National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for limit policy costs

  1. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

    2011-06-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent renewable energy policy used globally to date, and there are many benefits to the certainty offered in the marketplace to reduce development risks and associated financing costs and to grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control in renewable energy policy design. In recent years, policy mechanisms for containing FIT costs have become more refined, allowing policymakers to exert greater control on policy outcomes and on the resulting costs to ratepayers. As policymakers and regulators in the United States begin to explore the use of FITs, careful consideration must be given to the ways in which policy design can be used to balance the policies' advantages while bounding its costs. This report explores mechanisms that policymakers have implemented to limit FIT policy costs. If designed clearly and transparently, such mechanisms can align policymaker and market expectations for project deployment. Three different policy tools are evaluated: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report employs case studies to explore the strengths and weaknesses of these three cost containment tools. These tools are then evaluated with a set of criteria including predictability for policymakers and the marketplace and the potential for unintended consequences.

  2. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, Claire; Couture, Toby D.; Cory, Karlynn S.

    2011-06-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent policy used globally to reduce development risks, cut financing costs, and grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control. Using case studies and market-focused analysis, this report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines strengths and weaknesses of three cost-containment tools: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report provides useful insights on containing costs for policymakers and regulators in the United States and other areas where FIT policies are in development.

  3. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent policy used globally to reduce development risks, cut financing costs, and grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over ...

  4. Cost and Impacts of Policies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Impacts of Policies David L. Greene Paul N. Leiby ORNL David C. Bowman Econotech 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure January 31, 2007 Washington, D.C. Plan of presentation: Brief review of HyTrans Calibration of FCV learning, scale, technological change Scenarios and Policies RESULTS 2010-2025 and long-run impacts 2010-2025 Government/Industry Costs Hydrogen production, infrastructure & cost HyTrans merges the early transition scenarios with

  5. ''Measuring the Costs of Climate Change Policies''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P.M.

    2003-05-09

    Studies of the costs of climate change policies have utilized a variety of measures or metrics for summarizing costs. The leading economic models have utilized GNP, GDP, the ''area under a marginal cost curve,'' the discounted present value of consumption, and a welfare measure taken directly from the utility function of the model's representative agent (the ''Equivalent Variation''). Even when calculated using a single model, these metrics do not necessarily give similar magnitudes of costs or even rank policies consistently. This paper discusses in non-technical terms the economic concepts lying behind each concept, the theoretical basis for expecting each measure to provide a consistent ranking of policies, and the reasons why different measures provide different rankings. It identifies a method of calculating the ''Equivalent Variation'' as theoretically superior to the other cost metrics in ranking policies. When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes

  6. Cost and Impacts of Policies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Impacts of Policies Cost and Impacts of Policies Presentation by David Greene and Paul Leiby at the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure meeting, January 31, 2007. scenario_analysis_greene1_07.pdf (289.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Policy and Analyzing the Transition Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with HyTrans Hydrogen Transition Study

  7. Are renewables portfolio standards cost-effective emission abatement policy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katerina Dobesova; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave

    2005-11-15

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) could be an important policy instrument for 3P and 4P control. The authors examine the costs of renewable power, accounting for the federal production tax credit, the market value of a renewable credit, and the value of producing electricity without emissions of SO{sub 2}, NOx, mercury, and CO{sub 2}. The focus is on Texas, which has a large RPS and is the largest U.S. electricity producer and one of the largest emitters of pollutants and CO{sub 2}. The private and social costs of wind generation in an RPS is compared with the current cost of fossil generation, accounting for the pollution and CO{sub 2} emissions. It was found that society paid about 5.7 cents/kWh more for wind power, counting the additional generation, transmission, intermittency, and other costs. The higher cost includes credits amounting to 1.1 cents/kWh in reduced SO{sub 2}, NOx, and Hg emissions. These pollution reductions and lower CO{sub 2} emissions could be attained at about the same cost using pulverized coal (PC) or natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS); the reductions could be obtained more cheaply with an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CCS. 35 refs., 7 tabs.

  8. Policy Flash 2013-79 Professional and Consultant service cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jason Taylor of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Policy, Office of Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1560 or at Jason.taylor@hq.doe....

  9. Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

    2012-02-28

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when necessary. The ranking

  10. Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are in .pdf format) After Hours Access Policy Booking and Login Policy Cleanroom Policy Equipment Use Policy Two-Person Rule Cleanroom Chemical List Experimental Hall Policy...

  11. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-16

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

  12. Limit on Saudi Arabia's oil pricing policy: a short-run econometric-simulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagour, O.S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Absence of a unified OPEC policy is largely attributed to frequent Saudi Arabian pricing/production decisions to influence oil price changes. Such demonstrated ability in the past prompted many to attribute oil price current downward rigidity to Saudi Arabian unwillingness to increase production. Empirically, this study presents a simultaneous equations oil market model in a simulation setting to test this hypothesis and to predict future oil prices under specific assumptions. Major conclusions are: (1) contrary to popular belief the international oil industry rarely, if ever, operated competitively; (2) the sole association of oil price increases to the embargo of 1973 is an outright distortion of facts; (3) the roots of the so-called energy crisis lie in: (a) post-World War II West European reconstruction, (b) US industrial adjustments from a war to a consumer-oriented economy, (c) the continuously dwindling oil reserves in major industrial countries, and (d) the comparative advantage of location and cost-per-unit of the Middle Eastern oil; (4) barring further market institutionalizations, a per barrel price below $15 by the end of 1990 (in constant 1984 prices) is not unlikely; and (5) future Saudi Arabian pricing/production policies to exert downward pressures on prices could lead to price increases, if perceived to be permanent by the OPEC group excluding Saudi Arabia.

  13. A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

    2005-12-01

    During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

  14. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    investment tax credit, the production tax credit, and accelerated depreciation. The nature of these tax incentives often requires an outside investor and a complex financial...

  15. Policy Flash 2014-26 Acquisition Guide Chapter 70.31A - Costs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Jason Taylor, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division at (202) 287-1560 or at Jason.Taylor@hq.doe.gov PDF ...

  16. Limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  17. Limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  18. policy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    eld-field-page-name">

    Page Name: 
    policysystem

    The NNSA's Policy...

  19. Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    This analysis supplements the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 alternative cases which imposed hypothetical carbon dioxide emission fees on fossil fuel consumers. It offers further cases that examine the impacts of fees placed only on the emissions from electric power facilities, impacts of returning potential revenues to consumers, and two cap-and-trade policies.

  20. A retrospective investigation of energy efficiency standards: Policies may have accelerated long term declines in appliance costs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Van Buskirk, R. D.; Kantner, C. L. S.; Gerke, B. F.; Chu, S.

    2014-11-14

    We perform a retrospective investigation of multi-decade trends in price and life-cycle cost (LCC) for home appliances in periods with and without energy efficiency (EE) standards and labeling polices. In contrast to the classical picture of the impact of efficiency standards, the introduction and updating of appliance standards is not associated with a long-term increase in purchase price; rather, quality-adjusted prices undergo a continued or accelerated long-term decline. In addition, long term trends in appliance LCCs—which include operating costs—consistently show an accelerated long term decline with EE policies. We also show that the incremental price of efficiency improvements has declinedmore »faster than the baseline product price for selected products. These observations are inconsistent with a view of EE standards that supposes a perfectly competitive market with static supply costs. These results suggest that EE policies may be associated with other forces at play, such as innovation and learning-by-doing in appliance production and design, that can affect long term trends in quality-adjusted prices and LCCs.« less

  1. A retrospective investigation of energy efficiency standards: Policies may have accelerated long term declines in appliance costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buskirk, R. D.; Kantner, C. L. S.; Gerke, B. F.; Chu, S.

    2014-11-14

    We perform a retrospective investigation of multi-decade trends in price and life-cycle cost (LCC) for home appliances in periods with and without energy efficiency (EE) standards and labeling polices. In contrast to the classical picture of the impact of efficiency standards, the introduction and updating of appliance standards is not associated with a long-term increase in purchase price; rather, quality-adjusted prices undergo a continued or accelerated long-term decline. In addition, long term trends in appliance LCCs—which include operating costs—consistently show an accelerated long term decline with EE policies. We also show that the incremental price of efficiency improvements has declined faster than the baseline product price for selected products. These observations are inconsistent with a view of EE standards that supposes a perfectly competitive market with static supply costs. These results suggest that EE policies may be associated with other forces at play, such as innovation and learning-by-doing in appliance production and design, that can affect long term trends in quality-adjusted prices and LCCs.

  2. Policy Flash 2014-13 AL 2014-03: Allowability of Contractor Litigation Defense and Settlement Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Policy, Office Acquisition and Project Management at ...

  3. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-07

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

  4. POLICY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 13, 2013 POLICY ď‚· Successful execution of this research and development (R&D) program will materially contribute to U.S. supply of oil and gas both today and beyond the 10 year R&D horizon. It is the consensus of this Committee that the resource potential impacted by this technology program is significant and of major importance to the Nation. There is a critical need for a sustainable and consistent approach to the technology challenges facing unconventional resource

  5. Policy Flash 2014-26 Acquisition Guide Chapter 70.31A- Costs Associated with Whistleblower Actions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Jason Taylor, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division at (202) 287-1560 or at Jason.Taylor@hq.doe.gov

  6. Policy Flash 2014-39 Initiatives to Achieve Strategic Plan 2014-2018 Performance Goal Focused on Cost Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Scott Clemons of the Strategic Programs Division, Office of Contract Management, at (202) 287-1554 or at Scott.Clemons@hq.doe.gov.

