Sample records for lime ls limestone

  1. LS-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-139 H a J2

  2. LS-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. LS-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. LS-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. LS-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-139 H a57

  6. LS-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. LS Note LS-139

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  9. LS-102

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. LS-108

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. LS-115

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. LS-132

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. LS-138

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. LS-146

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. LS-22

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. LS Note NNN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. LS- W. Chou

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. LS- W. Chou

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-139 HMarch

  19. LS-1.50

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-139

  20. LS-104 S. Ohnuma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. LS-13 K. Thompson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. LS-14 T. Khoe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-13924

  3. LS-144 M. Choi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-139244 M.

  4. LS-16 S. Kim

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-1392447 M.

  5. LS-165 A. Nassiri'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-1392447 M.5

  6. LS-I06

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. LS-IOO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. LS-l36

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  9. Introduction LS-156

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. The Needs of Texas Soils for Lime.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Agriculture. STS PAGE ............................................. What lime does 5 ............................................. Acidity of soils 7 ............................................. Sources of lime 8... of Texas soils for lime, as far as our present information permits. WHST LIME DOES Lime performs sereral functions in the soil, some of which are favor- able to increased crops and the maintenance of fertility, some favorable to certain crops...

  11. LS-Kim LS-54 S. H. Kim

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. LS-133 S. L. Kramer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. LS-l Y. Cho

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Microsoft Word - ls279.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA Trimodal SizePreliminary ResultsLS Note 279

  15. Microsoft Word - ls280.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA Trimodal SizePreliminary ResultsLS Note 279280

  16. Microsoft Word - ls295.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA Trimodal SizePreliminary ResultsLS Note

  17. Microsoft Word - ls303.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA Trimodal SizePreliminary ResultsLS

  18. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD systems. Volume 3. Plant profiles. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant profiles are given for the following plants: Tombigbee 2, 3; Apache 2, 3; Cholla 1, 2; Four Corners 1, 2, 3; Laramie River 1; Green 1, 2; Duck Creek 1; Craig 1, 2; Conesville 5, 6; Coal Creek 1, 2; Elrama 1, 2, 3, 4; and Phillips 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. (DLC)

  19. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an expandable mineral...

  20. Factors affecting the supply and demand for limes and lime oil in the U.S.: development implications for Veracruz state, Mexico.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abarca Orozco, Saul Julian

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The fresh lime industry is an important economic activity in Veracruz, Mexico. In this thesis, the economic potential of the fresh lime and lime oil… (more)

  1. Opacity reduction using hydrated lime injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, D.E.; Seaba, J.P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation is to study the effects of injecting dry hydrated lime into flue gas to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) concentrations and consequently stack opacity at the University of Missouri, Columbia power plant. Burning of high sulfur coal (approx. 4% by weight) at the power plant resulted in opacity violations. The opacity problem was due to sulfuric acid mist (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) forming at the stack from high SO{sub 3} concentrations. As a result of light scattering by the mist, a visible plume leaves the stack. Therefore, reducing high concentrations of SO{sub 3} reduces the sulfuric acid mist and consequently the opacity problem. The current hydrated lime injection system has reduced the opacity to acceptable limits. To reduce SO{sub 3} concentrations, dry hydrated lime is injected into the flue gas upstream of a particulate collection device (baghouse) and downstream of the induced draft fan. The lime is periodically injected into the flue via a pneumatic piping system. The hydrated lime is transported down the flue and deposited on the filter bags in the baghouse. As the hydrated lime is deposited on the bags a filter cake is established. The reaction between the SO{sub 3} and the hydrated lime takes place on the filter bags. The hydrated lime injection system has resulted in at least 95% reduction in the SO{sub 3} concentration. Low capital equipment requirements and operating cost coupled with easy installation and maintenance makes the system very attractive to industries with similar problems. This paper documents the hydrated lime injection system and tests the effectiveness of the system on SO{sub 3} removal and subsequent opacity reduction. Measurements Of SO{sub 3} concentrations, flue gas velocities, and temperatures have been performed at the duct work and baghouse. A complete analysis of the hydrated lime injection system is provided.

  2. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

  3. SN54147, SN54148, SN54LS147, SN54LS148 SN74147, SN74148 (TIM9907), SN74LS147, SN74LS148

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    OFFICE BOX 655303 · DALLAS, TEXAS 75265 '147, 'LS147 D Encode 10-Line Decimal to 4-Line BCD D (Octal) D Applications Include: - n-Bit Encoding - Code Converters and Generators 3 2 1 20 19 9 10 11 12 devices encode nine data lines to four-line (8-4-2-1) BCD. The implied decimal zero condition requires

  4. Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

  5. Limestone, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) JumpDesignLimestone, Oklahoma: Energy

  6. LS-114 W. Chou and Y. Jin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-13924 S.84

  7. LS-12 K. Thompson/R. Lari

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-13924

  8. LS-I05 S.Ohnuma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s.LS-I03 G. K5

  9. LS-l25 Y. Jin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s.LS-I03

  10. FAST AND LS TTL DATA BCD TO 7-SEGMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    for the LS48. The circuit accepts 4-bit binary-coded-decimal (BCD) and, depending on the state5-1 FAST AND LS TTL DATA BCD TO 7-SEGMENT DECODER The SN54/74LS48 is a BCD to 7-Segment Decoder are connected in pairs to make BCD data and its complement available to the seven decoding AND-OR-INVERT gates

  11. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  12. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sulfur content is highly dependent upon coal type. In gen~ral, conventional coal cleaning does not effect sufficient sulfur reduction to permit combustion without! i additional flue gas desulfurization. Several novel technologies now under development..., or equilibrium limita tions requires that super stoichiometric quantities of CaO be charged to the boiler. Operationally the introduction of large amounts of calcium additive can pose increased problems due to slagging and fouling in the combustion chamber...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid lime plants Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of Activated Carbon Enhanced Lime for Controlling Acid Gases, Mercury, and Dioxins form MWCs... PEER-REVIEW Lime Enhances Moving Bed Filters for Mercury and Dioxin...

  14. Lime slurry use at the Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, L.E. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.; Hughes, R.W. [Professional Services Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baggett, G. [Genex/Praxair, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of lime slurry at the IWPF demonstrated many benefits. Hazardous chemical use was reduced, solids handling was improved, water quality was enhanced and there has been a cost savings. The lime slurry also enabled the plant to begin treating the soluble oil waste, which we were not able to do in the past.

  15. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Padua U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Grenoble Observ. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  16. Lime kiln source characterization: Lime manufacturing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toney, M.L.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this testing program is to obtain uncontrolled and controlled hydrogen chloride (HCl) and speciated hydrocarbon Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) emissions data from lime production plants to support a national emission standard for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP). This report presents data from the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. FTIR source testing was conducted for the following purposes: Quantify HCl emission levels; and Gather screening (i.e., qualitative) data on other HAP emissions.

  17. Wood Residues as Fuel Source for Lime Kilns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azarniouch, M. K.; Philp, R. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    completed and the preliminary results indicate that our approach is potentially a very cost-effective and simple option to substantially reduce or possibly eliminate fossil-fuel usage in lime kilns....

  18. Enhancement of phosphogypsum with high lime fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Chuck Alan

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENHANCEMENT OF PHOSPHOGYPSUM WITH HIGH LIME FLY ASH A Thesis by CHUCK ALAN GREGORY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering ENHANCEMENT OF PHOSPHOGYPSUM WITH HIGH'LIME FLY ASH A Thesis by CHUCK ALAN GREGORY Approved as to style and content by: Dr. ona d Saylak (Chairman f Committee) Dr. W. edbetter ( ember) (Member) r. Lloyd Deuel, 3...

  19. L&S Deans' Office Purchase Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    L&S Deans' Office Purchase Request Form poses a risk to the University. The University has does not need to be by the original requestor of this purchase FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Approver: Cardholder://businessservices.berkeley.edu/HtmFiles/RestrictItems.htm) 2. One form may be used for multiple purchases from a single vendor. 3. Submit form to Blu

  20. An insoluble residue study of the Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones of Kimble County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurik, Paul Peter

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Previous investigations Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones. . Insoluble res idues 1 1 3 5 6 S tratigraphy Wa)nut clay. Conanche Peak limestone Edwards limestone. Georgetown limestone. 8 9 9 12 Paleontology Macropaleontology... on the basis of tha silt?clay insoluble residua y. Tectonic map of Early Cretaceous. Plate I. Vertical variation in insoluble residua content. . . . pocket vertical variation in sand-siss insoluble residue content Vertical vari. stion in sand...

  1. Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae, and for other species. Keywords: Ocean acidification; Pacific oyster; Larval stages; Hydrated lime; Shellfish No.: 577 Title of Project: Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition

  2. Low frequency radio spectrum and spectral turnover of LS 5039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagar Godambe; Subir Bhattacharyya; Nilay Bhatt; Manojendu Choudhury

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LS 5039, a possible black hole x-ray binary, was recently observed with Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. The observed spectrum presented here shows that the spectrum is inverted at the low frequency. When combined with the archival data with orbital phase similar to the present observations, it shows a clear indication of a spectral turnover. The combined data are fitted with a broken power-law and the break frequency signifies a possible spectral turnover of the spectrum around 964 MHz. Truly simultaneous observations in radio wavelength covering a wide range of frequencies are required to fix the spectrum and the spectral turn over which will play a crucial role in developing a deeper understanding of the radio emitting jet in LS 5039.

  3. Cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and limestone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoni, M., E-mail: mathieu.antoni@epfl.ch [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rossen, J. [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Martirena, F. [CIDEM-UCLV, Universidad Las Villas, Santa Clara (Cuba)] [CIDEM-UCLV, Universidad Las Villas, Santa Clara (Cuba); Scrivener, K. [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [EPFL-STI-IMX-Laboratoires des Materiaux de Construction, Station12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the coupled substitution of metakaolin and limestone in Portland cement (PC). The mechanical properties were studied in mortars and the microstructural development in pastes by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry and isothermal calorimetry. We show that 45% of substitution by 30% of metakaolin and 15% of limestone gives better mechanical properties at 7 and 28 days than the 100% PC reference. Our results show that calcium carbonate reacts with alumina from the metakaolin, forming supplementary AFm phases and stabilizing ettringite. Using simple mass balance calculations derived from thermogravimetry results, we also present the thermodynamic simulation for the system, which agrees fairly well with the experimental observations. It is shown that gypsum addition should be carefully balanced when using calcined clays because it considerably influences the early age strength by controlling the very rapid reaction of aluminates.

  4. The lime-soda sinter process for resource recovery from fly ash: A new look

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnet, G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lime-soda sinter process is one of the earliest and most thoroughly researched and evaluated of the several methods available for resource recovery from fly ash. The principle product, metallurgical grade alumina, is obtained with yields as high as 90% depending upon how much alumina needs to be left in the residue to form acceptable byproduct cement clinker. The process has the advantages of requiring a relatively low sintering temperature (1100-1200{degree}C), using conventional equipment of carbon steel construction, utilizing a variety of calcium and mineralizer raw materials, and producing only a single byproduct consisting of dicalcium silicate that has been shown to be an attractive raw material for the manufacture of portland cement. An economic feasibility study for a combined facility to produce alumina and cement from the fly ash generated by a 1000 MWe coal-fired power station shows a 10.5% return on average investment. This is increased to 14.2% when a disposal charge of $10/ton of fly ash consumed is credited to the process. Research has shown that the soda ash can be replaced by coal cleaning refuse or that the soda ash and one-fourth of the limestone can be replaced by FGD sludge with a savings in raw material cost in both cases. The return on average investment becomes 14.5% when the refuse is used and 15.2% when the sludge is used. The return could be increased further if an inexpensive fluxing agent were substituted for the alumina deliberately left in the residue. 12 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. New waste based clinkers: Belite and lime formulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raupp-Pereira, Fabiano [Ceramics and Glass Engineering Department, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ball, Richard James [University of Bristol, Interface Analysis Centre, Oldbury House, 121 St Michael's Hill, Bristol, BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: richard.ball@bristol.ac.uk; Rocha, Joao [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Labrincha, Joao A. [Ceramics and Glass Engineering Department, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Allen, Geoffrey C. [University of Bristol, Interface Analysis Centre, Oldbury House, 121 St Michael's Hill, Bristol, BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the formulation of new belite-based (CR2) and lime-based (CR3) cementitious materials derived from industrial wastes, such as sludges (generated in the Al-anodising and surface coating industrial processes, potable water filtration/cleaning operations and in marble sawing processes) and foundry sand. Powder mixtures were prepared and fired at different temperatures. For comparison, similar formulations were prepared with pre-treated and commercially available natural raw materials and processed in similar conditions. The thermal process was followed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high-temperature powder X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) studies. The CR2 clinker was found to contain belite as the main cementitious phase, the main polymorph being identified by NMR. The CR3 clinker contained common cementitious phases, such as C{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S, but free lime and calcium aluminium oxide sulphates were also identified by high temperature XRD and NMR. Then the corresponding cement was prepared and the evolution of the mechanical strength with time was evaluated. The lime-based cement obtained from wastes shows a stronger hardening character than the standard material, which tends to show dusting phenomena due to the presence of a reasonable amount of free lime (as the result of its expansive reaction with ambient moisture). Some fluxing impurities (e.g. alkalis) present in the waste materials improve the overall reactivity of the mixture and induces the combination of the lime in CR3. Raman, XPS and FIB techniques were used to fully characterise the aged cements.

  6. Pulsar model of the high energy phenomenology of LS 5039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnieszka Sierpowska-Bartosik; Diego F. Torres

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the assumption that LS 5039 is a system composed by a pulsar rotating around an O6.5V star in a $\\sim 3.9$ day orbit, we present the results of a theoretical modeling of the high energy phenomenology observed by the High Energy Stereoscopy Array (H.E.S.S.). This model (including detailed account of the system geometry, Klein-Nishina inverse Compton, $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$ absorption, and cascading) is able to describe well the rich observed phenomenology found in the system at all timescales, both flux and spectrum-wise.

  7. LS-145 STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR UNITS OF MEASURE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-139244 M.5

  8. LS-147 M. Knott, M. Kraimer, and F. Lenkszus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-1392447 M.

  9. LS-ll D. Y. Smith and A. E. Williamsont

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s.LS-I03l36ll D.

  10. N"I. L-S- Rad. Mat. DU

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores TubaySite,N"I. L-S- Rad.

  11. Protective effect of endolithic fungal hyphae on oolitic limestone buildings Nicolas Concha-Lozano a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    limestone from four quarries and eight monuments exposed on various environmental conditions focusing molding. Study of weathering forms on old quarries indicates that lichens colonization (Verrucaria

  12. Reservoir Characterization and Enhanced Oil Recovery Potential in Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone Reservoirs, Michigan Basin, USA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abduslam, Abrahim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Middle Devonian Rogers City and subjacent Dundee Limestone formations have combined oil production in excess of 375 MMBO. In general, hydrocarbon production occurs in… (more)

  13. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  14. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The second model used the crystal growth rate as an alternate measure of supersaturation. The growth rate obtained from a settling procedure correlated well with values for silica removal rates for experiments grouped by pH and recycie conditions... of precipitation processes specific applications to lime soFtening and silica removal can be addressed. Mechanisms oF silica raawal. Many of the processes studied for specific removal of silica From industrial water have relied on adsorption...

  15. Decon2LS: An Open-Source Software Package for Automated Processing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Package for Automated Processing and Visualization of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data. Decon2LS: An Open-Source Software Package for Automated Processing and...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural liming techniques Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beech and sycamore, adventitious shoots... which are especially suitable for use in coppice woodland including ash, oak, chestnut, willow, lime... when well rooted. Alder, ash,...

  17. Hydrochemical Impacts of Limestone Rock Mining Ghinwa M. Naja & Rosanna Rivero &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    . 2002). Even though the environmental impacts of ore and coal mining have been adequately investigated, the impact of limestone rock mining has not been well studied. Water Air Soil Pollut DOI 10.1007/s11270-mail: mnaja@evergladesfoundation.org #12;Quarrying of limestone aggregate currently repre- sents in the USA

  18. Autonomous Remote Crack Displacement Monitoring of a Residence Near a Limestone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonomous Remote Crack Displacement Monitoring of a Residence Near a Limestone Quarry, Naples a limestone quarry. The object is to quantitatively compare crack re- sponse to blast-induced ground motion for construction and raw materials. For instance, neighbors of road aggregate quarries often perceive

  19. Actes JFPC 2008 LS(Graph): Un cadre de recherche locale pour des

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deville, Yves

    le diam`etre d'un arbre) parce que ceux-ci sont dŽej`a implŽementŽes dans LS(Graph). Le program- meur recherche heu- ristiques et metaheuristiques. LS(Graph) est conžcu et implŽementŽe en COMET (le code source

  20. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  1. The effects of lime and amines on the aging of asphalts and recycling agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisneski, Mary Luvola

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    amounts of quick lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH),) on SHRP AAA-I and SHRP AAF-1. The second experiment was to determine the effects of three different amines and various amounts of CaO on aged SHRP AAA-I and SHRP AAF-I rejuvenated with ABM-F2, YBF-F2...

  2. Control of Lime Kiln Heat Balance is Key to Reduced Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramm, D. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the various heat loads in a pulp mill lime sludge kiln, pointing out which heat loads cannot be reduced and which heat loads can, and how a reduction in energy use can be achieved. In almost any existing rotary lime sludge...

  3. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Soda-Lime Silicate Glassmelts with Different Iron Contents Between 1100C and 1500C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Effective Thermal Conductivity of Soda-Lime Silicate Glassmelts with Different Iron Contents collected for soda- lime silicate glasses with iron content ranging from 0.008 to 1.1 wt% and temperatures, refractory walls wear more rapidly for clear glassmelts compared with colored ones.1 Soda-lime silicate glass

  4. An insoluble residue study of the Cretaceous Cow Creek Limestone of Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, William Rogers

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Stratigr chy. Local Stratigrapby 14 14 Honeycut Bend. Cyoress Creek. Hickory Creek. Cox Crossing Hamilton Pool. IB 19 2O 21 21 Rebecca Creek. PALEONTOLOGY MINERALOGY 23 25 Page Introduction 27 Constituents of the Sand... of the Cow. Creek Limestone on the basis of the silt-clay fraction 46 10. Zonation and suggested corr . lation of the Cow Creek Limestone on the basis of feldspar content of the sand-size fraction. 47 11. Zonation of the Cow Creek Limestone on the basis...

