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Sample records for linco ln okmul

  1. LN Innovative Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: LN Innovative Technologies Place: Israel Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Partnership (investment, law etc) ) References: LN Innovative...

  2. LnQl Q51

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    v F. ii. hWling LnQl Q51 1. Ltr Pm hr. CyanmId Co. 2. EC of ltr Lo Agar. CyanamId Oo

  3. Beijing LN Green Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Beijing LN Green Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing LN Green Power Company Place: Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100000 Sector: Vehicles Product:...

  4. Antiferromagnetic transitions of osmium-containing rare earth double perovskites Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=rare earths)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinatsu, Yukio Doi, Yoshihiro; Wakeshima, Makoto

    2013-10-15

    The perovskite-type compounds containing both rare earth and osmium Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, SmLu) have been prepared. Powder X-ray diffraction measurements and Rietveld analysis show that Ln{sup 3+} and Os{sup 5+} ions are structurally ordered at the M site of the perovskite BaMO{sub 3}. Magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements show that an antiferromagnetic ordering of Os{sup 5+} ions has been observed for Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Lu) at 6571 K. Magnetic ordering of Ln{sup 3+} moments occurs when the temperature is furthermore decreased. - Graphical abstract: The perovskite-type compounds containing both rare earth and osmium Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, SmLu) have been prepared. An antiferromagnetic ordering of Os{sup 5+} ions has been observed for Ba{sub 2}LnOsO{sub 6} (Ln=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Lu) at 6571 K. Measurements and analysis of the specific heat for Ba{sub 2}PrOsO{sub 6} show that magnetic ordering of the Pr{sup 3+} moments should have occurred at ?20 K. Display Omitted.

  5. Structure and magnetic properties of LnMnSbO ( Ln=La and Ce)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Qiang; Kumar, C. M. N.; Tian, Wei; Dennis, Kevin W.; Goldman, Alan I.; Vaknin, David

    2016-03-11

    Here, a neutron powder diffraction (NPD) study of LnMnSbO (Ln = La or Ce) reveals differences between the magnetic ground state of the two compounds due to the strong Ce-Mn coupling compared to La-Mn. The two compounds adopt the P4/nmm space group down to 2 K, and whereas magnetization measurements do not show obvious anomaly at high temperatures, NPD reveals a C-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) order below TN = 255K for LaMnSbO and 240 K for CeMnSbO. While the magnetic structure of LaMnSbO is preserved to base temperature, a sharp transition at TSR = 4.5K is observed in CeMnSbO due tomore » a spin-reorientation (SR) transition of the Mn2+ magnetic moments from pointing along the c axis to the ab plane. The SR transition in CeMnSbO is accompanied by a simultaneous long-range AFM ordering of the Ce moments, which indicates that the Mn SR transition is driven by the Ce-Mn coupling. The ordered moments are found to be somewhat smaller than those expected for Mn2+ (S = 5/2) in insulators, but large enough to suggest that these compounds belong to the class of local-moment antiferromagnets. The lower TN found in these two compounds compared to the As-based counterparts (TN = 317 for LaMnAsO, TN = 347K for CeMnAsO) indicates that the Mn-Pn (Pn=As or Sb) hybridization that mediates the superexchange Mn-Pn-Mn coupling is weaker for the Sb-based compounds.« less

  6. Chemical Substitution and High Pressure Effects on Superconductors in the LnOBiS$_2$ (Ln = La-Nd) System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fang, Yuankan; Wolowiec, Christian T.; Yazici, Duygu; Maple, M. Brian

    2015-12-14

    A large number of compounds which contain BiS$_2$ layers exhibit enhanced superconductivity upon electron doping. Much interest and research effort has been focused on BiS$_2$-based compounds which provide new opportunities for exploring the nature of superconductivity. Important to the study of BiS2-based superconductors is the relation between structure and superconductivity. By modifying either the superconducting BiS$_2$ layers or the blocking layers in these layered compounds, one can effectively tune the lattice parameters, local atomic environment, electronic structure, and other physical properties of these materials. In this article, we will review some of the recent progress on research of the effectsmore » of chemical substitution in BiS$_2$-based compounds, with special attention given to the compounds in the LnOBiSS$_2$ (Ln = La-Nd) system. Strategies which are reported to be essential in optimizing superconductivity of these materials will also be discussed.« less

  7. 4X6" Rotary Bayonet LN2 Test Fill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, J.B.; /Fermilab

    1988-08-02

    This engineering note describes a test fill of the 4-inch x 6-inch rotary bayonet test fixture with LN{sub 2}. This test verifies the operation of valves on the fixture, and checks for proper construction/insulation. Further cold testing is imminent (with rotation and moment loading of the bayonet) after proper construction is verified and the test fixture is accepted. While this test fixture is a pressure vessel (4-inch), it does not require special safety treatment because it is under 6-inch in diameter. Flow capacity calculations were done to insure that the relief valve chosen would be capable of handling fire/loss of vacuum conditions. The D-Zero Safety Committee Chairman was notified of this testing.

  8. Structure, thermodynamic, and magnetic properties of Ln[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] with Ln = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, M.; Grins, J.; Nygren, M. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden))

    1999-09-01

    The structure of Nd[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] has been determined and refined using the Rietveld method and combined CuK[alpha][sub 1] X-ray and neutron powder data in space group P[bar 1] with unit cell a = 15.972(2), b = 7.1927(7), c = 6.9160(6) [angstrom], [alpha] = 96.299(4), [beta] = 131.643(3), [gamma] = 121.438(3)[degree], V = 353.83(6) [angstrom][sup 3] and Z = 2, to R[sub F] = 2.0% (neutron data) and R[sub F] = 6.2% (X-ray data). The structure is closely related to the monoclinic La[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] structure and exhibits Nd atoms coordinated by seven O atoms and Pd atoms coordinated by a square of O atoms. Isolated chains of trans-corner-sharing PdO[sub 4] squares are straight in the La[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] structure and staggered in the Nd[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] structure. Electron and X-ray powder diffraction data show that Ln[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] with Ln = Sm, Eu, and Gd is isostructural with Nd[sub 4]PdO[sub 7]. The enthalpies of dissolution of Ln[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] (Ln = La, Nd) in 1.000 M HCl have been measured with an in-house built calorimeter, and from these values the enthalpies of formation for the compounds have been calculated. The decomposition temperatures of Ln[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] with Ln = La and Nd in oxygen have been determined by thermogravimetric measurements and found to decrease from 1645 [+-] 10 K for La[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] to 1540 [+-] 10 K for Nd[sub 4]PdO[sub 7]. Using these data, an Ellingham diagram has been constructed assuming temperature-independent [Delta]H[sub f][degree] and [Delta]S[sub f][degree]. The magnetic susceptibilities of Ln[sub 4]PdO[sub 7] with Ln = La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, recorded in the temperature range 10--320 K, were found to be in agreement with the expected ones for noninteracting Ln[sup 3+] ions.

  9. The rare earth silicon phosphides LnSi{sub 2}P{sub 6} (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, P.; Jeitschko, W.

    1996-07-01

    The title compounds were prepared in well-crystallized form from a tin flux and their crystal structure was determined from single-crystal diffractometer data of LaSi{sub 2}P{sub 6}: Cmc2{sub 1}, a = 1012.9(3) pm, b = 2817.5(7) pm, c = 1037.4(5) pm, Z = 16, R = 0.034 for 3303 structure factors and 181 variable parameters. The structure of the isotypic compound CeSi{sub 2}P{sub 6} was also refined from single-crystal X-ray data: a = 1011.8(4) pm, b = 2803.1(8) pm, c = 1031.1(4) pm, R = 0.035 for 2132 F values and 181 variables. The silicon and the phosphorus atoms could be distinguished by comparing their occupancy parameters obtained from both structure refinements. The assignments agree with those deduced by structure-chemical arguments. These atoms form a three-dimensionally infinite framework polyanion, which accommodates four different kinds of rare earth atoms: three with nine and one with ten phosphorus neighbors. The silicon atoms are all in tetrahedral phosphorus coordination. There are phosphorus atoms which have only two rare earth and two silicon neighbors, but most phosphorus atoms have--in addition to the rare earth and silicon atoms--phosphorus neighbors, thus forming P{sub 3}, P{sub 4}, P{sub 5}, and P{sub 6} units. Using oxidation numbers, the compounds can be rationalized with the formulas Ln{sup 3+}(Si{sub 2}P{sub 6}){sub 3-} and Ln{sup 3+}(Si{sup 4+}){sub 2}(P{sub 6}){sup 11-}, where the octet rule is obeyed for the silicon and phosphorus atoms and two electrons are counted for each Si-P and P-P interaction.

  10. Sonochemical synthesis of highly luminescent Ln2O3:Eu3+ (Y, La, Gd) nanocrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alammar, Tarek; Cybinska, Joanna; Campbell, Paul S.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-05-12

    In this study, sonication of Ln(CH3COO)3·H2O, Eu(CH3COO)3·H2O and NaOH dissolved in the ionic liquid-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonylamide lead to Ln(OH)3:Eu (Ln: Gd, La, Y) nanoparticles. Subsequent calcination at 800 °C for 3 h allowed to obtain Ln2O3:Eu nanopowders. Gd2O3 and Y2O3 were obtained in the C-type lanthanide sequioxide structure, whereas La2O3 crystallized in the A-type. Structure, morphology, and luminescent properties of the nano-oxides were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dispersive X-ray (EDX), and photoluminescence (PL). SEM studies revealed that the synthesized Gd2O3:Eu, La2O3:Eu, and Y2O3:Eu formed nano-spindle, -sheets, and -rods in shape, respectively. The nanoscale materials showmore » very efficient red emission due to the intraconfigurational f–f transitions of Eu3+. The quantum yields for Ln2O3:Eu (5%) were determined to be 4.2% for Ln=Gd, 13.8% for Ln=Y and 5.2% for Ln=La. The asymmetric ratio I02/I01 of Eu3+ varies from 5.3 for Gd2O3, to 5.6 for Y2O3 to 6.5 for La2O3, which increased the color chromaticity.« less

  11. Sonochemical synthesis of highly luminescent Ln2O3:Eu3+ (Y, La, Gd) nanocrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alammar, Tarek; Cybinska, Joanna; Campbell, Paul S.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-05-12

    In this study, sonication of Ln(CH3COO)3·H2O, Eu(CH3COO)3·H2O and NaOH dissolved in the ionic liquid-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonylamide lead to Ln(OH)3:Eu (Ln: Gd, La, Y) nanoparticles. Subsequent calcination at 800 °C for 3 h allowed to obtain Ln2O3:Eu nanopowders. Gd2O3 and Y2O3 were obtained in the C-type lanthanide sequioxide structure, whereas La2O3 crystallized in the A-type. Structure, morphology, and luminescent properties of the nano-oxides were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dispersive X-ray (EDX), and photoluminescence (PL). SEM studies revealed that the synthesized Gd2O3:Eu, La2O3:Eu, and Y2O3:Eu formed nano-spindle, -sheets, and -rods in shape, respectively. The nanoscale materials showmore »very efficient red emission due to the intraconfigurational f–f transitions of Eu3+. The quantum yields for Ln2O3:Eu (5%) were determined to be 4.2% for Ln=Gd, 13.8% for Ln=Y and 5.2% for Ln=La. The asymmetric ratio I02/I01 of Eu3+ varies from 5.3 for Gd2O3, to 5.6 for Y2O3 to 6.5 for La2O3, which increased the color chromaticity.« less

  12. Structural integrity assessment of type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D.; Zawierucha, R.

    1995-12-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved the Code Case 2123 in 1992 which allows the use of Type 201LN stainless steel in the construction of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and Division 2 pressure vessels for -320{degrees}F applications. Type 201LN stainless steel is a nitrogen strengthened modified version of ASTM A240, Type 201 stainless steel with a restricted chemistry. The Code allowable design stresses for Type 201LN for Division 1 vessels are approximately 27% higher than Type 304 stainless steel and equal to that of the 5 Ni and 9 Ni steels. This paper discusses the important features of the Code Case 2123 and the structural integrity assessment of Type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic vessels. Tensile, Charpy-V-notch and fracture properties have been obtained on several heats of this steel including weldments. A linear-elastic fracture mechanics analysis has been conducted to assess the expected fracture mode and the fracture-critical crack sizes. The results have been compared with Type 304 stainless steel, 5 Ni and 9 Ni steel vessels.

  13. Weldability Comparison of Tritium-Charged-and -Aged 304 and 316LN Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tosten, M.H.

    2003-06-10

    Measurement of the effects of helium (from tritium decay) on the weldability of Types 304 and ITER Grade 316LN stainless steel demonstrated the inherent complexities in designing and conducting an experimental program using tritium-charged-and-aged materials to simulate the effects of irradiation-induced helium on weld behavior. Differences in microstructure, surface condition and alloy chemistry are known to play key roles in tritium absorption and distribution and thus have direct effects on the subsequent 3He production and distribution. The helium embrittlement cracking produced in 0.5 in. (12.7 mm) thick 304 and 316LN plates that were tritium-charged in the same container and subsequently welded with gas metal arc, low heat input weld overlays and gas tungsten arc stringer beads, varied markedly. For example, the porosity in the weld beads was much higher in the 304 plate than in the 316LN plate. Additionally, crack measurements from weld cross-sections revealed more extensive intergranular cracking in the heat-affected zones of welds on the 304 plate when compared to the 316LN plate. However, the differences between the two types of stainless steel may not be a result of differences in the resistance to helium embrittlement cracking, but may be due to initial tritium concentration differences developed in the as-charged plates. Further work is necessary to identify the reasons for the apparent plate to plate variation in tritium/helium content and to demonstrate the similarities (or differences) between Types 304 and ITER grade 316LN stainless steel.

  14. Deliverable for F?ST project: Ln Resin based PLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Rim, Jung H.

    2012-05-03

    This memo describes the fabrication of a polymer ligand extractant based on Eichrom's LN-1 resin. This work has been in support of the Fast Alpha Spectrometry Tool (F{alpha}ST) project. The first part of LANL's role in this project is to evaluate new extractants for use in polymer ligand extractants (PLEs). The first new extractant evaluated is Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), which is an effective metal extractant. It has very efficient chelating properties for a wide variety of metal ions. HDEHP is an amphiphillic molecule with two long hydrocarbon chains and a polar end with a phosphoryl oxygen (P=O) and an acidic -OH group as shown in Figure 1. HDEHP has shown effectiveness in extracting lanthanides, selective actinides, and other trivalent elements. Several authors have reported that lanthanides and elements with +3 oxidation state have similar extraction behavior in nitric acid. The distribution ratio for lanthanides rapidly decreases at lower nitric concentration then start to increase at higher concentration as shown in. The trivalent americium, curium, and yttrium exhibit similar trend as trivalent lanthanides. This extraction trend can be also observed from hydrogen chloride solution. This work describes the use of this ligand in a PLE to extract plutonium from solution. Polymer ligand films were prepared by dissolving HDEHP ligands and polystyrene beads in THF. The solution was directly deposited onto a 40 mm diameter stainless steel substrate using an automated pipette. HDEHP based PLEs with direct stippling method are shown in Figure 2. The solution was air dried at room temperature overnight to ensure complete evaporation of THF. The plutonium tracer solution was prepared in 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 8M nitric solutions to study the effect of nitric concentration in plutonium extraction. 0.1667 Bq {sup 239}Pu tracer solution was directly stippled on each PLE and was allowed to equilibrate for 3 hours before removing the solution. The plutonium

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- LASL Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    07 Land Parcels A B C E K LN PL - NM 07 Site ID (CSD Index Number): NM.09 Site Name: LOS ALAMOS LAND PARCELS A B C E K L N PIPELINE (NM.07) / LASL PIPELINE FACILITY (NM.08) / LASL TRACTS EASTERN AREA L Site Summary: These land parcels, previously owned by the federal government, were sold in 1972. The pipeline facility and eastern area L were identified separately in some documents and assigned individual numbers by FUSRAP researchers, but these parcels were included in NM.07. Site Link:

  16. Preparation, characterization, magnetic susceptibility (Eu, Gd and Sm) and XPS studies of Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy and Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijaya Kumar, B.; Velchuri, Radha; Rama Devi, V.; Sreedhar, B.; Prasad, G.; Jaya Prakash, D.; Kanagaraj, M.; Arumugam, S.; Vithal, M.

    2011-02-15

    Bulk and nanosized pyrochlore materials Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy, Gd and Sm) have been prepared by the sol-gel method. All the samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Magnetic susceptibility ({chi}) measurements of Gd{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7}, Sm{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} and Eu{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} were carried out by vibrating sample magnetometer in the temperature range 2-320 K. The variation of {chi}{sup -1} (or {chi}) with temperature of Gd{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7}, Sm{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} and Eu{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} follows the Curie law, intermediate formula and the Curie-Weiss law, respectively. From the linear portion of {chi}T vs. T{sup -1} plot of Eu{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} from 2 to 15 K, the classical nearest neighbor exchange (J{sup cl}) and dipolar interactions (D{sub nn}) are obtained. The XPS of Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy and Gd) gave characteristic peaks for Ln, Ti, Zr and O. The satellite peaks are observed only for 3d La of La{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7}. -- Graphical abstract: Sm{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} does not follow the Curie or the Curie-Weiss law. The effective magnetic moment is found to be 0.768 BM (at 300 K), which is smaller than the free ion moment 1.3-1.4 BM. Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} Bulk and nano Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Eu, Dy, Gd and Sm) have been prepared by the sol-gel method. {yields} The broad Raman lines are attributed to cation disorder and small crystallite size. {yields} XPS of Ln{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} exhibit characteristic X-ray photoelectron spectral features. {yields} Magnetic moment of Gd{sub 2}ZrTiO{sub 7} is obtained from magnetic susceptibility and ESR spectra.

  17. Influence of structural distortions upon photoluminescence properties of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} activated Na{sub 3}Ln(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Ln=Y, Gd) borates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asiri Naidu, S.; Boudin, S.; Varadaraju, U.V.; Raveau, B.

    2012-06-15

    The comparative study of the structure and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} activated Na{sub 3}Ln(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, with Ln=Y, Gd, showed the important role of the host lattice structure upon PL. Higher emission intensities of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} are observed for Na{sub 3}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} than for Na{sub 3}Y(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}, through direct Eu{sup 3+} excitation at 395 nm for Eu{sup 3+} doped borates, and through Gd{sup 3+} excitation around 280 nm for Tb{sup 3+} doped borates. This higher performance for Na{sub 3}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} is due to the less regular environment of Eu{sup 3+} (Tb{sup 3+}) in the Gd sites than in the Y sites and to energy transfer from Gd{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+}(Tb{sup 3+}). The smaller critical concentration in Na{sub 3}Ln{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} observed for Ln=Gd, x=0.5, compared to x=0.6 for Ln=Y, is explained by shorter Ln-Ln distances (4.11 A for Gd-Gd vs. 4.59 A for Y-Y). Both Na{sub 3}Y{sub 0.4}Tb{sub 0.6}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Na{sub 3}Gd{sub 0.5}Tb{sub 0.5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} show intense green emission under UV excitation. - Graphical abstract: The PL properties of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} are studied in Na{sub 3}Ln(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Ln=Y, Gd) borates. Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}exhibits higher emission intensity in Na{sub 3}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} compared to Na{sub 3}Y(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} due to the less regular environment of the Gd{sup 3+} ion. Energy transfer from Gd{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} is observed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structure of Na{sub 3}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} by X-ray powder diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoluminescence properties of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} doped Na{sub 3}Ln(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Ln=Y, Gd). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} emission for Na{sub 3}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} due to an irregular environment of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} emission

  18. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2010-09-23

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste

  19. Synthesis, properties and phase transitions of pyrochlore- and fluorite-like Ln{sub 2}RMO{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Ho; R = Lu, Sc; M = Nb, Ta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shlyakhtina, A.V.; Belov, D.A.; Pigalskiy, K.S.; Shchegolikhin, A.N.; Kolbanev, I.V.; Karyagina, O.K.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependences of bulk conductivity for Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} pyrochlore prepared at (1) 1400 °C, 20 h; and (2) 1200 °C, 40 h. - Highlights: • The phase formation of Ln{sub 2}RMO{sub 7} (Ln = Sm, Ho; R = Lu, Sc; M = Nb, Ta) at 1200–1600 °C. • The bulk conductivity and magnetic susceptibility were measured. • The bulk conductivity of Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} has oxygen ion type at T ≥ 750 °C. • The first-order structural phase transition was observed in Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} at ∼650–700 °C. • This phase transformation is not typical for defect fluorites. - Abstract: We have studied the new compounds with fluorite-like (Ho{sub 2}RNbO{sub 7} (R = Lu, Sc)) and pyrochlore-like (Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7}) structure as potential oxide ion conductors. The phase formation process (from 1200 to 1600 °C) and physical properties (electrical, thermo mechanical, and magnetic) for these compounds were investigated. Among the niobate materials the highest bulk conductivity is offered by the fluorite-like Ho{sub 2}ScNbO{sub 7} synthesized at 1600 °C: 3.8 × 10{sup −5} S/cm at 750 °C, whereas in Sm system the highest bulk conductivity, 7.3 × 10{sup −6} S/cm at 750 °C, is offered by the pyrochlore Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} synthesized at 1400 °C. In Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} pyrochlore we have observed the first-order phase transformation at ∼650–700 °C is related to rearrangement process in the oxygen sublattice of the pyrochlore structure containing B-site cations in different valence state and actually is absent in the defect fluorites. The two holmium niobates show Curie–Weiss paramagnetic behavior, with the prevalence of antiferromagnetic coupling. The magnetic susceptibility of Sm{sub 2}ScTaO{sub 7} is a weak function of temperature, corresponding to Van Vleck paramagnetism.

  20. Substitution studies of Mn and Fe in Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43} (Ln=Gd, Yb) and the structure of Yb{sub 6}Ti{sub 4}Al{sub 43}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treadwell, LaRico J.; Watkins-Curry, Pilanda; McAlpin, Jacob D.; Prestigiacomo, Joseph; Stadler, Shane; Chan, Julia Y.

    2014-02-15

    The synthesis and characterization of Mn- and Fe-substituted Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43} (Ln=Gd, Yb) and Yb{sub 6}Ti{sub 4}Al{sub 43} are reported. The compounds adopt the Ho{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}Al{sub 43} structure type with lattice parameters of a∼11 Å and c∼17.8 Å with structural site preferences for Mn and Fe. The magnetization of Yb{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43} is sensitive to Mn and Fe doping, which is evident by an increase in the field dependent magnetization. Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43}, Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 42.31(11)}Mn{sub 0.69(11)}, and Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 41.69(12)}Fe{sub 1.30(12)} order antiferromagnetically in the ab- and c-directions at 15, 14, and 13 K, respectively, with positive Weiss constants, suggesting the presence of ferromagnetic exchange interactions. Anisotropic magnetization data of Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub y} (T=Mn, Fe) analogs are discussed. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic susceptibility of Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4−x}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub x+y} (Ln = Gd, Yb; T= Mn, Fe). Display Omitted - Highlights: • Single crystals of Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4−x}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub x+y} were grown with Al-flux. • Anisotropic magnetic behavior were determined on single crystals. • Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4−x}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub x+y} (T=Mn, Fe) analogs order antiferromagnetically.