  7. Policy Flash 2013-40 Acquisition Guide Chapter 43.3 – Maintaining Alignment of Project Management with Contract Management of Non-Management and Operating (M&O) Cost Reimburstment Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is Policy Flash 2013-40 Acquisition Guide Chapter 43.3 – Maintaining Alignment of Project   Management with Contract Management of Non-Management and Operating (M&O) Cost Reimbursement...

  8. Potential for savings in compliance costs for reducing ground-level ozone possible by instituting seasonal versus annual nitric oxide emission limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lookman, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    Ground-level ozone is formed in the atmosphere from its precursor emissions, namely nitric oxide (NO{sub x}) and volatile organic compounds (VOC), with its rate of formation dependent on atmospheric conditions. Since ozone levels tend to be highest during the summer months, seasonal controls of precursors have been suggested as a means of reducing the costs of decreasing ozone concentrations to acceptable levels. This paper attempts to quantify what the potential savings if seasonal control were instituted for coal-fired power plants, assuming that only commercially available NO{sub x} control technologies are used. Cost savings through seasonal control is measured by calculating the total annualized cost of NO{sub x} removal at a given amount of seasonal control for different target levels of annual control. For this study, it is assumed that trading of NO{sub x} emissions will be allowed, as has been proposed by the Ozone Transportation Commission (OTC). The problem has been posed as a binary integer linear programming problem, with decision variables being which control to use at each power plant. The results indicate that requiring annual limits which are lower than seasonal limits can substantially reduce compliance costs. These savings occur because requiring stringent compliance only on a seasonal basis allows power plants to use control methods for which the variable costs are paid for only part of the year, and through the use of gas-based controls, which are much cheaper to operate in the summer months.

  9. Consumer Choice of E85 Denatured Ethanol Fuel Blend: Price Sensitivity and Cost of Limited Fuel Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David

    2014-12-01

    The promotion of greater use of E85, a fuel blend of 85% denatured ethanol, by flex-fuel vehicle owners is an important means of complying with the Renewable Fuel Standard 2. A good understanding of factors affecting E85 demand is necessary for effective policies that promote E85 and for developing models that forecast E85 sales in the United States. In this paper, the sensitivity of aggregate E85 demand to E85 and gasoline prices is estimated, as is the relative availability of E85 versus gasoline. The econometric analysis uses recent data from Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa. The more recent data allow a better estimate of nonfleet demand and indicate that the market price elasticity of E85 choice is substantially higher than previously estimated.

  10. Consumer Choice of E85 Denatured Ethanol Fuel Blend: Price Sensitivity and Cost of Limited Fuel Availability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David

    2014-12-01

    The promotion of greater use of E85, a fuel blend of 85% denatured ethanol, by flex-fuel vehicle owners is an important means of complying with the Renewable Fuel Standard 2. A good understanding of factors affecting E85 demand is necessary for effective policies that promote E85 and for developing models that forecast E85 sales in the United States. In this paper, the sensitivity of aggregate E85 demand to E85 and gasoline prices is estimated, as is the relative availability of E85 versus gasoline. The econometric analysis uses recent data from Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa. The more recent data allowmore » a better estimate of nonfleet demand and indicate that the market price elasticity of E85 choice is substantially higher than previously estimated.« less

  11. Microfabrication Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polcies Booking Login Policy Cleanroom Policy Equipment Use Policy 2 Person Rule Experimental Hall Policy After Hours Policy

  12. U.S. OpenLabs - Policy and Program Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The NRELDOE Approach Feed-in Tariffs: Best Practices and Application in the U.S. Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs NREL...

  13. Privacy Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    privacy policy Privacy Policy The National Energy Technology Laboratory strives to protect the privacy of website visitors. Information collected is strictly limited to the following: Information Collected and Stored Automatically The IP address, a number that is automatically assigned to each computer that connects to the World Wide Web Date and time of website access Pages browsed NETL reviews this information to help make the website more useful and informative. This information is used

  14. Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Use Policies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-12-16

    According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), geothermal energy generation in the United States is projected to more than triple by 2040 (EIA 2013). This addition, which translates to more than 5 GW of generation capacity, is anticipated because of technological advances and an increase in available sources through the continued development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) and low-temperature resources (EIA 2013). Studies have shown that air emissions, water consumption, and land use for geothermal electricity generation have less of an impact than traditional fossil fuel?based electricity generation; however, the long-term sustainability of geothermal power plants can be affected by insufficient replacement of aboveground or belowground operational fluid losses resulting from normal operations (Schroeder et al. 2014). Thus, access to water is therefore critical for increased deployment of EGS technologies and, therefore, growth of the geothermal sector. This paper examines water issues relating to EGS development from a variety of perspectives. It starts by exploring the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects. It then examines the relative costs of different potential traditional and alternative water sources for EGS. Finally it summarizes specific state policies relevant to the use of alternative water sources for EGS, and finally explores the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects.

  15. Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Use Policies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), geothermal energy generation in the United States is projected to more than triple by 2040 (EIA 2013). This addition, which translates to more than 5 GW of generation capacity, is anticipated because of technological advances and an increase in available sources through the continued development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) and low-temperature resources (EIA 2013). Studies have shown that air emissions, water consumption, and land use for geothermal electricity generation have less of an impact than traditional fossil fuel?based electricity generation; however, the long-term sustainability of geothermal power plants can be affected by insufficient replacement of aboveground or belowground operational fluid losses resulting from normal operations (Schroeder et al. 2014). Thus, access to water is therefore critical for increased deployment of EGS technologies and, therefore, growth of the geothermal sector. This paper examines water issues relating to EGS development from a variety of perspectives. It starts by exploring the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects. It then examines the relative costs of different potential traditional and alternative water sources for EGS. Finally it summarizes specific state policies relevant to the use of alternative water sources for EGS, and finally explores the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects.

  16. Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability of Incurred Costs Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability of Incurred Costs Attached is...

  17. Dissecting the Cost of the Smart Grid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentdissecting-cost-smart-grid Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: "Resource Integration Planning,Cost...

  18. Policy and Regulatory Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs Policy and Regulatory Environment Policy and Regulatory Environment Photo of a man speaking while seated at a table with men and women surrounding him. A favorable ...

  19. DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DOE, 1994) | Department of Energy Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act (DOE, 1994) DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental Policy Act (DOE, 1994) In this policy statement, the Secretary of Energy directed a number of actions to streamline the NEPA process, minimize the cost and time for document preparation and review, emphasize teamwork, and make the process more useful to decision makers and the public. The Policy Statement requires continuing

  20. The differential impact of low-carbon technologies on climate change mitigation cost under a range of socioeconomic and climate policy scenarios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, Robert W.; McJeon, Haewon C.

    2015-05-01

    This paper considers the effect of several key parameters of low carbon energy technologies on the cost of abatement. A methodology for determining the minimum level of performance required for a parameter to have a statistically significant impact on CO2 abatement cost is developed and used to evaluate the impact of eight key parameters of low carbon energy supply technologies on the cost of CO2 abatement. The capital cost of nuclear technology is found to have the greatest impact of the parameters studied. The cost of biomass and CCS technologies also have impacts, while their efficiencies have little, if any. Sensitivity analysis of the results with respect to population, GDP, and CO2 emission constraint show that the minimum performance level and impact of nuclear technologies is consistent across the socioeconomic scenarios studied, while the other technology parameters show different performance under higher population, lower GDP scenarios. Solar technology was found to have a small impact, and then only at very low costs. These results indicate that the cost of nuclear is the single most important driver of abatement cost, and that trading efficiency for cost may make biomass and CCS technologies more competitive.

  1. Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentbiotrans-cost-optimization-model,http Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration &...

  2. Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mpia-development-policy-modelingabout-mpia Cost: Free Related Tools Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) Tool for Selecting CDM Methods &...

  3. Costing and pricing electricity in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munasinghe, M.; Rungta, S.

    1984-01-01

    This book compiles the papers presented at a conference on costing and pricing electricity in developing countries. The topics discussed include: Power tariffs, an overview; electricity tariff policy; estimating and using marginal cost pricing concepts; power tariff policy of Philippines, India, Papua New Guinea, Burma, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Korea, Pakistan; Inter-American Development Bank-Electricity tariffs, policies and practices; and costs of supplying electricity and tariff policy in some other countries.

  4. Effectiveness of State-Level Policies on Solar Market Development in Different State Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Doris, E.; Krasko, V.; Hillman, D.

    2014-02-01

    In response to public interest in customer-sited distributed solar photovoltaics (PV), state and local policymakers have implemented policy initiatives with the goal of encouraging private investment and building a robust PV market. Policymakers face challenges, including limited budgets and incomplete information about the effectiveness of the various policy options in their specific situation, in crafting and executing policy that supports market development goals. Recent work investigated the effect of the order in which policies are implemented (referred to as 'policy stacking') and the presence of low-cost enabling policies, such as interconnection standards and net metering, can have on the success of states in promoting PV markets. Findings indicate that implementation of interconnection standards and policy related to the valuation of excess electricity (e.g., net metering), along with indicators of long term government support for a solar PV market (e.g., RPS) and a non-policy determinant (population), explain about 70% of the variation among states in new PV capacity. This paper builds on that research to determine the most effective policy strategies for different types of states, as determined by their physical, demographic and macroeconomic context. A number of researchers have investigated the effectiveness of state-level policy using various statistical methods to determine relationships between installed solar PV projects and policy initiatives. In this study, the grouping of states by non-policy factors adds dimension to these analyses by identifying how policies function in different non-policy environments.

