 3He/4He ratios were generally in agreement with expectations except for the Ziracaloy-2 which showed very low values, likely from increased 3He generation from decay of irradiation-generated tritium. Hydrogen contents on the other hand tended inversely with dose, suggesting increased hydrogen loss at the higher dose (and higher temperature) locations from diffusion. Hydrogen levels in the Zircaloy were considerably higher than expected ({approx}10,000 to 25,000 appm), suggesting additional pickup of hydrogen from the irradiation environment. Hydrogen levels in the aluminum were similar to predicted. Helium and hydrogen release measurements from the temperature ramp experiments showed considerable levels of deuterium and tritium species which generally mirrored those of hydrogen. Hydrogen release occurred from about 300 for the aluminum to about 800 C for the Zircaloy-2. For the Zircaloy-2 and the steels, helium release began to occur at about 1100 C, which is consistent with previous measurements on irradiated steels. For the aluminum, helium release began at just under 600 C.

Oliver, Brian M.; Dai, Yong; Causey, Rion A.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

1 Noncommutative gravity in three dimensions coupled to point-like sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noncommutative gravity in three dimensions with no cosmological constant is reviewed. We find a solution which describes the presence of a torsional source. 1 What does noncommutative mean? Please see [1] for a review of noncommutative field theory, if you want to study more. Consider noncommutative coordinates, for example [ x, y] = i ?, (1) where ? is a real constant. Then the uncertainty lies between x and y, namely, ?x?y ? ?, (2) (where a numerical factor has omitted). This means the existence of the minimal length scale. If complex combinations of the coordinates, z = x + iy and z = x ? iy, are introduced, they satisfy [ z, z] = 2?. (3) There are different representations to describe the noncommutativity; the commutative coordinate formalism with the star product, the Fock space (operator) formalism, etc. (see [1] for details). In this talk, we simply use them identically, unless the identification leads to confusions (thus, we do not use ? in this talk). For example, we denote the equalities 1 = |n??n | , z = ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 2? n + 1|n??n + 1 | , z = 2? n + 1|n + 1??n | , (4) n=0 n=0 where ket and bra satisfy z|0 ? = 0, z|n ? = ? 2? ? n|n ? 1?, z|n ? = ? 2? ? n + 1|n + 1?, and so on. Another example is 2 (?1) m Lm(2r 2 /?)e ?r2 /? = |m??m | , (5) where r2 = x2 + y2 and Ln(x) is the Lagurre polynomial. For later use, we define 2 the inverse of z, z as ? ? 1 1 1 1 1 ? ? ? |n + 1??n | , ? ? z 2? n + 1 z 2? This definition leads to z 1

Kiyoshi Shiraishi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Cast Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect

Casting of austenitic stainless steels offers the possibility of directly producing large and/or relatively complex structures, such as the first wall shield modules or the diverter cassette for the ITER fusion reactor. Casting offers major cost savings when compared to fabrication via welding of quarter modules machined from large forgings. However, the strength properties of such cast components are typically considered inferior to those of conventionally forged and annealed components. To improve and validate cast stainless steel as a substitute for wrought stainless steel, a development and testing program was initiated, utilizing nitrogen and manganese additions to promote improved performance. This paper focuses on the response of the first set of developmental alloys to neutron-irradiation and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. These cast materials may also have applications for different components in light water reactors. Results showed that all steels exhibited irradiation-induced hardening and a corresponding drop in ductility, as expected, although there is still considerable ductility in the irradiated samples. The cast steels all exhibited reduced hardening in comparison to a wrought reference steels, which may be related to a larger grain size. Higher nitrogen contents did not negatively influence irradiation performance. Regarding stress corrosion cracking susceptibility, the large difference in grain size limits the comparison between wrought and cast materials, and inclusions in a reference and archive cast alloy tests complicate analysis of these samples. Results suggest that the irradiated archive heat was more susceptible to cracking than the modified alloys, which may be related to the more complex microstructure. Further, the results suggest that the modified cast steel is at least as SCC resistant as wrought 316LN. The beneficial effect of nitrogen on the mechanical properties of the alloys remains after irradiation and is not detrimental to SCC resistance.