  5. On the Dynamic Fragmentation of two Limestones using Edge-on Impact Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a crinoidal limestone and the so-called "blanche de Beaucaire." These rocks are extracted from quarries. The mining and quarrying industries aim at controlling the block size distributio

  6. Paleoenvironment of an upper Cotton Valley (Knowles limestone) patch reef, Milam County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cregg, Allen Kent

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proces- ses and potential reservoir properties to be evaluated. 23 PALEOSTRUCTURE The lack of' deep well control in the study precludes subsurface structural and isopach mapping. However, the stratigraphic cross section (Figure 7), for which... Committee: Dr. ird'ayne M. Ahr The Knowles Limestone is the uppermost unit of the Upper Jurassic Cotton Valley Group, and in Milam County, Texas is approxima+ely )50 fee. thick ard consists of arenaceous shales, terrigenous dolomitic limestones, gra...

  7. In What Form is Lime Present in Portland Cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Claude W.

    1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain Si02.33a0, In his conclusions Hebuffat does not consider it of importance whether alit consists of pure Si02.3CaO or a crystalline compound of Si02.2CaO with 3a0 and an aluminate. He says the aluminate in Portland dement can­ not be Al 203.30a..., Erd- meyer, Nev/berry's, Zulkowski, Rebuff at, Meyers, Richardson, Michaelis and Meade• d. Work of the Carbegie Institute of Washington on CaO #Si0 2 series and binary compounds of Al 2°3> Si0 2, MgO, CaO. On the presence of free lime in cement...

  8. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  9. The effect of hydrated lime on Salmonella enteritidis survival in poultry litter and poult performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanush, Deborah Denise

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of Salmonella and/or Campylobacter in poultry litter may contribute to contaminated processed carcasses. Initially in our first study, we evaluated the effect of 5, 10, or 20% added lime on in vitro survival of Salmonella enteritidis...

  10. Validation of the new mixture design and testing protocol for lime stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Fateh Ul Anam Muhammad Shafee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and testing protocol is presented for lime stabilized subgrades. Comparison of field test data and laboratory test data shows that laboratory design test properties were achieved in the field. These properties are used in a mechanistic analysis to assess...

  11. Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

  12. Legume establishment, nodulation, and forage production as influenced by N, P, K fertilizers and lime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martillo Chalen, Eduardo Enrique

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LEGUME ESTABLISHMEJ'JT, NODL'LATION, AND FORAGE PRODUCTION AS INFLUE. 'JCZD BY N, P, K FERTILIZERS AND LIME A thesis by EDUARDO ENRIQUZ MARTII, 0 CHA EIJ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for tne degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Agronomy LEGUME ESTABLISHMENT, NODULATION, AND FORAGE PRODUCTION AS INFLUENCED BY N, P, K FERTILIZERS AND LIME A thesis EDUARDO ENRIQUE MARTILLO CHALEN Approved as to style...

  13. Evaluation of lime-fly ash stabilized bases and subgrades using static and dynamic deflection systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raba, Gary W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF LIME-FLY ASH STABILIZED BASFS AND SUBGRADES USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC DEFLECTION SYSTEMS A Thesis GARY W. RABA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF LIME-FLY ASH STABILIZED BASES AND SUBGRADES USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC DEFLECTION SYSTEMS A Thesis by Gary Nl. Raba Approved as to style and content by: !Chairman...

  14. Limestone/adipic acid FGD and stack opacity reduction pilot plant tests at Big Rivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laslo, D.; Bakke, E.; Chisholm, E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Big Rivers Electric Corporation (BREC) contracted Peabody Process Systems, Inc. (PPSI) to install a flue gas cleaning (FGC) pilot plant at the BREC R.D. Green Station Unit No. 2 located at Sebree, KY. A six month test program was completed demonstrating technology for: alternatives to using lime as an alkali; methods for improving cake dewatering; identification of the causes of high stack opacity; and methods for the reduction of high stack opacity. This paper presents highlights extracted from the reports submitted by PPSI to BREC on this test program. BREC was primarily interested in reduction of operating costs, if possible, by using an alkali less expensive than lime, and by improving the poor dewatering characteristic inherent in a dolomitic lime system. BREC was also within compliance for particulate emissions and opacity in the duct after the dry electrostatic precipitator, but not in compliance with the stack opacity regulation, and therefore wanted to investigate methods for stack opacity reduction.

  15. An introduction to LIME 1.0 and its use in coupling codes for multiphysics simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcourt, Noel; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Hooper, Russell Warren

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIME is a small software package for creating multiphysics simulation codes. The name was formed as an acronym denoting 'Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes.' LIME is intended to be especially useful when separate computer codes (which may be written in any standard computer language) already exist to solve different parts of a multiphysics problem. LIME provides the key high-level software (written in C++), a well defined approach (with example templates), and interface requirements to enable the assembly of multiple physics codes into a single coupled-multiphysics simulation code. In this report we introduce important software design characteristics of LIME, describe key components of a typical multiphysics application that might be created using LIME, and provide basic examples of its use - including the customized software that must be written by a user. We also describe the types of modifications that may be needed to individual physics codes in order for them to be incorporated into a LIME-based multiphysics application.

  16. Stratigraphy and diagenesis of the Mississippian Lodgepole Limestone, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, P.W. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic correlation of the Lodgepole Limestone (Bottineau Interval) indicates a sequence of three clinoform-shaped wedges that filled in the early Williston Basin. To date four productive 100m thick mounds have been discovered in the Lodgepole Limestone at Dickinson Field. The mounds seem to have nucleated at the toe of slope of the first highstand system tract and were subsequently buried by the second highstand systems tract. By isopaching each of the systems tracts one can predict were other mounds might have nucleated. Burial depth of the Bakken Shale-Lodgepole Limestone contact grade from 0.6 km at the edge of the Williston Basin to 3.4 km in the center. With increased depth the basal Lodgepole Limestone shows three phases of dolomitization, which are: small clear early dolomite; later iron rich fracture filling saddle dolomite and a later iron rich dolomite that seems to follow stylolites. Pre-oil migration mineralization of the overlying limestone include minor amounts of: anhydrite, pyrite, iron poor sphalerite, late iron rich sphalerite, chalcopyrite and celestite.

  17. Stratigraphy and diagenesis of the Mississippian Lodgepole Limestone, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, P.W. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic correlation of the Lodgepole Limestone (Bottineau Interval) indicates a sequence of three clinoform-shaped wedges that filled in the early Williston Basin. To date four productive 100m thick mounds have been discovered in the Lodgepole Limestone at Dickinson Field. The mounds seem to have nucleated at the toe of slope of the first highstand system tract and were subsequently buried by the second highstand systems tract. By isopaching each of the systems tracts one can predict were other mounds might have nucleated. Burial depth of the Bakken Shale-Lodgepole Limestone contact grade from 0.6 km at the edge of the Williston Basin to 3.4 km in the center. With increased depth the basal Lodgepole Limestone shows three phases of dolomitization, which are: small clear early dolomite; later iron rich fracture filling saddle dolomite and a later iron rich dolomite that seems to follow stylolites. Pre-oil migration mineralization of the overlying limestone include minor amounts of: anhydrite, pyrite, iron poor sphalerite, late iron rich sphalerite, chalcopyrite and celestite.

  18. The Unique Frequency Spectrum of the Blazhko RRc Star LS Her

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Wils; Stelios Kleidis; Eric Broens

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blazhko effect in RR Lyrae stars is still poorly understood theoretically. Stars with multiple Blazhko periods or in which the Blazhko effect itself varies are particularly challenging. This study investigates the Blazhko effect in the RRc star LS Her. Detailed VRI CCD photometry has been performed on 63 nights during six months. LS Her is confirmed to have a Blazhko period of 12.75+/-0.02 days. However, where normally the side frequencies of the Blazhko triplet are expected, an equidistant group of three frequencies is found on both sides of the main pulsation frequency. As a consequence the period and amplitude of the Blazhko effect itself vary in a cycle of 109+/-4 days. LS Her is a unique object turning out to be very important in the verification of the theories for the Blazhko effect.

  19. Accumulation of surface-applied agricultural limestone in acid soils of east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Earl Raymond

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , Georgetown is considered a 20 Table 2. Elemental analysis of agricultural limestone sam les ( ercenta e basis) . T Source %Ca %N %Si %Fe %Nn Georgetown Hugo Idabel 34. 6a 37. 4b 35. 2a 3. 0a 1. 0a 0. 2a 0. 00a 0. 3b 0. 4b 0. 2a 0. 05b 0. 4b 1. 7c 0.... Wilding (Member) Marvin W. Rowe (Member) E. C. A. Run (Head of Department) August 1987 ABSTRACT Accumulation of Surface-applied Agricultural Limestone in Acid Soils of East Texas. (August 1987) Earl Raymond Allen, B. Stf University of Illinois...

  20. Paleoenvironmental analysis of the Cotton Valley Limestone, southeastern Smith County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glynn, William George

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    t ta i the E t T B i g de from continental clastics to marine limestones in an onlap-offlap depositional sequence (Halbouty, 1966). The oldest known Gulf Coast Jurassic rocks are the continental redbeds of the Eagle Mills Formation. Following Eagle... County Area, Texas (August, 1984) William George Glynn, B. S. , S. U. N. Y. at Brockport Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne M. Ahr Dr. Robert R. Berg The Upper Jurassic Cotton Valley Limestone produces gas and condensate from a belt...

  1. Advanced mineral calciner for regeneration of lime. Final report, March 1995--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namazian, M.; Nickeson, R.; Lovas, B.; Miller, G.; Kelly, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are approximately 800 pulp, paper and paperboard mills in the United States. Pulp and paper is the ninth largest industry in US, uses 2.8 quads of energy per year and ranks third among all domestic US industries in the cost of energy consumed. A significant fraction of the energy consumed in pulp and paper plants is needed to recover chemicals that are used in breaking down the wood chips into pulp. In particular, 0.1 quads of energy per year are used to regenerate lime. Furthermore, pulp and paper plant operations generate 9,870 tons of NOx per year. Additionally over two million tons of spent lime are sent to landfills each year. In addition, growth in paper demand and changes in plant processes (e.g., bleaching), as a result of environmental pressures, will continue to drive the need for more lime regeneration capacity. Unless the increased capacity can be delivered productively and inexpensively, the growth in pulp and paper may occur in overseas markets. Furthermore, if new environmental constraints cannot be met at low cost, existing US pulp and paper production capacity may also move off-shore. The advanced mineral calciner (AMC) technology was developed to address this lime regeneration need. Prior to describing the technology, and the program of work that was used to test the concept, conventional lime regeneration systems and their limitations are described.

  2. Modification of water transfer properties on historical limestones induced by bio-calcification treatment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of water within the stone which are the main vector of pollutants. Different surface treatmentsModification of water transfer properties on historical limestones induced by bio-calcification treatment. O. Rozenbaum, J.-L. Rouet June 28, 2013 Univ d'OrlÂŽeans, ISTO, UMR 7327, 45071, OrlÂŽeans, France

  3. Distribution of authigenic albites in a limestone succession of the Helvetic Domain, eastern Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    exclusively in limestones with a carbonate content higher than 80 wt-%. A diagenetic or hydrothermal origin contenant plus de 80 %m de carbonate. La possibilité d'une origine diagéné- tique ou hydrothermale est to a thin section scale, and we discuss a possible diagenetic or hydrothermal origin of these albites. 2

  4. Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete international /january 2010 35 Portland limestone cement (PLC) is produced by blending demonstration of PLC concrete in the late-fall construction of a parking lot at a ready mixed concrete plant near Gatineau, QC, Canada. The performance of the plastic and hardened concretes produced with PLC

  5. LS-SVM based regression and spectral clustering for predicting maintenance of machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with sensory3 faults have been used [? ],[? ],[? ]: corrective maintenance, preventive main-4 tenance, manual the machine fails, it is expensive and6 safety and environmental issues arise. Preventive maintenance is basedLS-SVM based regression and spectral clustering for predicting maintenance of machines Rocco

  6. Personal Data Form Revised: LS 06-01-12 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    Personal Data Form Revised: LS 06-01-12 Page 1 Office of Research Services Phone: (250) 807 9412 UBC Okanagan Campus Personal Data Form PERSONAL INFORMATION APPLICANT SURNAME: APPLICANT GIVEN NAME AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE INSTITUTION DEPARTMENT: POSITION (begin with current): PERIOD DATE: #12;Personal Data

  7. Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology , L.-S. Bai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland J. E. Box 1 , L.-S. Bai 1 , R across the southern half of Greenland led to substantially higher west coast sea ice thickness and concentration. Even so, record-setting summer temperatures around Greenland, combined with an intense melt

  8. The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic database L.S. Rothman a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    The HITRAN2012 molecular spectroscopic database L.S. Rothman a,n , I.E. Gordon a , Y. Babikov b , A i n f o Article history: Received 6 April 2013 Received in revised form 2 July 2013 Accepted 4 July 2013 Available online 12 July 2013 Keywords: HITRAN Spectroscopic database a b s t r a c t This paper

  9. Phosphorus limitation in the Mississippi River Plume (MRP) and Louisiana shelf (LS) during May 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jin-Seok

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the dissolved N/P are, nevertheless, the most frequently cited evidence for N-limitation in the MRP and LS region. Large rivers can significantly affect to biological processes in the coastal zone and some polluted rivers now carry dissolved phosphorus loads...

  10. CALCOLO NUMERICO LS in Astronomia e Geologia, a.a. 2008/09 (5 crediti)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vianello, Marco

    CALCOLO NUMERICO LS in Astronomia e Geologia, a.a. 2008/09 (5 crediti) Docenti: Marco Vianellošorner), di una potenza ad esponente intero (metodo rapido con codifica binaria dell'esponente), di un determinante (metodo di eliminazione gaussiana con piv- oting); laboratorio: primi esperimenti di calcolo

  11. Designing fecal pellet surveys for snowshoe hares K.E. Hodges *, L.S. Mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, L. Scott

    Designing fecal pellet surveys for snowshoe hares K.E. Hodges *, L.S. Mills Wildlife Biology, 2003), some popular indices, like counts of fecal pellets, have been used to answer basic ecological pellets to examine long-term population dynamics at individual sites (Malloy, 2000; Krebs et al., 2001

  12. Landmarks in OpenLS --A Data Structure for Cognitive Ergonomic Route Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, UniversitÀt

    Landmarks in OpenLS -- A Data Structure for Cognitive Ergonomic Route Directions Stefan Hansen1 ergonomic route directions in this article. They try to reduce the cognitive load for the travelers ergonomic route directions. In M. Raubal, H. Miller, A. U. Frank, & M. F. Goodchild (Eds.), GIScience

  13. Louis Stokes Colorado Alliance for Minority Participation (LS CO-AMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Louis Stokes Colorado Alliance for Minority Participation (LS CO-AMP) Funded by The National-2978 omnia@engr.colostate.edu cherich@engr.colostate.edu Colorado State University Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523-1301 Fort Collins, CO 80523-1301 #12;Louis Stokes Colorado Alliance for Minority

  14. A reclamation approach for mined prime farmland by adding organic wastes and lime to the subsoil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface mined prime farmland may be reclaimed by adding organic wastes and lime to subsoil thus improving conditions in root zone. In this study, sewage sludge, poultry manure, horse bedding, and lime were applied to subsoil (15-30 cm) during reclamation. Soil properties and plant growth were measured over two years. All organic amendments tended to lower the subsoil bulk density and increase organic matter and total nitrogen. Liming raised exchangeable calcium, slightly increased pH, but decreased exchangeable magnesium and potassium. Corn ear-leaf and forage tissue nitrogen, yields, and nitrogen removal increased in treatments amended with sewage sludge and poultry manure, but not horse bedding. Subsoil application of sewage sludge or poultry manure seems like a promising method in the reclamation of surface mined prime farmland based on the improvements observed in the root zone environment.

  15. EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY, AND FUSARIUM WILT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY compost as an antagonistic suppression approach to combat soil-borne disease effects on crop yields the effect of compost and lime on soil chemical properties, the soil microbial community (including Fusarium

  16. A theory manual for multi-physics code coupling in LIME.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcourt, Noel; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Hooper, Russell Warren

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment (LIME) is a software package for creating multi-physics simulation codes. Its primary application space is when computer codes are currently available to solve different parts of a multi-physics problem and now need to be coupled with other such codes. In this report we define a common domain language for discussing multi-physics coupling and describe the basic theory associated with multiphysics coupling algorithms that are to be supported in LIME. We provide an assessment of coupling techniques for both steady-state and time dependent coupled systems. Example couplings are also demonstrated.

  17. Performance of lime-treated silty soil under long-term hydraulic conditions B. Le Runigoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to a significant decrease in shear strength. The results also indicated that the mechanical performance of soils calcium aluminates (C-S-H and C-A-H) can be formed. As a result, an improvement in the soil mechanical1 Performance of lime-treated silty soil under long-term hydraulic conditions B. Le Runigoa , V

  18. Predicting Classes in Need of Refactoring: An Application of Static Metrics Liming Zhao Jane Huffman Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    . In general, the following process is followed by a software team performing refactoring: Identify code1 Predicting Classes in Need of Refactoring: An Application of Static Metrics Liming Zhao Jane to predicting refactoring candidates. Using a selected set of static metrics and a weighted ranking method

  19. Performance of Decay Heat Removal Systems in the LS-VHTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, James J.; Moisseytsev, Anton; Farmer, Mitchell T.; Dunn, Floyd E.; Cahalan, James E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations are underway to determine the viability of the Liquid Salt-Cooled - Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) concept which combines fuel and moderator similar to gas cooled VHTR concepts but utilizes liquid salt coolant which can operate at low pressures with improved heat transfer properties relative to helium. Analyses have been carried out investigating the viability of two alternative passive approaches for emergency decay heat removal for a 2400 MWt LS-VHTR: RVACS air natural circulation cooling of the exterior of the guard vessel and DRACS Direct Reactor Heat Exchangers (DRHXs) immersed in the liquid salt coolant and connected to natural draft air heat exchangers through secondary and tertiary cooling circuits. Results of first principles and integrated systems analyses of RVACS and DRACS performance are presented for a postulated accident scenario involving loss-of-normal heat removal, loss-of-forced (pumped) liquid salt flow, and successful scram of the reactor. (authors)

  20. Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in limestones using X-ray microtomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renard, Francois; Desrues, Jacques; Plougonven, Erwan; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic tension fractures were produced in porous limestones using a specially designed hydraulic cell. The 3D geometry of the samples was imaged using X-ray computed microtomography before and after fracturation. Using these data, it was possible to estimate the permeability tensor of the core samples, extract the path of the rupture and compare it to the heterogeneities initially present in the rock.