  5. Queues and Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Job Scheduling Jobs must be submitted to a valid Submit Queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate Torque execution class. Users can not directly access the Torque execution classes. Submit Queue Execution Queue (Do not use in batch script) Nodes Available Processors Max Wallclock Relative Priority (1 being the highest) Run Limit Queued Limit (eligible to run limit) Queue Charge Factor xfer xfer 1 4 6 hrs 3 3 2 1 interactive

  6. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  7. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  8. Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability of Incurred Costs Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy...

  9. Policy Flash 2014-29 Acquisition Letter 2014-07- Benchmark Compensation Amount for Individual Executive Salary Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of Acquisition Letter (AL) 2014-07 is to establish the form, "Compensation Subject to the Executive CAP (OFPP Limitation)" as the minimum required documentation to support DOE/NNSA Contracting Officers (CO) and Contractor Human Resources Specialists’ conclusion, that approved allowable costs do not exceed the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) limitation pursuant to FAR 31.205-6(p).

  10. Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-11-02

    To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

  11. Security Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Security Policy analyzes, develops and interprets safeguards and security policy governing national security functions and the protection of related critical assets entrusted to the...

  12. Policy Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located within Transmission Policy Development and Analysis (TSPP) organization of Transmission Policy and Strategy (TSP), Transmission Marketing and Sales (TS), Transmission...

  13. Web Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Web Policies Web Policies LANL places a high degree of emphasis on user experience and thus all webspaces are designed, developed, and tested thoroughly for usability ...

  14. Web Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Web Policies Web Policies Accessibility The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is part of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), which ...

  15. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  16. Network Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acceptable Use Policy About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Data Privacy Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities ESnet Staff & Org Chart Contact Us Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net ESnet Acceptable Use Policy The

  17. Section 1: Agency Policy and Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... energy or water consumption and cost trends * Public visibility (DOE places value ... Energy Policy Act (EPACT) 1992 Alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) acquisitions 75% of the 733 ...

  18. Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OE's mission includes assisting states and regions in developing policies that decrease demand on existing energy infrastructure. Appropriate cost-effective demandresponse ...

  19. OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration Policy Flash 2015-05 - Acquisition Letter 2015-02 Acquisition Letter No. AL 2015-02

  20. Policy Flash 2014-37 Update to the Department of Energy Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.2, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non-Management and Operating Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Carol Jenkins, of the Office of Acquisition and Project Management Policy at 202-287-1827 or at Carol.Jenkins@hq.doe.gov.

  1. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing

  2. A Framework for Comparative Assessments of Energy Efficiency Policy Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Helcio; Atkinson, Barbara; Lekov, Alex

    2011-05-24

    When policy makers propose new policies, there is a need to assess the costs and benefits of the proposed policy measures, to compare them to existing and alternative policies, and to rank them according to their effectiveness. In the case of equipment energy efficiency regulations, comparing the effects of a range of alternative policy measures requires evaluating their effects on consumers’ budgets, on national energy consumption and economics, and on the environment. Such an approach should be able to represent in a single framework the particularities of each policy measure and provide comparable results. This report presents an integrated methodological framework to assess prospectively the energy, economic, and environmental impacts of energy efficiency policy measures. The framework builds on the premise that the comparative assessment of energy efficiency policy measures should (a) rely on a common set of primary data and parameters, (b) follow a single functional approach to estimate the energy, economic, and emissions savings resulting from each assessed measure, and (c) present results through a set of comparable indicators. This framework elaborates on models that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has used in support of its rulemakings on mandatory energy efficiency standards. In addition to a rigorous analysis of the impacts of mandatory standards, DOE compares the projected results of alternative policy measures to those projected to be achieved by the standards. The framework extends such an approach to provide a broad, generic methodology, with no geographic or sectoral limitations, that is useful for evaluating any type of equipment energy efficiency market intervention. The report concludes with a demonstration of how to use the framework to compare the impacts estimated for twelve policy measures focusing on increasing the energy efficiency of gas furnaces in the United States.

  3. Queues and Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Overview Jobs must be submitted to a valid submit queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate execution queue. Users can not directly access the execution queues. Submit Queue Execution Queue Nodes Available Cores Max Wallclock Relative Priority Run Limit Eligible Limit Charge Factor* interactive interactive 1-8 1-64 30 mins 1 2 1 1.5 debug debug 1-32 1-256 30 mins 2 2 1 1.5 regular reg_short 1-16 1-128 4 hrs 3 8 4 1.5 reg_small 1-16 1-128

  4. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-01

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved

  5. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  6. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs

  7. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs

  8. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Policy Print 1. Guiding Principles The aim of User Policy at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is to provide a framework for establishing a challenging yet congenial environment where talented scientists from different backgrounds can work together in pursuit of the new scientific opportunities presented by the availability of this innovative facility. User policy must address a variety of user needs and sensitivities. On one hand, the qualified researcher with little financial backing needs

  9. Energy Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is focusing on an all-of-the-above energy policy, investing in all sources of American energy.

  10. Policy Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate will serve as sole or senior representative and recognized authority regarding economic productivity, policy expertise, communicating EPSA/DOE positions to advance and...

  11. User Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE pricing policy will apply for experiments whose results are not intended for the open literature. In addition, experimenters will be required to open operating or equipment...

  12. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE’s '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  13. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funded "Best Practices for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind" to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth).

  14. Chapter 31 - Contract Cost Principles and Procedures | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 31.4 Allowability of Incurred Costs.pdf More Documents & Publications OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Microsoft Word - AL2005-12.doc OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides...

  15. BPA's Costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings and Workshops Customer...

  16. CAMD Policy Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lists: Caretakers, Accelerator Operators, Shift Operators Building Security: Policy Crane: Directive, Use, Procedure Emergency: Policy, Procedure Experimental Hall: Policy ...

  17. Cost analysis guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strait, R.S.

    1996-01-10

    The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

  18. Quality Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors.

  19. Policy and Analysis Data and Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Policy and Analysis Data and Tools Policy and Analysis provides foundational datasets and web-accessible tools for EERE decision-makers and the public covering cost and performance ...

  20. Account Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Account Ownership and Password Policies A user is given a username (also known as a login name) and associated password that permits herhim to access NERSC resources. This ...

  1. Publication Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    publication policy Publication Policy Publication of work performed at JLF JLF encourages dissemination of results of experiments performed at the Facility. Vehicles for the publication may include: Journal articles Conference proceedings articles Books or book chapters Technical reports Dissertations Published patents Published abstracts Invited or contributed talks Popular articles Press reports The decision whether to publish and in what form(s) is the responsibility of the Principal

  2. Website Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website Policies NETL Website Policies Accessibility NETL is committed to providing access to its website pages for individuals with disabilities. To meet this commitment, this site is built to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 requires that individuals with disabilities, who are members of the public seeking information or services from NETL, have access to and use of information and data that is comparable to that provided to the public who are

  3. Measuring it Right: Best Practices in the Selection and Implementation of Cost-Effectiveness Tests

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents the National Home Performance Council's cost-effectiveness tests, stakeholder concerns, public policy issues, and best practices.

  4. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-10-16

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrument—the carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  5. Privacy Act Fees and Time Limits | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Fees and Time Limits The Act provides agencies to assess fees only for the cost of reproducing records. However, it is the policy of the DOE to provide an individual with one copy of his or her requested records free of charge. The Act does not stipulate a time frame for an agency to provide access to individual records; however, the DOE's regulation (10 CFR, Part 1008.7(b)) states "Every effort will be made to respond within ten working days of the date of receipt by the

  6. POLICY FLASH 2016-22 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 POLICY FLASH 2016-22 DATE: May 3, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: AL 2016-05-Determining if an activity is a FAR 31.205-44 training and education activity (and consequently rendering the overtime costs caused by the activity specifically unallowable); and Managing all overtime costs. SUMMARY: *NOTE* This Policy Flash was previously issued with an incorrectly numbered

  7. Cost Analysis: Technology, Competitiveness, Market Uncertainty | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Technology to Market » Cost Analysis: Technology, Competitiveness, Market Uncertainty Cost Analysis: Technology, Competitiveness, Market Uncertainty As a basis for strategic planning, competitiveness analysis, funding metrics and targets, SunShot supports analysis teams at national laboratories to assess technology costs, location-specific competitive advantages, policy impacts on system financing, and to perform detailed levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analyses. This shows the

  8. Cost Participation in Research and Development Contracting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    35.2 June 2016 ______________________________________________________________________________ 1 Cost Participation in Research and Development Contracting [References: Public Law 109-58, Energy Policy Act of 2005, FAR 35.003(b), DEAR 917.70] 1.0 Summary of Latest Changes This update: (1) combines Acquisition Guide Chapters 17.2, Cost Participation, and 35.2, Cost Sharing in Research and Development Contracting, (2) updates delegations of authority, (3) updates sample cost sharing language for

  9. SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    labor are authorized as direct charges Control : SF 6432-CR Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Cost Reimbursement Owner: Procurement Policy Department Release Date: 11...