Teysseyre, Sebastien [University of Michigan; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Was, Gary [University of Michigan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Controlled synthesis, formation mechanism and upconversion luminescence of NaYF{sub 4}: Yb, Er nano-/submicrocrystals via ionothermal approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to deepen the fundamental understanding of IL-mediated synthesis of nano-/submicrostructure, hydrophilic ILs ([Emim][BF{sub 4}], [Bmim][BF{sub 4}] and [Omim][BF{sub 4}]), which act as solvents, templates, as well as fluorine source, have been employed to synthesize rare earth doped NaYF{sub 4} upconversion nano-/submicrocrystals (UC-NMCs). The imidazolium cations provide the capping reagent to prevent the nucleation centers from aggregation and growing, while the tetrafluoroborate anions introduce a new fluorine source according to partial hydrolysis. It is demonstrated that the properties of IL, such as viscosity, polarity, solvency and interfacial tension, extremely affect the dissolution, diffusion and nucleation process of lanthanide ions in IL. Morphology and size of the final products can thus be tailored by synthetical parameters, like imidazolium cations, cosolvents, Ln{sup 3+} and fluoride concentrations, as well as ionothermal time. Based on the experimental results, the possible mechanism of the nucleation and growth of UC-NMCs in IL is discussed. - Graphical abstract: The upconversion nano-/submicrocrystals with diverse morphologies and sizes have been synthesized through ionothermal approach. The possible mechanism is concluded, which strengthens the fundamental understanding of IL-mediated synthesis of nano-/submicrostructure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The upconversion nano-/submicrocrystals were synthesized through ionothermal approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The as-prepared products exhibited diverse morphologies and sizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible mechanism of the nucleation and growth process in ILs is concluded.

Liu Jia [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Application, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Xiaomin [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Application, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Kong Xiangui, E-mail: xgkong14@ciomp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Application, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Zhan, Hong, E-mail: h.zhang@uva.nl [Van't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park, PO Box 94157. 1090 GD Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR AN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE  

SciTech Connect

A series of ceramic waste forms were developed and characterized for the immobilization of a Cesium/Lanthanide (CS/LN) waste stream anticipated to result from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites (particularly BaTiO{sub 3}), pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. Three fabrication methodologies were used, including melting and crystallizing, pressing and sintering, and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) results showed that the partitioning of the waste elements in the sintered materials was very similar, despite varying stoichiometry of the phases formed. Identification of excess Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via XRD and SEM/EDS in the first series of compositions led to a Phase II study, with significantly reduced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations and increased waste loadings. The Phase II compositions generally contained a reduced amount of unreacted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as identified by XRD. Chemical composition measurements showed no significant issues with meeting the target compositions. However, volatilization of Cs and Mo was identified, particularly during melting, since sintering of the pressed pellets and SPS were performed at lower temperatures. Partitioning of some of the waste components was difficult to determine via XRD. SEM/EDS mapping showed that those elements, which were generally present in small concentrations, were well distributed throughout the waste forms.

Marra, J.; Billings, A.; Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Soft Modes, Resonances and Quantum Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of the propagation of particles, which have a finite life-time and an according width in their mass spectrum, are discussed in the context of transport description. First, the importance of coherence effects (Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect) on production and absorption of field quanta in non-equilibrium dense matter is considered. It is shown that classical diffusion and Langevin results correspond to re-summation of certain field-theory diagrams formulated in terms of full non-equilibrium Green's functions. Then the general properties of broad resonances in dense and hot systems are discussed in the framework of a self-consistent and conserving Phi-derivable method of Baym at the examples of the rho-meson in hadronic matter and the pion in dilute nuclear matter. Further we address the problem of a transport description that properly accounts for the damping width of the particles. The Phi-derivable method generalized to the real-time contour provides a self-consistent and conserving kinetic scheme. We derive a generalized expression for the non-equilibrium kinetic entropy flow, which includes corrections from fluctuations and mass-width effects. In special cases an H-theorem is proved. Memory effects in collision terms give contributions to the kinetic entropy flow that in the Fermi-liquid case recover the famous bosonic type T^3 ln T correction to the specific heat of liquid Helium-3. At the example of the pion-condensate phase transition in dense nuclear matter we demonstrate important part played by the width effects within the quantum transport.