  1. The HITRAN 2008 molecular spectroscopic database L.S. Rothman a,, I.E. Gordon a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    The HITRAN 2008 molecular spectroscopic database L.S. Rothman a,Ă?, I.E. Gordon a , A. Barbe b , D'AeÂŽronomie Spatiale de Belgique, B-1180 Brussels, Belgium a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 21 December database Molecular spectroscopy Molecular absorption a b s t r a c t This paper describes the status

  2. EXTENDED X-RAY EMISSION IN THE VICINITY OF THE MICROQUASAR LS 5039: PULSAR WIND NEBULA?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, Martin; Kargaltsev, Oleg [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Pavlov, George G.; Chang, Chulhoon; Garmire, Gordon P., E-mail: martin.durant@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LS 5039 is a high-mass binary with a period of 4 days, containing a compact object and an O-star, one of the few high-mass binaries detected in {gamma}-rays. Our Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observation of LS 5039 provided a high-significance ({approx}10{sigma}) detection of extended emission clearly visible for up to 1' from the point source. The spectrum of this emission can be described by an absorbed power-law model with photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.3, somewhat softer than the point-source spectrum {Gamma} = 1.44 {+-} 0.07, with the same absorption, N{sub H} = (6.4 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. The observed 0.5-8 keV flux of the extended emission is {approx_equal} 8.8 x 10{sup -14} erg s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} or 5% of the point-source flux; the latter is a factor of {approx}2 lower than the lowest flux detected so far. Fainter extended emission with comparable flux and a softer ({Gamma} {approx} 3) spectrum is detected at even greater radii (up to 2'). Two possible interpretations of the extended emission are a dust scattering halo and a synchrotron nebula powered by energetic particles escaping the binary. We discuss both of these scenarios and favor the nebula interpretation, although some dust contribution is possible. We have also found transient sources located within a narrow stripe south of LS 5039. We discuss the likelihood of these sources to be related to LS 5039.

  3. DNA structure(s) recognized and bound by large subunit of Replication Factor C (ls RFC) in Drosophila melanogaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaur, Lalit Kumar

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lsRFC protein purified from the maltose affinity column with protein in the crude extract . . 22 8. DNA sequence of synthetic oligonucleotides used to determine the binding affinity of Drosophila lsRFC protein . . 24 9. Relative binding affinity.... . . . . . . . . . . 15. The cutting pattern of "D" series of DNA structures by piperidine 33 after Os04/pyridine modification 34 16. Southwestern assay comparing relative binding affinity of MBP-IsRFC purified protein to DNA structures of "Y" series and "D" series...

  4. LS-29

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H. Kim

  5. LS-334

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2 Grand

  6. LS-56

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2~6

  7. LS-58

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2~68

  8. LS-61

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2~681

  9. LS-65

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2~681635

  10. LS-74

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494 Augus

  11. LS-76

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494 Augus6

  12. LS-79

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494

  13. LS-8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494 s. H.

  14. LS-89

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34949 April

  15. ls112

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE MilestoneEddyObservationsLowIMPEDANCE

  16. ls118

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE MilestoneEddyObservationsLowIMPEDANCE8 E.

  17. ls2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE MilestoneEddyObservationsLowIMPEDANCE8 E.2

  18. ls209

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE MilestoneEddyObservationsLowIMPEDANCE8

  19. ls3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. Norem October 23, 1984 6 GeV

  20. ls4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. Norem October 23, 1984 6 GeV Nov. 8,

  1. ls5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. Norem October 23, 1984 6 GeV Nov. 8, A.

  2. ls6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. Norem October 23, 1984 6 GeV Nov. 8,

  3. ls70

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE J. Norem October 23, 1984 6 GeV Nov.

  4. The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ULTRA-HIGH LIME WITH ALUMINUM PROCESS FOR REMOVING CHLORIDE FROM RECIRCULATING COOLING WATER A Dissertation by AHMED IBRAHEEM ALI ABDEL-WAHAB Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...-WAHAB Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chair of Committee) Robin L. Autenrieth (Member...

  5. Liming effects on slash pine (Pinus elliottii Englm.) seedlings growing on acid soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzner, John Thomas

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth Liming CHAPTER III. NETHODS Experimental Design Soil Treatments Greenhouse Care Laboratory Analysis Statistical Analysis . CHAPTER IV. RESULTS . Soils Exchangeable Aluminum Extractable Aluminum Exchangeable Acidity pH Calcium Page 1... growth; and under very acid conditions, phosphorus may be tied up with soluble aluminum (Shoulders and McKee, 1973). Solubility of aluminum is strongly influenced by pH and may interfere with the uptake of phosphorus and subsequent growth of southern...

  6. Sulfate Induced Heave: Addressing Ettringite Behavior in Lime Treated Soils and in Cementitious Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochyil Sasidharan Nair, Syam Kumar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , due to the formation of expansive minerals like ettringite and thaumasite, has been recognized as a problem in Portland cement concrete, stabilized soils, weathered cements, alkaline fly ashes, FGD wastes, chromite ore processing residues and cement... moles of Ca2+, 2 moles of Al3+, 3 moles of SO42-, and 32 moles of water are required. Calcium ions are provided by lime, Portland cement, or fly ash; alumina is supplied by dissolution of oxyhydroxides and phyllosilicates; and sulfates are supplied...

  7. Mixing and combustion in a coal-limestone fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, M.O.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 1 was to investigate experimentally the characteristics of solids mixing between coal and limestone in a cold fluidized bed; Task 2 was to derive a model to describe the behavior of solids mixing observed in Task 1; and Task 3 was to develop a combustor model, which couples the mixing model derived in Task 2 with a combustion model, to simulate the mixing and combustion behavior in a hot coal-limestone fluidized bed combustor. In Task 1, the experiments were carried out in a 0.203 m diameter cold fluidized bed with coal and limestone of different sizes the the fluidized particles. Experimental parameters examined included operation time, air flow rate, bed height, initial bed setup, relative particle size and relative amount of the two particles. In the second task, the mixing model considered the downward or upward movement of a particle in the bed as being governed by certain probability laws; these laws were, in turn, affected by the bubbles. The distance of the upward movement was governed by the residence time of a particle staying in a bubble wake; the distance of downward movement, however, was determined from a material balance consideration. In all, the model took into account the effects of time, flow rate, initial bed setup and relative particle size on solids mixing. Dynamic coal concentration profiles under different operating conditions were generated by the simulation and were found to represent the experimental data reasonably well. In addition to the operation parameters included in Tasks 1 and 2, the model developed in Task 3 also considered the inlet size distribution of coal, size reduction of coal due to combustion and coal elutriation. This model was a capable of predicting the dynamic mixing and combustion behavior in a combustor under specific operation conditions.

  8. LS-1l7 M. J. Knott and H. J. Moe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping ofLS-1392447

  9. LS-I03 G. K Shenoy P. J. Viccaro E. E. Alp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s.LS-I03 G. K

  10. LS-ll1 J. A. Jendrzej czyk M. W. Wambsganss R. K. Smith

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s.LS-I03l36ll

  11. Stratigraphic variations and secondary porosity within the Maynardville Limestone in Bear Creek Valley, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstrand, P.M. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate groundwater and surface water contamination and migration near the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, a Comprehensive Groundwater Monitoring Plan was developed. As part of the Maynardville exit pathways monitoring program, monitoring well clusters were ii installed perpendicular to the strike of the Maynardville Limestone, that underlies the southern part of the Y-12 Plant and Bear Creek Valley (BCV). The Maynardville Project is designed to locate potential exit pathways of groundwater, study geochemical characteristics and factors affecting the occurrence and distribution of water-bearing intervals, and provide hydrogeologic information to be used to reduce the potential impacts of contaminants entering the Maynardville Limestone.

  12. Moduli dispersion and attenuation in limestones in the laboratory L. Adam and M. Batzle, Center for Rock Abuse, Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    range from our experimental data. SAMPLE DESCRIPTION Our limestone samples come from a Middle Eastern for Rock Abuse, Colorado School of Mines SUMMARY There is growing interest in using seismic attenuation for reservoir characterization. We measure limestone samples in the laboratory to analyze attenuation

  13. A cement kiln flue-dust evaluated as a soil liming material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacha, Raimund

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CEMENT KILN FLUE-DUST EVALUATED AS A SOIl LIMING MATERIAL A Thesis by RAIMUND STACHA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE 1973 NJSbj t...:~StlCh tt A CEMENT KILN FLUE-DUST EVALUATED AS A SOIL I IMING MATERIAL A Thesis by RAIMUND STACHA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Me er) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) 1973 ABSTRACT A...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are herePA 3003A AECMexicoEngland Lime Co -

  15. Whipple Telescope Observations of LS I +61 303: 2004-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andy Smith

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the results of the past two years' observations on the galactic microquasar LS I +61 303 with the Whipple 10m gamma-ray telescope. The recent MAGIC detection of the source between 200 GeV and 4 TeV suggests that the source is periodic with very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission linked to its orbital cycle. The entire 50-hour data set obtained with Whipple from 2004 to 2006 was analyzed with no reliable detection resulting. The upper limits obtained in the 2005-2006 season covered several of the same epochs as the MAGIC Telescope detections, albeit with lower sensitivity. Upper limits are placed on emission during the orbital phases of 0->0.1 and 0.8->1, phases which are not included in the MAGIC data set.

  16. The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (<5 {micro}m), interlocking crystals that faithfully preserve depositional fabrics; and (2) porous, coarser (>100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

  17. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Stephen Pennell; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Devinder Arora; John Hannon; Michael Woods; Huishan Duan; Tom Lawlor

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating some of the concerns of discharging CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. Laboratory experiments showed that the CaCO{sub 3} emulsion is slightly alkaline, not acidic. We tested the release of the CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by pulverized limestone in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF). Digital photographs showed the sinking globules in the HPWTF, confirming the concept of releasing the emulsion in the deep ocean. We modeled the release of an emulsion from the CO{sub 2} output of a 1000 MW coal-fired power plant at 500 m depth. The emulsion would typically sink several hundred meters before density equilibration with ambient seawater. The CO{sub 2} globules would rain out from the equilibrated plume toward the ocean bottom where they would disintegrate due to wave action and bottom friction. Conceptual release systems are described both for an open ocean release and a sloping seabed release of the emulsion.

  18. Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

  19. Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Late Jurassic shallow marine limestone in western Palaeo-Pacific, northwest Borneo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy of the Late Jurassic shallow marine limestone in western-Pacific a b s t r a c t Strontium and carbon isotope stratigraphy was applied to a 202 m-thick shallow marine, which was deposited in the western Palaeo-Pacific. Strontium isotopic ratios of rudist specimens suggest

  20. The Chachil Limestone (Pliensbachianeearliest Toarcian) Neuqun Basin, Argentina: UePb age calibration and its significance on the Early Jurassic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    The Chachil Limestone (Pliensbachianeearliest Toarcian) Neuquén Basin, Argentina: UePb age Geológico Minero Argentino and CONICET, Av. Julio A. Roca 651, 1322 Buenos Aires, Argentina b Physics Geológicas, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Calle 1 - # 644, 1900 La Plata, Argentina e Volcanic Basin

  1. ICSE6 Paris -August 27-31, 2012 Herrier, Berger, Bonelli The Friant-Kern canal : a forgotten example of lime-treated structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : a forgotten example of lime-treated structure in hydraulic conditions Gontran HERRIER1 , Eric BERGER2 in the paper. The treated clay was replaced and compacted by a sheep- foot roller, to achieve a typical in the 70's . Despite the fact that the lime-treated soil has been in constant direct contact

  2. Physico-chemical modifications of the interactions between hemp fibres and a lime mineral matrix: impacts on mechanical properties of mortars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Physico-chemical modifications of the interactions between hemp fibres and a lime mineral matrix interactions between hemp fibres and a lime-based mineral matrix, the consequences of various chemical treatments onto hemp fibres characteristics were measured using scanning electron microscopy, thermal

  3. Hazardous-waste combustion in industrial processes: cement and lime kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mournighan, R.E.; Branscome, M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of several studies relating to hazardous-waste combustion in cement and lime kilns. The tests included in the study are four kilns tested by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, four kilns tested by State agencies or the kiln operator, two Canadian tests, and one Swedish test. The predominant types of wastes tested included chlorinated organic compounds, aromatic compounds, and metal-contaminated waste oil. The kiln types include lime kilns and cement kilns, which included the dry, wet, and preheated processes. Fabric filters and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) were the pollution-control devices used in these processes, and the primary fuels included coal, coke, coal/coke, fuel oil, and natural gas/coke. The parameters examined in the report were Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of the Principal Organic Hazardous Constitutents, particulate and HCl emissions, metals, and the effect of burning hazardous waste on SO/sub 2/, NOx, and CO emissions. The primary conclusion of the study is that DRE's of 99.99% or greater can be obtained in properly-operated calcining kilns. Particulate matter can increase when chlorinated wastes are burned in a kiln equipped with an electrostatic precipitator. Those kilns equipped with fabric filters showed no change in emissions.

  4. Preliminary neutronic studies for the liquid-salt-cooled very hightemperature reactor (LS-VHTR).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Yang, W. S.

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary neutronic studies have been performed in order to provide guidelines to the design of a liquid-salt cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) using Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) as coolant and a solid cylindrical core. The studies were done using the lattice codes (WIMS8 and DRAGON) and the linear reactivity model to estimate the core reactivity balance, fuel composition, discharge burnup, and reactivity coefficients. An evaluation of the lattice codes revealed that they give very similar accuracy as the Monte Carlo MCNP4C code for the prediction of the fuel element multiplication factor (kinf) and the double heterogeneity effect of the coated fuel particles in the graphite matrix. The loss of coolant from the LS-VHTR core following coolant voiding was found to result in a positive reactivity addition, due primarily to the removal of the strong neutron absorber Li-6. To mitigate this positive reactivity addition and its impact on reactor design (positive void reactivity coefficient), the lithium in the coolant must be enriched to greater than 99.995% in its Li-7 content. For the reference LS-VHTR considered in this work, it was found that the magnitude of the coolant void reactivity coefficient (CVRC) is quite small (less than $1 for 100% voiding). The coefficient was found to become more negative or less positive with increase in the lithium enrichment (Li-7 content). It was also observed that the coefficient is positive at the beginning of cycle and becomes more negative with increasing burnup, indicating that by using more than one fuel batch, the coefficient could be made negative at the beginning of cycle. It might, however, still be necessary at the beginning of life to design for a negative CVRC value. The study shows that this can be done by using burnable poisons (erbium is a leading candidate) or by changing the reference assembly design (channel dimensions) in order to modify the neutron spectrum. Parametric studies have been performed to attain targeted cycle length of 18 months and discharge burnup greater than 100 GWd/t with a constraint on the uranium enrichment (less than 20% to support non-proliferation goals). The results show that the required uranium enrichment and discharge burnup increase with the number of batches. The three-batch scheme is, however, impractical because the required uranium enrichment is greater than 20%. The required enrichment is smallest for the one-batch case, but its discharge burnup is smaller than the target value. Therefore, the two-batch scheme is desirable to satisfy simultaneously the target cycle length and discharge burnup. It was additionally shown that to increase the core power density to 150% of the reference core value, the required uranium enrichment is less than 20% in the single-batch scheme. This higher power density might not be achievable in the two- or three-batch schemes because the fuel enrichment would exceed 20%.

  5. Soil Acidity and Liming L. A. Redmon, M. L. McFarland, V. A. Haby, and D. H. Bade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Acidity and Liming L. A. Redmon, M. L. McFarland, V. A. Haby, and D. H. Bade Department of Soil and Crop Sciences The Agriculture Program The Texas A&M University System SCS-2001-06 What Causes SoilAcidity? Various environmental, climatic, and cultural factors can af- fect formation of acid soils

  6. An investigation of the use of lime as a soil additive to modify the detrimental effects of frost action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnest, Clyde Talley

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chosen from those availabls in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory of A and M College of Texas. A local silty brown CL clay and a sandy gray' CH olay from Corpus Christi were chosen because past experience indicated them to bs bsnefitted by lime...

  7. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS IN SUPPORT OF CARBON DIOXIDE-LIMESTONE SEQUESTRATION IN THE OCEAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; John Hannon; Huishan Duan

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second half of the second contractual year the construction of the High Pressure Flow Reactor (HPFR) was completed, tested, and satisfactory results have been obtained. The major component of the HPFR is a Kenics-type static mixer in which two fluids are thoroughly mixed. In our case the two fluids are liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2} and a slurry of pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) in pure or artificial seawater. The outflow from the static mixer is an emulsion consisting of CO{sub 2} droplets coated with a sheath of CaCO{sub 3} particles dispersed in water. The coated CO{sub 2} droplets are called globules, and the emulsion is called globulsion. By adjusting the proportions of the two fluids, carbon dioxide and water, the length and pressure drop across the static mixer, globules with a fairly uniform distribution of diameters can be obtained. By using different particle sizes of CaCO{sub 3}, globules can be obtained that are lighter or heavier than water, thus floating or sinking in a water column. The globulsion ensuing from the static mixer flows into a high pressure cell with windows, where the properties of the globules can be observed, such as their diameter and settling velocity. Using the Stokes' equation, the specific gravity of the globules can be determined. Also, a second generation High Pressure Batch Reactor (HPBR) was constructed. This reactor allows better mixing of the ingredients, more accurate temperature and pressure control, better illumination and video camera observations. In this reactor we established that CO{sub 2}-in-water globulsions can be formed stabilized by other particles than pulverized limestone. So far, we used flyash obtained from a local coal-fired power plant, and a pulverized magnesium silicate mineral, lizardite, Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}, obtained from DOE's Albany Research Laboratory. In the reporting period we conducted joint experiments in NETL's high pressure water tunnel facility. Thanks to the longer travel path of the globules, and the excellent optical instrumentation available at NETL, we were able to more accurately obtain globule diameters and settling velocities.