  10. SF6432-CR (02-01-12) Cost Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as direct charges to this contract Control : SF 6432-CR Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Cost Reimbursement Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release Date:...

  11. SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Part 931 of the DEAR by a Sandia audit. Control : SF 6432-CR Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Cost Reimbursement Owner: Procurement Policy Department Release Date: 04...

  12. SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Government site to perform work shall have Control : SF 6432-CR Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Cost Reimbursement Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release...

  13. A Systematic Approach to Better Understanding Integration Costs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Energy Policy Research Conference Denver, Colorado ... impact the accuracy of natural gas orders? 4 Integration Costs: Definition ...

  14. Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentcost-renewable-energy-spreadsheet-too Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs Assess projects, design cost-based...

  15. DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements April 27, 2006 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced new policy measures for the reimbursement of contractor pension and medical benefit plan costs that are based on sound business practices and market-based benchmarks for cost management. The Department will continue to reimburse contractors for costs for current and retired

  16. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Tax Incentives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

    2009-10-01

    As a policy tool, state tax incentives can be structured to help states meet clean energy goals. Policymakers often use state tax incentives in concert with state and federal policies to support renewable energy deployment or reduce market barriers. This analysis used case studies of four states to assess the contributions of state tax incentives to the development of renewable energy markets. State tax incentives that are appropriately paired with complementary state and federal policies generally provide viable mechanisms to support renewable energy deployment. However, challenges to successful implementation of state tax incentives include serving project owners with limited state tax liability, assessing appropriate incentive levels, and differentiating levels of incentives for technologies with different costs. Additionally, state tax incentives may result in moderately higher federal tax burdens. These challenges notwithstanding, state tax incentives that consider certain policy design characteristics can support renewable energy markets and state clean energy goals.The scale of their impact though is directly related to the degree to which they support the renewable energy markets for targeted sectors and technologies. This report highlights important policy design considerations for policymakers using state tax incentives to meet clean energy goals.

  17. Policies and Procedures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    procedures Policies and Procedures Guidelines Safety Computer Security Conduct of Operations JLF Forms Publication Policy

  18. Cost Compliance Manager | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Compliance Manager Department: Business Operations Supervisor(s): Kristen Fischer Staff: AM 6 Requisition Number: 1600452 The Cost Compliance Manager (CCM) is responsible for monitoring compliance with Laboratory policies primarily in support of procurement operations. The position will maintain analytical tools, procedures, and reports to drive compliance and best practices with Laboratory policies and applicable laws and regulations. The CCM will oversee staff responsible for analyzing

  19. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's ... to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. ...

  20. DOE Secretarial Policy Statement on the National Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this policy statement, the Secretary of Energy directed a number of actions to streamline the NEPA process, minimize the cost and time for document preparation and review,...

  1. GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses A report by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) on the costs, time ...

  2. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-02-26

    decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

  3. Transmission line capital costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

  4. ADR Revised Policy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Policy on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) (60 FR 54482) to further its commitment to the use of ADR for resolving issues in controversy in a fair, timely, and cost...

  5. Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Kreycik, C.; Young, K.

    2009-09-01

    Geothermal electricity production capacity has grown over time because of multiple factors, including its renewable, baseload, and domestic attributes; volatile and high prices for competing technologies; and policy intervention. Overarching federal policies, namely the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA), provided certainty to project investors in the 1980s, leading to a boom in geothermal development. In addition to market expansion through PURPA, research and development policies provided an investment of public dollars toward developing technologies and reducing costs over time to increase the market competitiveness of geothermal electricity. Together, these efforts are cited as the primary policy drivers for the currently installed capacity. Informing policy decisions depends on the combined impacts of policies at the federal and state level on geothermal development. Identifying high-impact suites of policies for different contexts, and the government levels best equipped to implement them, would provide a wealth of information to both policy makers and project developers.

  6. A review of EIAs on trade policy in China: Exploring the way for economic policy EIAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Xianqiang; Song, Peng; Kørnøv, Lone; Corsetti, Gabriel

    2015-01-15

    During the discussion on the “Environmental Protection Law Amendment (draft)” in 2011, it was decided to drop the proposed clauses related to environmental impact assessments (EIAs) on policy, which means that there remained no provisions for policy EIAs, and China's strategic environmental assessment system stayed limited to the planning level. However, considering that economic policy making is causing significant direct and indirect environmental problems and that almost every aspect of governmental policy has an economic aspect, EIAs on economic policies are of the utmost urgency. The purpose of this study is to review the EIA work that has been carried out on trade policy in China through four case studies, and illustrate how trade policy EIAs can be helpful in achieving better environmental outcomes in the area of trade. Through the trade policy EIA case studies we try to argue for the feasibility of conducting EIAs on economic policies in China. We also discuss the implications of the case studies from the point of view of how to proceed with EIAs on economic policy and how to promote their practice. - Highlights: • SEA system is incomplete and stays limited to the plan EIA level in China. • EIA on economic policy is of utmost importance for all the developing countries. • Four case studies of trade policy EIA in China are reviewed for policy implications. • Departmental competition for political power impedes economic policy EIAs in China. • Legislative regulation on policy EIA is the first thing needed to overcome barrier.

  7. Policy Flash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Use the table below to search and filter by Year and/or by Attachment Type.  Previous year Policy Flashes not posted below can be located in the Archive Search File and requested through DOE...

  8. Use of Cost Estimating Relationships

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

  9. Role of State Policy in Renewable Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Busche, S.; Hockett, S.; McLaren, J.

    2009-07-01

    State policies can support renewable energy development by driving markets, providing certainty in the investment market, and incorporating the external benefits of the technologies into cost/benefit calculations. Using statistical analyses and policy design best practices, this paper quantifies the impact of state-level policies on renewable energy development in order to better understand the role of policy on development and inform policy makers on the policy mechanisms that provide maximum benefit. The results include the identification of connections between state policies and renewable energy development, as well as a discussion placing state policy efforts in context with other factors that influence the development of renewable energy (e.g. federal policy, resource availability, technology cost, public acceptance).

  10. Policies - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies Policies Web Accessibility Privacy and Security Policy Use of Information Resources Contact Information Texas A&M University College of Science Department of Chemistry ...

  11. Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration 30.1_DOE's_Oversight_of_Certain_Contractor_Defined_Pension_Plans_and_Its_Effect_on_Contracts_0.pdf (19.91 KB) More Documents & Publications OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Policy Flash 2015-05 - Acquisition Letter 2015-02 Acquisition Letter No. AL 2015-02

  12. Audit of Department of Energy`s contractor liability insurance costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-13

    Fifty-four of DOE`s major contractors reported expending $44.3 million in liability insurance costs for the last 3 years of operation. Purpose of this audit was to evaluate how DOE implemented its policy to assume the risk of losses for its contractors rather than to insure them commercially. Contractors are required to use self-insurance if combined annual premiums for commercial insurance exceed $10,000. Review of 18 major contractors showed that DOE was not consistently following its policy and that contractors using commercial insurance incurred higher costs. Required approvals were not always obtained prior to purchasing certain other types of liability insurance. It is recommended that DOE`s policies requiring self-insurance be fully implemented; that requests for approval for commercial insurance when annual premiums exceeded $10,000 be fully justified; and that the commercial insurance policies specifically define the liability coverage prior to approval and payment. It is also recommended that the contracts include clauses limiting reimbursements for insurance expenditures to actual losses and administrative costs.

  13. Dose Limits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Dose Limits ERAD (Question Posted to ERAD in May 2012) Who do you define as a member of the public for the onsite MEI? This question implies that there may be more than one maximally exposed individual (MEI), one on-site and one off-site, when demonstrating compliance with the Public Dose Limit of DOE Order 458.1. Although all potential MEIs should be considered and documented, as well as the calculated doses and pathways considered, the intent of DOE Order 458.1 is in fact to ultimately identify only one MEI, a theoretical individual who could be either on-site or off-site.

  14. levelized costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    levelized costs - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  15. The US uranium industry: Regulatory and policy impediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, T.E.; Glicken, J.

    1995-06-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 required the DOE to develop recommendations and implement government programs to assist the domestic uranium industry in increasing export opportunities. In 1993, as part of that effort, the Office of Nuclear Energy identified several key factors that could (or have) significantly impact(ed) export opportunities for domestic uranium. This report addresses one of these factors: regulatory and policy impediments to the flow of uranium products between the US and other countries. It speaks primarily to the uranium market for civil nuclear power. Changes in the world political and economic order have changed US national security requirements, and the US uranium industry has found itself without the protected market it once enjoyed. An unlevel playing field for US uranium producers has resulted from a combination of geology, history, and a general US political philosophy of nonintervention that precludes the type of industrial policy practiced in other uranium-exporting countries. The US has also been hampered in its efforts to support the domestic uranium-producing industry by its own commitment to free and open global markets and by international agreements such as GATT and NAFTA. Several US policies, including the imposition of NRC fees and licensing costs and Harbor Maintenance fees, directly harm the competitiveness of the domestic uranium industry. Finally, requirements under US law, such as those in the 1979 Nuclear Nonproliferation Act, place very strict limits on the use of US-origin uranium, limitations not imposed by other uranium-producing countries. Export promotion and coordination are two areas in which the US can help the domestic uranium industry without violating existing trade agreements or other legal or policy constraints.