  1. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawel, Steven J; Hsu, Julia

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  2. Evaluation of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Containing Metallic Solutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawel, Steven J; Mansur, Louis K

    2006-08-01

    Room temperature cavitation tests of vacuum annealed type 316LN stainless steel were performed in pure Hg and in Hg with various amounts of metallic solute to evaluate potential mitigation of erosion/wastage. Tests were performed using an ultrasonic vibratory horn with specimens attached at the tip. All of the solutes examined, which included 5 wt% In, 10 wt% In, 4.4 wt% Cd, 2 wt% Ga, and a mixture that included 1 wt% each of Pb, Sn, and Zn, were found to increase cavitation-erosion as measured by increased weight loss and/or surface profile development compared to exposures for the same conditions in pure Hg. Qualitatively, each solute appeared to increase the post-test wetting tenacity of the Hg solutions and render the Hg mixture susceptible to manipulation of droplet shape.

  3. Effect of surface polishing and vacuum firing on electron stimulated desorption from 316LN stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyshev, Oleg B. Hogan, Benjamin T.; Pendleton, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The reduction of thermal outgassing from stainless steel by surface polishing or vacuum firing is well-known in vacuum technology, and the consequent use of both techniques allows an even further reduction of outgassing. The aim of this study was to identify the effectiveness of surface polishing and vacuum firing for reducing electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) from 316LN stainless steel, which is a frequently used material for particle accelerator vacuum chambers and components. It was found that, unlike for thermal outgassing, surface polishing does not reduce the ESD yield and may even increase it, while vacuum firing of nonpolished sample reduces only the H{sub 2} ESD yield by a factor 2.

  4. A new continuous two-step molecular precursor route to rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Crom, N.

    2012-07-15

    A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway is designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu). This new route involves a first oxidation step leading to the rare-earth oxysulfate Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub 4} which is subsequently reduced to the rare-earth oxysulfide Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S by switching to a H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere. The whole process occurs at a temperature significantly lower than usual solid state synthesis (T{<=}650 Degree-Sign C) and avoids the use of dangerous sulfur-based gases, providing a convenient route to the synthesis of the entire series of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S. The molecular precursors consist in heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(phen)] and [Ln(Et{sub 2}dtc){sub 3}(bipy)] (Et{sub 2}dtc=N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate; phen=1,10-phenanthroline; bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine) and were synthesized by a new high yield and high purity synthesis route. The nature of the molecular precursor determines the minimum synthesis temperature and influences therefore the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase. - Graphical abstract: A continuous two-step molecular precursor pathway was designed for the preparation of rare-earth oxysulfides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu), starting from heteroleptic dithiocarbamate complexes. The influence of the nature of the molecular precursor on the minimum synthesis temperature and on the purity of the final Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}S crystalline phase is discussed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new high yield and high purity synthesis route of rare earth dithiocarbamates is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds are used as precursors in a continuous process leading to rare-earth oxysulfides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxysulfides are obtained under much more moderate conditions than previously described.

  5. Extraction Based on in situ Formation of Dithiocarbamate for Separation of Am(III) from Ln(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyashita, Sunao; Yanaga, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji; Suganuma, Hideo; Satoh, Isamu

    2007-07-01

    A new solvent extraction technique based on in situ extractant formation of dithiocarbamate derivatives was constructed for the purpose of separation of Am(III) from Ln(III). Ammonium salts of dithiocarbamate in this technique are formed during the extraction course by the reaction between secondary amines and carbon disulfide in organic phase. The effects of substituent of secondary amines against the behavior of in situ formation of dithiocarbamate and the distribution behaviors of Am(III) and Ln(III)(especially Eu(III)) into nitrobenzene phase using in situ formation of dithiocarbamate were investigated. It was revealed that amines containing substituent in {alpha} position of amine were not suited that for in situ extractant formation method. The values of separation factor of Am(III)/Eu(III) >10{sup 4} were obtained by the new method using five di-substituted amines/CS{sub 2}/nitrobenzene system. (authors)

  6. Aqueous Binary Lanthanide(III) Nitrate Ln(NO3)3 Electrolytes Revisited: Extended Pitzer and Bromley Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Campbell, Emily L.; Neiner, Doinita; Pence, Natasha; Robinson, Troy; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2015-09-11

    To date, only limited thermodynamic models describing activity coefficients of the aqueous solutions of lanthanide ions are available. This work expands the existing experimental osmotic coefficient data obtained by classical isopiestic technique for the aqueous binary trivalent lanthanide nitrate Ln(NO3)3 solutions using a combination of water activity and vapor pressure osmometry measurements. The combined osmotic coefficient database for each aqueous lanthanide nitrate at 25°C, consisting of literature available data as well as data obtained in this work, was used to test the validity of Pitzer and Bromley thermodynamic models for the accurate prediction of mean molal activity coefficients of the Ln(NO3)3 solutions in wide concentration ranges. The new and improved Pitzer and Bromley parameters were calculated. It was established that the Ln(NO3)3 activity coefficients in the solutions with ionic strength up to 12 mol kg-1 can be estimated by both Pitzer and single-parameter Bromley models, even though the latter provides for more accurate prediction, particularly in the lower ionic strength regime (up to 6 mol kg-1). On the other hand for the concentrated solutions, the extended three-parameter Bromley model can be employed to predict the Ln(NO3)3 activity coefficients with remarkable accuracy. The accuracy of the extended Bromley model in predicting the activity coefficients was greater than ~95% and ~90% for all solutions with the ionic strength up to 12 mol kg-1 and and 20 mol kg-1, respectively. This is the first time that the activity coefficients for concentrated lanthanide solutions have been predicted with such a remarkable accuracy.

  7. Luminescent pillared Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination frameworks with two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylate ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Sui-Jun; Jia, Ji-Min; Cui, Yu; Han, Song-De; Chang, Ze

    2014-04-01

    In our efforts toward rational design and systematic synthesis of pillar-layer structure coordination frameworks, four new Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination polymers (CPs) based on two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylic ligands with formula ([LnZn(L1){sub 2}(L2)(H{sub 2}O){sub m}]nH{sub 2}O){sub ?} (Ln=La (1), Eu (2), Gd (3) and Dy (4), m=3 (for 1) and 2 (for 24), n=8 (for 1) and 7 (for 24), H{sub 2}L1=pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate acid, HL2=isonicotinic acid), have been synthesized under hydrothermal reaction of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnO, H{sub 2}L1 and HL2. CP 1 has a three-dimensional (3D) structure with a (3,6)-connected sit topology network, while CPs 24 are isostructural with 3D single-node pcu alpha-Po topology network. Also, luminescent properties of these CPs have also been investigated. The emission of 1 and 3 should be attributed to the coordination-perturbed ligand-centered luminescence and the emission spectra of 2 and 4 show the characteristic bands of the corresponding Ln{sup III} ions. - Graphical abstract: Four new 3D Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} coordination frameworks with pillar-layer sit or pcu alpha-Po topology have been successfully obtained. Moreover, the photoluminescent properties of compounds 14 have also been investigated. - Highlights: Four new Ln{sup III}Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination frameworks with two types of topologies have been synthesized. Metal oxides and two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylate ligands were used for the construction of targeted coordination polymers. The luminescent properties of the coordination polymers are investigated.

  8. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu) ceramics obtained by molten-salt synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siqueira, K.P.F.; Soares, J.C.; Granado, E.; Bittar, E.M.; Paula, A.M. de; Moreira, R.L.; Dias, A.

    2014-01-15

    Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) ceramics were obtained by molten-salt synthesis and their structures were systematically investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), second harmonic generation (SHG) and Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that ceramics with the largest ionic radii (La, Pr, Nd) crystallized into the Pmcn space group, while the ceramics with intermediate ionic radii (Sm-Gd) exhibited a different crystal structure belonging to the Ccmm space group. For this last group of ceramics, this result was corroborated by SHG and Raman scattering and ruled out any possibility for the non-centrosymmetric C 222{sub 1} space group, solving a recent controversy in the literature. Finally, according to SXRD, Tb-Lu containing samples exhibited an average defect fluorite structure (Fm3{sup ¯}m space group). Nonetheless, broad scattering at forbidden Bragg reflections indicates the presence of short-range domains with lower symmetry. Vibrational spectroscopy showed the presence of six Raman-active modes, inconsistent with the average cubic fluorite structure, and in line with the existence of lower-symmetry nano-domains immersed in the average fluorite structure of these ceramics. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectrum for Sm{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} ceramics showing their 27 phonon modes adjusted through Lorentzian lines. According to synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, this material belongs to the space group Cmcm. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} ceramics were obtained by molten-salt synthesis. • SXRD, SHG and Raman scattering confirmed orthorhombic and cubic structures. • Ccmm instead of C222{sub 1} is the correct structure for Sm–Gd ceramics. • Pmcn space group was confirmed for La-, Pr- and Nd-based ceramics. • For Tb–Lu ceramics, ordered domains of a pyrochlore structure were observed.

  9. Crystal structure of fluorite-related Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} (Ln=LaDy) ceramics studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siqueira, K.P.F.; Borges, R.M.; Granado, E.; Malard, L.M.; Paula, A.M. de; Moreira, R.L.; Bittar, E.M.; Dias, A.

    2013-07-15

    Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Dy) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction in optimized conditions of temperature and time to yield single-phase ceramics. The crystal structures of the obtained ceramics were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG) and Raman scattering. All samples exhibited fluorite-type orthorhombic structures with different oxygen arrangements as a function of the ionic radius of the lanthanide metal. For ceramics with the largest ionic radii (LaNd), the ceramics crystallized into the Cmcm space group, while the ceramics with intermediate and smallest ionic radii (SmDy) exhibited a different crystal structure belonging to the same space group, described under the Ccmm setting. The results from SHG and Raman scattering confirmed these settings and ruled out any possibility for the non-centrosymmetric C222{sub 1} space group describing the structure of the small ionic radii ceramics, solving a recent controversy in the literature. Besides, the Raman modes for all samples are reported for the first time, showing characteristic features for each group of samples. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectrum for La{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} ceramics showing their 22 phonon modes adjusted through Lorentzian lines. According to synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, this material belongs to the space group Cmcm. - Highlights: Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} ceramics belonging to the space groups Cmcm and Ccmm are synthesized. SXRD, SHG and Raman scattering confirmed the orthorhombic structures. Ccmm instead of C222{sub 1} is the correct one based on SHG and Raman data.

  10. Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of series of 4d–4f ln(III)–Ag(I) heterometallic coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ran, Xing-Rui; Wang, Ning; Xie, Wei-Ping; Xiong, Yan-Ju; Cheng, Qian; Long, Yi; Yue, Shan-Tang; Liu, Ying-Liang

    2015-05-15

    By control of the experimental parameters such as ligands, pH value and reacting temperature, series of three-dimensional (3D) 4d–4f Ln(III)–Ag(I) porous coordination polymers (PCPs) with interesting chain-layer construction, namely, ([Ln{sup III}Ag{sup I}(na)(ina)(ox)]·2(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} [Ln=Sm(1), Eu(2), Gd(3), Tb(4), Dy(5), Ho(6), Y(7), Yb(8)], have been successfully synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized. All the complexes are characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA). Furthermore, the luminescence properties of compounds 2 and 4 and the magsnetic properties of complexes 3 and 5 were also investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: Series of three-dimensional (3D) 4d–4f Ln(III)–Ag(I) porous coordination polymers (PCPs) with interesting chain-layer construction which are featured by tetranuclear Ln{sub 2}Ag{sub 2} and ‘non-linear’ N–Ag–N linkages. - Highlights: • Complexes 1–8 are first built by three kinds of organic ligands based on nicotinic acid and isonicotinic acid. • PCPs 1–8 are featured by tetranuclear Ln{sub 2}Ag{sub 2} and ‘non-linear’ N–Ag–N linkages. • The total solvent-accessible volume of PCP 2 comprises 11.6% of the crystal volume after dislodging the free water molecules. • Complexes 2 and 4 exhibit characteristic lanthanide-centered luminescence, while compounds 3 and 5 show antiferromagnetic behaviors.

  11. Sonochemical synthesis of highly luminescent Ln2O3:Eu3+ (Y, La, Gd) nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alammar, Tarek; Cybinska, Joanna; Campbell, Paul S.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-05-12

    In this study, sonication of Ln(CH3COO)3·H2O, Eu(CH3COO)3·H2O and NaOH dissolved in the ionic liquid-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonylamide lead to Ln(OH)3:Eu (Ln: Gd, La, Y) nanoparticles. Subsequent calcination at 800 °C for 3 h allowed to obtain Ln2O3:Eu nanopowders. Gd2O3 and Y2O3 were obtained in the C-type lanthanide sequioxide structure, whereas La2O3 crystallized in the A-type. Structure, morphology, and luminescent properties of the nano-oxides were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dispersive X-ray (EDX), and photoluminescence (PL). SEM studies revealed that the synthesized Gd2O3:Eu, La2O3:Eu, and Y2O3:Eu formed nano-spindle, -sheets, and -rods in shape, respectively. The nanoscale materials show very efficient red emission due to the intraconfigurational f–f transitions of Eu3+. The quantum yields for Ln2O3:Eu (5%) were determined to be 4.2% for Ln=Gd, 13.8% for Ln=Y and 5.2% for Ln=La. The asymmetric ratio I02/I01 of Eu3+ varies from 5.3 for Gd2O3, to 5.6 for Y2O3 to 6.5 for La2O3, which increased the color chromaticity.

  12. Preparation and spectroscopic properties of rare-earth (RE) (RE = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Tm)-activated K{sub 2}LnZr(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (Ln = Y, La, Gd and Lu) phosphate in vacuum ultraviolet region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Lin, Xiao; Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, 100039 ; Zhao, Jing-Tai; Zhang, Guo-Bin

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? We report the VUV spectroscopic properties of rare-earth ions in K{sub 2}LnZr(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. ? The O{sup 2?}-Eu{sup 3+} charge transfer bands at about 220 nm have been observed. ? The 4f5d spin-allowed and spin-forbidden transitions of Tb{sup 3+} have been observed. ? There is energy transfer between the host and rare-earth activators. -- Abstract: Rare earth (RE = Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy and Tm)-activated K{sub 2}LnZr(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (Ln = Y, La, Gd and Lu) have been synthesized by solid-state reaction method, and their vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation luminescent characteristics have been investigated. The band in the wavelength range of 130157 nm and the other one range from 155 to 216 nm with the maximum at about 187 nm in the VUV excitation spectra of these compounds are attributed to the host lattice absorption and OZr charge transfer transition, respectively. The charge transfer bands (CTB) of O{sup 2?}-Sm{sup 3+}, O{sup 2?}-Dy{sup 3+} and O{sup 2?}-Tm{sup 3+}, in Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}-activated samples, have not been obviously observed probably because the 2p electrons of oxygen are tightly bound to the zirconium ion in the host lattice. For Eu{sup 3+}-activated samples, the relatively weak O{sup 2?}-Eu{sup 3+} CTB at about 220 nm is observed. And for Tb{sup 3+}-activated samples, the bands at 223 and 258 nm are related to the 4f-5d spin-allowed and spin-forbidden transitions of Tb{sup 3+}, respectively. It is observed that there is energy transfer between the host lattice and the luminescent activators (e.g. Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}). From the standpoint of luminescent efficiency, color purity and chemical stability, K{sub 2}GdZr(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Sm{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} are attractive candidates for novel yellow, red, green-emitting PDP phosphors.

  13. Ab initio calculation of excess properties of La{sub 1−x}(Ln,An){sub x}PO{sub 4} solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yan; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Blanca-Romero, Ariadna; Vinograd, Victor; Bosbach, Dirk

    2014-12-15

    We used ab initio computational approach to predict the excess enthalpy of mixing and the corresponding regular/subregular model parameters for La{sub 1−x}Ln{sub x}PO{sub 4} (Ln=Ce,…, Tb) and La{sub 1−x}An{sub x}PO{sub 4} (An=Pu, Am and Cm) monazite-type solid solutions. We found that the regular model interaction parameter W computed for La{sub 1−x}Ln{sub x}PO{sub 4} solid solutions matches the few existing experimental data. Within the lanthanide series W increases quadratically with the volume mismatch between LaPO{sub 4} and LnPO{sub 4} endmembers (ΔV=V{sub LaPO{sub 4}}−V{sub LnPO{sub 4}}), so that W(kJ/mol)=0.618(ΔV(cm{sup 3}/mol)){sup 2}. We demonstrate that this relationship also fits the interaction parameters computed for La{sub 1−x}An{sub x}PO{sub 4} solid solutions. This shows that lanthanides can be used as surrogates for investigation of the thermodynamic mixing properties of actinide-bearing solid solutions. - Highlights: • The excess enthalpies of mixing for monazite-type solid solutions are computed. • The excess enthalpies increase with the endmembers volume mismatch. • The relationship derived for lanthanides is transferable to La{sub 1−x}An{sub x}PO{sub 4} systems.

  14. Method for synthesizing fine-grained phosphor powders of the type (RE.sub.1- Ln.sub.x)(P.sub.1-y V.sub.y)O.sub.4

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Mark L. F.

    1998-01-01

    A method for generating well-crystallized photo- and cathodoluminescent oxide phosphor powders. The method of this invention uses hydrothermal synthesis and annealing to produce nearly monosized (RE.sub.1-x Ln.sub.x)(P.sub.1-y V.sub.y)O.sub.4 (Ln.dbd.Ce.fwdarw.Lu) phosphor grains with crystallite sizes from 0.04 to 5 .mu.m. Such phosphors find application in cathode-ray tube, flat-panel, and projection displays.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Th{sub 1−x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2−x/2} mixed-oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horlait, D.; Clavier, N.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Th{sub 1−x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2−x/2} (Ln = Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Yb) were produced from oxalates precursors. ► The isomorphic thermal conversion of oxalates to oxides were followed by HT-ESEM. ► The stabilization of the ThO{sub 2} fluorite structure up to x = 0.4 was evidenced by XRD. ► Neodymium incorporation limits in solid solutions were determined by XRD and μ-Raman. ► Lanthanide incorporation mechanism in ThO{sub 2} structure was formally determined by μ-Raman. -- Abstract: Several Th{sub 1−x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2−x/2} mixed-oxides (Ln = Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er or Yb) were prepared from oxalate precursors. Structural and microstructural investigations of both initial precursors and resulting oxides were undertaken by XRD, μ-Raman spectroscopy and SEM, with a particular attention paid to the Th{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 2−x/2} series. For oxides, XRD and μ-Raman agreed well with the stabilization of the Fm3{sup ¯}m structure up to x{sub Nd} = 0.4, thanks to the concomitant creation of oxygen vacancies, as also confirmed by μ-Raman. Then, a structural transition to the Ia3{sup ¯} superstructure occurred. For x{sub Nd} ≥ 0.49, mixed-oxides with an additional hexagonal Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase were prepared. Besides, the unit cell parameter of the Th{sub 1−x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2−x/2} series followed a quadratic relation versus the x substitution rate as a result of the combination between modifications of cationic radius and cation coordination, and the decrease of O-O repulsion linked to the presence of oxygen vacancies.

  16. Electron-stimulated desorption from polished and vacuum fired 316LN stainless steel coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyshev, Oleg B. Valizadeh, Reza; Hogan, Benjamin T.; Hannah, Adrian N.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, two identical 316LN stainless steel tubular samples, which had previously been polished and vacuum-fired and then used for the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments, were coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V with different morphologies: columnar and dense. ESD measurement results after nonevaporable getter (NEG) activation to 150, 180, 250, and 350 °C indicated that the values for the ESD yields are significantly (2–20 times) lower than the data from our previous study with similar coatings on nonvacuum-fired samples. Based on these results, the lowest pressure and best long-term performance in particle accelerators will be achieved with a vacuum-fired vacuum chamber coated with dense Ti-Zr-Hf-V coating activated at 180 °C. This is likely due to the following facts: after NEG activation, the hydrogen concentration inside the NEG was lower than in the bulk stainless steel substrate; the NEG coating created a barrier for gas diffusion from the sample bulk to vacuum; the dense NEG coating performed better as a barrier than the columnar NEG coating.

  17. Monodisperse and core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho, and Tm) spherical particles: A facile synthesis and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhenhe; Feng, Bin; Bian, Shasha; Liu, Tao; Wang, Mingli; Gao, Yu; Sun, Di; Gao, Xin; Sun, Yaguang

    2012-12-15

    The core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} particles were realized by coating the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} phosphors onto the surface of non-aggregated, monodisperse and spherical SiO{sub 2} particles by the Pechini sol-gel method. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), photolumiminescence (PL), and low-voltage cathodoluminescence (CL). The results indicate that the 800 Degree-Sign C annealed sample consists of crystalline Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} shells and amorphous SiO{sub 2} cores, in spherical shape with a narrow size distribution. The as-obtained particles show strong light emission with different colors corresponding to different Ln{sup 3+} ions under ultraviolet-visible light excitation and low-voltage electron beams excitation, which have potential applications in fluorescent lamps and field emission displays. - Graphical Abstract: Representative SEM and TEM images of the core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} particles; CIE chromaticity diagram showing the emission colors for SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+}; Multicolor emissions of SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} particles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The core-shell particles were realized by coating the phosphors onto the surface of SiO{sub 2} particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample consists of crystalline Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} shells and amorphous SiO{sub 2} cores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particles show different light emission colors corresponding to Ln{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They have potential applications in fluorescent lamps and field emission displays.

  18. Synthesis and structural characterization of new defect pyrochlore type A{sub x}Ln{sub y}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 6+z} antimoniates (0Ln = Eu, Gd, and Y) prepared by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Haimouti, A.; Zambon, D.; El-Ghozzi, M.; Avignant, D.; Leroux, F.; El Aatmani, M.; Daoud, M

    2003-07-14

    New cubic defect pyrochlore type A{sub x}Ln{sub y}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 6+z} antimoniates (0Ln=Eu, Gd, and Y) (space group Fd3m) were prepared by calcination in air at 650 deg. C of compositions obtained by a coprecipitation method. Their crystal structures were refined by the Rietveld procedure and further confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) experiments. Refinements of the X-ray powder diffraction data show a partial and statistical occupation of the 8b site by alkaline or thallous ions and oxygen and lead to values close to 0.33 for the only refinable positional x parameter of the 48f oxygenated site.

  19. Bis-diglycol-amides (Bis-DGA) as new extractants for An(III) and Ln(III) from aqueous high-level wastes issued from the Purex process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espartero, A.G.; Murillo, M.T.; Almaraz, M.; Sanchez-Quesada, J.; Iglesias-Sanchez, J.C.; Prados, P.; Segura, M.; Mendoza, J. de

    2008-07-01

    A new family of compounds with two diglycolamide moieties in their molecule have been synthesized and studied as suitable extractants for trivalent actinides (An(III)) and trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) present in high-level wastes (HLW) issued from the PUREX process. Although the obtained distribution ratios are comparable with those from TODGA under similar experimental conditions, the bis-DGA compounds showed higher selectivity towards Ln(III). The number of bis-DGA molecules involved in the formation of the dominant complex is two, and it is possible to recover more than 99% of the extracted An and Ln with 0.01 M nitric acid in order to recycle the solvent in subsequent extraction cycles. (authors)

  20. Method for synthesizing fine-grained phosphor powders of the type (RE{sub 1{minus}x}Ln{sub x})(P{sub 1{minus}y}V{sub y})O{sub 4}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, M.L.F.