Yu. B. Ivanov; J. Knoll; H. van Hees; D. N. Voskresensky

2000-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Complexation Studies of Bidentate Heterocyclic N-Donor Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)  

SciTech Connect

A new bidentate nitrogen donor complexing agent that combines pyridine and triazole functional groups, 2-((4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl)pyridine (PTMP), has been synthesized. The strength of its complexes with trivalent americium (Am3+) and neodymium (Nd3+) in anhydrous methanol has been evaluated using spectrophotometric techniques. The purpose of this investigation is to assess this ligand (as representative of a class of similarly structured species) as a possible model compound for the challenging separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides. This separation, important in the development of advanced nuclear fuel cycles, is best achieved through the agency of multidentate chelating agents containing some number of nitrogen or sulfur donor groups. To evaluate the relative strength of the bidentate complexes, the derived constants are compared to those of the same metal ions with 2,2*-bipyridyl (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), and 2-pyridin-2-yl-1H-benzimidazole (PBIm). At issue is the relative affinity of the triazole moiety for trivalent f element ions. For all ligands, the derived stability constants are higher for Am3+ than Nd3+. In the case of Am3+ complexes with phen and PBIm, the presence of 1:2 (AmL2) species is indicated. Possible separations are suggested based on the relative stability and stoichiometry of the Am3+ and Nd3+ complexes. It can be noted that the 1,2,3-triazolyl group imparts a potentially useful selectivity for trivalent actinides (An(III)) over trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)), though the attainment of higher complex stoichiometries in actinide compared with lanthanide complexes may be an important driver for developing successful separations.

Ogden, Mark; Hoch, Courtney L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Risk factors for work-related symptoms in northern California office workers  

SciTech Connect

In most episodes of health complaints reported in office buildings in the last-twenty years, causal factors have not been identified. In order to assess risk factors for work-related symptoms in office workers, a reanalysis was performed of previous studies, and an epidemiologic study was conducted. The reanalysis of data, showed remarkable agreement among studies. Air-conditioned buildings were consistently associated with higher prevalence of headache, lethargy, and eye, nose, or throat problems. Humidification was not a necessary factor for this higher prevalence. Mechanical ventilation without air-conditioning was not associated with higher symptom prevalence. A study was conducted among 880 office workers, within 12 office buildings selected without regard to worker complaints, in northern California. A number of factors were found associated with prevalence of work-related symptoms, after adjustment in a logistic regression model for personal, psychosocial, job, workspace, and building factors. Two different ventilation types were associated with increases Ln symptom prevalence, relative to workers in naturally ventilated buildings: mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation, without air conditioning and with operable windows; and air-conditioning with sealed windows. No study buildings were humidified. In both these ventilation types, the highest odds ratios (ORs) found were for skin symptoms (ORs-5.0, 5.6) and for tight chest or difficulty breathing (ORs-3.6, 4.3). Use of carbonless copies or photocopiers, sharing a workspace, carpets, new carpets, new walls, and distance from a window were associated with symptom increases. Cloth partitions and new paint were associated with symptom decreases.

Mendell, M.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Americium/Lanthanide Separations in Alkaline Solutions for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project goals: Can used nuclear fuel be partitioned by dissolution in alkaline aqueous solution to give a solution of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium and a filterable solid containing nearly all of the lanthanide fission products and certain other fission products? What is the chemistry of Am/Cm/Ln in oxidative carbonate solutions? Can higher oxidation states of Am be stabilized and exploited? Conclusions: Am(VI) is kinetically stable in 0.5-2.0 M carbonate solutions for hours. Aliquat 336 in toluene has been successfully shown to extract U(VI) and Pu(VI) from carbonate solutions. (Stepanov et al 2011). Higher carbonate concentration gives lower D, SF{sub U/Eu} for = 4 in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Experiments with Am(VI) were unsuccessful due to reduction by the organics. Multiple sources of reducing organics...more optimization. Reduction experiments of Am(VI) in dodecane/octanol/Aliquat 336 show that after 5 minutes of contact, only 30-40% of the Am(VI) has been reduced. Long enough to perform an extraction. Shorter contact times, lower T, and lower Aliquat 336 concentration still did not result in any significant extraction of Am. Anion exchange experiments using a strong base anion exchanger show uptake of U(VI) with minimal uptake of Nd(III). Experiments with Am(VI) indicate Am sorption with a Kd of 9 (10 minute contact) but sorption mechanism is not yet understood. SF{sub U/Nd} for = 7 and SF{sub U/Eu} for = 19 after 24 hours in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Kristy Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reilly, Sean D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runde, Wolfgang H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