  16. Hydrogen Policy and Analyzing the Transition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy and Analyzing the Transition Hydrogen Policy and Analyzing the Transition Presentation at the Renewable Hydrogen Workshop held Nov 16, 2009, in Palm Springs, CA renewable_hydrogen_workshop_nov16_leiby.pdf (697.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Integrated Market Modeling of Hydrogen Transition Scenarios with HyTrans Hydrogen Transition Study Cost and Impacts of Policies

  17. Renewable Energy Cost Modeling. A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, Jason S.; Grace, Robert C.; Rickerson, Wilson H.

    2011-05-01

    This report serves as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculations, including cost-based incentives. The report identifies key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlights the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and presents recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, FITs, or similar policies. These recommendations shaped the design of NREL's Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST), which is used by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist with analyses of policy and renewable energy incentive payment structures. Authored by Jason S. Gifford and Robert C. Grace of Sustainable Energy Advantage LLC and Wilson H. Rickerson of Meister Consultants Group, Inc.

  18. State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    This fact sheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

  19. Policies | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounts Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy ALCC Quarterly Report Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Data Policy INCITE Quarterly Report Policy Job Scheduling Policy on BG/Q Job Scheduling Policies on Cooley Pullback Policy Refund Policy Software Policy User Authentication Policy Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Policies Official policies and procedures of the ALCF.

  20. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  1. Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Southern recognizes that many policy and logistical concerns must be addressed for the promises of smart grid technologies and applications to be fully realized in ways that are beneficial, secure, and cost-effective

  2. Cost Study Manual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a

  3. Policy Building Blocks: Helping Policymakers Determine Policy Staging for the Development of Distributed PV Markets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.

    2012-04-01

    There is a growing body of qualitative and a limited body of quantitative literature supporting the common assertion that policy drives development of clean energy resources. Recent work in this area indicates that the impact of policy depends on policy type, length of time in place, and economic and social contexts of implementation. This work aims to inform policymakers about the impact of different policy types and to assist in the staging of those policies to maximize individual policy effectiveness and development of the market. To do so, this paper provides a framework for policy development to support the market for distributed photovoltaic systems. Next steps include mathematical validation of the framework and development of specific policy pathways given state economic and resource contexts.

  4. Refund Policy | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooley Policies Accounts Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy ALCC Quarterly Report Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Data Policy INCITE Quarterly Report Policy Job...

  5. Pullback Policy | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooley Policies Accounts Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy ALCC Quarterly Report Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Data Policy INCITE Quarterly Report Policy Job...

  6. Comparison of financing costs for wind turbine and fossil powerplants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahn, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper compares the financing costs of wind turbine powerplants with those of fossil powerplants. The goal of this examination is to determine the extent to which these costs differ and what the sources of such differences may be. The discussion is organized in the following fashion. Section 2 introduces basic terminology and concepts from finance, as they apply in the powerplant setting. Section 3 reviews available data from a variety of sources to estimate the magnitude of the variables identified in Section 2. In Section 4 we examine the effect of the production tax credit enacted in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on the financing of wind turbine projects. Conclusions are offered in Section 5. In the past two years there have been only two wind turbine projects that have been financed, so the basis for broad conclusions is limited. Nonetheless, there appears to be a significant advantage in financing costs for conventional projects compared to wind turbines. The two sources of disadvantage to wind power are first, the cost of equity capital is significantly more expensive, and second, the capital structure of wind projects has a much greater fraction of expensive equity than conventional alternatives.

  7. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  8. Website Policies / Important Links | Geothermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Website Policies Important Links Website Policies Important Links Javascript Not Enabled OSTI Security Website Policies and Important Links

  9. Website Policies / Important Links | sciencecinema

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website Policies / Important Links Website Policies / Important Links Javascript Not Enabled OSTI Security Website Policies and Important Links

  10. Internal Policy Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    230-1 Monitoring and Recording Conversations BPA Policy 230-2 Reporting Incidents of Fraud, Waste and Abuse BPA Policy 231-2 Power Transacting Risk Management BPA Policy 231-3...

  11. Small Business First Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy POLICY Washington, D.C. DOE P 547.1 Approved: 12-14-2012 SUBJECT: SMALL BUSINESS FIRST POLICY PURPOSE AND SCOPE To establish a Small Business First Policy that: (1) Enforces ...

  12. Travel Policy | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Travel Policy Travel Policy for Contractor Personnel Travel Policy Changes October 1, 2009 Per Diem Adjustments for Meals Memo or EXAMPLE...

  13. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  14. Queues and Scheduling Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queue Look Queue Wait Times Edison Queues and Policies Cori Queues and Policies Compute Reservation Request Form Realtime Queue Request Form Job Logs & Statistics Application ...

  15. ESnet Policy Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Board About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board Larry Smarr Jagdeep Singh Kristin Rauschenbach Cees de Laat David Foster David...

  16. PAFC Cost Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell® 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ® FUEL CELL SYSTEM First cost 2010 cost reduction is being accomplished by incremental changes in technology & low cost sourcing Technology advances are required to reduce further cost and attain UTC Power's commercialization targets 2010 First unit 2010 Last unit Commercialization target Powerplant cost 4

  17. Feed-in Tariff Policy: Design, Implementation, and RPS Policy Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.; Couture, T.; Kreycik, C.

    2009-03-01

    Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies are implemented in more than 40 countries around the world and are cited as the primary reason for the success of the German and Spanish renewable energy markets. As a result of that success, FIT policy proposals are starting to gain traction in several U.S. states and municipalities. Experience from Europe is also beginning to demonstrate that properly designed FITs may be more cost-effective than renewable portfolio standards (RPS), which make use of competitive solicitations. This article explores the design and operation of feed-in tariff policies, including a FIT policy definition, payment-structure options, and payment differentiation. The article also touches on the potential interactions between FIT policies and RPS policies at the state level.

  18. Utility Best Practices Guidance for Providing Business Customers with Energy Use and Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-11-01

    Summarizes the context; current state of utility practices; and the customer, business, and policy cases for providing business customers with consistent, standardized energy use and cost data.

  19. Carbon Lock-in Through Capital Stock Inertia Associated with Weak Near-term Climate Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, Christoph; Johnson, Nils; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Isaac, Morna; Eom, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    Stringent long-term climate targets necessitate a strict limit on cumulative emissions in this century for which sufficient policy signals are so far lacking. Based on an ensemble of ten energy-economy models, we explore how long-term transformation pathways depend on policies pursued during the next two decades. We find that weak GHG emission targets for 2030 lead, in that year alone, to excess carbon dioxide emissions of nearly half of the annual emissions in 2010, mainly through coal electricity generation. Furthermore, by consuming more of the long-term cumulative emissions budget in the first two decades, weak policy increases the likelihood of overshooting the budget and the urgency of reducing GHG emissions. Therefore, to be successful under weak policies, models must prematurely retire much of the additional coal capacity post-2030 and remove large quantities of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in the latter half of the century. While increased energy efficiency lowers mitigation costs considerably, even with weak near-term policies, it does not substantially reduce the short term reliance on coal electricity. However, increased energy efficiency does allow the energy system more flexibility in mitigating emissions and, thus, makes the post-2030 transition easier.

  20. Report on Transmission Cost Allocation for RTOs and Others (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, L.

    2011-06-01

    Presented at the MARC 2011 Annual Conference, 6 June 2011, Rapid City, South Dakota. This presentation provides an overview of the latest research findings and policy developments pertaining to cost allocation and new variable generation resources on the power grid.

  1. Determine the Cost of Compressed Air for Your Plant; Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and load duty cycle. * Use a systems approach while operating and maintaining a compressed air system. * Adopt a plant-wide compressed air management policy to cut costs and ...

  2. Restructuring local distribution services: Possibilities and limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duann, D.J.

    1994-08-01

    The restructuring of local distribution services is now the focus of the natural gas industry. It is the last major step in the ``reconstitution`` of the natural gas industry and a critical clement in realizing the full benefits of regulatory and market reforms that already have taken place in the wellhead and interstate markets. It could also be the most important regulatory initiative for most end-use customers because they are affected directly by the costs and reliability of distribution services. Several factors contribute to the current emphasis on distribution service restructuring. They include the unbundling and restructuring of upstream markets, a realization of the limitations of supply-side options (such as gas procurement oversight), and the increased diversity and volatility of gas demand facing local distribution companies. Local distribution service is not one but a series of activities that start with commodity gas procurement and extend to transportation, load balancing, storage, and metering and billing of services provided. There are also considerable differences in the economies of scale and scope associated with these various activities. Thus, a mixture of supply arrangements (such as a competitive market or a monopoly) is required for the most efficient delivery of local distribution services. A distinction must be made between the supply of commodity gas and the provision of a bundled distribution service. This distinction and identification of the best supply arrangements for various distribution service components are the most critical factors in developing appropriate restructuring policies. For most state public utility commissions the criteria for service restructuring should include pursuing the economies of scale and scope in gas distribution, differentiating and matching gas service reliability and quality with customer requirements, and controlling costs associated with the search, negotiation, and contracting of gas services.