    1998-04-28

    A method for generating well-crystallized photo- and cathodoluminescent oxide phosphor powders is disclosed. The method of this invention uses hydrothermal synthesis and annealing to produce nearly monosized (RE{sub 1{minus}x}Ln{sub x})(P{sub 1{minus}y}V{sub y}O{sub 4}) (Ln{double_bond}Ce{yields}Lu) phosphor grains with crystallite sizes from 0.04 to 5 {micro}m. Such phosphors find application in cathode-ray tube, flat-panel, and projection displays. 4 figs.

  1. Metal–organic frameworks assembled from lanthanide and 2,5-pyridinedicaboxylate with cubane-like [Ln{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}] building units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelbaky, Mohammed S.M.; Amghouz, Zakariae; Fernández-Zapico, Eva; García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R.

    2015-09-15

    tremendous attention due to the unique characteristic of lanthanide cations, such as variable coordination numbers and geometries which often lead to novel complex structures, and also to their magnetic and photoluminescence properties. Herein, three LOFs formulated as [Ln{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(25p){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]·H{sub 2}O (Ln=Y, Yb) and [Y{sub 6}(OH){sub 8}(25p){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] have been obtained by hydrothermal method and characterized, and the photoluminescence properties of the Eu and Tb doped compounds are discussed. - Highlights: • Three novel LnOFs has been synthesized and characterized. • Crystal structures are based on tetranuclear cuban-like [Ln{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}]{sup 8+} clusters. • 25pYb and 25pY-1 are based on isolated [Ln{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}]{sup 8+} clusters. • 25pY-2 is based on infinite inorganic chains built up from [Y{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}]{sup 8+} clusters. • Photoluminescence studies show strong red and green light emissions.

  2. The arsenides LnPd{sub 3}As{sub 2} (Ln = La-Nd, Sm, Gd) and structure refinement of CePd{sub 2-x}As{sub 2} with the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quebe, P.; Jeitschko, W.

    1995-02-15

    The title compounds were prepared in well-crystallized form by annealing the corresponding binary arsenides in a NaCl/KCl flux. The compounds LnPd{sub 3}As{sub 2} crystallize with a new monoclinic structure type, which was determined from single-crystal X-ray data of GdPd{sub 3}As{sub 2}: C2/m, a = 1656.3(6) pm, b = 404.6(2) pm, c = 993.7(4) pm, {beta} = 107.85(2){degrees}, Z = 6, R = 0.025 for 1728 structure factors and 58 variable parameters. These arsenides belong to a large structural family with a metal to metalloid ratio of 2:1. Somewhat unusual features in the structure of GdPd{sub 3}As{sub 2} are the (distorted) octahedral coordination of one gadolinium site and the square-planar coordination of arsenic atoms around two palladium sites. All of these, however, are also observed for the corresponding atoms in the previously reported, closely related structure of Th{sub 5}Fe{sub 19}P{sub 12}. CePd{sub 2-x}As{sub 2} has the tetragonal ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure (a = 425.1(2) pm, c = 1026.1(6)pm, R = 0.023 for 244 F values and 11 variables) with an As-As distance of 247.1(1) pm. The refinement of the occupancy parameter of the palladium position resulted in a value of 87.9(2)% corresponding to the formula CePd{sub 1.758(4)}As{sub 2}. It is argued that the formation of these defects reduces antibonding (destabilizing) Pd-Pd interactions.

  3. Enhanced ferromagnetic order in Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} featuring canted [MnO{sub 4}]{sub ∞} spin chains of mixed-valent Mn(III)/Mn(IV). Aliovalent substitution of the Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sup III}{sub 2+x}Mn{sup IV}{sub 1−x}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} solid-solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, J. Palmer; Sulejmanovic, Dino; Becht, Gregory; He, Jian; Hitchcock, Dale; Yan, Yonggao; Hwu, Shiou-Jyh

    2013-10-15

    Crystals of Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} (x=0; x∼0.15 for Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm. Eu, Gd, Dy; x∼0.3 for Ln=Gd) were isolated upon using high-temperature, solid-state methods in molten-salt media. These compounds are isostructural with the previously reported Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} (Ln=La, Sm, Gd) series that contains the same [MnO{sub 4}]{sub ∞} spin chains. The synthesis of the Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} (x=0) phase was carried out by a double aliovalent substitution with respect to the Sr{sup 2+} and Ge{sup 4+} ions that replace Na{sup +}/Ln{sup 3+} and As{sup 5+} in Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}, respectively. The title series contains mixed-valent Mn(III)/Mn(IV) and shows a limited range of solid solution, both of which were not observed in the previously reported Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} series. To form the Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} solid solution, one of the Sr{sup 2+} sites, i.e., the original Ln-site in Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}, is partially substituted by Ln{sup 3+} in a statistical disorder of Sr{sub 1−x}/Ln{sub x}. Initial magnetic investigations of selected derivatives reveal higher ferromagnetic ordering temperatures than those reported for the Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3} series, presumably attributed to a lesser degree of canting as a result of introducing non-Jahn–Teller Mn{sup 4+} ions. Also intriguing is the observation of multiple anomalies at low temperatures which appear to be of electronic origins. - Graphical abstract: Sr{sub 4−x}Ln{sub x}Mn(III){sub 2+x}Mn(IV){sub 1−x}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Double aliovalent substitution: Sr{sub 4}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3} with respect to Na{sub 3}LnMn{sub 3}O{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 3}. • Solid solution with respect to statistical disorder of Sr{sub 1−x}Ln

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure and thermal behavior of two hydrated forms of lanthanide phthalates Ln{sub 2}(O{sub 2}+C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O) (Ln=Ce, Nd) and Nd{sub 2}(O{sub 2}C-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizon, David; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry; Roussel, Pascal; Abraham, Francis

    2010-09-15

    New hydrated lanthanide phthalates have been hydrothermally prepared with cerium and neodymium in different reaction media involving water or mixed water-ethanol solvent. The monohydrated Ln{sub 2}(1,2-bdc){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O) (Ln=Ce or Nd) and dihydrated Nd{sub 2}(1,2-bdc){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} forms have been characterized by single-crystal analysis. Their structures consist of infinite inorganic chains of lanthanide-centered polyhedra linked to each other through the phthalate ligands in order to generate mixed organic-inorganic layered structure. The two hydrated structures differ by the number of terminal water species attached to the lanthanide cations, which induce symmetry change from a triclinic (Nd{sub 2}(1,2-bdc){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}) to an orthorhombic (Nd{sub 2}(1,2-bdc){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}) cell for neodymium whereas the cerium-based phase only exists in the monohydrated form, with two distinct symmetries (orthorhombic or triclinic). Structural comparisons with the other members of the lanthanide phthalate series with identical chemical formula are also discussed. Thermal X-ray diffraction experiment indicates that the transformation from dihydrate form into the monohydrated form does not occur during a heating process. - Graphical abstract: New members of the chain-like structures of neodymium phthalates with different hydration states Nd{sub 2}(1,2-bdc){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub x} (x=1 or 2, 1-2bdc=phthalate group) and comparison with cerium-based analogs.

  5. STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Admin",92 1600009187,01,001,1,126140459,"ID 10610","Idaho Falls City of",92 ...40,01,001,1,21396665,"TX 10610","College Station City of",92 4800003940,01,002,1,1898516,"...

  6. STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","FL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAROFDAT

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 1600009187,01,001,1,1,000137324699,"ID 10610","Idaho Falls City of",98 ...001,1,1,000040367779,"TX 10610","College Station City of",98 4800003940,01,002,1,1,0000060...

  7. STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Admin",90 1600009187,01,013,1,2805149,"ID 13600","Idaho Falls City of",90 ...940,01,013,1,7532742,"TX 13600","College Station City of",90 4800003940,01,014,1,4913040,"...

  8. STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Admin",91 1600009187,01,013,1,6221585,"ID 13600","Idaho Falls City of",91 ...40,01,013,1,11606854,"TX 13600","College Station City of",91 4800003940,01,014,1,4066385,"...

  9. LN 03-04-2016.qxp_la02_02-20-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... design innovations for diesel engines, pulse combustors ... for predicting the lifetime of dif- ferent rubbers ... Jose Pacheco stand in front of Sandia's ion beam generator. ...

  10. Thermal Expansion of the Orthorhombic Phase in the Ln[subscript...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Lnsubscript 2TiOsubscript 5 System Citation Details In-Document Search ... Country of Publication: United States Language: ENGLISH Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  11. ln 01-222-16.qxp_la02_02-20-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    driving force Sandia spent roughly $983 million on goods and ser- vices in fiscal year 2015, up nearly $21 million from the previous year, and New Mexico businesses received more than $381 million, or 39 percent of the total, according to the Labs' latest economic impact report. US small businesses received more than 52 percent of the available dollars, about $519 million in Sandia con- tracts, with the New Mexico share totaling $259 million, or 68 percent of the small business total. Compared

  12. ln.12-11-15.qxp_la02_02-20-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gil Herrera awarded UNM Lobo Award Inside . . . Sandia's soot formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Sandia startup mPower, Part 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The American Vacuum Society honors Catherine Sobczak . . 5 David Moore named a fellow of the American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 When winter weather hits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Sandia, ASU

  13. ln11-27-15.qxp_la02_02-20-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crush materials at 1 million atmospheres A new star is rising in Area 4. Its name is Thor, its aim is to study materials at extreme pressures, and its novel features may foreshadow future renovations in Z, the world's largest and most powerful pulsed-power accelerator. Z is a mainstay in Sandia's stockpile stewardship efforts. It is also Sandia's lead machine in the race for peacetime nuclear fusion and premier in creating research conditions mimicking the cores of planets and interiors of

  14. Phase Relations and Elemental Distribution Among Co-Existing Phases in the Ceramics of the Pseudobinary System CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-LnAlO{sub 3} (Ln= Nd, Sm)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailenko, Natalia; Stefanovsky, Sergey

    2007-07-01

    In the ceramics in series (1-x) CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} - x NdAlO{sub 3} and (1-x) CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} - x SmAlO{sub 3} (x = 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75) produced by cold pressing and sintering at 1400, 1450 and 1500 deg. C zirconolite was found to be a major phase, perovskite was an extra phase and traces of residual baddeleyite occurred. At x = 0.75 the perovskite was major phase and zirconolite and cubic oxide of fianite or tazheranite type were extra phases. Major Nd and Sm host phase at x = 0.25 was found to be zirconolite (about 65% of total Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 74% of total Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}). With the x value increasing perovskite becomes major host phase for Nd and Sm accumulating of up to about 92% of total Nd and about 72% of total Sm. As follows from SEM/EDS data Nd and Sm contents in the zirconolite may reach {approx}1 formula unit (fu). (authors)

  15. Alpha and gamma radioysis of nuclear solvent etxraction ligands used for An(III) and Ln(III) Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen P. Mezyk; Bruce J. Mincher; Christian Ekberg; Gunnar Skarnemark

    2013-05-01

    The separation of the minor actinides from dissolved nuclear fuel remains a major challenge in developing large-scale waste separations processes. One important criterion is that all these processes must be robust under high acidity and radiation dose conditions. Here we have investigated the TRUEX ligand CMPO in dodecane, comparing the effects of gamma (60Co) with alpha irradiation using isotopic alpha sources (244Cm, 211At) experiments. The radiolytically-based CMPO decomposition efficiencies are approximately the same for both types of radiolysis, with the overall decomposition being significantly less when this formulation is irradiated in contact with aqueous acid.

  16. GS-PR-0002-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20010130 This document describes the general procedure for filling large stainless steel liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) dewars from the large external LN 2 tank located in the gas ...

  17. ANL-78-XX-95 Energy Level Structure and Transition Probabilities

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    III. Treatment of Experimental Data 8 Fig. 2. Crystal-field Parameters for Ln 3+ :LaCl 3 and Ln 3+ :LaF 3 13 IV. Energy Level Correlations - Survey of Experimental Data 14 1. f 2 ...

  18. Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Testing (BeLPT)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... to beryllium. 8.3. Establish a reference data set for each serum, and determine the Ln of ... of the Ln(maximum SI) for the reference data set (see Appendix B section B.10). 8.4. ...

  19. On the relationships between the Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics, and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use either of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the equilibrium chemistry approximation (ECA) kinetics, which is the first-order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of an enzyme–substrate complex exactly for a single-enzyme and single-substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of a quasi-steadymore » state for the enzyme–substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme–substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme–substrate complexes, substrates, and enzymes. In particular, I show that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in deriving the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [E]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [E]T, and persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [S]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration

  20. On the relationships between Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-03

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state formore » the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the

  1. The photorefractive characteristics of bismuth-oxide doped lithium niobate crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Dahuai; Yao, Jiaying; Kong, Yongfa; Liu, Shiguo; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Shaolin; Xu, Jingjun

    2015-01-15

    Bismuth-doped lithium niobate (LN:Bi) crystals were grown by Czochralski method and their optical damage resistance, photorefraction, absorption spectra, and defect energy levels were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the photorefractive properties of LN:Bi were enhanced as compared with congruent one, the photorefractive response time was greatly shortened, the photorefractive sensitivity was increased, and the diffraction efficiency of near-stoichiometric LN:Bi (SLN:Bi) reached 31.72% and 49.08% at 532 nm and 488 nm laser, respectively (light intensity of 400 mW/cm{sup 2}). An absorption peak at about 350 nm was observed in the absorption spectrum of LN:Bi. And the defect energy levels simulation indicates new defect levels appear in the forbidden gap of LN:Bi crystals. Therefore bismuth can act as photorefractive centers in LN crystals.

  2. Measurement of Adhesion in Alumina/Glass-Epoxy System Using Spherical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Setup 116" WC Spherical Indenter Capacitive Gauge Environmental Chamber (LN2 chilled) Indenter attached to load cell bolts to bottom of crosshead. Crosshead rate 0.05 mmmin. ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Hence, the spacing between measurement points is an ... particle growth following the contact between the particles. ... over undoped LN such as resistance to photorefraction, lower ...

  4. Texas Solar Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1703 W Koenig Ln Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78756 Region: Texas Area Sector: Solar Product: Design, sales and installation of renewable energy equipment and systems Website:...

  5. SSRLUOEC Minutes 2/03

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Recent lightning strikes caused some power outages. Piero Pianetta reported that back up generators are being investigated for critical equipment. LN monos are particularly ...

  6. Eufinium Finance Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: EC1M 3LN Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product: Eufinium specialises in the equity financing...

  7. Enncloc&et

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .T I. 0 ,; ..i ,I.. ' (,' . . .._ . . . . . . . . . Enncloc&et tm w&r Farm (ln quild.) Res. Ser. Br. 'Feed Idtrls. Fin&" Beenrkm

  8. Envirogen Sustainable Resources ESR | Open Energy Information

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    Place: Scunthorpe, United Kingdom Zip: DN17 4LN Product: Manufacturers and suppliers of wood pellets. Coordinates: 53.586502, -0.651811 Show Map Loading map......

  9. Lanthanide(III) di- and tetra-nuclear complexes supported by a chelating tripodal tris(amidate) ligand

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Jones, Matthew B.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Scott, Brian L.; MacBeth, Cora E.; Gordon, John C.

    2015-04-06

    Syntheses, structural, and spectroscopic characterization of multinuclear tris(amidate) lanthanide complexes is described. Addition of K3[N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3] to LnX3 (LnX3 = LaBr3, CeI3, and NdCl3) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) results in the generation of dinuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)(DMF)]2(μ-DMF) (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Nd(3)), in good yields. Syntheses of tetranuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)]4 (Ln = Ce (4), Nd(5)), resulted from protonolysis of Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Ce, Nd) with N(o-PhNCH(O)tBu)3. As a result, in the solid-state, complexes 1–5 exhibit coordination modes of the tripodal tris(amidate) ligand that are unique to the 4f elements and have not been previously observed in transition metal systems.

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TOA Radiative Forcing F f(n) - f(N CCN 100) nN CCN 500 nN CCN 2500 ACI ln d ln N CCN McComiskey and Feingold, GRL, 2008 F (W m -2 ) ACI Quantifying Error in the...

  11. Micro- and nanodomain imaging in uniaxial ferroelectrics: Joint application of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya. Zelenovskiy, P. S.

    2014-08-14

    The application of the most effective methods of the domain visualization in model uniaxial ferroelectrics of lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) family, and relaxor strontium-barium niobate (SBN) have been reviewed in this paper. We have demonstrated the synergetic effect of joint usage of optical, confocal Raman, and piezoelectric force microscopies which provide extracting of the unique information about formation of the micro- and nanodomain structures. The methods have been applied for investigation of various types of domain structures with increasing complexity: (1) periodical domain structure in LN and LT, (2) nanodomain structures in LN, LT, and SBN, (3) nanodomain structures in LN with modified surface layer, (4) dendrite domain structure in LN. The self-assembled appearance of quasi-regular nanodomain structures in highly non-equilibrium switching conditions has been considered.

  12. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fangxu . E-mail: jiang@wehi.edu.au; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its {alpha}{sub 6} integrin and {alpha}-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells.

  13. Structure and physical properties of single crystal PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} and CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (M=V, Cr): A comparison of compounds adopting the CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} structure type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangas, Michael J.; Schmitt, Devin C.; Sakai, Akito; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 ; Chan, Julia Y.

    2012-12-15

    Crystal growth and full structure determination of compounds adopting the CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} structure type, LnTi{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=La-Pr, Sm, and Yb), LnV{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=La-Pr, and Sm), and LnCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=La-Pr, Sm, and Yb), are reported. Resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity of flux grown single crystals of the nonmagnetic CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} (Ln=Ce, Yb; M=Ti, V) compounds are compared to PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20}. Of particular interest is PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} which does not show any phase transition down to the lowest temperature of the measurement (400 mK in resistivity measurement and 1.8 K for magnetic susceptibility measurements) and exhibits Kondo behavior at low temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of SmV{sub 2}Al{sub 20} showing the interpenetrating diamond-like samarium network and pyrochlore-like vanadium network. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystals of LnM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} were grown from a molten aluminum flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic, electrical, and specific heat of single crystal LnM{sub 2}Al{sub 20} are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PrCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} exhibits evidence of Kondo effect.

  14. Radiation Tolerance of A{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} Materials - A Question of Bonding?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittle, Karl R.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Smith, Katherine L.; Blackford, Mark G.; Harvey, Elizabeth J.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2007-07-01

    The resistance of Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = lanthanide) compounds to radiation damage is an important topic in the understanding and development of new materials by which radioactive nuclear waste can safely be immobilised. A model has been developed, from previously published density functional theory and molecular orbital theory simulations of the band structure for Ln{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} materials. This model provides a chemical interpretation of radiation stability. (authors)

  15. Syntheses, Structure, Magnetism, and Optical Properties of Lutetium-based Interlanthanide Selenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Corwin H; Jin, Geng Bang; Choi, Eun Sang; Guertin, Robert P.; Brooks, James S.; Booth, Corwin H.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2007-10-01

    Ln{sub 3}LuSe{sub 6} (Ln = La, Ce), {beta}-LnLuSe{sub 3} (Ln = Pr, Nd), and Ln{sub x}Lu{sub 4-x}Se{sub 6} (Ln = Sm, Gd; x = 1.82, 1.87) have been synthesized using a Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} flux at 1000 C. Ln{sub 3}LuSe{sub 6} (Ln = La, Ce) adopt the U{sub 3}ScS{sub 6}-type three-dimensional structure, which is constructed from two-dimensional {infinity}{sup 2} [Ln{sub 3}Se{sub 6}]{sup 3-} slabs with the gaps between these slabs filled by octahedrally coordinated Lu{sup 3+} ions. The series of {beta}-LnLuSe{sub 3} (Ln = Pr, Nd) are isotypic with UFeS{sub 3}. Their structures include layers formed from LuSe6 octahedra that are separated by eight-coordinate larger Ln{sup 3+} ions in bicapped trigonal prismatic environments. Sm{sub 1.82}Lu{sub 2.18}Se{sub 6} and Gd{sub 1.87}Lu{sub 2.13}Se{sub 6} crystallize in the disordered F-Ln{sub 2}S{sub 3} type structure with the eight-coordinate bicapped trigonal prismatic Ln(1) ions residing in the one-dimensional channels formed by three different double chains via edge and corner sharing. These double chains are constructed from Ln(2)Se{sub 7} monocapped trigonal prisms, Ln(3)Se{sub 6} octahedra, and Ln(4)S{sub 6} octahedra, respectively. The magnetic susceptibilities of {beta}-PrLuSe{sub 3} and {beta}-NdLuSe{sub 3} follow the Curie-Weiss law. Sm{sub 1.82}Lu{sub 2.18}Se{sub 6} shows van Vleck paramagnetism. Magnetic measurements show that Gd{sub 1.87}Lu{sub 2.13}Se{sub 6} undergoes an antiferromagnetic transition around 4 K. Ce{sub 3}LuSe{sub 6} exhibits ferromagnetic ordering below 5 K. The optical band gaps for La{sub 3}LuSe{sub 6}, Ce{sub 3}LuSe{sub 6}, {beta}- PrLuSe{sub 3}, {beta}-NdLuSe{sub 3}, Sm{sub 1.82}Lu{sub 2.18}Se{sub 6}, and Gd{sub 1.87}Lu{sub 2.13}Se{sub 6} are 1.26, 1.10, 1.56, 1.61, 1.51, and 1.56 eV, respectively.

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... We have studied five stainless steel electrodes (304L and 316LN) that were polished to approximately 20 nm surface roughness using diamond grit, and evaluated inside a high voltage ...

  17. In situ, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction study of natural gas conversion by CO[sub 2] reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashcroft, A.T. ); Cheetham, A.K. ); Jones, R.H.; Natarajan, S.; Thomas, J.M.; Waller, D. ); Clark, S.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The selective CO[sub 2] reforming of methane to synthesis gas over a rare-earth iridate pyrochlore, Ln[sub 2]Ir[sub 2]O[sub 7] (Ln = Eu), and rare-earth ruthenate pyrochlores, Ln[sub 2]Ru[sub 2]O[sub 7] (Ln = Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd), has been studied in situ by using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation. Analysis of the diffraction data shows that the oxides are activated by reduction to the platinum group metal, the iridate by a second-order kinetic reaction, and the ruthenates by a first-order process. Temperature programmed reductions under carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and methane establish that the iridates proceed directly to the metal, whereas the ruthenates reduce via an oxygen deficient pyrochlore. 18 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Synchropulse Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hughs, United Kingdom Zip: LN6 9TW Product: Manufacturer of highly efficient electric motors. References: Synchropulse Ltd.1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  19. Syntheses, structures and tunable luminescence of lanthanide metal-organic frameworks based on azole-containing carboxylic acid ligand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Dian; Rao, Xingtang; Yu, Jiancan; Cui, Yuanjing Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-10-15

    Design and synthesis of a series of isostructural lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (LnMOFs) serving as phosphors by coordinate the H{sub 2}TIPA (5-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)isophthalic acid) ligands and lanthanide ions is reported. The color of the luminescence can be tuned by adjusting the relative concentration of the lanthanide ions in the host framework GdTIPA, and near-pure-white light emission can be achieved. - Graphical abstract: Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (LnMOFs) with tunable luminescence were synthesized using an azole-containing carboxylic acid as ligand. - Highlights: • A series of isostructural LnMOFs serving as phosphor is reported. • We model the GdTIPA: Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} which can tune color and emit white light. • The scheme and mechanism of luminescent LnMOFs are also presented and discussed.