460

Prognosis of Esophageal Cancer Patients With Pathologic Complete Response After Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To define failure patterns and predictive factors in esophageal cancer patients who had a pathologic complete response (pCR) after preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 61 esophageal cancer patients who were enrolled in prospective studies and showed pCR after PCRT. All of the patients had squamous cell carcinoma. Of the patients, 40 were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (4,560 cGy in 28 fractions) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (FP), and 21 patients received conventional fractionation radiotherapy with capecitabine and cisplatin (XP). Results: The median follow-up time was 45.2 months (range, 6.5-162.3 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival rates (DFS) were 60.2% and 80.4%, respectively. In univariate analysis, age and lymph node (LN) metastasis were poor prognostic factors for OS, and pretreatment weight loss (>2 kg) was a poor prognostic factor for DFS. In multivariate analysis, lymph node metastasis and pretreatment weight loss were independent prognostic factors for OS and DFS. Nine patients (15%) had disease recurrence. Of the nine patients, 5 patients had locoregional failure, 1 patients had distant metastasis, and 3 patients had distant and locoregional failure. In-field failure occurred in 5 patients; out-of-field failure occurred in 1 patient; both in-field and out-of-field failure occurred in 2 patients; and both marginal and out-of-field failure occurred in 1 patient. Conclusions: Even in pCR patients, the most common failure site was within the radiation field, which suggests that more efficient local treatment is needed. Tumor recurrence was more common in patients with older age and with pretreatment weight loss.

Park, Jae Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang-wook; Yoon, Sang Min; Song, Si Yeol; Lee, Yu Sun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Bae [Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung il [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seung Do [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "linco ln okmul" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a target vessel.

Farrell, K

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

D0 Silicon Upgrade: Commissioning Test Results for D-Zero's Helium Refrigerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The test objectives are: (1) Make liquid helium and measure refrigerator capacity; (2) Measure liquid helium dewar heat leak, transfer line heat leak, and liquid nitrogen consumption rates; (3) Operate all cryogenic transfer lines; (4) Get some running time on all components; (5) Debug mechanical components, instrumentation, DMACs user interface, tune loops, and otherwise shake out any problems; (6) Get some operating time in to get familiar with system behavior; (7) Revise and/or improve operating procedures to actual practice; and (8) Identify areas for future improvement. D-Zero's stand alone helium refrigerator (STAR) liquified helium at a rate of 114 L/hr. This is consistent with other STAR installations. Refrigeration capacity was not measured due to lack of a calibrated heat load. Measured heat leaks were within design values. The helium dewar loss was measured at 2 to 4 watts or 9% per day, the solenoid and VLPC helium transfer lines had a heat leak of about 20 watts each. The liquid nitrogen consumption rates of the mobile purifier, STAR, and LN2 subcooler were measured at 20 gph, 20 to 64 gph, and 3 gph respectively. All cryogenic transfer lines including the solenoid and visible light photon counter (VLPC) transfer lines were cooled to their cryogenic operating temperatures. This included independent cooling of nitrogen shields and liquid helium components. No major problems were observed. The system ran quite well. Many problems were identified and corrected as they came up. Areas for improvement were noted and will be implemented in the future. The instrumentation and control system operated commendably during the test. The commissioning test run was a worthwhile and successful venture.

Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

A PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS USING FLUID-BED DRYING AND VOLATILITY TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

A process scheme for the recovery of uranium from fuel elements has been developed. The scheme combines continuous fluid-bed drying and fluoride volatility techniques after initial dissolution of the fuel element in the appropriate aqueous system, hence the designation ADF, Aqueous Dry Fluorination Process. The application of this process to the recovery of uranium from highly enriched, low uranium-zirconium alloy plate-type fuels is described. ln the process, the feed solution is sprayed horizontally through a two-fluid nozzle and is atomized directly in the heated fluidized bed. The spray droplets are dried on the fluidized particles and form a dense coating. Excessive particle growth was limited by the use of air attrition-jets inserted directly in the bed. Aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions containing l.2 to 3.6 M zirconiuni, 0.007 to 0.03 M uranium, and free acid concentrations from 1 to about l0 M were successfully processed in a 6-in.-diameter Inconel fluid-bed spray dryer. Rates equivalent to about 3.l kg/hr of zirconium were achieved, 160 ml/min with the most concentrated feed solution. Experiments were successfully carried out from 240 to 450 deg C. A new design for a two-fluid nozzle was developed. Extensive work was done to identify the various zirconium fluoride compounds formed. The granular dryer product was subsequently fluorinated at temperatures to 600 deg C in fluid beds and to 700 deg C in static beds to remove the uranium as the volatile hexafluoride. About 90 to 95% uranium removal was consistently achieved near 600 deg C. The relatively low uranium recovery under these conditions is a disadvantage for the application to zirconium-base fuels. It was found necessary to resort to static beds and higher temperatures to achieve greater removal. Since the fluorine attack on nickel, the material of construction, is prohibitive at temperatures above 600 deg C, a disposable fluorinator concept for use with static beds is described. Results of corrosion studies are reported. A preliminary chemical flowsheet with a design capacity of 1l00 kg of uranium (93% enriched) annually is presented. (auth)

Levitz, N.; Barghusen, J.; Carls, E.; Jonke, A.A.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ANIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranium and vanadium can be economically purified and recovered from non- salt roast carbonate leach liquors by adsorption on a strongly basic anionic exchange resin and subsequent selective elution by one of three alternative methods. Method 1 comprises selectively eluting uranium from the resin with an ammonium sulfate solution followed by eluting vanadium from the resin with either 5 M NaCl, saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, saturated NaHCO/sub 3/, 1 M NaOH, or saturated S0/sub 2/ solutions. Method II comprises selectively eluting vanadium from the resin with either concentrated NaCl or S0/sub 2/ solutions subsequent to pretreatment of the column with either S0/sub 2/ gas, 1 N HCl, or 0.1 N H/sub 2/8O/sub 4/ followed by eluting uranium from the resin with solutions containing 0.9 M NH/sub 4/Cl or NaCl and 0.1 Cl. Method III comprises flowing the carbonate leac solutlon through a first column of a strongly basic anlonlc exchange resin untll vanadium breakthrough occurs, so that the effluent solution is enriched ln uranium content and the vanadium is chiefly retalned by the resln, absorbing the uranlum from the enriched effluent solution on a second column of a strongly basic anionic exchange resin, pretreating the first column with either 0.1 N HCl, 0.1 H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, C0/sub 2/ gas, or ammonium sulfate, selectively eluting the vanadlum from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, pretreatlng the second column with either 0.1 N HCl or S0/sub 2/ gas, selectively eluting residual vanadium from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, and then eluting the uranium from the column with either 0.1 N HCl and 1 N NaCl orO.l N HCl and 1 N NH/sub 4/Cl.

Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.; Long, R.S.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower team developing a high temperature superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL). ORNL teamed with SuperPower, Inc. on a Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry (SPI) proposal for the SFCL that was submitted to DOE and approved in FY 2003. A contract between DOE and SuperPower, Inc. was signed on July 14, 2003 to design, fabricate and test the SFCL. This device employs high temperature superconducting (HTS) elements and SuperPower's proprietary technology. The program goal was to demonstrate a device that will address a broad range of the utility applications and meet utility industry requirements. This DOE-sponsored Superconductivity Partnership with Industry project would positively impact electric power transmission reliability and security by introducing a new element in the grid that can significantly mitigate fault currents and provide lower cost solutions for grid protection. The project will conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower-led team developing a SFCL as detailed in tasks 1-5 below. Note the SuperPower scope over the broad SPI project is much larger than that shown below which indicates only the SuperPower tasks that are complementary to the ORNL tasks. SuperPower is the Project Manager for the SFCL program, and is responsible for completion of the project on schedule and budget. The scope of work for ORNL is to provide R&D support for the SFCL in the following four broad areas: (1) Assist with high voltage subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing including characterization of the general dielectric performance of LN2 and component materials; (2) Consult on cryogenic subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing; (3) Participate in project conceptual and detailed design reviews; and (4) Guide commercialization by participation on the Technical Advisory Board (TAB). SuperPower's in-kind work for the SFCL will be provided in the following areas: (1) Work with ORNL to develop suitable test platforms for the evaluation of subsystems and components; (2) Provide cryogenic and high voltage subsystem designs for evaluation; (3) Lead the development of the test plans associated with the subsystem and components and participate in test programs at ORNL; and (4) Based on the test results, finalize the subsystem and component designs and incorporate into the respective SFCL prototypes.