  8. On the formation of TeV radiation in LS 5039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khangulyan, Dmitry; Bosch-Ramon, Valenti

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent detections of TeV gamma-rays from compact binary systems show that relativistic outflows (jets or winds) are sites of effective acceleration of particles up to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we discuss the conditions of acceleration and radiation of ultra-relativistic electrons in LS 5039, currently the binary system emitting gamma-rays with the highest quality data in the TeV range. Assuming that the gamma-ray emitter is a jet-like structure, we performed detailed numerical calculations of the energy spectrum and lightcurves accounting for the acceleration efficiency, the location of the accelerator, the speed of the emitting flow, the inclination angle of the system, as well as specific features related to anisotropic inverse Compton scattering and pair production. We conclude that the accelerator should not be deep inside the binary system unless we assume a very efficient acceleration rate. We show that within the IC scenario both the gamma-ray spectrum and flux are strongly orbital phase d...

  9. On the formation of TeV radiation in LS 5039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Khangulyan; Felix Aharonian; Valenti Bosch-Ramon

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent detections of TeV gamma-rays from compact binary systems show that relativistic outflows (jets or winds) are sites of effective acceleration of particles up to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we discuss the conditions of acceleration and radiation of ultra-relativistic electrons in LS 5039, the gamma-ray emitting binary system for which the highest quality TeV data are available. Assuming that the gamma-ray emitter is a jet-like structure, we performed detailed numerical calculations of the energy spectrum and lightcurves accounting for the acceleration efficiency, the location of the accelerator, the speed of the emitting flow, the inclination angle of the system, as well as specific features related to anisotropic inverse Compton scattering and pair production. We conclude that the accelerator should not be deep inside the binary system unless we assume a very efficient acceleration rate. We show that within the IC scenario both the gamma-ray spectrum and flux are strongly orbital phase dependent. Formally, our model can reproduce, for specific sets of parameter values, the energy spectrum of gamma-rays reported by HESS for wide orbital phase intervals. However, the physical properties of the source can be constrained only by observations capable of providing detailed energy spectra for narrow orbital phase intervals ($\\Delta\\phi\\ll 0.1$).

  10. Subsurface stratigraphy and depositional history of Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.A.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyclic carbonate-evaporite deposits of the Madison Limestone (Mississippian) in the Williston basin are made up of four main facies. From basin to shelf, the normal facies transition is from offshore deeper water (Lodgepole) facies to crinoidal-algal banks and back-bank fine carbonate, evaporite, and minor terrigenous clastic beds on the shallow shelf. Five major depositional cycles are correlated and mapped on the basis of shaley marker beds identified on gamma-ray-neutron or gamma-ray-sonic logs. The marker beds are interpreted as reworked and redistributed silt and clay-size sediments originally deposited, possibly by eolian processes, on the emergent shelf during low sea level phases of cycle development. From oldest to youngest, the first two cycles are characterized by increasing amounts of crinoidal-bioclastic and oolite-algal carbonates, culminating in the Mission Canyon facies of the middle cycle. The upper two cycles are characterized by increasing amounts of evaporite deposits, culminating in the Charles salt facies of the youngest cycle. Much of the Madison section on the south and east flanks of the basin consists of dolomite. Dolomite content decreased toward the basin center, where a major share of Madison petroleum production is located. Reservoir beds in the oil fields are primarily partially dolomitized oolite-algal or crinoidal-bioclastic bank carbonates. Most of the productive petroleum reservoirs are located in the middle cycles of the Madison.

  11. WHOLE-ROCK 87Sr/86Sr COMPOSITION AND APPARENT STRONTIUM ISOTOPIC AGE OF LIMESTONES FROM SITE 1118, WOODLARK RIFT BASIN, SOUTHWEST PACIFIC (OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Tony; Robertson, Alastair H F; Sharp, Timothy R; Trotter, Julie

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limestone from Unit VI (857.1–859.15 meters below seafloor) collected at Site 1118 contains a planktonic foraminiferal fauna indicating a latest Miocene to early Pliocene age. Globorotalia tumida is recorded in Sample ...

  12. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project is investigating methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Work done in the previous quarter concentrated on developing a low-cost froth flotation process that could remove limestone, unburned carbon, and related contaminants from the sludge while recovering the bulk of the calcium sulfite and gypsum. In the current quarter, experiments to remove impurities from the sludge using a water-only cyclone were conducted. The cyclone has been found to be effective for removing the coarser limestone impurities, as well as removing contaminants such as fine gravel and grinding-ball chips. These results show that the cyclone will be very complementary with froth flotation, which mainly removes the very fine impurities.

  13. TeV and X-ray Monitoring of LS I +61 303 With VERITAS, Swift, and RXTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VERITAS Collaboration; A. Smith

    2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Between September 2006 and February 2007, the galactic binary LS I +61 303 was monitored in the TeV band with the VERITAS array of imaging Cherenkov telescopes. These observations confirm LS I +61 303 as a variable TeV gamma-ray source, with emission peaking between orbital phase 0.6 and 0.7. During this observational period, monitoring in the X-ray regime was also carried out using both the RXTE and Swift detectors, which offered complementary coverage of the source. Outbursts in the 0.2-10 keV band were observed by both satellites at close to the same orbital phase as the TeV peak during the 2 orbital cycles covered simultaneously in both bands. While this source has been extensively studied in the X-ray band in the past, this is the first observational campaign to utilize contemporaneous X-ray and TeV data on LS I +61 303.

  14. Microfacies analysis, paleoecology, and environment of deposition of Morrowan shelf carbonates, Magdalena Limestone (lower division), Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, William Marc

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROFACIES ANALYSIS, PALEOECOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF MORROWAN SHELF CARBONATES, MAGDALENA LIMESTONE (LOWER DIVISION), HUECO MOUNTAINS, EL PASO COUNTY, WEST TEXAS Volume I A Thesis by WILLIAM NARC CONNOLLY Submitted..., MAGDALENA LIMESTONE (LOWER DIVISION), HUECO MOUNTAINS, EL PASO COUNTY, WEST TEXAS Volume I A Thesis by WILLIAM MARC CONNOLLY Approved as to style and content by: Robert S to , Jr. (Chai an of Committee) Thomas E. Yancey (Member) Richard Rezak...

  15. Ecology and Analysis of Communities PLB 444 Instructor: Dr. Loretta Battaglia, Dept. of Plant Biology, LS II, Room 411. Tel: 618-453-3216; email

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Ecology and Analysis of Communities PLB 444 Instructor: Dr. Loretta Battaglia, Dept. of Plant Biology, LS II, Room 411. Tel: 618-453-3216; email: lbattaglia@plant.siu.edu, Battaglia

  16. Multidisciplinary reservoir description of the Batu Raja Limestone, Bima field, offshore northwest Java, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaldi, J.G.; Woodling, G.S. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA)); Roe, R.C. (Atlantic Richfield Indonesia, Inc., Jakarta (Indonesia))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bima field is the largest hydrocarbon reservoir producing from carbonate rocks in the offshore northwest Java area. The giant field has multiple drive mechanisms and high viscosity oil, resulting in rapid gas/oil ratio and water-cut increase after 2 yr of production. Because of high stakes and reservoir complexities, a three dimensional reservoir simulation model was used to evaluate field development options. An integrated geological, geophysical, and engineering reservoir description was done to provide input for the model. Geologically, the Oligocene-Miocene Batu Raja Limestone was deposited on the Seribu Platform, a basement-controlled, fault-bounded carbonate build-up. The reservoir consists of a series of cleaning-upwards cycles that were exposed to meteoric leaching during a lower Miocene drop in sea level. This diagenetic event enhanced porosity and permeability across the buildup. Based on reservoir quality, the reservoir was zoned into five model layers. Geophysical input included micromodeling sections (a form of seismic inversion) that were generated from a dense grid of seismic data. These were calibrated to well logs and used to define the buildup edge and map the thickness of the entire Batu Raja and the main pay zone. Engineering reservoir description integrated capillary pressure, relative permeability, production, and drill-stem test data. The three-dimensional simulation model required treatments unique to the Bima Field including varying GOC depths to honor separate gas cap closures; making permeability pressure dependent in poorly consolidated zones, and setting up horizontal well completion treatments. The synergistic approach of geological, engineering, and geophysical input into the Bima reservoir study resulted in a reservoir management tool as well as a model to aid regional Batu Raja exploration strategies.

  17. Massive hydraulic fracture test Cotton Valley Lime East Texas. Final report, 8 August 1978-31 July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozik, H.G.; Holditch, S.A.; Kumar, A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of an active stimulation program on the Cotton Valley Lime as evaluated using reservoir production and pressure transient data. Using standard economic parameters and reservoir permeabilities determined by history matching, a detailed study was made to determine the well spacing and fracture length radius necessary for optimum development of the Fallon and North Personville Fields. In addition, the major details of designing and executing a super massive hydraulic fracture job are discussed in the appendix.

  18. Design of Refractory Linings for Balanced Energy Efficiency, Uptime, and Capacity in Lime Kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorog, John Peter [ORNL; Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Walker, Harold [Refratechnik North America, Inc.; Leary, William R [ORNL; Ellis, Murray [Australian Paper, Co.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotary kilns used by the pulp and paper industry to regenerate lime in the Kraft process are very energy intensive. Throughout the 90 s, in response to increasing fuel prices, the industry used back up insulation in conjunction with the high alumina brick used to line the burning zones of their kilns. While this improved energy efficiency, the practice of installing insulating brick behind the working lining increased the inner wall temperatures. In the worst case, due to the increased temperatures, rapid brick failures occurred causing unscheduled outages and expensive repairs. Despite these issues, for the most part, the industry continued to use insulating refractory linings in that the energy savings were large enough to offset any increase in the cost of maintaining the refractory lining. Due to the dramatic decline in the price of natural gas in some areas combined with mounting pressures to increasing production of existing assets, over the last decade, many mills are focusing more on increasing the uptime of their kilns as opposed to energy savings. To this end, a growing number of mills are using basic (magnesia based) brick instead of high alumina brick to line the burning zone of the kiln since the lime mud does not react with these bricks at the operating temperatures of the burning zone of the kiln. In the extreme case, a few mills have chosen to install basic brick in the front end of the kiln running a length equivalent to 10 diameters. While the use of basic brick can increase the uptime of the kiln and reduce the cost to maintain the refractory lining, it does dramatically increase the heat losses resulting from the increased operating temperatures of the shell. Also, over long periods of time operating at these high temperatures, damage can occur in the shell. There are tradeoffs between energy efficiency, capacity and uptime. When fuel prices are very high, it makes sense to insulate the lining. When fuel prices are lower, trading some thermal efficiency for increased uptime and capacity seems reasonable. This paper considers a number of refractory linings in an effort to develop optimized operating strategies that balance these factors. In addition to considering a range of refractory materials, the paper examines other factors such as the chain area, discharge dams and other operating variables that impact the service life of the refractory lining. The paper provides recommendations that will help mill personnel develop a strategy to select a refractory lining that is optimized for their specific situation.

  19. The stratigraphy and environment of deposition of productive Wilcox clays in west central Freestone and southeast Limestone Counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelvey, Stephanie Anne

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lies between the Brazos River system to the west and the T ri n1ty River system to the east, and is 1 ncluded within the l i o r Freestone County u ~ xiogo Cs 0 QF ~ lrfi ~ Id ~ m ~ boro ~ oso ~ Limestone Count STUDY AREA Figure 2. Out1ine rf.... The dominance of these minerals indicates a highly active weathering environment in which only stable minerals could survive complete transport. The abundance of kaolinite also indicates that the area was well drained. Fisher (1961) reports that the Simsboro...

  20. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Technical report, December 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Banerjee, D. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}-2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project is investigating methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Work done in the previous quarter concentrated on developing a dependable technique for analysis of scrubber sludge, so that it would be possible to determine exactly how well a particular purification process was working. This technique was then used to characterize the sludge from a particular Illinois power station. In the current quarter, studies were carried out using froth flotation to produce a product that could be oxidized to high-purity gypsum. These experiments have been quite successful, due to certain properties of the limestone impurity that makes it easier to remove by this method than was expected.

  1. An evaluation of acid frac/matrix stimulation of a tight limestone formation in exploratory wells in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J.R.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of Kuwait's intensive exploratory activities to locate and test deeper geologic structures, tighter and very low porosity limestone formations were progressively encountered. Most of these hydrocarbon bearing formations initially appeared to be very stubborn and hardly indicated any fluid influx into the well-bore. In certain cases the hydrostatic head was nearly completely removed by unloading the well practically down to perforations, thereby creating optimum draw-down but it either resulted in poor inflow or none at all. In the absence of currently available chemicals, equipment, job design engineering and better understanding of tight carbonate formations and their responses to various acid formulations, some of these could have slipped into unattractive categories. With the implementation of specially designed matrix and acid-frac treatments, these formation have, however, been unmasked and turned out to be highly potential finds now. This paper basically outlines the salient features of theoretical and operational aspects of stimulating and testing some of the very low porosity hard limestone formations in Kuwait recently.

  2. ASSOCIATING LONG-TERM {gamma}-RAY VARIABILITY WITH THE SUPERORBITAL PERIOD OF LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J. M. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ''M. Merlin'' dell'Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A. [Institute of Space Sciences (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Caraveo, P. A. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cavazzuti, E. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Chekhtman, A., E-mail: andrea.caliandro@ieec.uab.es, E-mail: hadasch@ieec.uab.es, E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); and others

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray binaries are stellar systems for which the spectral energy distribution (discounting the thermal stellar emission) peaks at high energies. Detected from radio to TeV gamma rays, the {gamma}-ray binary LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 is highly variable across all frequencies. One aspect of this system's variability is the modulation of its emission with the timescale set by the {approx}26.4960 day orbital period. Here we show that, during the time of our observations, the {gamma}-ray emission of LS I +61 Degree-Sign 303 also presents a sinusoidal variability consistent with the previously known superorbital period of 1667 days. This modulation is more prominently seen at orbital phases around apastron, whereas it does not introduce a visible change close to periastron. It is also found in the appearance and disappearance of variability at the orbital period in the power spectrum of the data. This behavior could be explained by a quasi-cyclical evolution of the equatorial outflow of the Be companion star, whose features influence the conditions for generating gamma rays. These findings open the possibility to use {gamma}-ray observations to study the outflows of massive stars in eccentric binary systems.

  3. Evidence of coupling between the thermal and nonthermal emission in the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paredes-Fortuny, X; Bosch-Ramon, V; Casares, J; Fors, O; Núńez, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303 is composed of a Be star and a compact companion orbiting in an eccentric orbit. Variable flux modulated with the orbital period of ~26.5 d has been detected from radio to very high-energy gamma rays. In addition, the system presents a superorbital variability of the phase and amplitude of the radio outburst with a period of ~4.6 yr. We present optical photometric observations of LS I +61 303 spanning ~1.5 yr and contemporaneous Halpha equivalent width (EW Halpha) data. The optical photometry shows, for the first time, that the known orbital modulation suffers a positive orbital phase shift and an increase in flux for data obtained 1-yr apart. This behavior is similar to that already known at radio wavelengths, indicating that the optical flux follows the superorbital variability as well. The orbital modulation of the EW Halpha presents the already known superorbital flux variability but shows, also for the first time, a positive orbital phase shift. In addition, the optical ...

  4. Chemical alteration of limestone and marble samples exposed to acid rain and weathering in the eastern United States, 1984--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimann, K.J.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering of four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). A primary contribution of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been chemical analysis to determine changes in the samples caused by exposure to the environment. Wet chemical analysis was used to detect sulfates, nitrates, fluorides, chlorides, and a series of metal cations in sequential layers of stone removed from the briquettes after field exposure. Results from the first four years of the program indicate that rinsing by rain keeps skyward-facing stone relatively clean of reaction products, especially sulfate, the most abundant product. On groundward-facing samples, sulfate concentrations increased linearly with exposure time, and values were proportional to atmospheric SO{sub 2} concentrations at the site. Sulfate concentrations in groundward samples were much higher in limestone than in marble, because of the greater porosity of the limestone. A steep sulfate gradient was seen in both sample types from the surface to the interior. On skyward surfaces, material losses per rain event due to complete dissolution of accumulated sulfates were approximately equal to concentrations measured in runoff. Preexposed limestone samples had sulfate accumulations deep in their interiors, while fresh, unexposed limestone did not. No substantial changes in cation accumulations wee detected in either limestone or marble.

  5. Time-resolved measurement of photon emission during fast crack propagation in three-point bending fracture of silica glass and soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiota, Tadashi, E-mail: tshiota@ceram.titech.ac.jp; Sato, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Kouichi [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S7-13 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)] [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S7-13 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of photon emission (PE) and fast crack propagation upon bending fracture were conducted in silica glass and soda lime glass. Observation of fracture surfaces revealed that macroscopic crack propagation behavior was similar between the silica glass and soda lime glass when fracture loads for these specimens were comparable and cracks propagated without branching. However, a large difference in the PE characteristics was found between the two glasses. In silica glass, PE (645–655?nm) was observed during the entire crack propagation process, whereas intense PE (430–490?nm and 500–600?nm) was observed during the initial stages of propagation. In contrast, only weak PE was detected in soda lime glass. These results show that there is a large difference in the atomic processes involved in fast crack propagation between these glasses, and that PE can be used to study brittle fracture on the atomic scale.

  6. Numerical modeling of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate of pressure solution creep in limestone: Preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renard, Francois; Hellmann, Roland; Collombet, Marielle; Guen, Yvi Le

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its dissolution into solution results in acidification of the pore waters. As a consequence, the pore waters become more reactive, which leads to enhanced dissolution-precipitation processes and a modification of the mechanical and hydrological properties of the rock. This effect is especially important for limestones given that the solubility and reactivity of carbonates is strongly dependent on pH and the partial pressure of CO2. The main mechanism that couples dissolution, precipitation and rock matrix deformation is commonly referred to as intergranular pressure solution creep (IPS) or pervasive pressure solution creep (PSC). This process involves dissolution at intergranular grain contacts subject to elevated stress, diffusion of dissolved material in an intergranular fluid, and precipitation in pore spaces subject to lower stress. This leads to an overall and pervasive reduction in porosity due to both grain indent...