  20. MEMORANDUM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    shed b ---...g-rkFL---... EeLnEDLNvoLv-SIL 'Control q Health Physics Protection 0 AEWMED managed operations q Little or None 0 AECYMED responsible for E ...

  1. CoverSheet

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2: Th On sched Develope spectral r method c spectrum signal so o single tran transit, (ii frequency power spe with a str proportio medium o ln The line f current...

  2. Lightwave Circuits in Lithium Niobate through Hybrid Waveguides with Silicon Photonics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weigel, Peter O.; Savanier, Marc; DeRose, Christopher T.; Pomerene, Andrew T.; Starbuck, Andrew L.; Lentine, Anthony L.; Stenger, Vincent; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2016-03-01

    Here we demonstrate a photonic waveguide technology based on a two-material core, in which light is controllably and repeatedly transferred back and forth between sub-micron thickness crystalline layers of Si and LN bonded to one another, where the former is patterned and the latter is not. In this way, the foundry-based wafer-scale fabrication technology for silicon photonics can be leveraged to form lithium-niobate based integrated optical devices. Using two different guided modes and an adiabatic mode transition between them, we demonstrate a set of building blocks such as waveguides, bends, and couplers which can be used to route light underneathmore » an unpatterned slab of LN, as well as outside the LN-bonded region, thus enabling complex and compact lightwave circuits in LN alongside Si photonics with fabrication ease and low cost.« less

  3. Local Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept. SLAC ; Pfeiffer, L.N. ; West, K.W. ; Princeton U., Elect. Engion. Dept. ; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. ; Stanford U., Phys.Dept.TITLELocal Imaging of High Mobility Two-Dimensional ...

  4. UCRL-ID-105163 Air-Injection Field Tests

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... I.tRTQm ln(rer b) 2L In(rerb) k (4) where Pb is the borehole injection pressure, rb the borehole radius, and re the effective radius, or radius at which the pressure returns to ...

  5. Disneyland’s Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the provider of laundry and dry cleaning services for Disneyland Resort’s costumes and hospitality supply items, L&N Costume and Linen Service knows a little something about both quantity and quality.

  6. Baseline Glass Development for Combined Fission Products Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Lang, Jesse B.; Marra, James C.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

    2009-06-29

    Borosilicate glass was selected as the baseline technology for immobilization of the Cs/Sr/Ba/Rb (Cs), lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) waste steams as part of a cost benefit analysis study.[1] Vitrification of the combined waste streams have several advantages, minimization of the number of waste forms, a proven technology, and similarity to waste forms currently accepted for repository disposal. A joint study was undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop acceptable glasses for the combined Cs + Ln + TM waste streams (Option 1) and Cs + Ln combined waste streams (Option 2) generated by the AFCI UREX+ set of processes. This study is aimed to develop baseline glasses for both combined waste stream options and identify key waste components and their impact on waste loading. The elemental compositions of the four-corners study were used along with the available separations data to determine the effect of burnup, decay, and separations variability on estimated waste stream compositions.[2-5] Two different components/scenarios were identified that could limit waste loading of the combined Cs + LN + TM waste streams, where as the combined Cs + LN waste stream has no single component that is perceived to limit waste loading. Combined Cs + LN waste stream in a glass waste form will most likely be limited by heat due to the high activity of Cs and Sr isotopes.

  7. Early-lanthanide(III) acetonitrile–solvento adducts with iodide and noncoordinating anions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Davis, Benjamin L.; Scott, Brian L.; Gaunt, Andrew J.

    2015-12-25

    Dissolution of LnI3 (Ln = La, Ce) in acetonitrile (MeCN) results in the highly soluble solvates LnI3(MeCN)5 [Ln = La (1), Ce (2)] in good yield. The ionic complex [La(MeCN)9][LaI6] (4), containing a rare homoleptic La3+ cation and anion, was also isolated as a minor product. Extending this chemistry to NdI3 results in the consistent formation of the complex ionic structure [Nd(MeCN)9]2[NdI5(MeCN)][NdI6][I] (3), which contains an unprecedented pentaiodide lanthanoid anion. Also described is the synthesis, isolation, and structural characterization of several homoleptic early-lanthanide MeCN solvates with noncoordinating anions, namely, [Ln(MeCN)9][AlCl4]3 [Ln = La (5), Ce (6), Nd (7)]. Notably, complexmore » 6 is the first homoleptic cerium MeCN solvate reported to date. All reported complexes were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, as well as by IR spectroscopy and CHN elemental analysis. Furthermore, complexes 1–3 were also characterized by thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry to further elucidate their bulk composition in the solid-state.« less

  8. Early-lanthanide(III) acetonitrile–solvento adducts with iodide and noncoordinating anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Davis, Benjamin L.; Scott, Brian L.; Gaunt, Andrew J.

    2015-12-25

    Dissolution of LnI3 (Ln = La, Ce) in acetonitrile (MeCN) results in the highly soluble solvates LnI3(MeCN)5 [Ln = La (1), Ce (2)] in good yield. The ionic complex [La(MeCN)9][LaI6] (4), containing a rare homoleptic La3+ cation and anion, was also isolated as a minor product. Extending this chemistry to NdI3 results in the consistent formation of the complex ionic structure [Nd(MeCN)9]2[NdI5(MeCN)][NdI6][I] (3), which contains an unprecedented pentaiodide lanthanoid anion. Also described is the synthesis, isolation, and structural characterization of several homoleptic early-lanthanide MeCN solvates with noncoordinating anions, namely, [Ln(MeCN)9][AlCl4]3 [Ln = La (5), Ce (6), Nd (7)]. Notably, complex 6 is the first homoleptic cerium MeCN solvate reported to date. All reported complexes were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, as well as by IR spectroscopy and CHN elemental analysis. Furthermore, complexes 1–3 were also characterized by thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry to further elucidate their bulk composition in the solid-state.

  9. Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1/2016 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Day LO35 X114 SPI X115 LO58 Kong LO63 Staub LN34 Westenhoff Day LM95 Wang LN17 Cherezov LO47 Pollack Day PCS PCS PCS PCS PCS PCS PCS PCS PCS Night PCS LO46 Chen LN23 Lee DD LO08 Watk. LO63 LO08 Watkins 9/1/2016 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

  10. A [Cyclentetrakis(methylene)]tetrakis[2-hydroxybenzamide]Ligand That Complexes and Sensitizes Lanthanide(III) Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Aleo, Anthony; Xu, Jide; Do, King; Muller, Gilles; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-04-30

    The synthesis of a cyclen derivative containing four isophthalamide groups (L{sup 1}) is described. The spectroscopic properties of the Ln(III) complexes of L{sup 1} (Ln = Gd, Tb, Yb, Eu) reveal changes of the UV/visible absorption, circular dichroism absorption, luminescence and circularly polarized luminescence properties. It is shown that at least two metal complex species are present in solution, whose relative amounts are pH dependent. When at pH > 8.0, an intense long lived emission is observed (for [L{sup 1}Tb] and [L{sup 1}Yb]) while at pH < 8.0, a weaker, shorter-lived species predominates. Unconventional Ln(III) emitters (Pr, Nd, Sm, Dy and Tm) were sensitized in basic solution, both in the visible and in the near infra-red, to measure the emission of these ions.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  12. HEAVY METAL LOADED PLASTIC SCINTILLATING COMPOSITIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyman, M. Jr.

    1962-06-26

    Thls lnventlon relates to a plastlc sclntlllatlon composltlon havlng lncorporated ln the base plastlc a lead compound. Thls compound forms a haze- free sclntillator. The lead compound has the general formula (R/sub 4/) x from the group consisting of hydrogen, alky, and phenyl, R4 ls selected from the group conslstlng of acrylyl and methacryiyl radlcals, and x ls a number from 0,5 to 1; however, when R/sub 1/, R/sub 2/, and R/sub 3/ are all hydrogen the x ls equal to 1. The phosphor ln the sclntlllatlng compositlon and the lead compound can be dlssolved ln a polymerlc resln selected from the group conslsting of polyvinyl toluene and copolymers of vlnyl toluene and cyclohexyl methacrylate. (AEC)

  13. Inflection points of microcanonical entropy: Monte Carlo simulation of q state Potts model on a finite square lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Praveen, E. Satyanarayana, S. V. M.

    2014-04-24

    Traditional definition of phase transition involves an infinitely large system in thermodynamic limit. Finite systems such as biological proteins exhibit cooperative behavior similar to phase transitions. We employ recently discovered analysis of inflection points of microcanonical entropy to estimate the transition temperature of the phase transition in q state Potts model on a finite two dimensional square lattice for q=3 (second order) and q=8 (first order). The difference of energy density of states (DOS) ? ln g(E) = ln g(E+ ?E) ?ln g(E) exhibits a point of inflexion at a value corresponding to inverse transition temperature. This feature is common to systems exhibiting both first as well as second order transitions. While the difference of DOS registers a monotonic variation around the point of inflexion for systems exhibiting second order transition, it has an S-shape with a minimum and maximum around the point of inflexion for the case of first order transition.

  14. Oxycarbonitride phosphors and light emitting devices using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Yuanqiang; Romanelli, Michael Dennis; Tian, Yongchi

    2014-07-08

    Disclosed herein is a novel family of oxycarbonitride phosphor compositions and light emitting devices incorporating the same. Within the sextant system of M--Al--Si--O--N--C--Ln and quintuplet system of M--Si--O--N--C--Ln (M=alkaline earth element, Ln=rare earth element), the phosphors are composed of either one single crystalline phase or two crystalline phases with high chemical and thermal stability. In certain embodiments, the disclosed phosphor of silicon oxycarbonitrides emits green light at wavelength between 530-550 nm. In further embodiments, the disclosed phosphor compositions emit blue-green to yellow light in a wavelength range of 450-650 nm under near-UV and blue light excitation.

  15. Oxycarbonitride phosphors and light emitting devices using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Yuanqiang; Romanelli, Michael Dennis; Tian, Yongchi

    2013-10-08

    Disclosed herein is a novel family of oxycarbidonitride phosphor compositions and light emitting devices incorporating the same. Within the sextant system of M--Al--Si--O--N--C--Ln and quintuplet system of M--Si--O--N--C--Ln (M=alkaline earth element, Ln=rare earth element), the phosphors are composed of either one single crystalline phase or two crystalline phases with high chemical and thermal stability. In certain embodiments, the disclosed phosphor of silicon oxycarbidonitrides emits green light at wavelength between 530-550 nm. In further embodiments, the disclosed phosphor compositions emit blue-green to yellow light in a wavelength range of 450-650 nm under near-UV and blue light excitation.

  16. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  17. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-06-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  18. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  19. Experimental Station 11-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beam line 11-2 is a high-flux XAS station dedicated to molecular biogeochemical and interface sciences. It is optimized for challenging XAS measurements on dilute or radioactive samples, single crystals, and interfaces. To support these experiments, BL11-2 is equipped with collimating and focusing optics, a "double double" Si(220) LN2-cooled monochromator, and a 100-element solid state Ge detector array. Additional instrumentation includes LHe and LN2 cryostats, a grazing incidence

  20. Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site Workers Demolish Metals Plant at Paducah Site February 21, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Metals Plant is shown before workers removed panels from the structure ln 2012. The Metals Plant is shown before workers removed panels from the structure ln 2012. Workers remove panels from the Metals Plant in September 2012. Workers remove panels from the Metals Plant in September 2012. About half of the complex was demolished by the end of December 2012, ahead of

  1. Shape coexistence along the N=Z line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shape coexistence along the N=Z line Recoil Distance Method for knock-out reactions. NSCL/Köln plunger device The method Transition rates in N=Z 6 4 Ge 410(60) 620(210) 1.5(5) 14 610 406 NSCL: K. Starosta, IKP Köln: A.Dewald et al. PRL 99, 042503 (2007) CMU: M. Horoi 6 8 Se transition rate predictions Recoil Distance Method Doppler-Shift Attenuation Method E E Reactions for accessing nuclei along the 28<N=Z<50 line channel identification is the key REACTIONS stable beams TRIUMF unstable

  2. Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-12-08

    The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

  3. PROCEDUREPORTiEPRECIPI¶!ATIONOPl!RORIUE~~~ I/

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ABC-NY0 report ia the near ,fut-* Ru, solution nreJl oontain 2 to 150 mg. of thorium 0-e:. ... ulll be@n ln about 10 mlnutee when 50 to 100 ' a,l . of thorium are present. il (

  4. Complexation of Curium(III) with DTPA at 10–70 °C: Comparison with Eu(III)–DTPA in Thermodynamics, Luminescence, and Coordination Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Guoxin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Martin, Leigh R.; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-02-16

    Separation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) from trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) is a challenging task because of their nearly identical chemical properties. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA), a key reagent used in the TALSPEAK process that effectively separates An(III) from Ln(III), is believed to play a critical role in the An(III)/Ln(III) separation. However, the underlying principles for the separation based on the difference in the complexation of DTPA with An(III) and Ln(III) remain unclear. In this work, the complexation of DTPA with Cm(III) at 10-70 ºC was investigated by spectrophotometry, luminescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry, in conjunction with computational methods. The binding strength, the enthalpy of complexation, the coordination modes, and the luminescence properties are compared between the Cm(III)-DTPA and Eu(III)-DTPA systems. The experimental and computational data have demonstrated that the difference between Cm(III) and Eu(III) in the binding strength with DTPA can be attributed to the stronger covalence bonding between Cm(III) and the nitrogen donors of DTPA.

  5. Two Photon Distribution Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Beiyad, M.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2008-08-29

    The factorization of the amplitude of the process {gamma}*{gamma}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} in the low energy and high photon virtuality region is demonstrated at the Born order and in the leading logarithmic approximation. The leading order two photon (generalized) distribution amplitudes exhibit a characteristic ln Q{sup 2} behaviour and obey new inhomogeneous evolution equations.

  6. 09-008 FOIA Response.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2008 In reply refer to: DK-7 Mr. Wei Xu UWO 33-463 Platts Ln London, Ontario CANADA N6G3H2 RE: FOIA 09-008 Dear Mr. Xu: This letter is a final response to your request for...

  7. Cuprate-titanate superconductor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toreki, R.; Poeppelmeier, K.; Dabrowski, B.

    1995-05-23

    A new copper oxide superconductor of the formula Ln{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Sr{sub 2}Cu{sub 3{minus}y}Ti{sub y}O{sub 7+{delta}} is disclosed, and exhibits a {Tc} of 60 K with deviations from linear metallic behavior as high as 130 K. 2 Figs.

  8. Self-assembly and photophysical properties of lanthanide dinuclear triple-helical complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piguet, C.; Bernardinelli, G.; Williams, A.F. ); Buenzli, J.C.G. ); Hopfgartner, G. )

    1993-09-08

    The dinucleating ligand bis[1-methyl-2-(6[prime]-[1[double prime]-(3,5-dimethoxybenzyl)benzimidazol-2[double prime]-yl]pyrid-2[prime]-yl)benzimidazol-5-yl]methane (L) reacts with lanthanide perchlorates to give dinuclear 2:3 complexes [Ln[sub 2](L)[sub 3

  9. Beamline Temperatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV Current: 495.5347 mA Date: 09-Jan-2016 04:18:38 Beamline Temperatures Energy 3.0000 GeV Current 495.5 mA 09-Jan-2016 04:18:38 LN:MainTankLevel 112.0...

  10. Location of trivalent lanthanide dopant energy levels in (Lu{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}){sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Retot, H.; Viana, B.; Bessiere, A.; Galtayries, A.

    2011-06-15

    The location of Ln{sup 3+} dopant energy levels relative to bands in (Lu{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}){sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied. A several-steps analysis of XPS measurements on heavy lanthanides sesquioxides Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) and on Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reference materials were used to locate Ln{sup 3+} dopant ground state relative to the top of the valence band in (Lu{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}){sub 2}O{sub 3} within an error bar of {+-}0.4 eV. The agreement between XPS data and model was found improved relative to previous studies. When compared to XPS analysis, prediction based on optical absorption shows a slight underestimation attributed to the lack of precision in Ce{sup 4+} charge transfer band measurement.

  11. Cuprate-titanate superconductor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toreki, Robert; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth; Dabrowski, Bogdan

    1995-01-01

    A new copper oxide superconductor of the formula Ln.sub.1-x M.sub.x Sr.sub.2 Cu.sub.3-y Ti.sub.y O.sub.7+.delta. is disclosed, and exhibits a Tc of 60.degree. K. with deviations from linear metallic behavior as high as 130.degree. K.

  12. Inerfacial Characterization and Residual Stress Analysis in Diamond films on LiNbO3 (Prop. 2004-050)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, Thomas R; Lance, Michael J; Kasichainula, Jagannadham

    2006-01-01

    Diamond films were deposited via microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on lithium niobate (LN) substrates. Characterization of the interfacial regions formed between diamond films and LN substrates was carried out by several techniques. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the depth profiles of carbon, lithium, niobium, and oxygen in the LN substrate covered with diamond nuclei and in the substrate without nucleation. Results indicate that the diamond nuclei promoted growth of diamond, and in addition, a reduced depth of the lithium deficient zone formed in the LN substrate was observed. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy observations corroborated the results obtained by SIMS. Residual stresses determined experimentally by an x-ray method or by the shift in the characteristic diamond peak in Raman spectroscopy were much smaller than the calculated thermal residual stresses. The results further emphasize that the interfacial phases are responsible for relieving the thermal stresses generated during cooling of the layered structure. The thickness of the interfacial region was found to be well below for attenuation of the surface acoustic waves in the gigahertz frequency surface acoustic wave devices.

  13. CX-013689: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Automated Chromatography System for Purification of New Reagents for An/Ln Extraction and Separation- Washington State University CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 04/10/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  14. CX-007562: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. CX-007563: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Tools for Coupled lnSAR and Seismicity Monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Development and Management CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 01/18/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. Thermal Dihydrogen Elimination ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The ln(CC0) plots as a function of time are linear and yield a first order rate constant of kH of l.lOxlO"3 s'1 at 27 C. Similarly, the value of kD at 27C is of l.OOxlO"3 s'1. ...

  17. Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Rehman, Sana; Shukla, Monica E.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Moore, Halle; Budd, G. Thomas; Dietz, Jill; Crowe, Joseph P.; Macklis, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonal therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P<.05) correlated with LRR: estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.4), 2-3 LN+ (HR 2.6), nodal ratio >25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with {>=}2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered

  18. Temporal Nodal Regression and Regional Control After Primary Radiation Therapy for N2-N3 Head-and-Neck Cancer Stratified by HPV Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Waldron, John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the temporal lymph node (LN) regression and regional control (RC) after primary chemoradiation therapy/radiation therapy in human papillomavirus-related [HPV(+)] versus human papillomavirus-unrelated [HPV(?)] head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: All cases of N2-N3 HNC treated with radiation therapy/chemoradiation therapy between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. Human papillomavirus status was ascertained by p16 staining on all available oropharyngeal cancers. Larynx/hypopharynx cancers were considered HPV(?). Initial radiologic complete nodal response (CR) (?1.0 cm 8-12 weeks after treatment), ultimate LN resolution, and RC were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(?) HNC. Multivariate analysis identified outcome predictors. Results: A total of 257 HPV(+) and 236 HPV(?) HNCs were identified. The initial LN size was larger (mean, 2.9 cm vs 2.5 cm; P<.01) with a higher proportion of cystic LNs (38% vs 6%, P<.01) in HPV(+) versus HPV(?) HNC. CR was achieved is 125 HPV(+) HNCs (49%) and 129 HPV(?) HNCs (55%) (P=.18). The mean post treatment largest LN was 36% of the original size in the HPV(+) group and 41% in the HPV(?) group (P<.01). The actuarial LN resolution was similar in the HPV(+) and HPV(?) groups at 12 weeks (42% and 43%, respectively), but it was higher in the HPV(+) group than in the HPV(?) group at 36 weeks (90% vs 77%, P<.01). The median follow-up period was 3.6 years. The 3-year RC rate was higher in the HPV(?) CR cases versus non-CR cases (92% vs 63%, P<.01) but was not different in the HPV(+) CR cases versus non-CR cases (98% vs 92%, P=.14). On multivariate analysis, HPV(+) status predicted ultimate LN resolution (odds ratio, 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7]; P<.01) and RC (hazard ratio, 0.3 [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6]; P<.01). Conclusions: HPV(+) LNs involute more quickly than HPV(?) LNs but undergo a more prolonged process to eventual CR beyond the time of initial assessment at 8 to 12 weeks after treatment. Post

  19. Structural investigation and luminescence of nanocrystalline lanthanide doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pin, Sonia; Piccinelli, Fabio; Upendra Kumar, Kagola; Enzo, Stefano; Ghigna, Paolo; Cannas, Carla; Musinu, Anna; Mariotto, Gino; Bettinelli, Marco; Speghini, Adolfo

    2012-12-15

    Nd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} nanostructured multiferroics (nanoparticles or nanorods) were prepared by a sol-gel route. X-Ray powder diffraction results evidence that the sodium and mixed sodium-potassium niobates show orthorhombic (Pmc2{sub 1} space group), and monoclinic structure (Pm space group), respectively, confirmed by the Raman spectra. The local structure around the trivalent lanthanides was investigated with Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy at the Ln-K edge and luminescence spectroscopy. The Ln{sup 3+} ions enter the structure by substituting the alkali metals, with a 12-fold oxygen coordination, and inducing a large amount of static disorder. The visible emission bands of the Eu{sup 3+} ions indicate that multiple sites exist for the lanthanide ions, in agreement with the EXAFS results showing the largest amount of static disorder in these samples. A possible indication of clustering of oxygen vacancies around the Ln{sub Na} Double-Prime defect is obtained by VBS calculations. - Graphical Abstract: Ln{sup 3+} doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} nanoparticles or nanorods can be prepared by a simple sol-gel procedure. The synergy of X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and luminescence spectroscopy gives important information on the Ln{sup 3+} local environment. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} nanoparticles or nanorods are prepared by sol-gel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EXAFS indicates that the Ln{sup 3+} ions substitutes the Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions, inducing a large amount of static disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The visible emission bands of the Eu{sup 3+} ions confirm that multiple sites exist for the lanthanide ions.