Gouge, M..; Schwenterly, S.W.; Hazelton, D. (SuperPower, Inc.)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Galactic Halo's O VI Resonance Line Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used FUSE to observe ultraviolet emission from diffuse O VI in the hot gas in the Galactic halo. By comparing our result with another, nearby observation blocked by an opaque cloud at a distance of 230 pc, we could subtract off the contribution from the Local Bubble, leading to an apparent halo intensity of I_{OVI} = 4680^{+570}_{-660} photons/cm^2/s/sr. A correction for foreground extinction leads to an intrinsic intensity that could be as much as twice this value. Assuming T ~ 3 x 10^5 K, we conclude that the electron density, n_e, is 0.01-0.02 /cm^3, the thermal pressure, p/k, is 7000-10,000 K/cm^3, and that the hot gas is spread over a length of 50-70 pc, implying a small filling factor for O VI-rich gas. ROSAT observations of emission at 1/4 keV in the same direction indicate that the X-rays are weaker by a factor of 1.1 to 4.7, depending on the foreground extinction. Simulated supernova remnants evolving in low density gas have similar O VI to X-ray ratios when the remnant plasma is approaching collisional ioinizational equilibrium and the physical structures are approaching dynamical ``middle age''. Alternatively, the plasma can be described by a temperature power-law. Assuming that the material is approximately isobaric and the length scales according to T^(beta) d(ln T), we find beta = 1.5+/-0.6 and an upper temperature cutoff of 10^{6.6(+0.3,-0.2)} K. The radiative cooling rate for the hot gas, including that which is too hot to hold O VI, is 6 x 10^{38} erg/s/kpc^2. This rate implies that ~70% of the energy produced in the disk and halo by SN and pre-SN winds is radiated by the hot gas in the halo.

Robin L. Shelton; Shauna M. Sallmen; Edward B. Jenkins

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

467

Selected genomic and phenotypic responses of Salmonella serovars to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and cetylpyridinium chloride  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica serovars continue to be the leading cause of foodborne illnesses in United States. Chlorine, chlorine related, and quaternary compounds are generally used for disinfecting carcasses and equipment in processing industries. The current study was aimed at understanding the inactivation kinetics of four Salmonella serovars to chlorine, chlorine dioxide and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). The transcriptomic responses to oxidative stress was investigated in stationary and log phase cells of S. Typhimurium. The study was also aimed at understanding the effect of the chemicals on the expression of virulence genes associated with the Salmonella Pathogenecity Island 1 (SPI1). The possible induction of the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state in Salmonella due to CPC was also investigated. The inactivation parameters for each serovar and the chemical were estimated based on the Hom's model, ln (N/N0) = -k C^n T^m and it appeared that while disinfectant contact time was significant, biocide concentration in the overall disinfection was insignificant. This was true especially for chlorine and CPC with subtle differences observed between the serovars. The inactivation efficacy was, however, dependent on both concentration and the exposure time for chlorine dioxide. The highest degree of inactivation was obtained with chlorine followed by chlorine dioxide and CPC. Transcriptomic responses of S. Typhimurium revealed significant downregulation of several metabolic processes such as tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and amino acid biosynthesis in both log and stationary phase cells. Several stress related genes such as usp, rpoS and ompR were upregulated in the stationary phase cells. Majority of the virulence genes associated with the SPI1 were found to be downregulated for all the treatments. While treatment with chlorine and CPC caused downregulation of all the virulence genes, treatment with chlorine dioxide caused significant upregulation of few (hilC, invC, sipA and sipB) genes associated with the SPI1. Finally, the induction of VBNC state was not concluded as a result of treatment with CPC. However, significant percentage of cells (45 percent) with intact membrane was established based on the BacLight assayTM.