  7. Status of Physics and Safety Analyses for the Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, DT

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been completed to develop a new baseline core design for the liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR) that is better optimized for liquid coolant and that satisfies the top-level operational and safety targets, including strong passive safety performance, acceptable fuel cycle parameters, and favorable core reactivity response to coolant voiding. Three organizations participated in the study: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Although the intent was to generate a new reference LS-VHTR core design, the emphasis was on performing parametric studies of the many variables that constitute a design. The results of the parametric studies not only provide the basis for choosing the optimum balance of design options, they also provide a valuable understanding of the fundamental behavior of the core, which will be the basis of future design trade-off studies. A new 2400-MW(t) baseline design was established that consists of a cylindrical, nonannular core cooled by liquid {sup 7}Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) salt. The inlet and outlet coolant temperatures were decreased by 50 C, and the coolant channel diameter was increased to help lower the maximum fuel and vessel temperatures. An 18-month fuel cycle length with 156 GWD/t burnup was achieved with a two-batch shuffling scheme, while maintaining a core power density of 10 MW/m{sup 3} using graphite-coated uranium oxicarbide particle fuel enriched to 15% {sup 235}U and assuming a 25 vol-% packing of the coated particles in the fuel compacts. The revised design appears to have excellent steady-state and transient performance. The previous concern regarding the core's response to coolant voiding has been resolved for the case of Flibe coolant by increasing the coolant channel diameter and the fuel loading. Also, the LSVHTR has a strong decay heat removal performance and appears capable of surviving a loss of forced circulation (LOFC) even with failure to scram. Significant natural convection of the coolant salt occurs, resulting in fuel temperatures below steady-state values and nearly uniform temperature distributions during the transient.

  8. Fermi LAT Observations of LS I +61 303: First Detection of an Orbital Modulation in GeV Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Federal City Coll. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Blandford, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /NASA, Goddard /CSST, Baltimore /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Grenoble, CEN; /more authors..

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter presents the first results from the observations of LS I +61{sup o}303 using Large Area Telescope data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope between 2008 August and 2009 March. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated at 26.6 {+-} 0.5 days. This constitutes the first detection of orbital periodicity in high-energy gamma rays (20 MeV-100 GeV, HE). The light curve is characterized by a broad peak after periastron, as well as a smaller peak just before apastron. The spectrum is best represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux above 100 MeV of 0.82 {+-} 0.03(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst) 10{sup -6} ph cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 6.3 {+-} 1.1(stat) {+-} 0.4(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 2.21 {+-} 0.04(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). There is no significant spectral change with orbital phase. The phase of maximum emission, close to periastron, hints at inverse Compton scattering as the main radiation mechanism. However, previous very high-energy gamma ray (>100 GeV, VHE) observations by MAGIC and VERITAS show peak emission close to apastron. This and the energy cutoff seen with Fermi suggest that the link between HE and VHE gamma rays is nontrivial.

  9. The apparent discontinuity in the periodicity of the GeV emission from LS I +61{\\deg}303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaron, Frederic

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray binary LS I +61{\\deg}303 shows a discontinuity of the periodicity in its GeV emission. In this paper, we show that during the epochs when the timing analysis fails to determine the orbital periodicity, the periodicity is in fact present in the two orbital phase intervals $\\Phi = 0.0-0.5$ and $\\Phi = 0.5-1.0$. That is, there are two periodic signals, one towards periastron (i.e., $\\Phi = 0.0-0.5$) and another one towards apastron ($\\Phi = 0.5-1.0$). The apastron peak shows the same orbital shift as the radio outburst and, in addition, reveals the same two periods $P_1$ and $P_2$ that are present in the radio data. The gamma-ray emission of the apastron peak normally just broadens the emission of the peak around periastron. Only when it appears at $\\Phi = 0.8-1.0$, because of the orbital shift, it is detached enough from the first peak to become recognizable as a second orbital peak, which is the reason why the timing analysis fails. Two gamma-ray peaks along the orbit are predicted by the two-pea...

  10. Recovery and utilization of gypsum and limestone from scrubber sludge. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue-gas desulfurization units in coal-fired power plants produce a large amount of sludge which must be disposed of, and which is currently landfilled in most cases. Increasing landfill costs are gradually forcing utilities to find other alternatives. In principle, this sludge can be used to make gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) for products such as plaster-of-Paris and wallboard, but only if impurities such as unreacted limestone and soluble salts are removed, and the calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}) is oxidized to calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}). This project investigated methods for removing the impurities from the sludge so that high-quality, salable gypsum products can be made. Two processes were studied, both separately and in combination: Water-only cycloning, and froth flotation. A large fraction (30--40%) of the impurities in the sludge are contained in the coarser, higher-density particles, which are readily removed using a water-only cyclone. Much of the remaining impurities are hydrophobic, and can be removed by froth flotation. A combined cyclone/froth flotation process has been found to be suitable for producing a high-purity product from scrubber sludge at low cost.

  11. Cyclic carbonation calcination studies of limestone and dolomite for CO{sub 2} separation from combustion flue gases - article no. 011801

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthoorselvan, S.; Gleis, S.; Hartmut, S.; Yrjas, P.; Hupa, M. [TUM, Garching (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring limestone and dolomite samples, originating from different geographical locations, were tested as potential sorbents for carbonation/calcination based CO{sub 2} capture from combustion flue gases. Samples have been studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer under simulated flue gas conditions at three calcination temperatures, viz., 750{sup o}C, 875{sup o}C, and 930{sup o}C for four carbonation calcination reaction (CCR) cycles. The dolomite sample exhibited the highest rate of carbonation than the tested limestones. At the third cycle, its CO{sub 2} capture capacity per kilogram of the sample was nearly equal to that of Gotland, the highest reacting limestone tested. At the fourth cycle it surpassed Gotland, despite the fact that the CaCO{sub 3} content of the Sibbo dolomite was only 2/3 of that of the Gotland. Decay coefficients were calculated by a curve fitting exercise and its value is lowest for the Sibbo dolomite. That means, most probably its capture capacity per kilogram of the sample would remain higher well beyond the fourth cycle. There was a strong correlation between the calcination temperature, the specific surface area of the calcined samples, and the degree of carbonation. It was observed that the higher the calcination temperature, the lower the sorbent reactivity. For a given limestone/dolomite sample, sorbents CO{sub 2} capture capacity depended on the number of CCR cycles and the calcination temperature. According to the equilibrium thermodynamics, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the calciner should be lowered to lower the calcination temperature. This can be achieved by additional steam supply into the calciner. Steam could then be condensed in an external condenser to single out the CO{sub 2} stream from the exit gas mixture of the calciner. A calciner design based on this concept is illustrated.

  12. A study of the effects of limestone rock asphalt screenings on the structural properties of hot-mix asphaltic concrete made with siliceous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albritton, Oscar Willard

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LiSRagy pptt8pp py IEXAa A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF LIMESTONE ROCK ASPHALT SCREENINGS ON THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALTIC CONCRETE MADE WITH SILICEOUS MATERIALS A Thesis By OSCAR WILLARD. AQBRITTON Submitted to the Graduate... ON THE STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALTIC CONCRETE MADE WITH SILICEOUS MATERIALS A Thesis By OSCAR WILLARD ALBRITTON Approved as to Style and Content by: Chairman of Committee ead of Departme t August 1958 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Acknowledgment is due...

  13. Color measurements on marble and limestone briquettes exposed to outdoor environment in the Eastern United States. Volume I: Results of exposure 1984-1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimann, K.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a long-term program that began in 1984, limestone and marble briquettes have been exposed to both anthropogenic acid deposition and natural weathering at four field sites in the eastern United States. Similar tests began at an Ohio site in 1986. Effects of exposure on the briquettes and other materials at the sites are evaluated periodically by several federal agencies cooperating in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). One of the primary contributions of Argonne National Laboratory to the NAPAP has been the measurement of tristimulus color change on samples exposed to the environment. Results from the first six years indicate a yellowing of the marble and a darkening of limestone on both the skyward and groundward surfaces of fresh and preexposed briquettes. The relationship between discoloration and exposure period appears to be linear. Discoloration rates as a function of a cumulative exposure time are almost constant for marble and slightly decreasing for limestone Dark spots on groundward surfaces were measured with tristimulus color equipment prior to chemical analysis to determine if a correlation exists between darkening (change in reflectance) and SO{sub 4} concentration. Taking exposure time into consideration, and assuming that the airborne concentration of dark particles, which cause darkening, is proportional to airborne SO{sub 2} concentration, one can establish a linear relationship between exposure time, darkening, and SO{sub 2} concentration. The program is continuing so that additional data can be obtained.

  14. Table 2 -Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY NC ND OH PA SD TX WI Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2001 CO GA IL IN IA KS KY MI MN.7 Table 2 - Lime use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 2000 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NY use and practices on Corn, major producing states, 1999 CO IL IN IA KS KY MI MN MO NE NC OH SD TX WI

  15. Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinsky, F.T. (Pure Air, Allentown, PA (United States)); Ross, J. (Northern Indiana Public Service Co., Hammond, IN (United States)); Dennis, D.S. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (United States). Stearns-Roger Div.); Huston, J.S. (Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Warren NJ (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO{sub 2} will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. Effect of Long-term Lime and Potassium Applications on Quantity-Intensity (Q/I) Relationships in Sandy Soil1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    IN SANDY SOIL 787 may be presented as a measure of the free energy of exchange of K in the soil by Ca in Sandy Soil1 D. L. SPARKS AND W. C. LiEBHARDT2 ABSTRACT The effects of long-term lime and K applications on quan- tity-intensity (Q/I) relationships were investigated on the Ap and B21t horizons of a Kalmia soil

  17. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural... BEAUMONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By Nilliam B. Gay, III Chairman of Committee Head of the Department of Soil Sc Crop Sciences ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my appreciation to Dr. A. G. Caldwell for his 1nterest and guidance...

  18. LS-46 G. Mavrogenes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2

  19. LS-63 T. Khoe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2~68163

  20. LS-87 W. Chou

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494 s.6

  1. LS-88 W. Chou

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494

  2. LS-9 T. Khoe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34949

  3. G. K. Shenoy LS-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-D

  4. ls.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE MilestoneEddyObservationsLow

  5. Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge (LS-APGD) Ionization Source for Elemental Mass Spectrometry: Preliminary Parametric Evaluation and Figures of Merit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quarles, C. Derrick; Carado, Anthony J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, low power ionization source for the elemental analysis of aqueous solutions has recently been described. The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) source operates at relatively low currents (<20 mA) and solution flow rates (<50 ?L min-1), yielding a relatively simple alternative for atomic mass spectrometry applications. The LS-APGD has been interfaced to what is otherwise an organic, LC-MS mass analyzer, the Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap without any modifications; other than removing the electrospray ionization (ESI) source supplied with that instrument. A glow discharge is initiated between the surface of the test solution exiting a glass capillary and a metallic counter electrode mounted at a 90° angle and separated by a distance of ~5 mm. As with any plasma-based ionization source, there are key discharge operation and ion sampling parameters that affect the intensity and composition of the derived mass spectra; including signal-to-background ratios. We describe here a preliminary parametric evaluation of the roles of discharge current, solution flow rate, argon sheath gas flow rate, and ion sampling distance as they apply on this mass analyzer system. A cursive evaluation of potential matrix effects due to the presence of easily ionized elements (EIEs) indicate that sodium concentrations of up to 500 ?g mL-1 generally cause suppressions of less than 50%, dependant upon the analyte species. Based on the results of this series of studies, preliminary limits of detection (LOD) have been established through the generation of calibration functions. Whilst solution-based concentrations LOD levels of 0.02 – 2 ?g mL-1 3 are not impressive on the surface, the fact that they are determined via discrete 5 ?L injections leads to mass-based detection limits at picogram to singlenanogram levels. The overhead costs associated with source operation (10 W d.c. power, solution flow rates of <50 ?L min-1, and gas flow rates <10 mL min-1) are very attractive. While further optimization in the source design is suggested here, it is believed that the LS-APGD ion source may present a practical alternative to inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) sources typically employed in elemental mass spectrometry.

  6. Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist in cross section and the channel flows along a boundary between the t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Results Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist length. The highest percentage of bedrock coverage per geologic type appears in combined categories (Fig

  7. Functional homology of gHs and gLs from EBV-related {gamma}-herpesviruses for EBV-induced membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omerovic, Jasmina [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Ward 6-231, 303 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Longnecker, Richard [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Ward 6-231, 303 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)]. E-mail: r-longnecker@northwestern.edu

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human {gamma}-herpesvirus that primarily infects B lymphocytes and epithelial cells. Entry of EBV into B cells requires the viral glycoproteins gp42, gH/gL and gB, while gp42 is not necessary for infection of epithelial cells. In EBV, gH and gL form two distinct complexes, a bipartite complex that contains only gH and gL, used for infection of epithelial cells, and a tripartite complex that additionally includes gp42, used for infection of B cells. The gH/gL complex is conserved within the herpesvirus family, but its exact role in entry and mechanism of fusion is not yet known. To understand more about the functionality of EBVgH/gL, we investigated the functional homology of gHs and gLs from human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and two primate (rhesus and marmoset) {gamma}-herpesviruses in EBV-mediated virus-free cell fusion assay. Overall, gHs and gLs from the more homologous primate herpesviruses were better at complementing EBV gH and gL in fusion than HHV8 gH and gL. Interestingly, marmoset gH was able to complement fusion with epithelial cells, but not B cells. Further investigation of this led to the discovery that EBVgH is the binding partner of gp42 in the tripartite complex and the absence of fusion with B cells in the presence of marmoset gH/gL is due to its inability to bind gp42.

  8. Page 366 Courses: Political Science (POLS) Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog poLS 311 Modern poLitiCAL tHougHt: MACHiAVeLLi to oBAMA (4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Page 366 Courses: Political Science (POLS) Sonoma State University 2014-2015 Catalog poLS 311 Modern poLitiCAL tHougHt: MACHiAVeLLi to oBAMA (4) Examination of the major writings from Machiavelli AMeriCAn poLitiCAL tHougHt (4) An examination of the development of American political ideas

  9. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  10. The effects of calcitic and dolomitic limestone rates and particle sizes on soil chemical changes, plant nutrient concentration, and yields of corn and Coastal bermudagrass on two acid Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haby, Vincent A

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil pH and in decreasing soil acidity with depth under heavy applications of residual acid forming N fertilizer, even after a seven year reaction period. Meyer and Volk (38) reported that calcitic limestone was slightly more effective than...THE EFFECTS OF CALCITIC AND DOLOMITIC LIMESTO11E RATES AND PARTICLE SIZES ON SOIL CHEMICAL CHANGES, PLANT NUTRIE. "1T CONCENTRATION, AND YIELDS OF CORN AND COASTAL BERMUDAGPXSS ON TWO ACID TEXAS SOILS A Thesis by VINCENT ANDREW HABY Submitted...

  11. LS-96(11-8-88) LS-96 S. Kramer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.349490

  12. LS-EC(1/8/86) LS-48

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s.

  13. Microsoft Word - ls306.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FE) design use wire-coil inserts inside of the cooling channels to significantly enhance heat transfer. Wire-coil inserts have replaced the copper-mesh inserts used in previous...

  14. thesis_ls_note.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 JointProgramApplication ofUUse of the 1

  15. LS-68 S. L. Kramer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34

  16. LS-86 T. K. Khoe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494 s.6 T.

  17. LS8548 2..5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping

  18. Microsoft Word - ls278.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA Trimodal SizePreliminary Results

  19. Microsoft Word - ls311.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA Trimodal SizePreliminary ResultsLSAchievable

  20. Microsoft Word - LS-245.RTF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruarySave the Date!LMI-EFRC Annual07 1an

  1. Microsoft Word - LS310.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruarySave the Date!LMI-EFRC

  2. ls284_97.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon CaptureFY08 Joint JOULE

  3. Effects of Lime and Carbonate of Lime on Acid Phosphate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1917-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .50 .58 .05 -05 .36 .34 .56 .41 .45 day. 12.96 12 86 12:40 7.55 1.14 14 .14 .I5 .21 .32 1.17 4.08 2.80 1.40 .58 .05 .05 .30 .46 .56 1.34 .98 .81 days. 12.98 13 00 12:23 7.58 1.06 .OO days. --- 1.3.10 13 08 12... .03 .03 .41 .GO.. 1.84 1.13 1.06 16 14 .15 .17 .23 .28 .4P, 2.26 3.90 2.65 1.28 .53 .03 .03 .23 .34 .41 1.39 1.03 .76 .20 .25 .32 323 3.95 2.55 1.10 .53 .05 .05 .25 .34 -40 1.61 .93 .76 As was to be expected...

  4. Pennsylvanian Spiriferacea and Spiriferinacea of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, R. S.

    1967-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    unit is thin, the group as a whole is a fairly compact sequence, which stands jCool Creek Ls.Holt Shale Du Bois Limestone Turner Creek Shale Sheldon Lin-fester. 2.: tones Point Shalt lowa Palen Shale Co Li lone Hanford Limestone / Calhoun Shale Thin... unit is thin, the group as a whole is a fairly compact sequence, which stands jCool Creek Ls.Holt Shale Du Bois Limestone Turner Creek Shale Sheldon Lin-fester. 2.: tones Point Shalt lowa Palen Shale Co Li lone Hanford Limestone / Calhoun Shale Thin...

  5. Lime Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolar (Texas) Jump to:LignoKem Jump to:

  6. Tell'smoreNews 3Ls ASSOCIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    in our minds: "To live single and free like a tree and in brotherhood like a forest". Hasan is a keen forward to seeing you later in the year, in a class, Club meeting, an event or simply in the Graham Hills

  7. LS-2J G. K. Shenoy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.

  8. LS-80 MCT/MVl124

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494 s. H.0

  9. LS-81 MCT/MV1125

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.3494 s.