  3. Facility Data Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Data Policy About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Data Privacy Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities ESnet Staff & Org Chart Contact Us Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Facility Data Policy ESnet Data

  4. Governance & Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Data Privacy Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities ESnet Staff & Org Chart Contact Us Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Governance & Policies ESnet is operated by the

  5. Policy Flash 2014-37 Update to the Department of Energy Acquisition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Department of Energy Acquisition Guide Chapter 16.2, Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plans for Cost-Reimbursement, Non-Management and Operating Contracts Policy Flash...

  6. How three smart managers control steam costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, R.

    1982-11-01

    Three steam-intensive companies report innovative ways to reduce steam-production costs. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. concentrated on regular maintenance, process modifications, and heat recovery, but also has an on-going policy of seeking further cost savings. Future efforts will explore computer-based boiler controls. Zenith Radio Corporation's color picture tube-making process uses 12% less steam after 700 mechanical steam traps were replaced with fixed-orifice traps. Petro-Tex Chemical Corp. reduced steam costs by monitoring and optimizing process units and by making capital investments to improve steam management. (DCK)

  7. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Economics, ethics, and climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Monahan, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    Are the costs of greenhouse gas emissions abatement justified by the perceived benefits of sustained climate stability? Do people of the present generation have a moral right to impose climate risks on their descendants in generations to come? This report examines these questions in light of the emergent facts of climate science and their socioeconomic implications. We consider alternative normative criteria for social decision-making with particular emphasis on cost-benefit analysis and the principle of sustainable development. While each framework yields important insights, we argue that the gross uncertainties associated with climate change and the distribution of impacts between present and future generations constrain the usefulness of cost-benefit criteria in evaluating climate policy. If one accepts the ethical proposition that it is morally wrong to impose catastrophic risks on unborn generations when reducing those risks would not noticeably diminish the quality of life of existing persons, a case can be made for concerted policy action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. DOE Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy & Program Effectiveness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Benchmarking & Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation Handbook provides cost-effective, standardized analytic methods for determining gross and net energy reduction, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation, job creation and economic growth impacts.

  10. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  11. Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Krasko, V.A.

    2012-10-01

    State and local policymakers show increasing interest in spurring the development of customer-sited distributed generation (DG), in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. Prompted by that interest, this analysis examines the use of state policy as a tool to support the development of a robust private investment market. This analysis builds on previous studies that focus on government subsidies to reduce installation costs of individual projects and provides an evaluation of the impacts of policies on stimulating private market development.

  12. Policy Flash 2016-11 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 Policy Flash 2016-11 DATE: January 15, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors/Heads of Contracting Activities FROM: Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Streamlining DOE's Oversight of Compensation and Benefits SUMMARY: The purpose of Acquisition Letter (AL) 2016-01 is to provide guidance regarding required actions to move from DOE traditional transactional approach for approving certain costs relating to compensation and

  13. Producing liquid fuels from coal: prospects and policy issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Bartis; Frank Camm; David S. Ortiz

    2008-07-01

    The increase in world oil prices since 2003 has prompted renewed interest in producing and using liquid fuels from unconventional resources, such as biomass, oil shale, and coal. This book focuses on issues and options associated with establishing a commercial coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry within the United States. It describes the technical status, costs, and performance of methods that are available for producing liquids from coal; the key energy and environmental policy issues associated with CTL development; the impediments to early commercial experience; and the efficacy of alternative federal incentives in promoting early commercial experience. Because coal is not the only near-term option for meeting liquid-fuel needs, this book also briefly reviews the benefits and limitations of other approaches, including the development of oil shale resources, the further development of biomass resources, and increasing dependence on imported petroleum. A companion document provides a detailed description of incentive packages that the federal government could offer to encourage private-sector investors to pursue early CTL production experience while reducing the probability of bad outcomes and limiting the costs that might be required to motivate those investors. (See Rand Technical Report TR586, Camm, Bartis, and Bushman, 2008.) 114 refs., 2 figs., 16 tabs., 3 apps.

  14. Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

    2011-05-01

    This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

  15. State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

  16. 2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinrichs, Mr. Doug; Goggin, Mr. Michael

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

  17. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  18. Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Policy in Geothermal Electricity Development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity ...

  19. Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Policy Overview and Options for Maximizing the Role of Policy in Geothermal Electricity ... This research explores the effectiveness of the historical and current body of policies in ...

  20. Cellulosic Ethanol Cost Target

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plenary Talk May 21, 2013 Cellulosic Ethanol Cost Target 2 | Biomass Program ... "Our goal is to make cellulosic ethanol practical and cost competitive within 6 ...

  1. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon

  2. Post Award Auditing of Cost Reimbursable Subcontracts Policy | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Possible Scam Regarding OPM Social Media Checks Possible Scam Regarding OPM Social Media Checks July 19, 2016 - 3:30pm Addthis Possible Scam Regarding OPM Social Media Checks On May 12, 2016, the Security Executive Agent signed the Security Executive Agent Directive (SEAD) 5, "Collection, Use, and Retention of Publicly Available Social Media Information in Personnel Security Background Investigations and Adjudications." SEAD 5 "addresses the collection and use of publicly

  3. Office of Security Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Security Policy is the central source within the Department of Energy for the development and analysis of safeguards and security policies and standards affecting facilities, nuclear materials, personnel, and classified information.

  4. Policies, Manuals & References

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    03-00203-0311.tif-277x300 Key Berkeley Lab Policy Documents Regulations & Procedures Manual (RPM) : The RPM is the primary policy document for Berkeley Lab and links out to many...

  5. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Policy Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The laboratory's policy analysis evaluates policies that can advance-or provide alternatives to-renewable energy technologies in meeting national goals. Federal Policy NREL's ...

  7. Framework for SCADA Security Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Acceptable use policy Account and password policy Configuration management Security ... Accounts and Passwords The account and password policy will describe proper care of ...

  8. Successful Track Record with Diverse Policies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center helps governments, advisors, and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. Through its no-cost offerings, the Solutions Center enables countries to learn from and share policy best practices, data, and analysis tools, creating an international dialogue on clean energy policies that raises global awareness of emerging policy issues and innovations. As part of these efforts, the Solutions Center provides an indispensable service by connecting those seeking policy information and advice with a policy expert who can help them achieve their goals. The Solutions Center's Ask an Expert service matches policymakers with one of the more than 30 global experts selected as authoritative leaders on specific clean energy policy topics.

  9. Cost Estimation Package

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

  10. Life Cycle Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

  11. A chronicle of costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elioff, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains the history of all estimated costs associated with the superconducting super collider.

  12. Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient Future | Department of Energy Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future Changing the Climate: Looking Towards a More Cost Effective, Energy Efficient Future November 18, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy are helping states lead the way in an effort to promote low cost energy efficiency. More than 60 energy, environmental and state policy leaders from across the

  13. Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing

  14. Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric

  15. OOTW COST TOOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

  16. Energy Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Energy Policy Energy Policy Offices of the Deputy General Counsel for Energy Policy Civilian Nuclear Programs (GC-72) Office of Standard Contract (GC-73) Electricity and Fossil Energy (GC-76)

  17. Policy Flashes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procurement and Acquisition » Policy Flashes Policy Flashes Subscribe to the Policy Flash Updates Policy Flashes are issued by the Chief, Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division within the Office of Acquisition Management. Policy Flashes transmit information and items of interest to the DOE acquisition community. A Policy Flash itself is not a statement of policy and should not be referenced as such. Use the table below to search with the free text field and filter by Year and/or by

  18. Queues and Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queue Name Purpose User Requestable Slot Limit Memory Limit Wall Clock Limit Other Limits ... Users are limited to 2 slots for 12 hours. Always request the shortest wall clock time and ...

  19. Residential Prosumers: Drivers and Policy Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The rise of the solar photovoltaic "prosumers" has the potential to transform the 100-year-old centralized electric utility model into a more decentralized and interactive system. In some countries, it is now more cost-effective for households to produce their own power from PV than to purchase electricity from the grid. However, a prosumer "revolution" under which decentralized adoption of PV occurs on its own, in the absence of supportive policies or regulatory conditions, has not yet arrived. Self-consumption of solar PV is a growing trend globally, but its expansion remains within policy makers’ ability to control and develop.

  20. ASPEN costing manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwint, K.J.

    1986-07-25

    The ASPEN program contains within it a Cost Estimation System (CES) which estimates the purchase cost and utility consumption rates for major pieces of equipment in a process flowsheet as well as installed equipment costs. These estimates are ''preliminary-study grade'' with an accuracy of plus or minus 30%. The ASPEN program also contains within it an Economic Evaluation System (EES) which estimates overall capital investment costs, annual operating expenses and profitability indices for a chemical plant. This ASPEN costing manual has been written as a guide for those inexperienced in the use of ASPEN and unfamiliar with standard cost estimating techniques who want to use the ASPEN CES and EES. The ASPEN Costing Manual is comprised of the following sections: (1) Introduction, (2) ASPEN Input Language, (3) ASPEN Cost Estimation System (CES), (4) ASPEN Cost Blocks; and (5) ASPEN Economic Evaluation System (EES).

  1. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.; Doris, E.; Braccio, R.; Lippert, D.; Finch, P.; O'Toole, D.; Fetter, J.

    2010-04-01

    This report provides detailed analyses of 21 clean energy policy options considered by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative working groups for recommendation to the 2010 Hawaii State Legislature. The report considers the impact each policy may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits. The analyses provide insight into the possible impacts, both qualitative and quantitative, that these policies may have in Hawaii based on the experience with these policies elsewhere. As much as possible, the analyses incorporate Hawaii-specific context to reflect the many unique aspects of energy use in the State of Hawaii.