  20. Symmetry-dependent electron-electron interaction in coherent tunnel junctions resolved by measurements of zero-bias anomaly

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Xiang, Li; Wei, Jian; Li, D. -L.; Feng, J. -F.; Han, X. -F.; Zhang, X. -G.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-11-18

    We provide experimental evidence that zero bias anomaly in the differential resistance of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is due to electron-electron interaction (EEI). Magnon effect is excluded by measuring at low temperatures down to 0.2 K and with reduced AC measurement voltages down to 0.06 mV. The normalized change of conductance is proportional to ln (eV /kB T ), consistent with the Altshuler-Aronov theory of tunneling with EEI but inconsistent with magnetic impurity scattering. The slope of the ln (eV /kBT ) dependence is symmetry dependent, i.e., MTJs with symmetry filtering show di erent slopes for P and AP states,more » while those without symmetry filtering (amorphous barriers) have nearly the same slopes for P and AP.« less

  1. Ionic liquid assisted microwave synthesis route towards color-tunable luminescence of lanthanide- doped BiPO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cybinska, Joanna; Lorbeer, Chantal; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-07-08

    Ln3+-doped (Ln=Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) nanoparticles of BiPO4 with a particle size below 10 nm were synthesized in a straightforward manner from the appropriate mixture of the respective metal acetates and the task-specific ionic liquids choline or butylammonium dihydrogen-phosphate by conversion in a laboratory microwave (120 °C, 10 min). The ionic liquid acts not only as a solvent and microwave susceptor, but also as the reaction partner and nanoparticle stabilizer. The materials were thoroughly characterized not only with respect to their optical properties but also by PXRD, FT-IR, TEM techniques. Furthermore, depending on the lanthanide, the nanomaterial shows intense luminescencemore » of different colors such as: orange (Sm3+), red (Eu3+), green (Tb3+) or even white (Dy3+).« less

  2. M3FT-15OR0202212: SUBMIT SUMMARY REPORT ON THERMODYNAMIC EXPERIMENT AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurray, Jake W.; Brese, Robert G.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling the behavior of nuclear fuel with a physics-based approach uses thermodynamics for key inputs such as chemical potentials and thermal properties for phase transformation, microstructure evolution, and continuum transport simulations. Many of the lanthanide (Ln) elements and Y are high-yield fission products. The U-Y-O and U-Ln-O ternaries are therefore key subsystems of multi-component high-burnup fuel. These elements dissolve in the dominant urania fluorite phase affecting many of its properties. This work reports on an effort to assess the thermodynamics of the U-Pr-O and U-Y-O systems using the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHase Diagrams) method. The models developed within this framework are capable of being combined and extended to include additional actinides and fission products allowing calculation of the phase equilibria, thermochemical and material properties of multicomponent fuel with burnup.

  3. Ionic liquid assisted microwave synthesis route towards color-tunable luminescence of lanthanide- doped BiPO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cybinska, Joanna; Lorbeer, Chantal; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-07-08

    Ln3+-doped (Ln=Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy) nanoparticles of BiPO4 with a particle size below 10 nm were synthesized in a straightforward manner from the appropriate mixture of the respective metal acetates and the task-specific ionic liquids choline or butylammonium dihydrogen-phosphate by conversion in a laboratory microwave (120 °C, 10 min). The ionic liquid acts not only as a solvent and microwave susceptor, but also as the reaction partner and nanoparticle stabilizer. The materials were thoroughly characterized not only with respect to their optical properties but also by PXRD, FT-IR, TEM techniques. Furthermore, depending on the lanthanide, the nanomaterial shows intense luminescence of different colors such as: orange (Sm3+), red (Eu3+), green (Tb3+) or even white (Dy3+).

  4. Synthesis and Lanthanide Coordination Chemistry of Phosphine Oxide Decorated Dibenzothiophene and Dibenzothiophene Sulfone Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosario-Amorin, Daniel; Ouizem, Sabrina; Dickie, D. A.; Paine, Robert T.; Cramer, Roger E.; Hay, Benjamin; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia Helene

    2014-01-01

    Syntheses for new ligands based upon dibenzothiophene and dibenzothiophene sulfone platforms, decorated with phosphine oxide and methylphosphine oxide donor groups, are described. Coordination chem. of 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene (8) , 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (9) and 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (10) with lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO3) 3 (H2O) n is outlined, and crystal structure detns. reveal a range of chelation interactions on Ln(III) ions. The HNO3 dependence of the solvent extn. performance of 9 and 10 in 1, 2- dichloroethane for Eu(III) and Am(III) is described and compared against the extn. behavior of related dibenzofuran ligands (2, 3; R = Ph) and n- octyl(phenyl) - N, N- diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (4) measured under identical conditions.

  5. Section 24

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ln<T H 2 O > CK 'A 0 %A l (&ln<T H 2 O > MFRSR ) H 2 O H 2 O's H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O H 2 O 0.862&µm <T H 2 O > CK <T H 2 O > MFRSR Session Papers 97 (1) Atmospheric H O, Aerosol and the Unexplained Solar 2 Absorption: A Test with Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment W. C. Conant, A. M. Vogelmann and V. Ramanathan Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction 0.94 µm -

  6. Preparation and composition of superconducting copper oxides based on Ga-O layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dabrowski, Bogdan; Vaughey, J. T.; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting material with the general formula GaSr.sub.2 Ln.sub.1-x MxCu.sub.2 O.sub.7.+-.w wherein Ln is selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pt, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Y and M is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr, 0.2.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.4 and w is a small fraction of one. A method of preparing this high temperature superconducting material is provided which includes heating and cooling a mixture to produce a crystalline material which is subsequently fired, ground and annealed at high pressure and temperature in oxygen to establish superconductivity.

  7. Preparation and composition of superconducting copper oxides based on Ga-O layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dabrowski, B.; Vaughey, J.T.; Poeppelmeier, K.R.

    1994-12-20

    A high temperature superconducting material with the general formula GaSr[sub 2]Ln[sub 1[minus]x]M[sub x]Cu[sub 2]O[sub 7[+-]w] wherein Ln is selected from the group consisting of La, Ce, Pt, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Y and M is selected from the group consisting of C and Sr, 0.2[<=]x[<=]0.4 and w is a small fraction of one. A method of preparing this high temperature superconducting material is provided which includes heating and cooling a mixture to produce a crystalline material which is subsequently fired, ground and annealed at high pressure and temperature in oxygen to establish superconductivity. 14 figures.

  8. Multi-direction high-efficiency second harmonic generation in ellipse structure nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bao-Qin; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Rong-Juan; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-10-13

    We have designed and fabricated a lithium niobate (LN) nonlinear photonic crystal (NPC) with a two-dimensional (2D) ellipse structure of inverse poling domains. The structure can offer continuously varying reciprocal lattice vectors in different directions to compensate the phase-mismatching during the second harmonic generation (SHG) for diverse pump wavelengths. We consider three propagation directions with large effective nonlinear susceptibility and measure the nonlinear conversion efficiency of SHG. The experimental data are in good agreement with the quantitative calculation results using the effective susceptibility model with pump depletion. With high-efficiency SHG in multiple propagation direction, the 2D ellipse structure of LN NPC has the potential to realize various broadband nonlinear frequency conversion processes in different propagation direction with a single crystal.

  9. Symmetry-dependent electron-electron interaction in coherent tunnel junctions resolved by measurements of zero-bias anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Liang; Niu, Jiasen; Xiang, Li; Wei, Jian; Li, D. -L.; Feng, J. -F.; Han, X. -F.; Zhang, X. -G.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-11-18

    We provide experimental evidence that zero bias anomaly in the differential resistance of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is due to electron-electron interaction (EEI). Magnon effect is excluded by measuring at low temperatures down to 0.2 K and with reduced AC measurement voltages down to 0.06 mV. The normalized change of conductance is proportional to ln (eV /kB T ), consistent with the Altshuler-Aronov theory of tunneling with EEI but inconsistent with magnetic impurity scattering. The slope of the ln (eV /kBT ) dependence is symmetry dependent, i.e., MTJs with symmetry filtering show di erent slopes for P and AP states, while those without symmetry filtering (amorphous barriers) have nearly the same slopes for P and AP.

  10. Unravelling the low thermal expansion coefficient of cation-substituted YBaCo4O7+δ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Huq, Ashfia; Kan, Wang Hay; Lai, Ke -Yu

    2016-01-12

    With an aim to understand the origin of the low thermal expansion coefficients (TECs), cation substituted YBaCo4O7-type oxides have been investigated by in-situ neutron diffraction, bond valence sum (BVS), thermogravimetric analysis, and dilatometry. The compositions YBaCo4O7+δ, Y0.9ln0.1BaCo3ZnO7+δ, and Y0.9ln0.1BaCo3Zn0.6Fe0.4O7+δ) were synthesized by solid-state reaction at 1200 °C. Here, Rietveld refinement of the joint synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction data shows that the Zn and Fe dopants have different preferences to substitute the Co ions in the 6c and 2a sites.

  11. Electrochemical study of uranium cations in LiCl-KCl melt using a rotating disk electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, Sang-Eun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Yoon; Park, Tae-Hong; Cho, Young Hwan; Yeon, Jei-Won; Song, Kyuseok

    2013-07-01

    A rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurement technique was employed to investigate the electrochemical REDOX reactions of actinide (An) and lanthanide (Ln) ions in LiCl-KCl molten salt. By using RDE, it is possible to access more exact values of the diffusion coefficient, Tafel slope, and exchange current density. In this work, we constructed RDE setup and electrodes for RDE measurements in high temperature molten salt and measured the electrochemical parameters of the An and Ln ions. The RDE setup is composed of a Pine model MSRX rotator equipped with a rod type of W electrode. The active electrode area was confined to the planar part of the W rod by making meniscus at the LiCl-KCl melt surface.

  12. Projection techniques as methods of particle-number symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudih, M. R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Benhamouda, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32, El Alia, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers, Algeria, and Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d'Alger - COMENA, BP 399, Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria)

    2007-10-15

    The accuracy of the variation before (VBP) and after (VAP) particle-number projection methods, the Lipkin-Nogami (LN) prescription, and the projected Lipkin-Nogami (PLN) method have been studied using two exactly solvable models. It is shown that the VBP and the LN methods are rather dubious not only in a weak pairing regime, but also in strong pairing for the evaluation of quantities other than the ground state energy. The PLN method provides good results for the ground and the excited state energies, but it must be used with caution for the occupation probabilities and the observables that strongly depend on it. It seems that the VAP is the only suitable method for a global description of the nuclear properties.

  13. Ceramic membranes for catalytic membrane reactors with high ionic conductivities and low expansion properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mackay, Richard (Lafayette, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics of the composition: Ln.sub.x Sr.sub.2-x-y Ca.sub.y B.sub.z M.sub.2-z O.sub.5+.delta. where Ln is an element selected from the fblock lanthanide elements and yttrium or mixtures thereof; B is an element selected from Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; M is a d-block transition element of mixtures thereof; 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0; 0.01.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.7; 0.01.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.0 and .delta. is a number that varies to maintain charge neutrality are provided. These ceramics are useful in ceramic membranes and exhibit high ionic conductivity, high chemical stability under catalytic membrane reactor conditions and low coefficients of expansion. The materials of the invention are particularly useful in producing synthesis gas.

  14. FLUORINE CELL ANODE ASSEMBLY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cable, R.E.; Goode, W.B. Jr.; Henderson, W.K.; Montillon, G.H.

    1962-06-26

    An improved anode assembly is deslgned for use in electrolytlc cells ln the productlon of hydrogen and fluorlne from a moIten electrolyte. The anode assembly comprises a copper post, a copper hanger supported by the post, a plurality of carbon anode members, and bolt means for clamplng half of the anode members to one slde of the hanger and for clamplng the other half of the anode members to the other slde of the hanger. The heads of the clamplng bolts are recessed withln the anode members and carbon plugs are inserted ln the recesses above the bolt heads to protect the boIts agalnst corroslon. A copper washer is provided under the head of each clamplng boIt such that the anode members can be tightly clamped to the hanger with a resultant low anode jolnt resistance. (AEC)

  15. Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, Paul Nigel; Carolan, Michael Francis; Butt, Darryl; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias; Cutler, Raymond Ashton

    2002-01-01

    This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

  16. A Novel Coupled Resonator Photonic Crystal Design in Lithium Niobate for Electrooptic Applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ozturk, Birol; Yavuzcetin, Ozgur; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    High-aspect-ratio photonic crystal air-hole fabrication on bulk Lithium Niobate (LN) substrates is extremely difficult due to its inherent resistance to etching, resulting in conical structures and high insertion losses. Here, we propose a novel coupled resonator photonic crystal (CRPC) design, combining a coupled resonator approach with that of Bragg gratings. CRPC design parameters were optimized by analytical calculations and FDTD simulations. CRPC structures with optimized parameters were fabricated and electrooptically tested on bulk LN annealed proton exchange waveguides. Low insertion loss and large electrooptic effect were observed with the fabricated devices, making the CRPC design a promising structure for electroopticmore » device applications.« less

  17. Helicity evolution at small-x

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2016-01-13

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of αs ln2(1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of αs ln(1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation efects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-Nc and large-Nc & Nf limits. As a cross-check, in the ladder approximation, our equationsmore » map onto the same ladder limit of the infrared evolution equations for g1 structure function derived previously by Bartels, Ermolaev and Ryskin.« less

  18. Frontiers in Geoscience Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm Physics Auditorium (TA-3, Bldg 215) Parameter Estimation for some Geoscience Applications using a Measure-Theoretic Approach Professor Clint Dawson University of Texas at AusLn Effective modeling of complex physical systems arising in the geosciences is dependent on knowing parameters which are often difficult or impossible to measure in situ. In this talk we focus on two such problems, estimating parameters for groundwater flow and contaminant transport, and estimating

  19. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  20. SU-F-BRF-07: Impact of Different Patient Setup Strategies in Adaptive Radiation Therapy with Simultaneous Integrated Volume-Adapted Boost of NSCLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balik, S; Weiss, E; Sleeman, W; Wu, Y; Hugo, G; Dogan, N; Fatyga, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of several setup error correction strategies on a proposed image-guided adaptive radiotherapy strategy for locally advanced lung cancer. Methods: Daily 4D cone-beam CT and weekly 4D fan-beam CT images were acquired from 9 lung cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Initial planning CT was deformably registered to daily CBCT images to generate synthetic treatment courses. An adaptive radiation therapy course was simulated using the weekly CT images with replanning twice and a hypofractionated, simultaneous integrated boost to a total dose of 66 Gy to the original PTV and either a 66 Gy (no boost) or 82 Gy (boost) dose to the boost PTV (ITV + 3mm) in 33 fractions with IMRT or VMAT. Lymph nodes (LN) were not boosted (prescribed to 66 Gy in both plans). Synthetic images were rigidly, bony (BN) or tumor and carina (TC), registered to the corresponding plan CT, dose was computed on these from adaptive replans (PLAN) and deformably accumulated back to the original planning CT. Cumulative D98% of CTV of PT (ITV for 82Gy) and LN, and normal tissue dose changes were analyzed. Results: Two patients were removed from the study due to large registration errors. For the remaining 7 patients, D98% for CTV-PT (ITV-PT for 82 Gy) and CTV-LN was within 1 Gy of PLAN for both 66 Gy and 82 Gy plans with both setup techniques. Overall, TC based setup provided better results, especially for LN coverage (p = 0.1 for 66Gy plan and p = 0.2 for 82 Gy plan, comparison of BN and TC), though not significant. Normal tissue dose constraints violated for some patients if constraint was barely achieved in PLAN. Conclusion: The hypofractionated adaptive strategy appears to be deliverable with soft tissue alignment for the evaluated margins and planning parameters. Research was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  1. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2009-06-24

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, James C.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-02-26

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  4. Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols (Presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Meeting 11/06/2007 Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Renewable Hydrogen Production Using Sugars and Sugar Alcohols Sugars and Sugar Alcohols * * Problem: Problem: Need Need to develop renewable to develop renewable hydrogen production technologies using hydrogen production technologies using diverse diverse feedstocks feedstocks 10 15 20 CH 4 : C 6 H 14 ln(P) * * Description: Description: The BioForming The BioForming TM TM process uses process uses aqueous phase reforming to

  5. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2016 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Frank van Veggel, University of Victoria Title: On the Optical and Magnetic Properties of Ln3+ Based Nanoparticles for Bio-Imaging Location: 67-3111 Chemla Room Abstract: One of our main research thrusts in the field of colloidal nanomaterials and their applications is based on the trivalent lanthanide ions, which have unique optical and magnetic properties. We cover the range from synthesis and characterisation to (in vivo) applications, with a recent focus on

  6. Method for preparing high specific activity 177Lu

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Du, Miting; Beets, Arnold L.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    2004-04-06

    A method of separating lutetium from a solution containing Lu and Yb, particularly reactor-produced .sup.177 Lu and .sup.177 Yb, includes the steps of: providing a chromatographic separation apparatus containing LN resin; loading the apparatus with a solution containing Lu and Yb; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the Lu and the Yb in order to produce high-specific-activity .sup.177 Yb.

  7. Experimental calibration of silicon and oxygen isotope fractionations between quartz and water at 250°C by in situ microanalysis of experimental products and application to zoned low δ30Si quartz overgrowths

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pollington, Anthony D.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Georg, R. Bastian; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Valley, John W.

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of silicon isotope data for quartz is hampered by the lack of experimentally determined fractionation factors between quartz and fluid. Further, there is a large spread in published oxygen isotope fractionation factors at low temperatures, primarily due to extrapolation from experimental calibrations at high temperature. We report the first measurements of silicon isotope ratios from experimentally precipitated quartz and estimate the equilibrium fractionation vs. dissolved silica using a novel in situ analysis technique applying secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly analyze experimental products. These experiments also yield a new value for oxygen isotope fractionation. Quartz overgrowths up tomore » 235 μm thick were precipitated in silica–H2O–NaOH–NaCl fluids, at pH 12–13 and 250 °C. At this temperature, 1000lnα30Si(Qtz–fluid) = 0.55 ± 0.10‰ and 1000lnα18O(Qtz–fluid) = 10.62 ± 0.13‰, yielding the relations 1000lnα30Si(Qtz–fluid) = (0.15 ± 0.03) * 106/T2 and 1000lnα18O(Qtz–fluid) = (2.91 ± 0.04) * 106/T2 when extended to zero fractionation at infinite temperature. Values of δ30Si(Qtz) from diagenetic cement in sandstones from the basal Cambrian Mt. Simon Formation in central North America range from 0 to ₋5.4‰. Paired δ18O and δ30Si values from individual overgrowths preserve a record of Precambrian weathering and fluid transport. In conclusion, the application of the experimental quartz growth results to observations from natural sandstone samples suggests that precipitation of quartz at low temperatures in nature is dominated by kinetic, rather than equilibrium, processes.« less

  8. Evaluation of experiences in long-term radon and radon-daughter measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

    1982-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing side-by-side measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations using several instruments and techniques, and is comparing these measurements with side-by-side measurements made by other investigators at other locations. The standard deviation of the differences between the (natural) logarithms of the Terradex Track Etch radon concentrations and the logarithms of the Radon Progency Integrating Sampling Units (RPISU) radon daughter concentrations (S.D.-ln) measured in 50 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, was 0.37. Using this S.D.-ln, it can be calculated that if the Track Etch radon daughter concentration is 0.010 WL there should be only a 14% probability that the RPISU average would be greater than 0.015 WL, and only a 3% probability tht the RPISU average would be greater than 0.020 WL. If buildings had been cleared from remedial action when the Track Etch averages were less than 0.10 WL, then about 61% of the buildings would have been cleared from remedial action, and only a few percent of these buildings would have actually had average RPISU concentrations greater than 0.015 WL. The S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements made by ALARA at Grand Junction, the PERM radon measurements and the MOD-225 radon daughter measurements made by Mound Facility at Canonsburg and Middlesex, and the PERM and Track Etch radon measurements made by Mound Facility at Salt Lake City were similar to the S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements at Edgemont.

  9. Sensitized near infrared emission from lanthanide-exchanged zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monguzzi, A.; Macchi, G.; Meinardi, F.; Tubino, R.; Burger, M.; Calzaferri, G.

    2008-03-24

    In this work, we present an alternative approach to sensitize the near infrared emission of Er{sup 3+} ions (used in telecom applications) by exploiting the geometrical confinement occurring in porous zeolites structures. The sensitization of the Ln ion is obtained by energy transfer between a suitable organic molecule acting as an antenna and the emitting ion arranged in closed proximity, thus, avoiding the limits imposed by the coordination chemistry.

  10. LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

  11. shukurov-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 On Aerosol and Molecular Extinction of Solar Radiation in Transparency "Window" ν = 750 - 1250 cm -1 from Atmospheric Measurements K. A. Shukurov, A. Kh. Shukurov, and G. S. Golitsyn Oboukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction In investigations of variations of optical depth of the vertical column of atmosphere τ = - ln P, where P = transmittance of the atmosphere, in intervals ∆ν i of transparency "microwindows" i

  12. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol–cloud interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarna, Karolina; Russchenberg, Herman W. J.

    2016-03-14

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol–cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution measurements from a lidar, a radar and a radiometer, which allow us to collect and compare data continuously. This method is based on a standardised data format from Cloudnet and can be implemented at any observatory where the Cloudnet data set is available. Two example case studies were chosen from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurementmore » (ARM) Program deployment on Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, in 2009 to present the method. We use the cloud droplet effective radius (re) to represent cloud microphysical properties and an integrated value of the attenuated backscatter coefficient (ATB) below the cloud to represent the aerosol concentration. All data from each case study are divided into bins of the liquid water path (LWP), each 10 g m–2 wide. For every LWP bin we present the correlation coefficient between ln re and ln ATB, as well as ACIr (defined as ACIr = –d ln re/d ln ATB, change in cloud droplet effective radius with aerosol concentration). Obtained values of ACIr are in the range 0.01–0.1. Lastly, we show that ground-based remote sensing instruments used in synergy can efficiently and continuously monitor aerosol–cloud interactions.« less

  13. Maxima of two random walks: Universal statistics of lead changes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Randon-Furling, J.

    2016-04-18

    In this study, we investigate statistics of lead changes of the maxima of two discrete-time random walks in one dimension. We show that the average number of lead changes grows asmore » $${\\pi }^{-1}\\mathrm{ln}t$$ in the long-time limit. We present theoretical and numerical evidence that this asymptotic behavior is universal. Specifically, this behavior is independent of the jump distribution: the same asymptotic underlies standard Brownian motion and symmetric Lévy flights. We also show that the probability to have at most n lead changes behaves as $${t}^{-1/4}{(\\mathrm{ln}t)}^{n}$$ for Brownian motion and as $${t}^{-\\beta (\\mu )}{(\\mathrm{ln}t)}^{n}$$ for symmetric Lévy flights with index μ. The decay exponent $$\\beta \\equiv \\beta (\\mu )$$ varies continuously with the Lévy index when $$0\\lt \\mu \\lt 2$$, and remains constant $$\\beta =1/4$$ for $$\\mu \\gt 2$$.« less

  14. Plutonium (iv) complexes of mixed pyridine n-oxide and phosphinoxide f-element extractants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matonic, J. H.; Enriquez, A. E.; Scott, B. L.; Paine, R. T.; Neu, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    Analytical and bulk scale separation and processing of aqueous acidic solution s containing f-element ions are regularly accomplished using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) methods that employ a neutral organic donor ligand dissolved in an organic phase . 1-5 Several monofunctional ligands have been used as LLE reagents, but all display one or more deficiencies1 'S due to the chemical similarity of the tri valent lanthanides (Ln) to th e trivalent actindes (An) . Since the trivalent 4f and 5f ions have identical charges, chemical separation agents for these two groups need to differentiate among these har d cations based on their size or chemical bonding preferences . This task is not easy since, as a consequence of the lanthanide and actinide contractions, the Ln and An fission products which need to be separated have similar ionic radii . In order to develop new ligands for the separation process, we must have a fundamental understanding of how these separation agents interact with both Ln and An ions on a molecular level.

  15. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  16. Thermodynamics and extraction modeling of trivalent lanthanides in the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, T.G.; Chatterjee, S.; Valerio, E.L.; Robinson, T.A.