  10. STORAGE RING LS-41 E. A. Crosbie

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGEComplainant, V.STCObjective ïźEC (11/27/85)

  11. LS9 Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach,October, 2012 - 08:20 Event linked open

  12. ANL/APS/LS-330 March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2 Print258Department of3 Ab-initio4580

  13. U. S. Government purposes. LS-253

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof Energy Two2015 Tyson ResearchO P J I S

  14. Electrical resistivity investigations over limestone caverns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Charles Osgood

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    necessary to supplement the geo- electrical measurements with geologicsl structural information in orqer to carry out useful analyses, but the resistivi ty data did con- tr&bute significantly to the fine I interpretation. A new approach. to resistivity..., ) radial distance from electrode or image (m) radius of cavity (m) mutual resistance given by V/I (ohms) electric resistance between opposite faces of test specimen (ohms) current source and sink terms (volt. m/2'n ) electric potential (volts...

  15. Preservation of limestone material culture with siloxanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ann Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The dark area represents the siloxane penetration depth in the stone. 62 Figure 4. 3. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrograms of three different distances away from the penetration depth. All three measurements were taken at a magnification of X120, with a...

  16. In metamorphosed limestone, dolostone,and marble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ) or more in areas of subsidence from piping in thick unconsolidated material Fissures and voids present to a depth of 50 ft (15 m) in areas of subsidence from piping in thick,unconsolidated material Fissures

  17. Kinetics of the reaction of iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M. [Industrial Technological Research Institute, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present simultaneously, the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under the gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2} only, being affected mainly by the relative humidity. The sulfation of sorbents can be described by the surface coverage model and the model equations derived for the latter case. When both O{sub 2} and NOx, were present, the sulfation of sorbents was greatly enhanced, forming a great amount of sulfate in addition to sulfite. The surface coverage model is still valid in this case, but the model equations obtained show a more marked effect of relative humidity and negligible effects of SO{sub 2} concentration and temperature on the reaction. The effect of sorbent composition on the reaction kinetics was entirely represented by the effects of the initial specific surface area (S{sub g0}) and the Ca molar content (M{sup -1}) of sorbent. The initial conversion rate of sorbent increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}, and the ultimate conversion increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}M{sup -1}. The model equations obtained in this work are applicable to describe the kinetics of the sulfation of the sorbents in the low-temperature dry and semidry fine gas desulfurization processes either with an upstream NOx, removal unit or without.111

  18. How does this stack up for removing SO/sub 2/ and particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakke, E.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-fired boiler emissions are usually controlled by one of the following methods: (1) a high velocity spray tower for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) installed downstream of a dry electrostatic precipitator, or a baghouse which removes the fly ash. Lime or limestone is used for neutralization; (2) a high energy venturi scrubber for fly ash removal followed by a high velocity spray tower for FGD. The alkaline ash, with lime or limestone added is used for neutralization and saves alkali costs. Peabody Process Systems has been investigating an additional system comprising a low pressure drop gas quencher and an FRG spray tower with a Wet Tubular Precipitator (WTP) installed on top of the spray tower. The alkalinity in the ash, augmented with lime or limestone, can be used for neutralization if the full fly ash load goes into the tower.

  19. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

  20. Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindley, Thomas (Morgantown, WV)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

  1. Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindley, T.

    1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: Crystal structureComposite-- Energy, science, and technologyLettersLetters of

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHGResults The National

  4. Geology of the Cedar Mountain area, Llano County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewitt, Gary Ray

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mountain area. A part of Cedar Mountain was mapped by Barnes (1956) while studying the lead resources of central Texas. The report also in- cludes a brief discussion of buried topography and the genesis of the Hickory Sandstone. Absolute age... massif, In a later report (1848) he described a Carboniferous lime- stone having abundant black "silex" (possibly Marble Falls Limestone), and widespread "Silurian limestones, " Shumard (1861) described rocks of the "Primordial Zone" of Tex...

  5. Prevention of Salt Damage inPrevention of Salt Damage in LimestoneLimestone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    #12;Introduction: Sources of Na2SO4 Acid rain deposits SO4 2- which combines with Na+ Na2SO4 enters with a solution of polyacrylic acid (PAA) will reduce the crystallization pressure. #12;Warping Experiment Experiment Sample Size ~ 10 x 2.5 x 1.0 cm 1. Polyacrylic acid (PAA) treatment 2. Dried at 105°C 3

  6. Bryozoan Tabulipora carbonaria in Wreford Megacyclothem (Lower Permian) of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuffey, Roger J.

    1967-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and algal limestones formed; and it was either just barely able to survive or entirely absent where other rock types formed. T. carbonaria, therefore, is interpreted to have thrived most in waters which were relatively deep, far from shore, quiet...) Limestones. The facts that the chalky limestones of the upper Threemile occur only north of the area of this shoal and that the algal and algal-molluscan lime- stones at the top of the Threemile and in the upper Havensville occur largely south of the presumed...

  7. Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    with wastewater sludge, wood ash, coal ash, lime-kiln dust, and/or limestone quarry dust to improve the profile systems [Block & Goldstein 2000]. Anaerobic composting is not well used in the U.S until now [Goldstein of the process, the methane gas ("cleaner energy") and harvesting materials from MSW to #12;either recycle

  8. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  9. Coolside waste management demonstration OCDO grant agreement No. CDO/D-902-9. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Winschel, R.A. [CONSOL Inc., Library, PA (United States). Research & Development

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project were to evaluate the potential utilization in road construction of wastes produced from the Coolside, LIMB (limestone injection multi-stage burner) and FBC (fluidized-bed combustion) processes, and to specify criteria for landfill disposal of waste from the Coolside process. These three processes are considered to be clean coal technologies. The Coolside process involves injecting an aqueous slurry of hydrated lime into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater in a coal-fired boiler. The hydrated lime captures sulfur dioxide from the flue gas producing anhydrous calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate, which are collected along with the unused hydrated lime and fly ash. The LIMB process involves injection of lime or hydrated lime directly into the furnace to capture sulfur dioxide. The waste consists principally of anhydrous calcium sulfate, lime, and fly ash. Both processes were demonstrated successfully at the Edgewater Station of Ohio Edison in Lorrain, OH, from 1989 to 1992. Circulating fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is a commercial technology which combines steam generation with SO{sub 2} control by burning coal in a circulating bed of limestone. The waste, chemically similar to LIMB waste, is produced by bleed-off of the bed material and by collection of the flue dust. All three processes produce a dry solid waste, which must either be used or disposed of and managed to ensure environmental compliance and economic feasibility. The project was completed in June 1996.

  10. MFR PAPER 1031 Traw ls and traps capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a carapace II idlh of 7 inches and a \\\\eighl of more than 2.5 pounds (WillieI'. 1966), A cammer· ci al prl,\\uo, of ,\\ ,hart ,upph prl)UULCr "I red .:rab

  11. LS-DYNA Simulations of Thermal Shock in Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    = 2000K #12;~10-20% effect speed of sound in the tantalum · Temperature Dependent Bilinear Isotropic Model 'Classical' inelastic model Nonlinear ­ Uses 2 slopes (elastic, plastic) for representing of the stress-strain curve ­ Inputs: density, Young's modulus, CTE, Poisson

  12. FAST AND LS TTL DATA DUAL DECADE COUNTER;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    section. The two sections can be connected to count in the 8.4.2.1 BCD code or they can count in the 8.4.2.1 BCD code is obtained, as shown in the BCD Truth Table.Since the flip-flops change state

  13. EDITED--LS-332-DWA_FEL_August16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizes dynamics inE-print to theEBLECOR VAPED232

  14. LENGTH OF BEAMLINES AND WIDTH OF THE LS-37

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample Environment: Magnet and6ledp/ The listing of

  15. LS-90 H. J. Moe V. R. Veluri

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. STORAGE RING GEOMETRY LS-39 E. A. Crosbie

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGEComplainant, V.STCObjective ïź

  17. Global Orbit Corrections Keith Symon LS-I0l

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance GetGiant ProteaseGlassNational

  18. HYBRID UNDULATORS AND WIGGLERS LS-18 S.H. Kim

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting wasEngineering andHQHSIHYBRID UNDULATORS AND

  19. RACETRACK AT ANL S. L. Kramer LS-67

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.Office of Science7a.RACETRACK AT ANL S. L.

  20. MEAN TEMPERATURE RISE IN A TARGET Keith Symon LS-99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L. Wood,3, BPA earned net3rdKS (7

  1. Argonne Synchrotron X-ray Source LS-84 H. Moe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2 (CRACApril 22-23, 2011Argonne SiteImpacts

  2. Fracture testing of Edwards limestone: a statistical treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, David Earl

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    to represent strength data. It is the authors contention that assigning statistical distributions to "material properties" is preferred over assigning fixed constant values. Weibul1 [6] states, "the lack of agreement between the theory of strength... of materials and engineering practice is due to an unallowable extension of the limits of the theory of elasticity in its applications. " Weibull's view is that this lack of agreement between theory and practice is of fundamental nature and is caused...

  3. Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Christopher

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

  4. Compaction characteristics of crushed limestone using the Gyratory Testing Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Walter Herbert, III

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure is maintained at each end of the sample by parallel steel plungers. The development of' this compactor involved the mechanizing of the gyratory motion and incorporating a means of automatically control- ling the applied vertical pressure... the operation. Provision is made for three 12 K L Air Oil Roller Assemblies Rotate About This Axis I I Gyratory Notion 8 ' I 4I'~)l 0 Gyration Angle Excess Pore Pressure Develops Gyration Pressure Number of A Nold B Nold Chuck C Lower Roller...

  5. Microstructures and Rheology of a Limestone-Shale Thrust Fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Rachel Kristen

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    -grain junctions, and interpenetrating boundaries. Porosity rises to 6% from calcite veins. In coarse-grained calcite, trails of iv voids follow twin boundaries, and voids occur at twin-twin and twin-grain boundary intersections... contains calcite and shale. The different strengths of calcite (Rutter, 1995; Brodie and Rutter, 2000a) and dolomite (Davis et al., 2008; Delle Piane et al., 2008) and quartz (Griggs, 1967; Brodie and Rutter, 2000b) under similar conditions could...

  6. Consolidant particle transport in limestone, concrete and bone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Alanna Stacey

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of chemically compatible nano and fine particle colloidal consolidants is a new development within the field of cultural heritage conservation and applied most widely so far to the historic built environment. The ...

  7. Isotopic tracers of gold deposition in Paleozoic limestones, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, Z.E.; Widmann, B.L.; Marshall, B.D.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Futa, K.; Mahan, S.A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium isotopic analyses of barren and mineralized Paleozoic carbonate rocks show that hydrothermal fluids added radiogenic strontium ({sup 87}Sr) to the mineralized zones. At Bare Mountain, samples collected from mineralized areas have {delta}{sup 87}Sr{sub t} values ranging from +3.0 to +23.0, whereas unmineralized carbonate rocks have {delta}{sup 87}Sr, values of {minus}0.6 to +2.9. In other ranges, {delta}{sup 87}Sr, values of the unmineralized carbonate rocks are even lower and virtually indistinguishable from primary marine values. This correlation of elevated {delta}{sup 87}Sr{sub t} values with mineralized zones provides a useful technique for assessing the mineral potential of the Paleozoic basement beneath Yucca Mountain, and may find broader use in mineral exploration in the Basin and Range province as a whole.

  8. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates...

  9. Limestone County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) JumpDesign JumpLily Lake,Corporation

  10. Limestone County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) JumpDesign JumpLily

  11. Limestone Creek, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) JumpDesign

  12. Investigation of Sulfur Removal by Direct Limestone Injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colaluca, M. A.; Maloney, D. J.

    combustion process. The CaC03 decomposes (calcines) according to Equation (1) below and the resulting CaO captures H2S by the reaction given in Equation (2). ~he. calcination reaction is endotherm~c w~th an enthalpy of reaction for calcination of 42... of CaO with H 2 S to simulate reducing conditions such as encountered in the first stage of a two-staged combustion process. Reactions of CaO with s02 will be considered at a future date. ANALYSIS General Considerations The analysis is conducted...

  13. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 NationalTreatment. | EMSLand

  14. Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

  15. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    and then distributed to each column by the air-manifold having one input and 10 output fittings. Compressed nitrogen gas (Praxair Co., College Station, TX) was used to make the non-oxidative condition and supplied to each column by the N2-manifold after preheating...

  16. Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    reaction Alcohol Standard Alcohol Co. Power Energy Fuels Lignocellulose Gasification CO/H2 Fermentation Alcohol Alico Inc., Bioenergy, Coskata Lignocellulose Acid Hydrolysis Sugar Fermentation Alcohol Arkenol, BlueFire Ethanol, Masada...

  17. Lime Energy formerly Electric City Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) JumpDesign JumpLily Lake,Corporation Jump

  18. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime - Energy Management

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHG

  19. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: GHG Inventory Protocols

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHG Inventory Protocols

  20. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Resource and Links

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHG Inventory

  1. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Resources and Links -

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHG InventoryIndustry

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Resources and Links -

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHG

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Work Plans

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,-- Energy, science,Links - TechnicalGHGGHGResults The

  4. Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

  5. An AVO method toward direct detection of lithologies combining P-P and P-S reflection data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carcuz Jerez, Juan Ramon de Jesus

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -space models: uncon- solidated shale/sand, shale/salt, gas shale/limestone, and lime- stone/salt [VP : PĄwave velocity; VS : SĄwave velocity; and œ : density]. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 14 2.2 Numerical values... considered in this chapter. The estimated values approximate the actual ones with an error no greater than 1 percent. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 26 3.1 Elastic parameters for an isotropic half-space similar to the shale/salt model from...

  6. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  7. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  8. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  9. Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy Program. Technical progress report, 1 July 1984-30 September 1984 including summary of work for FY84

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Benson, J.D.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research discussed in this report deals with resource recovery from coal conversion solid wastes. Progress is reported on two methods (the HiChlor and Lime-Sinter processes) for extracting metal values from power plant fly ash. Preliminary work is also reported on a method of making cement from the residue of the lime-sinter process. In the HiChlor Process, metal oxides in the fly ash are converted to volatile chlorides by reaction with chlorine in the presence of a reductant. Several versions of this approach are being investigated. The Lime-Sinter Process utilizes a solid state reaction to selectively convert the alumina in fly ash to a soluble form. Fly ash is mixed with limestone and a suitable mineralizer (to reduce the temperature required for sintering and to enhance alumina recovery) and then sintered in a high temperature kiln. Alumina is recovered by leaching the resulting clinker. A complex relationship between the calcium, alumina, silica, and sulfur constituents in the feed mixture controls the formation and extraction of aluminate compounds. Alumina recovery levels are enhanced by promoting the formation of less-soluble calcium compounds and/or more-soluble aluminum compounds. A study is underway to determine the degree to which flue gas scrubber sludge can be used both as a limestone substitute and as a sulfur bearing mineralizer. Results show that 20 to 25% of the limestone can be provided by the scrubber sludges. 25 refs.,25 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. A n n a ls o f T r o p ic a l M e d ic in e & P a r a s ito lo g y , V o l. 9 2 , N o . 8 , 8 9 7 9 0 0 ( 1 9 9 8 ) G e n e t ic c o n r m a t io n o f t h e s p e c i c s t a t u s o f T r ia t o m a p e t r o c h ii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

    A n n a ls o f T r o p ic a l M e d ic in e & P a r a s ito lo g y , V o l. 9 2 , N o . 8 , 8 9 7 ± 9 0 0 ( 1 9 9 8 ) G e n e t ic c o n ź r m a t io n o f t h e s p e c iź c s t a t u s o f T r ia t o m a p e t r o c h ii (H e m ip t e r a : R e d u v iid a e : T r ia t o m in a e ) T ria to m a p

  11. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  12. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  13. An insoluble residue study of the upper Walnut Formation, Comanche Peak Limestone, and Edwards Limestone, Bosque and western McLennan counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Jimmie Darrell

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R' ERECERICKSBURG CROUP I &AHKH&HHwAT VVVVVV VvVV LINE AA' NORTHERN LIMIT OF CHERT LINE BBI SOUTHERN LIMIT OF KIAMICHI LINE CC' SOUTHERN LIMIT OF BIOHERMS SCALE WI IAIISOR' 25 50 . . : ~ :. ;: 0 GEORGETONN C ~ , ', 'T CI MILES Fig. 2... x Main Street Pawpaw Weno Denton Fort Worth Duck Creek Kiamichi 0-15& Edwards 15'-125' Comanche Peak 70'-125' Upper Marl Member Walnut 125'-175' Paluxy 0-25' g 5 Glen Rose Fig. 3. Columnar section of Early Cretaceous formation...

  14. Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS), Executable Model (Version 4. 0) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS) Cost Model is an IBM PC cost model that can be used to estimate the cost of installing SO2, NOx, and particulate matter control systems at coal-fired utility electric generating facilities. The model integrates various combinations of the following technologies: physical coal cleaning, coal switching, overfire air/low NOx burners, natural gas reburning, LIMB, ADVACATE, electrostatic precipitator, fabric filter, gas conditioning, wet lime or limestone FGD, lime spray drying/duct spray drying, dry sorbent injection, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, and pulverized coal burning boiler. The model generates capital, annualized, and unitized pollutant removal costs in either constant or current dollars for any year.

  15. Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS), Executable Model and Source Model (version 4. 0) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS) Cost Model is an IBM PC cost model that can be used to estimate the cost of installing SO2, NOx, and particulate matter control systems at coal-fired utility electric generating facilities. The model integrates various combinations of the following technologies: physical coal cleaning, coal switching, overfire air/low NOx burners, natural gas reburning, LIMB, ADVACATE, electrostatic precipitator, fabric filter, gas conditioning, wet lime or limestone FGD, lime spray drying/duct spray drying, dry sorbent injection, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, and pulverized coal burning boiler. The model generates capital, annualized, and unitized pollutant removal costs in either constant or current dollars for any year.

  16. The Establishment of Several Range Grasses Seeded in Burned and Unburned Slash of Ashe Junipe: (Juniperus Ashei Buchholz)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnett, Norman Neal

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that Ashe )uniper in Texas is found on rochy hills, cliffs, canyons, and di vides from Fort Worth to San Antonio, west to the Pecos River, and as far north as Nolan, Stephens, and Young counties. It is found mostly on soils derived from lime- -stone... in Travis County, Texas. The area is characteristic of the Edwards Plateau Region where Ashe )uniper is a ma)or problem to ranchers. The topography is very rough and rocky with shallow soils derived from limestone. Several canyons dissect the ranch...