  2. Software Policy | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cooley Policies Accounts Policy Account Sponsorship & Retention Policy ALCC Quarterly Report Policy ALCF Acknowledgment Policy Data Policy INCITE Quarterly Report Policy Job Scheduling Policy on BG/Q Job Scheduling Policies on Cooley Pullback Policy Refund Policy Software Policy User Authentication Policy Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Software Policy ALCF Resource Software

  3. Cost Principles and Special Terms and Conditions for DOE Financial Assistance Recipients

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Principles and Special Terms and Conditions for DOE Financial Assistance Recipients U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review May 2012 Federal Cost Principles The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) establishes federal grant management policies and cost principles through OMB circulars and common rules. These policies and cost principles are then incorporated into each relevant agency's applicable Federal regulations

  4. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Annual Fuel Cost gal Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and ...

  5. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  6. Queues and Scheduling Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduling Queues and Scheduling Policies Queue Look A listing of jobs running and waiting in the queues. Queue Wait Times A "heatmap" of queue wait times on NERSC computers. Edison Queues and Policies Cori Queues and Policies Compute Reservation Request Form Request dedicated time on NERSC systems for interactive debugging or when you need to make sure your job runs at a particular time. Realtime Queue Request Form Request access to the realtime queue that can be used to request

  7. Data Management Policy The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Policy The guidelines below describe Data Management procedures, processes and resources that need to be understood by both user projects and in-house research. 1....

  8. ORISE: Policy Implementation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ensuring compliance with federal and DOE regulations pertaining to the protection of human subjects participating in research. The Federal Policy for the Protection of Human...

  9. Departmental Directives Program Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16

    The Policy provides formal and organized communication of the Department's expectations for performance of work within the DOE complex. Cancels DOE P 251.1

  10. WIPP Privacy Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Privacy Policy and Disclaimers NOTICE: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Internet Server is provided as a service of the Department of Energy (DOE) for distribution of...

  11. Safety Management System Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SAFETY MANAGEMENT POLICY PURPOSE AND SCOPE To establish the Department of Energy's (DOE) expectation for safety, 1 including integrated safety management that will enable ...

  12. Policy and Reporting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Skip navigation links BPA Energy Efficiency Plan BPA Post-2011 EE Role Implementation Manual Archives IM Document Library Interim Solution 2.0 Files Low Income Efficiency Policy &...

  13. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  14. POLICY OPTIONS FOR FCV MARKET INTRODUCTION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    K.G. Duleep Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. www.eea-inc.com POLICY OPTIONS FOR FCV MARKET INTRODUCTION Prepared for: Hydrogen 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis Meeting Introduction Phases Phase 1 - sales of few hundred FCVs per year. Cost of vehicles will be 5 x over average vehicle and refueling infrastructure will be in an urban area. Phase 2 - ten to twenty thousand FCVs per model and one/two models per major manufacturer. Cost of vehicles will be 2 x over average vehicle, and urban and

  15. DOE Policies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Policies DOE Policies DOE Policies The CIO defines IT processes and policies using the Common Baseline for IT Management, consistent with OMB M-15-14. Access policy documents from the list below: Information Management Planning DOE Guide to IT Capital Planning and Investment, September 2016(pdf) DOE G 242.1-1, Forms Management Guide (pdf) Web Domain Name Policy REFERENCE NUMBER POLICY NAME APPROVED DATE DESCRIPTION DOE O 200.1A Information Technology Management Dec 23, 2008 Implementation

  16. Energy security, public policy, and the role of the DOE Office of Energy Emergencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, D.J.; Curlee, T.R. ); Bohi, D.R. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper addresses the concept of energy security, the costs and benefits of energy security, and policies which could potentially alter these costs and benefits. These issues are considered from the perspective of the DOE's Office of Energy Emergencies, with the goal of determining if alternative or additional roles should be open to this Office. The approach taken is limited to the economic costs and benefits of energy security, reflecting our view that the bulk of important energy security issues can at least be approached from this perspective. An energy emergency results from a sudden change in the quantity, market price, and/or social value of energy, in combination with a domestic and/or world wide energy system that cannot rapidly adjust to that change. We do not believe that mitigating the impacts of such events is always necessary, nor that it is uniquely a governmental responsibility. In fact, the first recourse in emergency preparedness should always be to the private sector. Government should deal with three different aspects of emergency energy activities. First, it should condition the decision making environment by seeing that adequate information about energy conditions is available and that its own policy position is clear. Next, it should evaluate the preparedness measures undertaken by the private sector. Finally, if it finds private sector preparation to be inadequate, government has a variety of direct and indirect means with which to intervene. One direct measure currently used is the buildup and drawdown of the strategic petroleum reserve (SPR). Others include contingency plans to override market allocations during wartime, as might be developed under the graduated mobilization response (GMR). Indirect means include a variety of tax and transfer schemes that alter existing private sector incentives to prepare. Well conceived monetary and fiscal policies complete the tools. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report finds that through strategic policy implementation, governments can successfully support renewable energy even in times when funding is limited. p r o g r a m o v e r v i e ...

  18. Financing investments in renewable energy: The role of policy design and restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.

    1997-03-01

    The costs of electric power projects utilizing renewable energy technologies are highly sensitive to financing terms. Consequently, as the electricity industry is restructured and new renewables policies are created, it is important for policymakers to consider the impacts of renewables policy design on project financing. This report describes the power plant financing process and provides insights to policymakers on the important nexus between renewables policy design and finance. A cash-flow model is used to estimate the impact of various financing variables on renewable energy costs. Past and current renewable energy policies are then evaluated to demonstrate the influence of policy design on the financing process and on financing costs. The possible impacts of electricity restructuring on power plant financing are discussed and key design issues are identified for three specific renewable energy programs being considered in the restructuring process: (1) surcharge-funded policies; (2) renewables portfolio standards; and (3) green marketing programs. Finally, several policies that are intended to directly reduce financing costs and barriers are analyzed. The authors find that one of the key reasons that renewables policies are not more effective is that project development and financing processes are frequently ignored or misunderstood when designing and implementing renewable energy incentives. A policy that is carefully designed can reduce renewable energy costs dramatically by providing revenue certainty that will, in turn, reduce financing risk premiums.

  19. Global warming policy: A coherent-sequential approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manicke, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper addresses these two closely related themes: (1) the need for structuring and evaluating global climate policy sequentially and (2) the need to incorporate the analysis of real options which may contribute significantly to global climate policy. This paper is organized into four sections. The first section deals with benefit-cost analysis and capital budgeting as they are generally practiced and discusses the reasons why the traditional benefit-cost formulation is inadequate. The second section then discusses the case of one financial option, namely, the European Call Option and discusses some important results. The third section of the paper addresses some of the important results or principles derived in the literature on real options, and while most of the mathematics is not easily transferred nor relevant to the global climate policy, there are many principles that can be applied. In the fourth section the author discusses the implications of a real option environment for the policy process.

  20. Benchmarking for Cost Improvement. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) conducted the Benchmarking for Cost Improvement initiative with three objectives: Pilot test benchmarking as an EM cost improvement tool; identify areas for cost improvement and recommend actions to address these areas; provide a framework for future cost improvement. The benchmarking initiative featured the use of four principal methods (program classification, nationwide cost improvement survey, paired cost comparison and component benchmarking). Interested parties contributed during both the design and execution phases. The benchmarking initiative was conducted on an accelerated basis. Of necessity, it considered only a limited set of data that may not be fully representative of the diverse and complex conditions found at the many DOE installations. The initiative generated preliminary data about cost differences and it found a high degree of convergence on several issues. Based on this convergence, the report recommends cost improvement strategies and actions. This report describes the steps taken as part of the benchmarking initiative and discusses the findings and recommended actions for achieving cost improvement. The results and summary recommendations, reported below, are organized by the study objectives.

  1. Website Policies / Important Links | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Website Policies Important Links Website Policies Important Links Javascript Not Enabled OSTI Security Website Policies and Important Links

  2. Website Policies / Important Links | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Website Policies Important Links Website Policies Important Links Javascript Not Enabled OSTI Security Website Policies and Important Links

  3. Website Policies / Important Links | DOE Patents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website Policies / Important Links Website Policies / Important Links Javascript Not Enabled OSTI Security Website Policies and Important Links

  4. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  6. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State Clean Energy Policies Analysis...

  7. E-Commerce Policies- Purpose

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To establish policies for the use of the Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (referred to as "STRIPES"). These policies supplement the DOE policies for the use of the Government...

  8. Riverside County- Sustainable Building Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In February 2009, the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors adopted Policy Number H-29, creating the Sustainable Building Policy. The Policy requires that all new county building projects...

  9. GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on NEPA Analyses | Department of Energy GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses GAO Report -- National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses A report by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) on the costs, time frames, and benefits of the NEPA process. The report posted here has been modified through the addition of yellow highlighting to denote text referring to DOE or DOE data. The original

  10. Part II: Section B - Supplies, Services, and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICE/COSTS DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M938 Section B - ii PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICE/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service Being Acquired ......................................................................................... 1 B.2 Obligation of Funds and Financial Limitations ...................................................... 1 B.3 Transition Cost, Estimated Costs and Maximum Available Fee ............................ 1 B.4 Allowability

  11. Workplace Charging Installation Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation costs and services vary considerably, so employers are encouraged to obtain a number of quotes before moving forward with any installation. An initial site investigation should include:

  12. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * ...