    2013-07-01

    In this investigation, a combination of VPO (Vapor Pressure Osmometry) and water activity methods was applied to measure water activity and osmotic coefficients of binary lanthanide nitrate solutions at a temperature of 25 C. degrees. It was observed that the nature of the lanthanide nitrate has pronounced effect on the water activity in solution. In the solutions with the same Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} molality, water activity is decreased in the order from the light to heavy lanthanides. This trend was explained by the contraction of the lanthanide ionic radii in the same order resulting in the [Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub n}]{sup 3+} (aq) hydration number of 9 for the early (La-Sm) and 8 for the late (Dy-Lu) lanthanides, with the intermediate metals exhibiting a mixture of eight and nine coordinate molecules. This results in the dissimilar effect of the light and heavy lanthanides on the water structure manifesting in the systematic changes of the water activity in the series of concentrated lanthanide solutions. Experimental water activity and osmotic coefficient data agree well with the literature for both 1:1 and 3:1 electrolyte systems. The Pitzer parameters obtained fitting these data are in an excellent agreement with the literature reported values for Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions.

  17. Manganite perovskite ceramics, their precursors and methods for forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, David Alan; Clothier, Brent Allen

    2015-03-10

    Disclosed are a variety of ceramics having the formula Ln.sub.1-xM.sub.xMnO.sub.3, where 0.Itoreq.x.Itoreq.1 and where Ln is La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu or Y; M is Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, or Pb; manganite precursors for preparing the ceramics; a method for preparing the precursors; and a method for transforming the precursors into uniform, defect-free ceramics having magnetoresistance properties. The manganite precursors contain a sol and are derived from the metal alkoxides: Ln(OR).sub.3, M(OR).sub.2 and Mn(OR).sub.2, where R is C.sub.2 to C.sub.6 alkyl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 alkoxyalkyl, or C.sub.6 to C.sub.9 aryl. The preferred ceramics are films prepared by a spin coating method and are particularly suited for incorporation into a device such as an integrated circuit device.

  18. Initial Evaluation of a New Electromechanical Cooler for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, RL

    2002-10-21

    The use of liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) constitutes the current state of the art in cryogenic cooling for high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, which are widely used for {gamma}-ray and characteristic X-ray spectroscopy because of their excellent energy discrimination. Use of LN{sub 2} requires a liquid nitrogen supply, cumbersome storage tanks and plumbing, and the frequent attention of personnel to be sure that nitrogen levels are sufficient to maintain the detectors at a sufficiently low operating temperature. Safety hazards also are associated with the use of LN{sub 2}, both because of the potential for severe frostbite on exposure to skin and because it displaces ambient oxygen when it evaporates in closed spaces. Existing electromechanical coolers have, until now, been more expensive to procure and maintain than LN{sub 2} systems. Performance and reliability have also been serious issues because of microphonic degradation of photon energy peak resolution and cooler failures due to compressor oil becoming entrained in the refrigerant. This report describes the results of tests of a new HPGe detector cooling technology, the PerkinElmer ORTEC{reg_sign} Products X-Cooler{trademark} that, according to the manufacturer, significantly reduces the lifetime cost of the cooling system without degradation of the output signal. The manufacturer claims to have overcome cost, performance and reliability problems of older-generation electromechanical coolers, but the product has no significant history of use, and this project is the first independent evaluation of its performance for Total cost savings for the DOE and other agencies that use HPGe systems extensively for safeguards monitoring is expected to be quite significant if the new electromechanical cooler technology is shown to be reliable and if performance characteristics indicate its usefulness for this application. The technology also promises to make HPGe monitoring, characterization and detection available for

  19. f-Element Ion Chelation in Highly Basic Media - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paine, R.T.

    2000-12-12

    A large body of data has been collected over the last fifty years on the chemical behavior of f-element ions. The ions undergo rapid hydrolysis reactions in neutral or basic aqueous solutions that produce poorly understood oxide-hydroxide species; therefore, most of the fundamental f-element solution chemistry has allowed synthetic and separations chemists to rationally design advanced organic chelating ligands useful for highly selective partitioning and separation of f-element ions from complex acidic solution matrices. These ligands and new examples under development allow for the safe use and treatment of solutions containing highly radioactive species. This DOE/EMSP project was undertaken to address the following fundamental objectives: (1) study the chemical speciation of Sr and lanthanide (Ln) ions in basic aqueous media containing classical counter anions found in waste matrices; (2) prepare pyridine N-oxide phosphonates and phosphonic acids that might act as selective chelator s for Ln ions in model basic pH waste streams; (3) study the binding of the new chelators toward Ln ions and (4) examine the utility of the chelators as decontamination and dissolution agents under basic solution conditions. The project has been successful in attacking selected aspects of the very difficult problems associated with basic pH solution f-element waste chemistry. In particular, the project has (1) shed additional light on the initial stages of Ln ion sol-gel-precipitate formulation under basic solution conditions; (2) generated new families of pyridine phosphonic acid chelators; (3) characterized the function of the chelators and (4) examined their utility as oxide-hydroxide dissolution agents. These findings have contributed significantly to an improved understanding of the behavior of Ln ions in basic media containing anions found in typical waste sludges as well as to the development of sludge dissolution agents. The new chelating reagents are easily made and could be

  20. Luminescent nanocrystals in the rare-earth niobatezirconia system formed via hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masanori Dozono, Hayato

    2013-08-15

    Luminescent nanocrystals based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}, were hydrothermally formed as cubic phase under weakly basic conditions at 240 C. The lattice parameter of the as-prepared nanoparticles corresponding to the composition of Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7}4ZrO{sub 2} that was estimated as a single phase of cubic gradually increased as the content of europium x increased. The existence of small absorbance peaks at 395 and 466 nm corresponding to the Eu{sup 3+7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}L{sub 6}, and {sup 7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}D{sub 2} excitation transition, respectively, was clearly observed in the diffuse reflectance spectra of the as-prepared samples containing europium. The optical band gap of the as-prepared samples was in the range from 3.5 to 3.7 eV. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared nanocrystals containing europium showed orange and red luminescences with main peaks at 590 and 610 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, respectively, under excitation at 395 nm Xe lamp. The emission intensity corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition increased as heat-treatment temperature rose from 800 to 1200 C. - Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract shows the excitation and emission spectra and a transmission electron microscopy image of nanocrystals (with composition based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}) formed via hydrothermal route. Display Omitted - Highlights: Nanocrystals composed of 50 mol% Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2} was directly formed. The nanocrystals were hydrothermally formed under weakly basic conditions at 240 C. The Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} showed an UV-blue and broad

  1. Rapid Method for Ra-226 and Ra-228 in Water Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod, L. III

    2006-02-10

    The measurement of radium isotopes in natural waters is important for oceanographic studies and for public health reasons. Ra-226 (1620 year half-life) is one of the most toxic of the long-lived alpha emitters present in the environment due to its long life and its tendency to concentrate in bones, which increases the internal radiation dose of individuals. The analysis of radium-226 and radium-228 in natural waters can be tedious and time-consuming. Different sample preparation methods are often required to prepare Ra-226 and Ra-228 for separate analyses. A rapid method has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory that effectively separates both Ra-226 and Ra-228 (via Ac-228) for assay. This method uses MnO{sub 2} Resin from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) to preconcentrate Ra-226 and Ra-228 rapidly from water samples, along with Ba-133 tracer. DGA Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) and Ln-Resin{reg_sign} (Eichrom) are employed in tandem to prepare Ra-226 for assay by alpha spectrometry and to determine Ra-228 via the measurement of Ac-228 by gas proportional counting. After preconcentration, the manganese dioxide is dissolved from the resin and passed through stacked Ln-Resin-DGA Resin cartridges that remove uranium and thorium interferences and retain Ac-228 on DGA Resin. The eluate that passed through this column is evaporated, redissolved in a lower acidity and passed through Ln-Resin again to further remove interferences before performing a barium sulfate microprecipitation. The Ac-228 is stripped from the resin, collected using cerium fluoride microprecipitation and counted by gas proportional counting. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  2. Microstructure and defects probed by Raman spectroscopy in lithium niobate crystals and devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontana, Marc D.; Bourson, Patrice

    2015-12-15

    Raman microprobe applied on LiNbO{sub 3} (LN) crystals and derived materials or devices is shown to be a tool to detect either local variations or changes of the whole structure. Position, width, or intensity of one Raman line can be used as markers of a structural change. Indeed, each Raman line can be assigned to a peculiar ionic motion and is differently sensitive to application of strain, temperature change, and electric field. Some vibrational modes are especially associated to the site of Li ion, or Nb ion, or still oxygen octahedron, so that they can be affected by the introduction of dopant ion on one or another site. Therefore, Raman Spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a site spectroscopy to describe the mechanism of doping incorporation in the LN lattice, allowing the optimization of some linear and non-linear optical properties according to the dopant concentration and substitution site. The composition or the content of non-stoichiometry related defects could be derived from the width of some lines. Any damage or local disorder can be detected by a line broadening. The quality or preservation of the structure after chemical treatment, or laser pulses, can be thus checked. The structure of ion-implanted or proton-exchanged wave-guides and periodically poled lithium niobate as well can be imaged from frequency shift or intensity change of some lines. RS is thus a useful way to control the structure of LN and/or to optimize the preparation parameters and its properties.

  3. Constraints on the richness-mass relation and the optical-SZE positional offset distribution for SZE-selected clusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saro, A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 0.8 in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness λ-mass relation with the following function 500> ∝ Bλln M500 + Cλln E(z) and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnessesmore » λ to constrain the parameters. We find Bλ=1.14+0.21–0.18 and Cλ=0.73+0.77–0.75. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is σlnM|λ = 0.18+0.08–0.05 at a characteristic richness λ = 70. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the matched sample, showing that the fraction of SPT-SZ-selected clusters with RM counterparts is consistent with expectations and that the fraction of RM-selected clusters with SPT-SZ counterparts is in mild tension with expectation. We model the optical-SZE cluster positional offset distribution with the sum of two Gaussians, showing that it is consistent with a dominant, centrally peaked population and a subdominant population characterized by larger offsets. We also cross-match the RM catalogue with SPT-SZ candidates below the official catalogue threshold significance ξ = 4.5, using the RM catalogue to provide optical confirmation and redshifts for 15 additional clusters with ξ ε [4, 4.5].« less

  4. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayley, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Bayley@rmp.uhn.on.c [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  5. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-06-17

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  6. Catalytic process for removing toxic gases from gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglio, J.A.; Gaudet, G.G.; Palilla, F.C.

    1983-02-22

    A multi-stage process for reducing the content of sulfurcontaining gases-notably hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide-in waste gas streams is provided. In the first stage, the gas stream is passed through a reaction zone at a temperature between about 150 and 350/sup 0/C in the presence of a pretreated novel catalyst of the formula xLn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in which Ln is yttrium or a rare earth element and T is cobalt, iron or nickel, and each of x and y is independently a number from 0 to 3, said catalyst being substantially non-crystalline and having a surface area of from about 10 m/sup 2//g to about 40 m/sup 2//g. The preferred catalyst is one in which Ln is lanthanum, T is cobalt, and x and y range from 1 to 3, including non-integers. The first stage yields a product stream having a reduced content of sulfur-containing gases, including specifically, substantial reduction of carbonyl sulfide and virtual elimination of carbon disulfide. An intermediate stage is a claus reaction, which may take place in one or more reaction zones, at temperatures less than about 130/sup 0/ C, in the presence of known catalysts such as bauxite, alumina or cobalt molybdates. The final stage is the air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide at a temperature between about 150 and 300/sup 0/ C in the presence of a catalyst usable in first stage.

  7. CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007915: Categorical Exclusion Determination Response to Increasing Turbine Cut-ln Speed at the Sheffield Wind Farm, Vermont CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.3 Date: 01/30/2012 Location(s): Vermont Offices(s): Golden Field Office Under this proposed project, the subcontractor would: (1) conduct a field assessment to determine the difference in bat fatality rates at turbines with different changes in the cut-in speed relative to fully operational turbines; and 2)

  8. Pavlos Kollias Associate Professor Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pavlos Kollias Associate Professor Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University Room 817, Burnside Hall, 805 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 0B9 Tel.: (514) 398-1500 Fax: (514) 398-6115 Email: pavlos.kollias@mcgill.ca https://www.mcgill.ca/meteo/facultystaff/kollias http://radarscience.weebly.com Susanne Crewell Professor Institute of Geophysics and Meteorology, University of Cologne Pohligstr. 3, Raum 3.123, 50969 Köln, Germany Tel.: +49 (0)221 470-5286 Fax:

  9. Interaction of half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Minoru; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Nitta, Muneto; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu; Tsubota, Makoto

    2011-06-15

    We study the asymptotic interaction between two half-quantized vortices in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. When two vortices in different components are placed at distance 2R, the leading order of the force between them is found to be (lnR/{xi}-1/2)/R{sup 3}, in contrast to 1/R between vortices placed in the same component. We derive it analytically using the Abrikosov ansatz and the profile functions of the vortices, confirmed numerically with the Gross-Pitaevskii model. We also find that the short-range cutoff of the intervortex potential linearly depends on the healing length.

  10. R K

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IS,,f 4I6*REI{,OUSS1..,,,,,,,,.,,,,.,.,,,,,. ) R K , , : ' ' : j ' : ' , ,'6ryB,t;:.tr..UOt-*:...,, ,.,.,'..'.'',.'.:.:'.':.,l.',.,,.',,,,,,,, ,,,,,.,,,. il Restoration' ,.,, ,, ,, ' } l t . - i J " . ' f : ' i ) i t - r . t l : it+,47,. l'.,,'.'.'.'N' ib'. !.'',,., .-t'd .:rir: ::i:iiij ,"tLi:::ilit:ii l ii; , . . : ) * : : l : : oRfsE 92tE-41 VERIFICATION SIJRVEY OF THE BAKER AI\D WILLIAMS WAREIIOUS$ BI]ILDING 52L.527 NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by J.D. Berger, P.R. Cotten and J.L.

  11. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IMS Dr. Markus Garst University of Cologne Köln, Germany Exciting Skyrmions and Helices in Chiral Magnets Wednesday, August 26, 2015 3:00 - 4:00 pm IMS/MPA Conference Room (TA3-0032-134) Abstract: Chiral magnets like MnSi, Fe1-xCoxSi, or Cu2OSeO3 gain Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin-orbit energy by twisting the magnetization on a long length scale giving rise to spatially modulated magnetic textures like helices and skyrmion crystals. The spin-wave excitations exhibit Bragg scattering of these

  12. A family of rare earth molybdenum bronzes: Oxides consisting of periodic arrays of interacting magnetic units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneemeyer, L.F.; Siegrist, T.; Besara, T.; Lundberg, M.; Sun, J.; Singh, D.J.

    2015-07-15

    The family of rare earth molybdenum bronzes, reduced ternary molybdates of composition LnMo{sub 16}O{sub 44,} was synthesized and a detailed structural study carried out. Bond valence sum (BVS) calculations clearly show that the molybdenum ions in tetrahedral coordination are hexavalent while the electron count in the primitive unit cell is odd. Yet, measurements show that the phases are semiconductors. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of samples containing several different rare earth elements was measured. These measurements verified the presence of a 6.5 K magnetic phase transition not arising from the rare earth constituent, but likely associated with the unique isolated ReO{sub 3}-type Mo{sub 8}O{sub 36} structural subunits in this phase. To better understand the behavior of these materials, electronic structure calculations were performed within density functional theory. Results suggest a magnetic state in which these structural moieties have an internal ferromagnetic arrangement, with small ~1/8 μ{sub B} moments on each Mo. We suggest that the Mo{sub 8}O{sub 36} units behave like pseudoatoms with spin 1/2 derived from a single hole distributed over the eight Mo atoms that are strongly hybridized with the O atoms of the subunit. Interestingly, while the compound is antiferromagnetic, our calculations suggest that a field-stabilized ferromagnetic state, if achievable, will be a narrow band half-metal. - Graphical abstract: LnMo{sub 16}O{sub 44} phases comprise corner sharing tetrahedral and octahedral molybdenum ions. The MoO{sub 6} octahedra form Mo{sub 8}O{sub 36} units that are well separated and act like pseudo-atoms, accommodating 11 electrons each. - Highlights: • Single crystal X-ray diffraction refinements of LnMo{sub 16}O{sub 44} single crystals for Ln=Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy and Ho. • DFT calculations based on LaMo{sub 16}O{sub 44}. • [Mo{sub 8}O{sub 36}] units behaving as superatoms with a net magnetic moment of 1 µ

  13. Enhanced dimer relaxation in an atomic and molecular Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.

    2004-10-01

    We derive a universal formula for the rate constant {beta} for relaxation of a shallow dimer into deeply-bound diatomic molecules in the case of atoms with a large scattering length a. We show that {beta} is determined by a and by 2 three-body parameters that also determine the binding energies and widths of Efimov states. The rate constant {beta} scales like ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})a/m near the resonance, but the coefficient is a periodic function of ln(a) that may have resonant enhancement at values of a that differ by multiples of 22.7.

  14. Three-Body Recombination into Deep Bound States in a Bose Gas with Large Scattering Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.

    2001-10-15

    An effective field theory for the three-body system with large two-body scattering length a is applied to three-body recombination into deep bound states in a Bose gas. The recombination constant {alpha} is calculated to first order in the short-distance interactions that allow the recombination. For a<0 , the dimensionless combination m{alpha}/({Dirac_h}a{sup 4}) is a periodic function of ln|a| that exhibits resonances at values of a that differ by multiplicative factors of 22.7. This dramatic behavior should be observable near a Feshbach resonance when a becomes large and negative.

  15. Section 51

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    v ' B L 8 / [*(d) µ o E 8 P(µ o ,µ,N), " b ' 0.101 % 0.853 " v & 0.130 " 2 v % 0.042 ln(1/µ o ). Session Papers 219 (1) (2) Figure 1. Correlation of GOES-6 visible and ERBS shortwave albedos over the Southern Great Plains. Cloud Shortwave Radiative Forcing from Satellite and Surface Data During the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment P. Minnis, C. H. Whitlock, T. P. Charlock, G. L. Schuster Atmospheric Sciences Division NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia W. L.

  16. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  17. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF THORIUM VALUES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warf, J.C.

    1959-04-21

    The separation of thorium values from rare earth metals contained ln aqueous solutions by means of extraction with a water immiscible alkyl phosphate diluted with a hydrocarbon such as hexane is described. While the extraction according to this invention may be carried out from any aqueous salt solution, it is preferred to use solutions containing free mineral acid. Hydrochloric acid and in particular nitric acid are sultable in a concentration ranging from 0.1 to 7 normal. The higher acid concentration results in higher extraction values.

  18. TRXP REPORT M i3UREAU 08 HINES, RWO, N,sVADA ON OCTOBIGt 9,1962

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TRXP REPORT M i3UREAU 08 HINES, RWO, N,sVADA ON OCTOBIGt 9,1962 3. Marehell W. E. Shaw OBJBcTIvE OFTRIP Infometion had been reoelved that the Bureau of Xinee Station was actively engaged.ln studying the eleotrowinnlng oi uranium from 602. It was dealred to eee the equipment used and deter- mine the statue of the projeot. SUMaaRp. CONCLUSIONS AND REC~ATIONS 1. A relatively simple cell that could be coaled up has bean designed for the suoceaefu~ pxyQction of aoaleeoed uraniua from UO2 feed at

  19. Spherical Wave Propagation in a Nonlinear Elastic Medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneev, Valeri A.

    2009-07-01

    Nonlinear propagation of spherical waves generated by a point-pressure source is considered for the cases of monochromatic and impulse primary waveforms. The nonlinear five-constant elastic theory advanced by Murnaghan is used where general equations of motion are put in the form of vector operators, which are independent of the coordinate system choice. The ratio of the nonlinear field component to the primary wave in the far field is proportional to ln(r) where r is a propagation distance. Near-field components of the primary field do not contribute to the far field of nonlinear component.

  20. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Hsueh, Tzu-Wei; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Yan, Yuan-Horng; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-01-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO{sub 4}; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO{sub 4} exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO{sub 4}. Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO{sub 4}-induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and

  1. Constraints on the richness-mass relation and the optical-SZE positional offset distribution for SZE-selected clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saro, A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 0.8 in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness λ-mass relation with the following function <ln λ|M500> ∝ Bλln M500 + Cλln E(z) and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnesses λ to constrain the parameters. We find Bλ=1.14+0.21–0.18 and Cλ=0.73+0.77–0.75. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is σlnM|λ = 0.18+0.08–0.05 at a characteristic richness λ = 70. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the matched sample, showing that the fraction of SPT-SZ-selected clusters with RM counterparts is consistent with expectations and that the fraction of RM-selected clusters with SPT-SZ counterparts is in mild tension with expectation. We model the optical-SZE cluster positional offset distribution with the sum of two Gaussians, showing that it is consistent with a dominant, centrally peaked population and a subdominant population characterized by larger offsets. We also cross-match the RM catalogue with SPT-SZ candidates below the official catalogue threshold significance ξ = 4.5, using the RM catalogue to provide optical confirmation and redshifts for 15 additional clusters with ξ ε [4, 4.5].

  2. Experimental calibration of silicon and oxygen isotope fractionations between quartz and water at 250°C by in situ microanalysis of experimental products and application to zoned low δ30Si quartz overgrowths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollington, Anthony D.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Georg, R. Bastian; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Valley, John W.

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of silicon isotope data for quartz is hampered by the lack of experimentally determined fractionation factors between quartz and fluid. Further, there is a large spread in published oxygen isotope fractionation factors at low temperatures, primarily due to extrapolation from experimental calibrations at high temperature. We report the first measurements of silicon isotope ratios from experimentally precipitated quartz and estimate the equilibrium fractionation vs. dissolved silica using a novel in situ analysis technique applying secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly analyze experimental products. These experiments also yield a new value for oxygen isotope fractionation. Quartz overgrowths up to 235 μm thick were precipitated in silica–H2O–NaOH–NaCl fluids, at pH 12–13 and 250 °C. At this temperature, 1000lnα30Si(Qtz–fluid) = 0.55 ± 0.10‰ and 1000lnα18O(Qtz–fluid) = 10.62 ± 0.13‰, yielding the relations 1000lnα30Si(Qtz–fluid) = (0.15 ± 0.03) * 106/T2 and 1000lnα18O(Qtz–fluid) = (2.91 ± 0.04) * 106/T2 when extended to zero fractionation at infinite temperature. Values of δ30Si(Qtz) from diagenetic cement in sandstones from the basal Cambrian Mt. Simon Formation in central North America range from 0 to ₋5.4‰. Paired δ18O and δ30Si values from individual overgrowths preserve a record of Precambrian weathering and fluid transport. In conclusion, the application of the experimental quartz growth results to observations from natural sandstone samples suggests that precipitation of quartz at low temperatures in nature is dominated by kinetic, rather than equilibrium, processes.