  17. Simulation of the T6 bridge rail system using LS-DYNA3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Mark Edward

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    subsystem models, primarily the post-base-weld assembly, against TTI test data prior to assembling the entire T6 model. Sections of the T6 installation located outside the impact region and various connections were represented using approximate modeling...

  18. OpenLS for indoor positioning : strategies for standardizing location based services for indoor use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziej, Krzysztof W., 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of location positioning technologies such as GPS and initiatives like the US Federal Communications Commission's E911 telecommunication initiatives has generated a lot of interest in applications and services ...

  19. Standardization of 18F by Digital beta(LS)-gamma Coincidence Counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues D.; Balpardo C.; Cassette P.; Arenillas P.; Capoulat M. E.; Ceruti G.; García-Torańo E

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclide 18F disintegrates to 18O by beta+ emission (96.86%) and electron capture (3.14%) with a half-life of 1.8288 h. It is widely used in nuclear medicine for positron emission tomography (PET). Because of its short half-life this nuclide requires the development of fast measuring methods to be standardized. The combination of LSC methods with digital techniques proves to be a good alternative to get low uncertainties for this, and other, short lived nuclides. A radioactive solution of 18F has been standardized by coincidence counting with a LSC, using the logical sum of double coincidences in a TDCR array and a NaI scintillation detector. The results show good consistency with other techniques like 4Pi gamma and LSC.

  20. Reproduced with pennission from Elsevier Solar CelLS',30 (1991) 515-523 515'f'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emerged since the early 1980s. In particular, thin film solar cell technologies such as amorphous silicon To investigate the implications of projected advances in thin film solar cells for PV hydrogen production, we set). A large (> 10 MW) tilted, fixed, flat plate PV array using thin film solar modules is coupled directly

  1. 18/09/2013 Tutoriel 1 eLS = Encyclopedia of Life Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maume-Deschamps, VĂ©ronique

    privilégier absolument les liens proposés sur cette page. #12;18/09/2013 Tutoriel 3 2. Modes de recherche Wiley : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.docelec.univ- lyon1.fr/mrw/advanced/search?doi=10.1002/047001590X Possibilité de relancer la recherche en sélectionnant « Search in this book » #12;18/09/2013 Tutoriel 7

  2. Nuclear forces in the parity odd sector and the LS forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiko Murano; for the HALQCD Collaboration

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report our first attempt at determining NN potentials in the parity odd sector including the spin-orbit force in lattice QCD, employing the method to extract successfully parity even NN potentials from Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions through the Schr\\"odinger equation. Using Nf = 2 CP-PACS gauge configurations on a 16^3 x 32 lattice at a = 0.16 fm and m_\\pi \\cong 1.1 GeV, we calculate central, tensor and spin-orbit potentials in the parity odd sector. Although statistical errors are still large, we observe that the qualitative features of these potentials roughly agree with those of phenomenological potentials.

  3. A Search For Direct CP Violation in The Decay K L,S # # + # -#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab

    papers that have been published over the years. Both Andrew Norman and Chad Materniak have over the past

  4. mLs-IIs-3G05 THE RADIOCHR+ISIIH OF AMERICIIRJIMD CURIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ---- ...- ,--. I . . . .. . . #12;The Radiocbwnishy d Americium =5cI Curium- mlulaF. 1960 u.s -. .- %blished W* 0. The Wtallic State - h(o) 190n4ExLctenceof DivaLent Americium The Trhelezm state - Am) and kI(VI) HIcatlcm & Americium fran Other Ekts (a) Tracer Scale AmEwIcium or Curl-an (b) (c) to Gram

  5. Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets LS-36 S. H. Kim and R.J. Lari

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileep SinghStockpile

  6. VIBRATIONS OF THE MAGNET-PEDESTAL SYSTEM LS-77 W. Chou

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV >41 -

  7. LS Note 339 - Calculated Shims' Signatures with the 17.2 mm Period New Undulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping of PlasmaMethod9

  8. LS Note 340 - New Design for a 27-mm Period Undulator for the MBA Lattice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping of

  9. LS-35 6 GeV Light Source Storage Ring Quadrupole and Sextupole Magnet Field Calculations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2 Grand5

  10. LS-4~ GROUND VIBRATION MEASUREMENTS NEAR THE SITE OF THE PROPOSED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.34 2~

  11. LS-69 DEVELOPING PULSE WIDTH MODULATED POWER SUPPLY FOR THE GeV LIGHT SOURCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping s. H.349

  12. SciTech Connect: Evaluation of the 2008 Lexus LS 600H Hybrid Synergy Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) O (10+delta)

  13. LS Power Associates (ON Line - formerly known as SWIP-S) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't Happen to HighJosephNOx Traps forLM2 LNG Annualn d e

  14. 6 GeV LIGHT SOURCE PROJECT COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURE LS-34

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICS H.CarbonMarchTHEMaterials and1663 January 2

  15. POISSON Codes Available on ANLHEP S. L. Kramer LS-30 S. Kramer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr. Steven Ashby Photo

  16. Decon2LS: An Open-Source Software Package for Automated Processing and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData Files Data Files 1B&W Y-12 TymesPathway of Ammonia

  17. HODIFIED ALADDIN LATTICE L2V2 S. Kramer and Y. Cho LS-20 AUS-26

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting was called1999Harvest84047

  18. ESTIMATION OF TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER FROM THE 6-GEV RING LS-24

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUIT reduces overall energy

  19. Microsoft Word - LS-324 - Equivalent Circuit Model & Power Calculations - DRAFT.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruarySave the Date!LMI-EFRC Annual07

  20. in the APS Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber Y. Chung Abstract LS-148

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon Capture andDeepwaterfors67 From:i6 GreenPower NewsNine

  1. L U. S. Government purposes. LS-lS2 K Symon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathanMultimaterial MultiphysicsKwok Ko SLACB L - - IJr;.

  2. ORIGINAL PAPER A gene encoding an abscisic acid biosynthetic enzyme (LsNCED4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradford, Kent

    Sciences, One Shields Ave, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8780, USA M. J. Truco Á O. Ochoa Á L00122-010-1425-3 #12;(Valdes et al. 1985). Thermoinhibitory conditions often occur in major winter

  3. Measuring Program for Wind, Waves and Current for Horns Rev and Ls; Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT Measuring Program for Wind, Waves and Current for Horns Rev and Læsű; Documentation Documentation of wind sensors, data logs, etc. for Horns Rev is described in folder 2CF/EB001 supplied by ED is described in folder 2 CF/EB003 supplied by ED service centre and TW. Documentation of 3D Sonic Wind

  4. A study of a lime-free calcium arsenate and lime-free calcium arsenate mixed with organic insecticides for cotton insect control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussel, John Severin

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the cotton aphid. 30 o ?s e* mi SS3 t=>o O fi w ow o Ix) s SM faO MOH Xoli W CtJofa ow w ? !=> o ei M 3...

  5. A study to improve the engineering properties of limestone rock asphalt paving mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, Philip Wayne

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    asphalt is a naturally occuring calcareous material with its interstices filled with natural bitumen. Deposits of this material exist in various locations throughout the United States. The 1 imestone rock asphalt materials used for thi s study... streets, parking lots, etc . Since the aggregate contains natural bitumen, the amount of additional asp baltic binder required to produce a quality paving mixture is reduced. Consequently, the cost of building a road with this material is reduced...

  6. Modification and modeling of water ingress in limestone after application of a biocalcification treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the water transfer properties of the stone, attributable to the bio- treatment, were measured and quantified. Bio-treatment has a limited service life over the period of the experimental run. Abstract Water. As water is involved in many types of stone decay [1], different surface treatments aimed at avoiding

  7. A study of strain characteristics in a limestone gravel subjected to repetitive loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargis, Louis Lane

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Spencer J. Buchanan for enthusiasm and guidance; Nr. James C. Armstrong and Mr. Lionel Milberger for aid in the testing program; Mr. Frank H. Scrivner for assistance in the statistics' analysis; M". s. Bette Osborn for typing the manuscript; ard. to my.... ? gravelly sand increased approximately five to 21 per cent (depending on the lateral pressure and initial void ratio) after 20, 000- 25, 000 repetitive loadings at two-thirds of the ultimate strength, Armstrong studied the effect of loading rate...

  8. Paleoautecology of Caninia torquia (Owen) from the Beil Limestone Member (Pennsylvanian, Virgilian), Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, R. H., Jr.

    1978-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    soft mud sub- 3 strate. Baird ( 1971) recognized two coral assemblages, a "Coral-Algal Community Wackestone" on the Nebraska shelf and a "Fusulinid-Coral Assemblage Wackestone" on the Nebraska shelf and in the Forest City basin. In the former... ( 1971) concluded that this assemblage lived in slightly deeper waters than the coral-algal community. Paleoecology of midcontinent Penn.sylva- nian rugose corals.—Most pre-1950 work on Pennsylvanian rugose corals was taxonomic, and later studies included...

  9. Diagenetic history and evolution of porosity of the Cotton Valley Limestone, Southeastern Smith County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covington, Thomas Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during a relative marine transgression. These progradational packages are underlain by low energy mudstones. In the western part of the Smith County study area the regressive shoal sediments are then over- lain by muddier rocks deposited during... structures modified paleobathymet& y and formed local highs on which oolitic-peloidal grainstones accumulated. These high-energy, shallow-marine shoals were flanked by medium-energy, shallow-marine shoal margin grainstones and packstones which, in turn...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - arnager limestone denmark Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 80 A calibrated composite section for the Late Jurassic Reuchenette Formation in northwestern Switzerland Summary:...

  11. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of more resistant chalk, or the burrows of other genera (Pl. 1, fig. 4-5; Pl. 2, fig. 1). In places the cores of horizontal burrow systems are weathered to form small cavities in the rock (Pl. 1, fig. 2), resembling the "cavity preserva- tion" of BROMLEY... structures are described in as much detail as possible. SYSTEMATIC DESCRIPTIONS Genus ASTEROSOMA von Otto, 1854 [A,tercuoma VON Ono, 1854, i n 151 DIAGNOSIS.—Star-shaped structures having an elevated center; rays are bulbous, tapered distally, and wrinkled...

  12. .:tiure Cited ., ^,"t*'{A.. "A Studv of the Interactions of Limestone in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    an estimate of -230 r.netric tons from air pollution fallout originating in the Chicago?1 - - - ;' ,;il, p \\\\'-,-flidrocarbon Extractiongf-.rd Mine Drain- - :'iis'ii,L" in Chemical Engtteer concentration of lead and the histor-v-of local lead pollution sources(3). High surficial concentrationsof lead

  13. Geology of the Northwest Wortham area, Navarro, Limestone, and Freestone counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Clifford Littleton

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . /Ft. ) Diameter (In, ) Dow Chemioal Polyethylene Mheat Union Carbide Polyethylene Celanese Hylon Polymer Celanese Nylon 6 Polymer Celanese Acetal Copolymer Shell Wax Celanese Polyester DuPont Polyethylene 37. 1 51. 0 37. 4 37. 8 40... to as the material-to-air ratio. Notice that this dimensionless ratio of material to air can be found for auy pipe diameter. 7000 ~ Dow Polyethylene 0 Union Carbide Polyethylene aAcetal Copolymer 0'Nylon 66 0 Polyester Fiber + Shell Max s Nylon 6 / DuPont...

  14. 3-D characterization of weathered building limestones by high resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of external environmental agents (physical, chemical and biological) such as rain, pollution, sunlight throughout the world. Every stone extracted from a quarry is subjected to deterioration due to the action extracted from quarries or from buildings, but in places where the sampled stones can be assumed

  15. RECORDING OF THE THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LIMESTONES UNDERGOING EXPERIMENTAL ACCELERATED AGEING TESTS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Abstract Sodium sulfates are widely regarded as the most destructive salts for porous stone, concrete destructive salts for porous stones, and other building materials such as concrete or brick (Goudie et al, 1997). It is important to fully understand their crystallization process in porous networks and

  16. Reservoir rock properties of the Arun limestone (Miocene), Arun field, North Sumatra, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, Suryadi

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RA 113 RA LF UC 29 LF BS PACK WACK WACK PACK WACK WACK PACK BOUN PACK PACK A024 Core 101 ID. 2 101 13. 2 10119$ 10123. 5 10128. 2 10132. 1 10137. 3 A02-5 Cne 10165. 6 10172. 6 10176. 0 101874 101 L3. 2 101198 101 23. 5...

  17. Submarine diagenesis in Lower Cretaceous coral-rudist reefs, Mural Limestone, southeastern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, Scott Lewis

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon isotope values (d 3 C? = 2. 5 '/ ) and a 0. 3X Mg enrichment over original low-Mg calcite rudi st shells support the interpretation of these peloidal features as former Mg-calcite submar1ne cements. Primary porosity in the reef core was neglig1.... . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Peloidal submarine cement infilling primary porosity. . 6O 62 65 25 26 27 Thin section photomicrographs of nonmarine diagenetic components. SEM micrograph showing section through Holocene submarine cement peloid 4 3 C vs. &IBO...

  18. Frictional properties between fine grained limestone, dolomite and sandstone along precut surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Takeshi

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of all the combinations of rocks in contact. Th following are the experimental variables: (1) Angle between cut surface and load axis: 45 0 (2) Confining pressure: 350, 700, 1, 000, 1, 400 bars. -4 (3) Strain-rate: 10 / sec. (4) Temperature... 13 4. 0 P =1 c gl, 00 400 (bars) 700 4. 0 3. 0 700 350 A 350 2. 0 eLO A 2. 0 4. 0 6. 0 Strain (X) Figure 1-a. Stress-strain curves of Tennessee Sandstone against Tennessee Sandstone. 4. 0 2. 0 4. 0 6. 0 Strain (%%d) Figure 1-b...

  19. Crinoids from the Anchor Limestone (Lower Mississippian) of the Monte Cristo Group, southern Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, G. D.; Lane, N. G.

    1987-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Visean. ACTINOCRINITES ANCHORENSIS, n. sp. Fig. 5,8-11 Diagnosis. -Calyx broadly turbinate, teg- men convex, theca bowl-shaped, basal flange scalloped, ornament sharp, stellate, 6 arms per ray. Description. -Calyx small, broadly turbi- nate, tegmen convex... Visean. ACTINOCRINITES ANCHORENSIS, n. sp. Fig. 5,8-11 Diagnosis. -Calyx broadly turbinate, teg- men convex, theca bowl-shaped, basal flange scalloped, ornament sharp, stellate, 6 arms per ray. Description. -Calyx small, broadly turbi- nate, tegmen convex...

  20. Modeling ofHybrid (Heat Radiation and Microwave) High Temperature Processing ofLimestone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakovlev, Vadim

    2 l Ceralink, Inc., Troy, NY, USA 2 Department of Mathematical Sciences, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA, USA 3 Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw electromagnetic (EM) and compu tational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses and thus cannot be easily extended

  1. Diagenesis of Strawn limestone, South Carlsbad Field, Eddy County, New Mexico.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maley, Elaine Gail

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Strawn bioherms in South Carlsbad Field represent carbonate mud mounds formed by sediment trapping and baffling organisms, which colonized topographically higher areas of the sea… (more)

  2. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to augment geologic and geophysical studies and to develop a hydrogeologic conceptual model of groundwater.1029/2007WR006058. 1. Introduction [2] In 2000, more than 226 m3 /s of groundwater were withdrawn from conceptualization of groundwater flow Robert A. Renken,1 Kevin J. Cunningham,1 Allen M. Shapiro,2 Ronald W. Harvey,3

  3. The presence of tristeza virus in Satsuma oranges, Meyer lemons, and other citrus plants in the Gulf Coast areas in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malouf, Wajih D

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'TS I. !TOO/ 'JCT I "'I. EE Y I E OF L I TEA iT J RE ~ /nTE-I I/' r N YIETRJ" S. IES'J' T ' " '/' . ':I SC'J 'S I tnI Symptoms oF the isease in mexican Lime Seedlings. Citrus '/arieties Founc to Carry Tristeza "irus. = J / ?", RY ' N CC... on var i ous rootstocks may be symptomlsss carriers of tristsza virus (Glson ano Sleeth, 1/54) (7". ); (Olson and 'Jlacl onald, 1y54)(21). '!hi ls the major citrus area in Texas is the Lower Rio Grande Valley~ where the commor rootstock is sour...

  4. Wet scrubbers: Choose the best chemical reagent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, N.U. [Tecnochim s.r.l., Milano (Italy)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than a century, facilities in the chemical process industries have had to contend with a variety of regulated pollutants -- SOx, NOx, heavy metals and flyash -- in their flue-gases. Historically, operators of fossil-fuel-combustion processes have dealt with flue-gas pollution by operating a separate treatment facility for each pollutant. In recent years, however, an integrated, flue-gas-treatment system has emerged as a viable alternative to the traditional approach. By eliminating the use of an electrostatic precipitator in favor of several wet scrubbers and a downstream catalytic-reduction system for NOx, the new system shows operational and cost advantages over the conventional techniques. In this new method that uses three-stage flue-gas treatment, lime (calcium hydroxide, or Ca(OH){sub 2}) shows cost and operational advantages, and could displace limestone (calcium carbonate, or CaCO{sub 3}), the traditional favorite. For flue-gas treatment in the electric utility market, limestone currently dominates the scene. However, this may change as utility and industrial operators become more familiar with the potential advantages of using lime-based scrubbing solutions.

  5. Sugarcane juice extraction and preservation, and long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granda Cotlear, Cesar Benigno

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    C)................................................................................146 Figure 4.6 Total mass, holocellulose, lignin and ash for treatment without air purging at 23oC. .........................................................................147 Figure 4.7 Total mass, holocellulose, lignin and ash for treatment... without air purging at 30oC. .........................................................................148 Figure 4.8 Total mass, holocellulose, lignin and ash for treatment without air purging at 40o...

  6. First New World Documentation of an Old World Citrus Pest, the Lime Swallowtail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian D.