  13. substantially reduced production costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production costs - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy ...

  14. SOFT COST GRAND CHALLENGE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energycenter.org California Center for Sustainable Energy Soft Cost Grand Challenge May 22, 2014 Accelerating the transition to a sustainable world powered by clean energy 2...

  15. Form:Policy Organization | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy Organization Jump to: navigation, search Add a Policy Organization Input your policy organization name below to add to the registry. If your policy organization is already...

  16. Policy Flash 2012-68

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DATE: September 21, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director, Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance...

  17. Policy Flash 2012-56

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    56 DATE: July 27, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT:...

  18. Policy Flash 2012-66

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 19, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT:...

  19. Policy Flash 2012-59

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6, 2012 TO: Procurement DirectorsContracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance...

  20. Policy Flash 2005-53

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DATE: April 09, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management...

  1. Policy Flash 2005-53

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DATE: April 17, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director, Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management...

  2. Policy Flash 2012-58

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    , 2012 TO: Procurement DirectorsContracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance...

  3. Policy Flash 2013-03

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11, 2012 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT:...

  4. Policy Flash 2012-57

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Communication to All Department of Energy Contractors SUMMARY:...

  5. Policy Flash 2005-53

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: OFPP Myth-busting 2 Memorandum SUMMARY: The Office of Federal...

  6. ADR Policy Federal Register

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SUMMARY: On October 24, 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) published an interim Statement of Policy on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) (60 FR 54482) to further its commitmentto the use of...

  7. Hall Ammendment Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Joint statement providing interim policy on processing proposals for leasing DOE real property using the authority in 42 U.S.C. 7256, commonly referred to as the "Hall Amendment."

  8. Supervisory Policy Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an expert policy advisor and recognized technical authority to the Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation. The candidate will...

  9. Evaluating Energy Efficiency Policies with Energy-Economy Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundaca, Luis; Neij, Lena; Worrell, Ernst; McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-08-01

    The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyse bottom-up energy-economy models and corresponding evaluation studies on energy efficiency policies to induce technological change. We use the household sector as a case study. Our analysis focuses on decision frameworks for technology choice, type of evaluation being carried out, treatment of market and behavioural failures, evaluated policy instruments, and key determinants used to mimic policy instruments. Although the review confirms criticism related to energy-economy models (e.g. unrealistic representation of decision-making by consumers when choosing technologies), they provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation related to energy efficiency. Different areas to further advance models remain open, particularly related to modelling issues, techno-economic and environmental aspects, behavioural determinants, and policy considerations.

  10. Queues and Scheduling Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Queues and Scheduling Policies Users submit jobs to a submit queue and wait in line until nodes become available to run a job. NERSC's queue structures are intended to be fair and to allow jobs of various sizes to run efficiently. Balancing the job size and throughput requirements of a large number of users is always a challenge. We encourage users to send questions, feedback, or concerns about the queue structures, to the consultants. Queue Classes Submit Queue Execution

  11. ORISE: Policy Implementation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Implementation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) assists the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science in the implementation of its program directed at ensuring compliance with federal and DOE regulations pertaining to the protection of human subjects participating in research. The Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects was adopted by DOE on June 18, 1991, as Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations 745, Protection of Human Subjects, and expressed

  12. Simple Modular LED Cost Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The LED Cost Model, developed by the DOE Cost Modeling Working Group, provides a simplified method for analyzing the manufacturing costs of an LED package. The model focuses on the major cost...

  13. POLICY MEMORANDUM #1 Policy and Operating Procedures for Senior Executive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service (SES) Performance Management System | Department of Energy MEMORANDUM #1 Policy and Operating Procedures for Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Management System POLICY MEMORANDUM #1 Policy and Operating Procedures for Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Management System Policy Memo #1-SES Performance Policy and Operating Procedures (690.37 KB) Responsible Contacts Erin Moore Deputy Director, Office of Executive Resources E-mail Erin.Moore@hq.doe.gov Phone (202)

  14. What does the 2°C Target Imply for a Global Climate Agreement in 2020? The LIMITS Study on Durban Action Platform Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Tavoni, Massimo; Aboumahboub, Tino; Luderer, Gunnar; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Krey, Volker; Riahi, Keywan; Rosler, Hilke; Schaeffer, Michiel; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides a novel and comprehensive model?based assessment of possible outcomes of the Durban Platform negotiations with a focus on emissions reduction requirements, the consistency with the 2°C target and global economic impacts. The Durban Action scenarios investigated in the LIMITS study—all assuming the implementation of comprehensive global emission reductions after 2020, but assuming different 2020 emission reduction levels and different long?term stabilization targets—show that the probability of exceeding the 2°C limit increases with stabilization target from below one third for 450?470 ppm to 40?60% for 490?510 ppm in 2100. Global time?averaged economic costs of the Durban Action scenarios are limited across models, and are largely unaffected by the stringency of 2020 pledges. By contrast, the economic impact of delaying action beyond 2030 is much stronger on transitional costs. The main significance of short term action in the period 2010?2030 lies in preparing the ground for steep emissions reductions thereafter by inducing global emissions to peak and decline. The institutional challenges of all scenarios with fragmented near?term climate policy can be expected to be high as reflected in a steep rise of carbon prices and decarbonization rates until 2040. We conclude that an agreement on comprehensive emissions reductions to be implemented from 2020 onwards has particular significance for meeting long term climate policy objectives.

  15. Enforcement Policy: Certain Ceiling Fans and Certain Ceiling Fan Light Kits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Certain Ceiling Fans and Certain Ceiling Fan Light Kits Enforcement Policy: Certain Ceiling Fans and Certain Ceiling Fan Light Kits Issued: December 15, 2015 Revised: March 15, 2016 DOE announced an enforcement policy in a Federal Register notice published on December 24, 2015. This document provides additional information about how DOE plans to implement the policy. This policy is limited to certain ceiling fans and certain ceiling fan light kits manufactured prior to

  16. Workplace Charging Equipment Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charging stations are available from a variety of manufacturers in a range of models for all charging applications. For a single port charging station, Level 1 hardware costs range from $300-$1,500...

  17. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

  18. Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for ... mile Downtown: 1 to 8 in. Downtown: 4 to 20 in. Urban H2A Right of Way Oil & Gas Journal

  19. INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Report SOP Standard Operating Procedure TEC Total Estimated Cost TIPR Technical ... FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 Total PED Construction TEC OPC TPC Note: above values include MR...

  20. Soft Costs Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national effort to make solar energy technologies cost-competitive with conventional forms of energy by the end of the decade. ...

  1. Estimating Renewable Energy Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically...

  2. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Choose a vehicle to compare fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select FuelTechnology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel ...

  3. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates.

  4. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    The objective of this Guide is to improve the quality of cost estimates and further strengthen the DOE program/project management system. The original 25 separate chapters and three appendices have been combined to create a single document.

  5. System Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-03-27

    SCM is used for estimation of the life-cycle impacts (costs, health and safety risks) of waste management facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing waste management facilities at Department of Energy (DOE) installations. SCM also provides transportation costs for intersite transfer of DOE wastes. SCM covers the entire DOE waste management complex tomore » allow system sensitivity analysis including: treatment, storage, and disposal configuration options; treatment technology selection; scheduling options; transportation options; waste stream and volume changes; and site specific conditions.« less

  6. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Intertek APTECH has organized the cycling cost data in consultation with NREL and WECC by the following eight generator plant types: 1. Small coal-fired sub-critical steam (35-299 ...

  7. Independent Cost Estimate (ICE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Independent Cost Estimate (ICE). On August 8-12, the Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) will conduct an ICE on the NNSA Albuquerque Complex Project (NACP) at Albuquerque, NM. This estimate will support the Critical Decision (CD) for establishing the performance baseline and approval to start construction (CD-2/3). This project is at CD-1, with a total project cost range of $183M to $251M.

  8. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Choose a vehicle to compare fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select Fuel/Technology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator Update Your Widget Code This widget version will stop working on March 31. Update your widget code. Ă— Widget Code Select All Close U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. Soft Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs » Soft Costs Soft Costs The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative's soft costs program works to lower the non-hardware costs of solar and accelerate the adoption of solar energy technologies throughout the United States. In support of the SunShot Initiative goals, the soft costs program works in the following strategic areas: networking and technical assistance, data analysis, business innovation, and training. Soft Costs Activity Areas, Business Innovation, Networking

  10. Equilibrium Control Policies for Markov Chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The average cost criterion has held great intuitive appeal and has attracted considerable attention. It is widely employed when controlling dynamic systems that evolve stochastically over time by means of formulating an optimization problem to achieve long-term goals efficiently. The average cost criterion is especially appealing when the decision-making process is long compared to other timescales involved, and there is no compelling motivation to select short-term optimization. This paper addresses the problem of controlling a Markov chain so as to minimize the average cost per unit time. Our approach treats the problem as a dual constrained optimization problem. We derive conditions guaranteeing that a saddle point exists for the new dual problem and we show that this saddle point is an equilibrium control policy for each state of the Markov chain. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those we study here, our results imply that recognition of such saddle points may be of value in deriving in real time an optimal control policy.