  3. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  4. Section 71

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 ' 12 µm * 8 µm F 89 8 d 8 ' 6 ' i ' 1 F 89 i *8 PCLoS (2) ' (1 & N) exp (&b tan 2); b ' & 2$ ln (1 & N) B (Z i , Z j , 2) Z i Z j (Z i , Z j , 2). Session Papers 309 (1) (3) Window-Region Longwave Fluxes: Accounting for Cloud Scattering E.E. Takara and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction The longwave radiative transfer models used in many general circulation models (GCMs) assume that broken cloud fields consist

  5. Section 85

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    i ' -ln I i I 0 i *µ%c i µ, c i Wm &2 c i NO 2 O 3 NO 2 c i c i NO 2 Session Papers 379 (1) Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol Size Distribution Parameters, Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide Column Amounts from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data M. Alexandrov, A. A. Lacis, B. E. Carlson and B. Cairns National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction The MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  9. Stopping distance for high energy jets in weakly coupled quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Peter; Cantrell, Sean; Xiao Wei

    2010-02-15

    We derive a simple formula for the stopping distance for a high-energy quark traveling through a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma. The result is given to next-to-leading order in an expansion in inverse logarithms ln(E/T), where T is the temperature of the plasma. We also define a stopping distance for gluons and give a leading-log result. Discussion of stopping distance has a theoretical advantage over discussion of energy loss rates in that stopping distances can be generalized to the case of strong coupling, where one may not speak of individual partons.

  10. ,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O'

  11. Analytic matrix elements for the two-electron atomic basis with logarithmic terms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2014-08-01

    The two-electron problem for the helium-like atoms in S-state is considered. The basis containing the integer powers of ln r, where r is a radial variable of the Fock expansion, is studied. In this basis, the analytic expressions for the matrix elements of the corresponding Hamiltonian are presented. These expressions include only elementary and special functions, what enables very fast and accurate computation of the matrix elements. The decisive contribution of the correct logarithmic terms to the behavior of the two-electron wave function in the vicinity of the triple-coalescence point is reaffirmed.

  12. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptiste Guegan

    2012-11-01

    The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

  13. Relationship between Anisotropy in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Saturation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is saturation-dependent. Accurate characterization of soil anisotropy is very important in simulating flow and contaminant (e.g., radioactive nuclides in Hanford) transport. A recently developed tensorial connectivity-tortuosity (TCT) concept describes the hydraulic conductivity tensor of the unsaturated anisotropic soils as the product of a scalar variable, the symmetric connectivity tortuosity tensor, and the hydraulic conductivity tensor at saturation. In this study, the TCT model is used to quantify soil anisotropy in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The TCT model can describe different types of soil anisotropy; e.g., the anisotropy coefficient, C, can be monotonically increase or decrease with saturation and can vary from greater than unity to less than unity and vice versa. Soil anisotropy is independent of soil water retention properties and can be characterized by the ratio of the saturated hydraulic conductivities and the difference of the tortuosity-connectivity coefficients in two directions. ln(C) is linearly proportional to ln(Se) with Se being the effective saturation. The log-linear relationship between C and Se allows the saturation-dependent anisotropy to be determined using linear regression with the measurements of the directional hydraulic conductivities at a minimum of two water content levels, of which one may be at full saturation. The model was tested using measurements of directional hydraulic conductivities.

  14. Fluctuations of the number of particles within a given volume in cold quantum gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astrakharchik, G. E.; Combescot, R.; Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2007-12-15

    In ultracold gases many experiments use atom imaging as a basic observable. The resulting image is averaged over a number of realizations and mostly only this average is used. Only recently the noise has been measured to extract physical information. In the present paper we investigate the quantum noise arising in these gases at zero temperature. We restrict ourselves to the homogeneous situation and study the fluctuations in particle number found within a given volume in the gas, and more specifically inside a sphere of radius R. We show that zero-temperature fluctuations are not extensive and the leading term scales with sphere radius R as R{sup 2} ln R (or ln R) in three- (or one-) dimensional systems. We calculate systematically the next term beyond this leading order. We consider first the generic case of a compressible superfluid. Then we investigate the whole Bose-Einstein-condensation (BEC) -BCS crossover, and in particular the limiting cases of the weakly interacting Bose gas and of the free Fermi gas.

  15. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, G. D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James C.

    2014-02-03

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (~1–5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  16. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jrg; Anglil, Raymond

    2014-05-21

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 ? 8) ?10{sup 9} Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Anglil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln?J{sup ?}/? is scaled by ln?S/?, where the supersaturation ratio is S, ? is the dimensionless surface energy, and J{sup ?} is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of diaquadi(2,2`-bipyridine)di(dichloroacetato)lanthanide (III) monodichloroacetato

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Weimin, Cheng Yiqiang, Dong Nan

    1995-05-01

    The title complexes, Diaquadi(2,2`-bipyridine)Di(Dichloroacetato)Lanthanide (III) Monodichloroacetato [Ln(CHCI{sub 2}COO){sub 2}(2,2`-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sup +}(CHCI{sub 2}COO){sup -}(Ln=Dy, Ho, Tm, Er, Yb) were obtained and characterized. [Er(CHCI{sub 2}COOO){sub 2}(2,2`-bipy){sub 2} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]+(CHCI{sub 2}COO){sup -} crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n with Z=4. Cell dimensions are a=15.886 (9), b=13.758(2), c=16.343(4) {angstrom}, {Beta}=113.31(3){degrees}, and the structure was refined to an R of 0.049 for 3415 observed reflections. The Er(III) ion exhibits a distorted, square antiprismatic configuration. Four N atoms of 2,2`-bipy and four O atoms from two dichloroacetato and two water ligands are coordinated. One dichloroacetato group lies outside the polyhedron and is connected with water ligands by hydrogen bonds.

  18. Resonant tunneling with high peak to valley current ratio in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D. Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated carrier transport in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers by room temperature current-voltage measurements. Resonant tunneling signatures accompanied by current peaks are observed. Carrier transport in the multi-layers were analyzed by plots of ln(I/V{sup 2}) as a function of 1/V and ln(I) as a function of V{sup 1/2}. Results suggest that besides films quality, nc-Si and barrier sub-layer thicknesses are important parameters that restrict carrier transport. When thicknesses are both small, direct tunneling dominates carrier transport, resonant tunneling occurs only at certain voltages and multi-resonant tunneling related current peaks can be observed but with peak to valley current ratio (PVCR) values smaller than 1.5. When barrier thickness is increased, trap-related and even high field related tunneling is excited, causing that multi-current peaks cannot be observed clearly, only one current peak with higher PVCR value of 7.7 can be observed. While if the thickness of nc-Si is large enough, quantum confinement is not so strong, a broad current peak with PVCR value as high as 60 can be measured, which may be due to small energy difference between the splitting energy levels in the quantum dots of nc-Si. Size distribution in a wide range may cause un-controllability of the peak voltages.

  19. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, R.J.; Kuo, L.; Li, B.

    1999-06-29

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO[sub 3]. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La[sub w]Ca[sub x]Ln[sub y]Ce[sub z]MnO[sub 3], wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics. 10 figs.

  20. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultra-high energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80° . Our measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the Surface Detector array and the Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the Surface Detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ± 0.04 ± 0.48 (sys.)) × 107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. Finally, the logarithmic gain d ln Nµ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 × 1018 eV and 5 × 1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ± 0.024 ± 0.030 (sys.)).

  1. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, R.P.; Miller, J.R.; Toplosky, V.J.

    2004-06-28

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  2. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Liu, Wei

    1995-01-01

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  3. Neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terasawa, Masao; Nagata, Kisaburo [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biomolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, 2-2-1, Miyama, Funabashi (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshiro [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biomolecular Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, 2-2-1, Miyama, Funabashi (Japan)], E-mail: yoshiro@biomol.sci.toho-u.ac.jp

    2008-12-12

    Antigen-transporting cells take up pathogens, and then migrate from sites of inflammation to secondary lymphoid tissues to induce an immune response. Among antigen-transporting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are believed to be the most potent and professional antigen-presenting cells that can stimulate naive T cells. However, the cells that transport antigens, tumor cell antigens in particular, have not been clearly identified. In this study we have analyzed what types of cells transport tumor cell antigens to secondary lymphoid tissues. We show that neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages but not DCs engulf X-irradiated P388 leukemic cells after their injection into the peritoneal cavity, and that neutrophils and monocytes but not macrophages migrate to the parathymic lymph nodes (pLN), the blood, and then the spleen. The monocytes in the pLN comprise Gr-1{sup -} and Gr-1{sup +} ones, and some of these cells express CD11c. Overall, this study demonstrates that neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues.

  4. Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C−O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-07-15

    Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C−O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C−O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C−O cleavage occurs via a C−H → O−H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C−O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C−O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

  5. Eu(III) Complexes of Octadentate 1-Hydroxy-2-pyridinones: Stability and Improved Photophysical Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Evan G.; D'Aleo, Anthony; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-05-29

    The luminescence properties of lanthanoid ions can be dramatically enhanced by coupling them to antenna ligands that absorb light in the UV-visible and then efficiently transfer the energy to the lanthanoid centre. The synthesis and the complexation of Ln{sup III} cations (Ln = Eu, Gd) for a ligand based on four 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) chelators appended to a ligand backbone derived by linking two L-lysine units (3LI-bis-LYS) is described. This octadentate Eu{sup III} complex ([Eu(3LI-bis-LYS-1,2-HOPO)]{sup -}) has been evaluated in terms of its thermodynamic stability, UV-visible absorption and luminescence properties. For this complex, the conditional stability constant (pM) is 19.9, which is an order of magnitude higher than diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid at pH = 7.4. This Eu{sup III} complex also shows an almost two-fold increase in its luminescence quantum yield in aqueous solution (pH = 7.4) when compared with other octadentate ligands. Hence, despite a slight decrease of the molar absorption coefficient, a much higher brightness is obtained for [Eu(3LI-bis-LYS-1,2-HOPO)]{sup -}. This overall improvement was achieved by saturating the coordination sphere of the Eu{sup III} cation, yielding an increased metal-centred efficiency by excluding solvent water molecules from the metal's inner sphere.

  6. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultra-high energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80° . Our measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the Surface Detector array and the Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the Surface Detector array at anmore » altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ± 0.04 ± 0.48 (sys.)) × 107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. Finally, the logarithmic gain d ln Nµ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 × 1018 eV and 5 × 1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ± 0.024 ± 0.030 (sys.)).« less

  7. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Kuo, Lewis; Li, Baozhen

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La.sub.w Ca.sub.x Ln.sub.y Ce.sub.z MnO.sub.3, wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics.

  8. Dynamic heterogeneity of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in embryonic stem cell populations captured by single-cell 3D high-content analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajbakhsh, Jian; Stefanovski, Darko; Tang, George; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Liu, Naiyou; Fair, Jeffrey H.

    2015-03-15

    Cell-surface markers and transcription factors are being used in the assessment of stem cell fate and therapeutic safety, but display significant variability in stem cell cultures. We assessed nuclear patterns of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC, associated with pluripotency), a second important epigenetic mark, and its combination with 5-methylcytosine (5mC, associated with differentiation), also in comparison to more established markers of pluripotency (Oct-4) and endodermal differentiation (FoxA2, Sox17) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) over a 10-day differentiation course in vitro: by means of confocal and super-resolution imaging together with 3D high-content analysis, an essential tool in single-cell screening. In summary: 1) We did not measure any significant correlation of putative markers with global 5mC or 5hmC. 2) While average Oct-4 levels stagnated on a cell-population base (0.015 lnIU/day), Sox17 and FoxA2 increased 22-fold and 3-fold faster, respectively (Sox17: 0.343 lnIU/day; FoxA2: 0.046 lnIU/day). In comparison, global DNA methylation levels increased 4-fold faster (0.068 lnIU/day), and global hydroxymethylation declined at 0.046 lnIU/day, both with a better explanation of the temporal profile. 3) This progression was concomitant with the occurrence of distinct nuclear codistribution patterns that represented a heterogeneous spectrum of states in differentiation; converging to three major coexisting 5mC/5hmC phenotypes by day 10: 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup −}, 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +}, and 5hmC{sup −}/5mC{sup +} cells. 4) Using optical nanoscopy we could delineate the respective topologies of 5mC/5hmC colocalization in subregions of nuclear DNA: in the majority of 5hmC{sup +}/5mC{sup +} cells 5hmC and 5mC predominantly occupied mutually exclusive territories resembling euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, respectively. Simultaneously, in a smaller subset of cells we observed a tighter colocalization of the two cytosine variants, presumably

  9. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Ka King

    2013-05-02

    A series of organometallic compounds containing the tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand are described. The potassium carbanions KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} and KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA are synthesized by deprotonation of the hydrocarbon HC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} with potassium benzyl. KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA crystallizes as a dimer with two types of three-center-two-electron KH- Si interactions. Homoleptic Ln(III) tris(silylalkyl) complexes containing β-SiH groups M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) are synthesized from salt elimination of the corresponding lanthanide halide and 3 equiv. of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The related reactions with Sc yield bis(silylalkyl) ate-complexes containing either LiCl or KCl. The divalent calcium and ytterbium compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) are prepared from MI{sub 2} and 2 equiv of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} react with 1 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to give 1,3- disilacyclobutane {Me2Si-C(SiHMe2)2}2 and MC(SiHMe2)3HB(C6F5)3L, and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}, respectively. The corresponding reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu) give the β-SiH abstraction product [{(Me{sub 2}HSi){sub 3}C}{sub 2}LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}SiMe{sub 2}][HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}] (Ln = Y, Lu), but the silene remains associated with the Y or Lu center. The abstraction reactions of M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2 }or TMEDA) and Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) and 2 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} give the expected dicationic M{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and dicationic mono(silylalkyl) LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2} (Ln = Y, Lu, La), respectively. Salt metathesis reactions of Cp

  10. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  11. The Impact of Extent and Location of Mediastinal Lymph Node Involvement on Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Mitra, Nandita; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Kucharczuk, John C.; Lin, Lilie; Rengan, Ramesh

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1-4 N2-3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups: supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients' conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07-0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06-1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11-4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33-1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38-1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58-1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94-1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic outcome in Stage III NSCLC

  12. Clinical Value of [{sup 11}C]Methionine PET for Stereotactic Radiation Therapy With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Metastatic Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miwa, Kazuhiro; Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu ; Matsuo, Masayuki; Shinoda, Jun; Aki, Tatsuki; Yonezawa, Shingo; Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu ; Ito, Takeshi; Asano, Yoshitaka; Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu ; Yamada, Mikito; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the clinical impact of {sup 11}C-labeled methionine-positron emission tomography (MET-PET) for stereotactic radiation therapy with intensity modulated radiation therapy (SRT-IMRT) in metastatic brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-two metastatic brain tumors were examined. All tumors were treated with SRT-IMRT using a helical tomotherapy system. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined and drawn on the stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) image, taking into account the respective contributions of MR imaging and MET-PET. Planning target volume (PTV) encompassed the GTV-PET plus a 2-mm margin. SRT-IMRT was performed, keeping the dose for PTV at 25-35 Gy in 5 fractions. The ratio of the mean value of MET uptake to the contralateral normal brain (L/N ratio) was plotted for the PTV prior to SRT-IMRT, at 3 months following SRT-IMRT, and at 6 months following SRT-IMRT. Tumor characteristic changes of MET uptake before and after SRT-IMRT were evaluated quantitatively, comparing them with MRI examination. Results: Mean {+-} SD L/N ratios were 1.95 {+-} 0.83, 1.18 {+-} 0.21, and 1.12 {+-} 0.25 in the pre-SRT-IMRT group, in the 3 months post-SRT-IMRT group, and in the 6 months post-SRT-IMRT group, respectively. Differences in the mean L/N ratio between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 3-month post-SRT-IMRT group and between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 6 month post-SRT-IMRT group were statistically significant, irrespective of MRI examination. Conclusions: We showed examples of metastatic lesions demonstrating significant decreases in MET uptake following SRT-IMRT. MET-PET seems to have a potential role in providing additional information, although MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosis and follow-up after SRT-IMRT. The present study is a preliminary approach, but to more clearly define the impact of PET-based radiosurgical assessment, further experimental and clinical analyses are required.

  13. The energetics of lanthanum tantalate materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbes, Tori Z.; Nyman, May; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2010-11-15

    Lanthanum tantalates are important refractory materials with application in photocatalysis, solid oxide fuel cells, and phosphors. Soft-chemical synthesis utilizing the Lindqvist ion, [Ta{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 8-}, has yielded a new phase, La{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}. Using the hydrated phase as a starting material, a new lanthanum orthotantalate polymorph was formed by heating to 850 {sup o}C, which converts to a previously reported LaTaO{sub 4} polymorph at 1200 {sup o}C. The stabilities of La{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} (LaTa-OH), the intermediate LaTaO{sub 4} polymorph (LaTa-850), and the high temperature phase (LaTa-1200) were investigated using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpy of formation from the oxides were calculated from the enthalpies of drop solution to be -87.1{+-}9.6, -94.9{+-}8.8, and -93.1{+-}8.7 kJ/mol for LaTa-OH, LaTa-850, and LaTa-1200, respectively. These results indicate that the intermediate phase, LaTa-850, is the most stable. This pattern of energetics may be related to cation-cation repulsion of the tantalate cations. We also investigated possible LnTaO{sub 4} and Ln{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} analogues of Ln=Pr, Nd to examine the relationship between cation size and the resulting phases. - Graphical abstract: The energetics of three lanthanum tantalates were investigated by the high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpies of formation from the oxides were calculated from the enthalpies of drop solution to be -87.1{+-}9.6, -94.9{+-}8.8, and -93.1{+-}8.7 kJ/mol for La{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}, LaTaO{sub 4} (850 {sup o}C), and LaTaO{sub 4} (1200 {sup o}C), respectively. These results indicate that the intermediate phase, LaTaO{sub 4} (850 {sup o}C), is the most stable in energy. Display Omitted

  14. TPX: Contractor preliminary design review. Volume 5, Manufacturing R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, J.F.; Urban, W.M.; Hartman, D.

    1995-08-04

    TPX Insulation & Impregnation R&D test results are reported for 1x2 samples designed for screening candidate conduit insulation systems for TPX PF and TF coils. The epoxy/glass insulation system and three proposed alternate insulation systems employing Kapton, was evaluated in as received sample condition and after 10 thermal cycles in liquid nitrogen. Two DGBA impregnation systems, Shell 826 and CTD101K were investigated. Square incoloy 908 and 316 LN stainless hollow conduits were used for 1x2 sample fabrication. Capacitance, dielectric loss, and insulation resistance dielectric characteristics were measured for all samples. Partial discharge performance was measured for samples either in air, under silicon oil, or under liquid nitrogen up to 10kVrms at 60 Hz. Hipot screening was performed at 10 kVdc. The samples were cross sectioned and evaluated for impregnation quality. The implications of the test results on the TPX preliminary design decision are discussed.

  15. CRUCIBLE LINING METHOD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bone, W.H.; Schmidt, W.W.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for forming refractory liners in cylindrical reaction vessels used for the reductlon of uranium tetrafluoride to metallic uranium. A preliminary form, having positioning lugs attached thereto, is inserted into the reaction vessel and the refractory powder, usually CaO, is put in the annular space between the form and the inner wall of the reaction vessel. A jolting table is used to compact this charge of liner material ln place, and after thls has been done, the preliminary form is removed and the flnal form or plug is lnserted without disturbing the partially completed lining. The remainder of the lining charge is then introduced and compacted by jolting, after which the form is removed.

  16. Extraction and separation of thorium(IV) from lanthanides(III) with room-temperature ionic liquids containing primary amine N{sub 1923}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Y.; Chen, J.; Bai, Y.; Li, D.Q.

    2008-07-01

    The extraction behavior of Th(IV) by primary amine N{sub 1923} in imidazolium-based ionic liquid namely 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (N{sub 1923}/IL) was studied in this paper. Results showed that N{sub 1923}/IL had poorer extraction ability for Th(IV) than N{sub 1923} in n-heptane (N{sub 1923}/HEP). The separation coefficients between Th(IV) and lanthanides(III) ({beta}{sub Th/Ln}) were obtained and compared with those in the N{sub 1923}/HEP system. On this basis, we made a preliminary assessment for the possibility of using ionic liquids as solvents for the separation of Th(IV) from lanthanides(III) sulfate in a clean process. (authors)

  17. O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}{delta}{sub g}) production at atmospheric pressure by microdischarge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sousa, J. Santos; Bauville, G.; Lacour, B.; Puech, V.; Touzeau, M.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2008-07-07

    We report experimental results showing that singlet oxygen O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}{delta}{sub g}) can be efficiently produced at atmospheric pressure in a three-electrode microcathode sustained discharge (MCSD) configuration. This configuration consists of a microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) acting as a plasma cathode to sustain a stable glow discharge between the MHCD and a third planar electrode placed at a distance of 8 mm. Experiments were performed in He/O{sub 2}/NO mixtures. O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}{delta}{sub g}) number densities higher than 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} were measured in the MCSD afterglow at total flow rates up to 30 ln/mn, resulting in O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}{delta}{sub g}) fluxes above 10 millimole per hour (mmol/h)

  18. ORNL/RASA-86/ L9

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Qq {8 oL'/7 8.-uf*t^* l/fii ORNL/RASA-86/ L9 COMPREHENSIVE MDIOLOGICAL $JRVEY OF OFF-SITE PROPERTY O NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE LEWISTON, NE}J YORK Access to the lnformatlon ln this report ls llmlted to those l n d l c a t e d o n t h e d l s t r l b u t l o n l l s t a n d t o D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y and Departnent of Energy Contractors Thi! roport w!! preprtcd a! an account of wott lponlot€d by an agency ot the Unatcd Stttos Govrrnmant. Naithcr thcU nited StltttGovcrnmrnt nor any

  19. Structural and dielectric properties of CuO-doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidu, K. Chandra Babu Sarmash, T. Sofi; Maddaiah, M.; Reddy, V. Narasimha; Subbarao, T.

    2015-06-24

    Copper-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (ST) ceramic powders were processed by solid-state route diffusion (SRD) bulk preparation technique. We reported the effect of Cu{sup +2} ions on the dielectric response of ST and it established the substantial increase in dielectric constant (ε{sub r}) than undoped ST from 303K-673K and low loss (tanδ) for good dielectric applications. In respect of the electrical properties ac- activation energies were computed of range 0.089-0.319eV using lnσ Vs 1/T plots. The microstructure was examined with grain sizes 6-9µm of uniform distribution by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Some additional phases SrCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} and TiO{sub 2} rutiles were detected by X-ray diffraction technique.

  20. Quadrature formulae for classes of functions of low smoothness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nursultanov, E D; Tleukhanova, N T

    2003-10-31

    For Sobolev and Korobov spaces of functions of several variables a quadrature formula with explicitly defined coefficients and nodes is constructed. This formula is precise for trigonometric polynomials with harmonics from the corresponding step hyperbolic cross. The error of the quadrature formula in the classes W{sup {alpha}}{sub p}[0,1]{sup n}, E{sup {alpha}}[0,1]{sup n} is o((ln M){sup {beta}}/M{sup {alpha}}), where M is the number of nodes and {beta} is a parameter depending on the class. The problem of the approximate calculation of multiple integrals for functions in W{sup {alpha}}{sub p}[0,1]{sup n} is considered in the case when this class does not lie in the space of continuous functions, that is, for {alpha}{<=}1/p.