Kakani, Grihalakshmi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

SDR PROJECT QUARTERLY TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT NO. 6 FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1958 THROUGH OCTOBER 31, 1958  

SciTech Connect

A family of 200-Mw(e) SDR's was designed which could be operable ln 1965. They give total energy costs in the range 10 to 12 mills/kwh. The most promising of these reactors has the following characteristics: single-region design, moderate steam conditlons, natural uranium fuel, Zircaloy cladding, and stainless steel fuel tubes. A study of the applicability of SDR's to a broad range of power outputs (10 to 500 Mw(e)) was made. Although it appears reasonable to design a natural-uranium SDR with a power output down to 10 Mw(e), present studies indicate significant and wide economic interest at 40 Mw(e) and higher. Difficulties were encountered in interpreting the results of natural uranlum--D/ sub 2/0 lattice experiments in the Process Development Pile, and studies were initiated to determine the sources of difficulty and corrective measures. A code, called PALINDROME, which solves the Boltzmarm transport equation in the P/ sub 3/ approximation, was written. Work during the quarter on the Chugach 10- Mw(e) reactor was mainly concerned with completing the layout design of the more important reactor components and systems. A listing of the current design data is given, and a cross section of the reactor is shown. Two major changes were made during the quarter: (1) the substitution of steel ball-filled organiccooled neutron shield disks for the original concretefilled, water-cooled designs and (2) the reduction in size of the shutdown gas cooling systems. The preliminary safety analysis is briefly outlined. The development of maintenance techniques is discussed. Approximately 280 additional hours of operation of the SDR mockup facility were logged during the quarter. Modifications were made of the barrier test apparatus, and three successful experiments were performed on 6061 Al alloy. A liquid sodium leak detector was constructed, and also a rig for testlng fuel -- coolant tube closures. Sodium --liquid water and sodium--water vapor reactions were studied. (For preceding period see NDA-84-12.1 (L.T.W.)

1958-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

RAPID DETERMINATION OF RA-226 IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for emergency response or routine sample analyses. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device or Improvised Nuclear Device event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. {sup 226}Ra (T1/2 = 1,620 years) is one of the most toxic of the long-lived alpha-emitters present in the environment due to its long life and its tendency to concentrate in bones, which increases the internal radiation dose of individuals. The new method to determine {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method for solid samples, calcium carbonate precipitation to preconcentrate Ra, and rapid column separation steps to remove interferences. The column separation process uses cation exchange resin to remove large amounts of calcium, Sr Resin to remove barium and Ln Resin as a final purification step to remove {sup 225}Ac and potential interferences. The purified {sup 226}Ra sample test sources are prepared using barium sulfate microprecipitation in the presence of isopropanol for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed good chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The determination of {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples can be performed in less than 16 h for vegetation, concrete, brick, soil, and air filter samples with excellent quality for emergency or routine analyses. The sample preparation work takes less than 6 h. {sup 225}Ra (T1/2 = 14.9 day) tracer is used and the {sup 225}Ra progeny {sup 217}At is used to determine chemical yield via alpha spectrometry. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory radium particles are effectively digested. The preconcentration and column separation steps can also be applied to aqueous samples with good results.

Maxwell, S.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

NEW CATHODE MATERIALS FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study are perovskite oxides based on Sr substituted LaFeO{sub 3}, where significant data in single cell tests exists at PNNL for cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ, and of Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions. A key component of the research strategy is to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. Results on electrical conductivity relaxation measurements on La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} samples are reported and compared with results from previous studies. Studies of the crystallization of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are reported. Such studies are a preliminary to the combinatorial synthesis approach described in the first report.

Allan J. Jacobson

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

471

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode - electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study are perovskite oxides based on Sr substituted LaFeO{sub 3}, where significant data in single cell tests exists at PNNL for cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ, and Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions. A key component of the research strategy is to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. Results on electrical conductivity relaxation measurements on additional compositions in the La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} series are presented in this report. Studies of the inter-diffusion of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} bilayer films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are described. Such studies are a preliminary to the combinatorial synthesis approach discussed in previous reports.

Allan J. Jacobson

2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z