  1. Rotating black lens solution in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Yu; Teo, Edward

    2008-09-15

    It has recently been shown that a stationary, asymptotically flat vacuum black hole in five space-time dimensions with two commuting axial symmetries must have an event horizon with either a spherical, ring or lens-space topology. In this paper, we study the third possibility, a so-called black lens with L(n,1) horizon topology. Using the inverse scattering method, we construct a black-lens solution with the simplest possible rod structure, and possessing a single asymptotic angular momentum. Its properties are then analyzed; in particular, it is shown that there must either be a conical singularity or a naked curvature singularity present in the space-time.

  2. RATIO COMPUTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1958-11-11

    An electronic computer circuit is described for producing an output voltage proportional to the product or quotient of tbe voltages of a pair of input signals. ln essence, the disclosed invention provides a computer having two channels adapted to receive separate input signals and each having amplifiers with like fixed amplification factors and like negatlve feedback amplifiers. One of the channels receives a constant signal for comparison purposes, whereby a difference signal is produced to control the amplification factors of the variable feedback amplifiers. The output of the other channel is thereby proportional to the product or quotient of input signals depending upon the relation of input to fixed signals in the first mentioned channel.

  3. ELECTRONIC PULSE SCALING CIRCUITS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke-Yarborough, E.H.

    1958-11-18

    Electronic pulse scaling circults of the klnd comprlsing a serles of bi- stable elements connected ln sequence, usually in the form of a rlng so as to be cycllcally repetitive at the highest scallng factor, are described. The scaling circuit comprises a ring system of bi-stable elements each arranged on turn-off to cause, a succeeding element of the ring to be turned-on, and one being arranged on turn-off to cause a further element of the ring to be turned-on. In addition, separate means are provided for applying a turn-off pulse to all the elements simultaneously, and for resetting the elements to a starting condition at the end of each cycle.

  4. Elpasolite scintillators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doty, F. Patrick; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Yang, Pin; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

    2012-12-01

    This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Research to develop elpasolite materials, with an emphasis on high-atomic-number rare-earth elpasolites for gamma-ray spectrometer applications. Low-cost, high-performance gamma-ray spectrometers are needed for detection of nuclear proliferation. Cubic materials, such as some members of the elpasolite family (A2BLnX6; Ln-lanthanide and X-halogen), hold promise due to their high light output, proportionality, and potential for scale-up. Using both computational and experimental studies, a systematic investigation of the composition-structure-property relationships of these high-atomic-number elpasolite halides was performed. The results reduce the barrier to commercialization of large single crystals or transparent ceramics, and will facilitate economical scale-up of elpasolites for high-sensitivity gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  5. The final stage of gravitational collapse for high density fluid medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza, R. G.; De Campos, M.

    2013-03-25

    The High density high density fluids can be represented by a stiff matter state equation P={rho} and also by the Hagedorn state equation. The first is constructed using a lagrangian that allows bare nucleons to interact attractively via scalar meson exchange, and repulsively by a more massive vector meson exchange; the second consider that for large mass the spectrum of hadrons grows exponentially, namely {rho}(m) {approx}exp(m/T{sub H}), where T{sub H} is the Hagedorn temperature, resulting the state equation P = P{sub 0}+{rho}{sub 0}ln({rho}/{rho}{sub 0}). We study the gravitational collapse for a high density fluid, considering a Hagedorn state equation in a presence of a vacuum component.

  6. Growth, defect structure, and THz application of stoichiometric lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lengyel, K.; Péter, Á.; Kovács, L.; Corradi, G.; Dravecz, G.; Hajdara, I.; Szaller, Zs.; Polgár, K.; Pálfalvi, L.; Unferdorben, M.; Hebling, J.

    2015-12-15

    Owing to the extraordinary richness of its physical properties, congruent lithium niobate has attracted multidecade-long interest both for fundamental science and applications. The combination of ferro-, pyro-, and piezoelectric properties with large electro-optic, acousto-optic, and photoelastic coefficients as well as the strong photorefractive and photovoltaic effects offers a great potential for applications in modern optics. To provide powerful optical components in high energy laser applications, tailoring of key material parameters, especially stoichiometry, is required. This paper reviews the state of the art of growing large stoichiometric LiNbO{sub 3} (sLN) crystals, in particular, the defect engineering of pure and doped sLN with emphasis on optical damage resistant (ODR) dopants (e.g., Mg, Zn, In, Sc, Hf, Zr, Sn). The discussion is focused on crystals grown by the high temperature top seeded solution growth (HTTSSG) technique using alkali oxide fluxing agents. Based on high-temperature phase equilibria studies of the Li{sub 2}O–Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}–X{sub 2}O ternary systems (X = Na, K, Rb, Cs), the impact of alkali homologue additives on the stoichiometry of the lithium niobate phase will be analyzed, together with a summary of the ultraviolet, infrared, and far-infrared absorption spectroscopic methods developed to characterize the composition of the crystals. It will be shown that using HTTSSG from K{sub 2}O containing flux, crystals closest to the stoichiometric composition can be grown characterized by a UV-edge position of at about 302 nm and a single narrow hydroxyl band in the IR with a linewidth of less than 3 cm{sup −1} at 300 K. The threshold concentrations for ODR dopants depend on crystal stoichiometry and the valence of the dopants; Raman spectra, hydroxyl vibration spectra, and Z-scan measurements prove to be useful to distinguish crystals below and above the photorefractive threshold. Crystals just above the threshold are

  7. OFFICE FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 155OP STREETNW. WiSHINGTON. D.C. ' , iQns 25,19&L At-t :. I' .' ~ at l530 P Btmat, IO&, XtwMn&m, 0. 6., at 9130 A.Jb Sa 1 llmbemupoftbaaomlttaal8~f~r :::i.: :;::j:/ :::.,:.,::: . . . -2, . -3- .,... .:.:. . . ,::;:: 2. lktlv4rsityof-ta ?oral8rtbnsfoaofth4~cnlLmd farumd4rContraotO~~9 t4a : lwlnde the d4v4logmullt. construotion j andop4ratloaofadditl~auls, s~tNm4t4ln. /; ./ 3. alllY4rsltyofcb.l4s&o on4fth4w*callyd sar tmdor OoBtroct OEUS~ 7 :;::.

  8. Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2011-09-23

    Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance

  9. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  10. Presence of Li clusters in molten LiCl-Li

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merwin, Augustus; Phillips, William C.; Williamson, Mark A.; Willit, James L.; Motsegood, Perry N.; Chidambaram, Dev

    2016-05-05

    Molten mixtures of lithium chloride and metallic lithium are of significant interest in various metal oxide reduction processes. These solutions have been reported to exhibit seemingly anomalous physical characteristics that lack a comprehensive explanation. ln the current work, the physical chemistry of molten solutions of lithium chloride and metallic lithium, with and without lithium oxide, was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra obtained from these solutions were in agreement with the previously reported spectrum of the lithium cluster, Li8. Furthermore, this observation is indicative of a nanofluid type colloidal suspension of Li8, in a molten salt matrix.more » It is suggested that the formation and suspension of lithium clusters in lithium chloride is the cause of various phenomena exhibited by these solutions that were previously unexplainable.« less

  11. Anion effects in the extraction of lanthanide 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone complexes into an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mark P.; Beitz, James V.; Rickert, Paul G.; Borkowski, Marian; Laszak, Ivan; Dietz, Mark L.

    2012-07-01

    The extraction of trivalent lanthanides from an aqueous phase containing 1 M NaClO{sub 4} into the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nonafluoro-1-butane sulfonate by the beta-diketone extractant 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) was studied. Radiotracer distribution, absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption fine structure measurements point to the extraction of multiple lanthanide species. At low extractant concentrations, fully hydrated aqua cations of the lanthanides are present in the ionic liquid phase. As the extractant concentration is increased 1:2 and 1:3 lanthanide:tta species are observed. In contrast, 1:4 Ln:tta complexes were observed in the extraction of lanthanides by Htta into 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. (authors)

  12. PUMPS FOR LIQUID CURRENT-CONDUCTING MATERIAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watt, D.A.

    1958-12-23

    An induction-type liquid conductor pump is described wherein the induced current flow is substantially tnansverse to the flow of the liquid in the duct, thus eliminating parallel current flow that tends to cause unwanted pressures resulting in turbulence, eddy-flow, heating losses, and reduced pumping efficiency. This improvement is achieved by offering the parallel current a path of lower impedance along the duct than that offered by the liquid so that the induced currents remaining in the liquid flow in a substantially transverse directlon. Thick copper bars are brazed to the liquid duct parallel to the flow, and additional induced currents are created in the copper bars of appropriate magnitude to balance the ohmic drop ln the current paths outside of the liquid metal.

  13. Development of a simple 5-15 litre per hour LNG refueling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corless, A.J.; Sarangi, S.; Hall, J.L.; Barclay, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A variable capacity, small-scale liquefied natural gas (LNG) refueling system has been designed, built, and tested at the Cryofuel Systems` Laboratory, University of Victoria, Canada. The system, designed to continuously liquefy between 5 and 15 litres of NG, utilizes liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) as its cold source and contains most of the components found in a typical commercial refueling system; i.e. purification system, liquefier, LNG storage, automatic control and monitoring system. This paper describes the design of the system as well as the results of a set of LNG production trials. The performance of the system exceeded expected LNG production rates, but at levels of efficiency somewhat less than predicted. Cryofuel Systems expects to use this system to implement an LNG vehicle demonstration program and to gain experience in the integration of LNG refueling systems which exploit advanced liquefaction technology such as magnetic refrigeration.

  14. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Dixon, Kelly d.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Martin, Floyd D.; Norton, Robert O.; Radovic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields with liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.

  15. Quantum methods for clock synchronization: Beating the standard quantum limit without entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgh, Mark de; Bartlett, Stephen D.

    2005-10-15

    We introduce methods for clock synchronization that make use of the adiabatic exchange of nondegenerate two-level quantum systems: ticking qubits. Schemes involving the exchange of N independent qubits with frequency {omega} give a synchronization accuracy that scales as ({omega}{radical}(N)){sup -1}--i.e., as the standard quantum limit. We introduce a protocol that makes use of N{sub c} coherent exchanges of a single qubit at frequency {omega}, leading to an accuracy that scales as ({omega}N{sub c}){sup -1} ln N{sub c}. This protocol beats the standard quantum limit without the use of entanglement, and we argue that this scaling is the fundamental limit for clock synchronization allowed by quantum mechanics. We analyze the performance of these protocols when used with a lossy channel.0.

  16. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  17. L A S O W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A S O W a re h o u s e M e tr o p o li s C e n te r N S S B S h o p s C M R N IS C P ar k in g P ar k in g P h y s ic s O to w i W el ln es s C en te r J. R. Oppenheimer Study Center (Cochiti and Jemez Rooms) Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies CINT Materials Science Laboratory MSL Auditorium MSL Courtyard Research Park Room 203 A / B 38 6 6 E A S T J E M E Z R O A D ( T R U C K R O U T E ) D IA M O N D D R IV E E N I W E T O K R O A D W E S T J E M E Z R O A D Los Alamos Canyon Bridge to Los

  18. Extracting grain-orientation-dependent data from in situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction. I. Inverse pole figures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoica, Grigoreta M.; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; An, Ke; Ma, Dong; Vogel, S. C.; Carpenter, J. S.; Wang, Xun-Li

    2014-11-28

    The problem of calculating the inverse pole figure (IPF) is analyzed from the perspective of the application of time-of flight neutron diffraction toin situmonitoring of the thermomechanical behavior of engineering materials. On the basis of a quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) method, a consistent set of grain orientations is generated and used to compute the weighting factors for IPF normalization. The weighting factors are instrument dependent and were calculated for the engineering materials diffractometer VULCAN (Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The QMC method is applied to face-centered cubic structures and can be easily extended to other crystallographic symmetries. Examples includemore » 316LN stainless steelin situloaded in tension at room temperature and an Al–2%Mg alloy, substantially deformed by cold rolling and in situannealed up to 653 K.« less

  19. Recovery of the actinides by electrochemical methods in molten chlorides using solid aluminium cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malmbeck, R.; Mendes, E.; Serp, J.; Soucek, P.; Glatz, J.P.; Cassayre, L.

    2007-07-01

    An electrorefining process in molten chloride salts is being developed at ITU to reprocess the spent nuclear fuel. According to the thermochemical properties of the system, aluminium is the most promising electrode material for the separation of actinides (An) from lanthanides (Ln). The actinides are selectively reduced from the fission products and stabilized by the formation of solid and compact actinide-aluminium alloys with the reactive cathode material. In this work, the maximum loading of aluminium with actinides was investigated by potentiostatic and galvano-static electrorefining of U-Pu- Zr alloys. A very high aluminium capacity was achieved, as the average loading was 1.6 g of U and Pu into 1 g of aluminium and the maximum achieved loading was 2.3 g. For recovery of the actinides from aluminium, a process based on chlorination and a subsequent sublimation of AlCl{sub 3} is proposed. (authors)

  20. Managing the risks of extreme events and disasters to advance climate change adaptation. Special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, C.B.; Barros, V.; Stocker, T.F.

    2012-07-01

    This Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) has been jointly coordinated by Working Groups I (WGI) and II (WGII) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report focuses on the relationship between climate change and extreme weather and climate events, the impacts of such events, and the strategies to manage the associated risks. This Special Report, in particular, contributes to frame the challenge of dealing with extreme weather and climate events as an issue in decision making under uncertainty, analyzing response in the context of risk management. The report consists of nine chapters, covering risk management; observed and projected changes in extreme weather and climate events; exposure and vulnerability to as well as losses resulting from such events; adaptation options from the local to the international scale; the role of sustainable development in modulating risks; and insights from specific case studies. (LN)

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. The currentvoltage and capacitancevoltage characteristics at high temperatures of Au Schottky contact to n-type GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    zerli, Halil; Karteri, ?brahim; Karata?, ?kr; Altindal, ?emsettin

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: The electronic parameters of the diode under temperature were investigated. The barrier heights have a Gaussian distribution. Au/n-GaAs diode exhibits a rectification behavior. - Abstract: We have investigated the temperature-dependent currentvoltage (IV) and capacitancevoltage (CV) characteristics of Au/n-GaAs Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) in the temperature range of 280415 K. The barrier height for the Au/n-type GaAs SBDs from the IV and CV characteristics have varied from 0.901 eV to 0.963 eV (IV) and 1.234 eV to 0.967 eV (CV), and the ideality factor (n) from 1.45 to 1.69 in the temperature range 280415 K. The conventional Richardson plots are found to be linear in the temperature range measured. Both the ln(I{sub 0}/T{sup 2}) versus (kT){sup ?1} and ln(I{sub 0}/T{sup 2}) versus (nkT){sup ?1} plots gives a straight line corresponding to activation energies 0.773 eV and 0.870 eV, respectively. A ?{sub b0} versus 1/T plot was drawn to obtain evidence of a Gaussian distribution of the BHs, and values of ?{sup }{sub b0} = 1.071 eV and ?{sub 0} = 0.094 V for the mean BH and zero-bias standard deviation have been obtained from this plot.

  4. Ferromagnetic interactions and slow magnetic relaxation behaviors of two lanthanide coordination polymers bridged by 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate ligand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Ming; Li, Xiuhua; Cui, Ping; Zhao, Bin

    2015-03-15

    Two lanthanide-based frameworks: (Ln(phen)(NDA){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} (Ln=Gd(1), NDA=2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate anion, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), and ([Dy(phen)(NDA){sub 1.5}]·0.5H{sub 2}NDA){sub n} (2) were structurally and magnetically characterized. Compound 1 exhibits 2D layer structure, belonging to the triclinic system with space group P−1, while compound 2 features a 3D framework with space group P−1. The magnetic studies revealed that ferromagnetic coupling existed between adjacent lanthanide ions in 1 and 2, and frequency-dependence out-of-phase signals in the measurement of alternate-current susceptibilities were observed for 2, albeit without reaching the characteristic maxima above 2 K, implying slow magnetic relaxation behavior in 2. After the application of a dc field, good peak shapes of ac signal were obtained and got the energy barrier ΔE/k{sub B}=29 K and the pre-exponential factor τ{sub 0}=4.47×10{sup −7} s at 2000 Oe field; and when the dc field was in 5000 Oe, giving ΔE/k{sub B}=40 K and τ{sub 0}=2.82×10{sup −6}. - Graphical abstract: Two novel lanthanide-based frameworks 1 and 2 were structurally and magnetically characterized. The results revealed that ferromagnetic coupling exists between adjacent lanthanide ions in 1 and 2, and 2 displayed slow magnetic relaxation behavior with the energy barrier of 29 K. - Highlights: • Two lanthanide frameworks were synthesized and magnetically characterized. • The magnetism studies indicate slow magnetic relaxation behavior in 2. • Weak ferromagnetic coupling existing between adjacent lanthanide centers.

  5. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  6. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Yuiko T.; Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.; Campbell, John H.; Aston, Mary Kay; Elder, Melanie L.

    1996-01-01

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  7. The effect of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and the resulting droplet size distributions. Third quarterly technical report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, A.; Chigier, N.

    1993-12-01

    Laminar and turbulent columns of liquids issuing from capillary tubes were studied in order to determine the effects of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and to establish the influence of liquid turbulence on droplet size distributions after breakup. Two capillary tubes were chosen with diameters D{sub 1}=3.0mm and D{sub 2}=1.2mm; jet Reynolds numbers were 1000--30000, and 400--7200. For water injection into stagnant air, stability curve is bounded by a laminar portion, where a jet radius and {delta}{sub o} initial disturbance amplitude, and a fully developed turbulent portion characterized by high initial disturbance amplitude (ln(a/{delta}{sub o,T}) {approximately} 4.85). In the transition region, ln(a/{delta}{sub o}) is not single valued; it decreases with increasing Reynolds number. In absence of aerodynamic effects, turbulent jets are as stable as laminar jets. For this breakup mode turbulence propagates initial disturbances with amplitudes orders of magnitude larger than laminar jets ({delta}{sub o,T}=28{times}10{sup 6} {delta}{sub o,L}). Growth rates of initial disturbances are same for both laminar and turbulent columns with theoretical Weber values. Droplet size distribution is bi-modal; the number ratio of large (> D/2), to small (< D/2) droplets is 3 and independent of Reynolds number. For laminar flow optimum wavelength ({lambda}{sub opt}) corresponding to fastest growing disturbance is equal to 4.45D, exactly the theoretical Weber value. For turbulent flow conditions, the turbulent column segments. Typically, segments with lengths of one to several wavelengths, detach from the liquid jet. The long ligaments contract under the action of surface tension, resulting in droplet sizes larger than predicted by Rayleigh and Weber. For turbulent flow conditions, {lambda}{sub opt} = 9.2D, about 2 times the optimum Weber wavelength.

  8. Meson-meson bound state in a 2+1 lattice QCD model with two flavors and strong coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O'Carroll, Michael; Neto, Antonio Francisco

    2005-08-01

    We consider the existence of bound states of two mesons in an imaginary-time formulation of lattice QCD. We analyze an SU(3) theory with two flavors in 2+1 dimensions and two-dimensional spin matrices. For a small hopping parameter and a sufficiently large glueball mass, as a preliminary, we show the existence of isoscalar and isovector mesonlike particles that have isolated dispersion curves (upper gap up to near the two-particle threshold {approx}-4ln{kappa}). The corresponding meson masses are equal up to and including O({kappa}{sup 3}) and are asymptotically of order -2ln{kappa}-{kappa}{sup 2}. Considering the zero total isospin sector, we show that there is a meson-meson bound state solution to the Bethe-Salpeter equation in a ladder approximation, below the two-meson threshold, and with binding energy of order b{kappa}{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.02359{kappa}{sup 2}. In the context of the strong coupling expansion in {kappa}, we show that there are two sources of meson-meson attraction. One comes from a quark-antiquark exchange. This is not a meson exchange, as the spin indices are not those of the meson particle, and we refer to this as a quasimeson exchange. The other arises from gauge field correlations of four overlapping bonds, two positively oriented and two of opposite orientation. Although the exchange part gives rise to a space range-one attractive potential, the main mechanism for the formation of the bound state comes from the gauge contribution. In our lattice Bethe-Salpeter equation approach, this mechanism is manifested by an attractive distance-zero energy-dependent potential. We recall that no bound state appeared in the one-flavor case, where the repulsive effect of Pauli exclusion is stronger.

  9. SU-E-J-262: Segmentation in Therapy: Impact of Display

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sensakovic, W; Letter, H; Pearson, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the calibration of monitors used for structure delineation in radiotherapy and to investigate the impact of window/level on the delineations. Method and Materials: hotometers were used to measure ambient light and luminance for 12 monitors used for delineating structures in radiotherapy. Luminance was determined using AAPM TG-18 patterns TG18-LN12-01 to TG18-LN12-18. The DICOM grayscale display function (GSDF) was calculated for each monitor. To investigate the impact of window and level eight observers each outlined two sets of structures (four structures per set) on CT simulation images. In the first set window and level were initialized at random values and the observers adjusted as needed. In the second set window and level were locked at preselected values for all observers. Results: Ambient light variability at different displays was 24% and was higher than radiology reading rooms. Monitor luminance curves were substantially different than the corresponding GSDF. Monitors demonstrated higher contrast than the GSDF in the lower third of driving levels and lower contrast in the upper third of driving levels. Increased contrast at low driving levels may be to compensate for high ambient light which would otherwise reduce contrast. Abrupt changes in luminance and loss of all contrast at both upper and lower driving levels was observed. Interobserver variability was 379HU for window and 217HU for level. Outline variability was lower when the window and level settings were similar and when they were preselected. Structures without sharp boundaries (e.g., partial volume and a wide window value) resulted in substantial interobserver variability even when window/level were preselected. Conclusion: Substantial variation in monitor calibration and ambient light exists in radiotherapy. Further, the substantially different window/level contributes to outline variability. Future work will quantify the contributions of monitor calibration and window

  10. Differences in urine cadmium associations with kidney outcomes based on serum creatinine and cystatin C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Virginia M.; Kim, Nam-Soo; Lee, Byung-Kook; Parsons, Patrick J.; Spector, June; Fadrowski, Jeffrey; Jaar, Bernard G.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Todd, Andrew C.; and others

    2011-11-15

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxicant; chronic exposure increases risk for chronic kidney disease. Recently, however, associations between urine cadmium and higher creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been reported. Analyses utilizing alternate biomarkers of kidney function allow evaluation of potential mechanisms for these observations. We compared associations of urine cadmium with kidney function measures based on serum cystatin C to those with serum creatinine in 712 lead workers. Mean (standard deviation) molybdenum-corrected urine cadmium, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) eGFR and multi-variable cystatin C eGFR were 1.02 (0.65) {mu}g/g creatinine, and 97.4 (19.2) and 112.0 (17.7) mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, respectively. The eGFR measures were moderately correlated (r{sub s}=0.5; p<0.001). After adjustment, ln (urine cadmium) was not associated with serum cystatin-C-based measures. However, higher ln (urine cadmium) was associated with higher creatinine-based eGFRs including the MDRD and an equation incorporating serum cystatin C and creatinine (beta-coefficient=4.1 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; 95% confidence interval=1.6, 6.6). Urine creatinine was associated with serum creatinine-based but not cystatin-C-based eGFRs. These results support a biomarker-specific, rather than a kidney function, effect underlying the associations observed between higher urine cadmium and creatinine-based kidney function measures. Given the routine use of serum and urine creatinine in kidney and biomarker research, additional research to elucidate the mechanism(s) for these associations is essential.