    (Lepidoptera:Papilionidae), in the Dominican Republic (Hispaniola) Kelvin A. Guerrero, Denia Veloz, Sarah Lyn, is documented from eastern Dominican Republic on the Ca- ribbean island of Hispaniola. Resumen. Se registra la especiePapilio derrzoleus, una reconocido plaga de 10s citricos en el Mundo Viejo, 1 para la Hispaniola

  7. Spring 2010 Anders Plejdrup Houmller, CEO, BlueLime Consulting, Karetmagervej 21 A, DK-7000 Fredericia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .bluelime.dk 2 2. The Point Tariff System In fig. 2, the water illustrates the electrical energy and the walls of the tanks illustrate the grid. The idea of the system of point tariff is that the producers pay a fee

  8. Volatile fatty acid fermentation of lime-treated bagasse by rumen microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chang-Ming

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the randomizing pathway through succinate. Carbohydrate Oxatoacetate 2H Malate QH 0 Fumarate Succmate Succinyl CoA C A Methylmalonyl CoA Propionyl CoA HrO Ct ATP? FF F ~~hl A ATP Acetoacetyl CoA 2HQ Acetate B ? hydroxybutyryt CoA Acrylate HtO... to those used to obtain the best yield or production of VFA. 25 13CHtCOOH ~ 4CHsCHtCHgCHtCOOH+ 7COg+ 6HtO (3) 4CHsCOOH ~ CHsCHgCHtCHtCHgCOOH + 2COa + 2HtO (4) However, all of the VFA concentrations can be measured directly, hence it is more convenient...

  9. Lessons Learned Following the Successful Decommissioning of a Reaction Vessel Containing Lime Sludge and Technetium-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, P. M.; Watson, D. D.; Hylko, J. M.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents how WESKEM, LLC utilized available source term information, integrated safety management, and associated project controls to safely decommission a reaction vessel and repackage sludge containing various Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The decommissioning activities were segmented into five separate stages, allowing the project team to control work related decisions based on their knowledge, experience, expertise, and field observations. The information and experience gained from each previous stage and rehearsals contributed to modifying subsequent entries, further emphasizing the importance of developing hold points and incorporating lessons learned. The hold points and lessons learned, such as performing detailed personal protective equipment (PPE) inspections during sizing and repackaging operations, and using foam-type piping insulation to prevent workers from cutting or puncturing their PPE on sharp edge s or small shards generated during sizing operations, minimized direct contact with the Tc-99. To prevent the spread of contamination, the decommissioning activities were performed inside a containment enclosure connected to negative air machines. After performing over 235 individual entries totaling over 285 project hours, only one first aid was recorded during this five-stage project.

  10. Volatile fatty acid fermentation of lime-treated biomass by rumen microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapier, Charles Robert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concentration was studied. A counter-current fermentation system was also simulated to determine if it provided advantages over a conventional batch fermentor. All of the substrates studied produced similar amounts of VFA's. Approximately 7- I 0 g/L of acetic... sugars. This is accomplished by hydrolytic enzymes. However, cellulose possesses a recalcitrant crystalline structure and is insoluble in aqueous solutions, making it highly resistant to enzymatic degradation. Compounding this problem is lignin, which...

  11. Cement kiln flue dust as a source of lime and potassium in four East Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, Warren David

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design on both sites. Yield, soil pH, plant and soil concentrations of K, Ca, and Mg were determined. Soil pH and extractable Ca increased with increasing rate of flue dust or calcite. Under field conditions, flue dust compared favorably with calcite... was similar to plant uptake from corresponding calcite + KC1 treatments. Soil pH and extractable soil K, Ca, and Mg increased with increased rate of flue dust treatment equally as well as from the corresponding calcite treatments. The flue dust was equal...

  12. Equations for predicting the layer stiffness moduli in pavement systems containing lime-flyash stabilized materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Shah Manzoor

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in site 2. Site 2 resurfaced with 2 in. NIAC jn Dctober 1980. originally constructed of one-course bituminous surface treatment. All ten sections of the test site were re-surfaced in October, 1980, with a 2-inch hot mix concrete overlay. Varying...

  13. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prepared mixtures, field mixtures obtained at the plant and pavement cores. Laboratory tests included Hveem and Marshall stability, resilient modulus and indirect tension. Mixture conditioning to evaluate resistance to moisture damage included vacuum... Mixed and Compacted Specimens Tensile Strength Ratio for Laboratory Mixed and Compacted Specimens 14 Marshall Stability Before and After 7-days Soaking in Water for Lab Mixed and Compacted Specimens 36 FIGURE Page 15 16 Hveem Stability Before...

  14. CONTROLLED LOW-STRENGTH MATERIAL (CLSM) PRODUCED WITH HIGH-LIME FLY ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    by the Detroit Edison Company, Detroit, Michigan, and Kuhlman Corp., Toledo, Ohio in the 1970s. The investigation

  15. LiME : A Linux based MPLS Emulator Abhijit Gadgil and Abhay Karandikar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karandikar, Abhay

    (API) for plugging in actual implementation thereby enabling a network device (called Device Under TestME to inject MPLS traĂ?c into the external world. Rest of the paper is organized as follows. Section 2 discusses

  16. inp_30cm_60x60_1_200Hz_lime_shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... ros(2)= solid grains density (shale)(kg/m^3) used 1.81465889E+10 km(2)= Bulk modulus dry matrix (Pa) used 1.33564722E+10 mum(2)= shear modulus dry

  17. RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    to immobilize metals from wastewater and soils (Viraraghavan and Rao, 1991). Various methods to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils and wastes exist, including thermal, biological, and physical/chemical treatments. However, most current treatment technologies are either too costly or only partially effective

  18. Sulfate Fining Chemistry in Oxidized and Reduced Soda-Lime-Silica Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Various reducing agents were used and their additions were varied to (1) increase glass quality through eliminating defects from silica scum, (2) decrease SOx emissions through changing the kind and quantity of reducing agents, and (3) improve production efficiency through increased flexibility of glass redox control during continuous processing. The work included measuring silica sand dissolution and sulfate decomposition in melts from glass batches. Glass batches were heated at a temperature-increase rate deemed similar to that experienced in the melting furnace. The sulfate decomposition kinetics was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis. Sulfur concentrations in glasses quenched at different temperatures were determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The distribution of residual sand (that which was not dissolved during the initial batch reactions) in the glass was obtained as a function of temperature with optical microscopy in thin-sections of melts. The fraction of undissolved sand was measured with X-ray diffraction. The results of the present study helped Visteon Inc. reduce the energy consumption and establish the batch containing 0.118 mass% of graphite as the best candidate for Visteon glass production. The improved glass batch has a lower potential for silica scum formation and for brown fault occurrence in the final glass product. It was established that bubbles trapped in the melt even at 1450 C have a high probability to be refined when reaching the hot zone in the glass furnace. Furthermore, silica sand does not accumulate at the glass surface and dissolves faster in the batch with graphite than in the batch with carbocite.

  19. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. [Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States); Beittel, R. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 30, 291-304 (1983) Wollastonite Exposure and Lung Fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    metamorphic limestone deposits. The commercially mined deposit is located in Lappeenranta, where the limestone

  1. Isolation and characterization of a wound inducible phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene (LsPAL1) from Romaine lettuce leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campos, R; Nonogaki, H; Suslow, T; Saltveit, Mikal E

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thaliana (L33678), Petroselinum crispum (X81159), Daucusisoenzymes from parsley (Petroselinum crispum Nym). FEBSenzyme from parsley (Petroselinum crispum L. ). FEBS Lett

  2. i* ,C le"/ ^ /o ^ -g C lS' -e l/ -iLE COPY DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE FLUIDYNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee #12;ABSTRACT The dynamio behavior of the liquid-piston Stirling engine tuning line oscillations INTRODUCTION The dynamics of the liquid piston Stirling engine have been before the 18th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference IECEC '83 August 21-26, 1983

  3. LS Note 327 - A New Type of Bunch Compressor and Seeding of a Short Wave Length Coherent Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping of Plasma

  4. LS Note 336 - A Method of Optimizing Field Roll-Off and the Peak Field of Hybrid Planar Undulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping of PlasmaMethod

  5. LS-266 OPTIMIZATION OF FOUR-BUTTON BEAM POSITION MONITOR CONFIGURATION FOR SMALL-GAP VACUUM CHAMBERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, NewattractsDamping

  6. Made ill Ullited States of :\\meTica Hcprintcd from TilE \\\\'!Loun: SOCIlITY BULu.'ls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . ANDERSON, Utah Cooperative Wildlife Rellearch Unit, Utah State Univer.ity, Logan, UT 84322 Abstract, Laurel, Mary- land, as shot or found dead during the hunting season were included in our analysis. Many) and Anderson (1975). Only birds 80-W #12;SURVIVAL ESTIMATES FOR CANADA GEESE' Ratti et al. 147 Table 1. Bandiu

  7. Initial test results of the limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) demonstration project. Report for September 1984-April 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolan, P.S.; Hendriks, R.V.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency and low-NOx burner performance obtained during short term tests, as well as the impact of LIMB ash on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station. Project goals are to demonstrate 50% or more SO/sub 2/ removal at a Ca/S molar stoichiometry of 2.0 and NOx emissions of less than 0.5 lb/million Btu while maintaining boiler operability and reliability. The tests, conducted before September 1987, indicated that 55-60% SO/sub 2/ removal and NOx emissions on the order of 0.48 lb/million Btu are achievable. The increased dust loading of a high-resistivity ash typically limited continuous operation to 2-6 hr. The paper discusses how the LIMB ash gave rise to back corona which, in turn, increased stack opacity to regulated levels. The extension of the project to include humidification of the flue gas is also described as a way to minimize these effects.

  8. Petrological and petrophysical causes for porosity reduction by bitumen plugging, Uwainat limestone (Middle Jurassic), Dukhan field, Qatar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdulla, Hezam Yahya H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and fabric whereas the pores formed by diagenetic alteration are related to processes of leaching and pressure dissolution. Intergranular pores are the most abundant pore type present in Uwainat rocks; therefore, they are considered to be the primary...

  9. Diagenetic history and the evolution of porosity in the Cotton Valley Limestone, Teague Townsite Field, Freestone County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffensen, Carl Kristian

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopes Environments of Diagenesis. CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES CITED APPENDIX I APPENDIX II APPENDIX III APPENDIX IV. 19 19 25 26 26 28 28 29 37 37 72 88 96 107 116 118 132 VITA 134 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Composition of modern... fine, intragranular porosity that is not detectable with the petrographic microscope. The "chalky" or pithy appearance of both the grains and cement can be seen under the SEM (Figs. 17 and 18). Inversion The transformation of aragonite to calcite...

  10. Effect of limestone reactivity on the digestibility of nutrients in sorghum based diets fed to lactating Holstein cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malasri, Kriangchitt Banphabutr

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    17 energy rations had little effect on pH in the reticulo- rumen but substantially increased (P(. 01) post-abomasal pH (61, 63) because of a low absorption rate of calcium from the lower gastro-intestinal tract (62 ). The increase of dietary...

  11. A comparative molecular analysis of water-filled limestone sinkholes in north-eastern Mexicoemi_2324 226..240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the autonomous underwater vehicle deep phreatic thermal explorer (DEPTHX). The community structure

  12. An investigation of the creep phenomena exhibited by Solenhofen limestone, halite, and cement under medium confining pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kendall, Halcombe Augustus

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHORT-T II" 1' - T IN F I GURE 5. CONF INED SHORT-T IME T'- ' T IN vROGR. 8 26 F IGURE 6 F IGURE 7 CREEP TESTS IN PROG+' b~, SH' ~tNG AUXILIARY LOADING DEViCi FA I LURE OF SOLENHOF t N L I I'tc STONc SPECIMENS 2'7 JO FIGURE 8. FAILURE OF CEMENT... IN 19/7 ON ROCK SALT& AND BY 12 LAYS LIBRARY A BIB COLLEGE OF TEXAS IN 19/6~ GR I GGS DEFORMED L I MESTONE UNDER CONF I N ING 1 PRESSURES UP TO 13 F000 ATMOSPHERES ~ HE SHOWED THAT WHEN THE SPECIMENS WERE JACKETED' SO THAT THE KEROSENE (USED...

  13. Image processing for the non-destructive characterization of porous media. Application to limestones and trabecular bones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) and manmade materials (e.g. industrial foams, ceramics, electronic nanodevices) are examples of porous media their complex geometry, in order to improve and enhance their performance (glass or carbon fiber), to avoid (or

  14. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  15. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  16. Demonstration of sorbent injection technology on a tangentially coal-fired utility boiler (Yorktown Limb Demonstration)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, J.P.; Koucky, R.W.; Gogineni, M.R. [Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) technology has been successfully demonstrated on a tangentially fired coal-burning utility boiler, Virginia Power`s 180 MWe Yorktown Unit No. 2. This document summarizes the activities conducted, and results achieved, under this EPA-sponsored demonstration program. LIMB combines furnace injection of a calcium-based sorbent for moderate reductions of sulfur dioxide with a low nitrogen oxide firing system for NO{sub x} emissions reduction. The process is attractive for retrofit of existing coal-burning utility boilers, since the capital equipment requirements and overall sulfur reduction costs per ton of SO{sub 2} removed are less than for most other options, such as wet flue gas desulfurization. Five sorbents were tested: commercial hydrated lime, with and without calcium lignosulfonate treatment, each from two suppliers, and finely pulverized limestone. The effects of LIMB operation on boiler, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and ash handling system performance are also discussed. The most significant impact on boiler performance was the deposition rate of LIMB solids plus flyash on boiler convective surfaces during continuous operation, resulting in poorer boiler heat transfer performance and higher temperatures leaving the boiler. Continuous operation of the sootblowing system minimized this effect. The results of two ESP performance tests which were conducted during continuous LIMB operation are discussed and compared to results from similar testing conducted without LIMB operation. Ash conditioning and disposal during LIMB operation at Yorktown was significantly affected by the unreacted lime in the ash. These problems, as well as suggested precautions to avoid them, are discussed. Recommendations for LIMB commercialization, and an evaluation of the economics of the technology in comparison to a conventional flue gas desulfurization system, are discussed.

  17. Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falls, Matthew David

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    enhanced the 72-h glucan digestibility of several promising biomass feedstocks: bagasse (74.0), corn stover (92.0), poplar wood (94.0), sorghum (71.8), and switchgrass (89.0). Highly digestible lignocellulose can also be used as ruminant animal feed. Shock...

  18. Zinc Fertilization Plus Liming to Reduce Cadmium Uptake by Romaine Lettuce on Cd-Mineralized Lockwood Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaney, Rufus L; Green, Carrie E.; Ajwa, Husein A; Smith, Richard F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by emissions from zinc smelters. Trace Subst. Environ.1999) who studied Zn-smelter or mine waste contaminated orgrowing Romaine lettuce on Zn-smelter contaminated soils in

  19. The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    small fish are being reared. Calcite and dolomite increase the total hardness, total alkalinity, and p desirable for most freshwater fish. Water in ponds reflects the quality of the soils in which they are located. In acid soils, ponds typically have low total alkalinity, total hardness, and pH. Total hardness

  20. Dry flue gas desulfurization process for various coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widico, M.J.; Dhargalkar, P.H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes have been widely used since the early 1970's for control of sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. First generation FGD systems employ ''wet processes'' whereby the flue gas is contacted with a solution or slurry of an alkali reagent. Most of these installations use either lime or limestone. Calcium-based wet systems have, in general, satisfied SO/sub 2/ removal requirements; however, reliability of the early systems was affected by some operational problems. Additionally, sludge dewatering and disposal equipment results in overall system complexity. A dry FGD process which minimizes these problems was developed in late 1970's. It incorporates a spray drying concept for removal of SO/sub 2/ by reaction with lime slurry or soda ash solution. The spray dryer absorber is followed by an electrostatic precipitator or a fabric filter where particulates are collected. The waste product, which is a mixture of FGD reaction products, unreacted reagent and fly ash, is dry thus eliminating the need for dewatering equipment.

  1. Fistuliporacean bryozoans of the Wreford megacyclothem (Lower Permian) of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, D. J.; Cuffey, Roger J.

    1973-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Millimmtimmik.. ROCS ilgal limestone El algal molluscan limestone :halky limestone ED enem y limestone CED lta .1 11 T::• Warner & Cugey—Wreford Fist uliporacean Bryozoans 13 Pclothem (complete section shown in, and after, Cuffey, ces of Fistulipora incrustans...Millimmtimmik.. ROCS ilgal limestone El algal molluscan limestone :halky limestone ED enem y limestone CED lta .1 11 T::• Warner & Cugey—Wreford Fist uliporacean Bryozoans 13 Pclothem (complete section shown in, and after, Cuffey, ces of Fistulipora incrustans...

  2. Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Second quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994 (Quarter No. 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite (CaSO{sub 3}{lg_bullet}0.5H{sub 2}0), gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{lg_bullet}2H{sub 2}0), and unreacted limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) or lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}), with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides; silica; and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. Currently, the only market for scrubber sludge is for manufacture of gypsum products, such as wallboard and plaster, and for cement. However, the quality of the raw sludge is often not high enough or consistent enough to satisfy manufacturers, and so the material is difficult to sell. This project is developing a process that can produce a high-quality calcium sulfite or gypsum product while keeping process costs low enough that the material produced will be competitive with that from other, more conventional sources. This purification will consist of minimal-reagent froth flotation, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified gypsum or calcium sulfite product. The separated limestone will be a useful by-product, as it can be recycled to the scrubber, thus boosting the limestone utilization and improving process efficiency. Calcium sulfite will then be oxidized to gypsum, or separated as a salable product in its own right from sludges where it is present in sufficient quantity. The main product of the process will be either gypsum or calcium sulfite, depending on the characteristics of the sludge being processed. These products will be sufficiently pure to be easily marketed, rather that being landfilled.

  3. Om du vill f en skymt av barkborrarna eller deras runristarlika spr, g ut i granskogen. P gammal gran och tall kan du frsiktigt plocka ls barkbitar,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Om du vill fÄ en skymt av barkborrarna eller deras runristarlika spÄr, gÄ ut i granskogen. PÄ gammal gran och tall kan du försiktigt plocka lös barkbitar, för att dÀr under hitta spÄren efter bita sig in i en nyfallen gran. VÀl inne i barken börjar vÄr man att fisa ­ vad nu? Han förvandlar

  4. C Reference Card (ANSI) Constants Flow of Control suffix: long, unsigned,6float5536L,s-1U,t3.0Fate*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverman, Joseph H.

    C Reference Card (ANSI) Constants Flow of Control(var)dtexteclarationsdeclaration of members Example. #define max(A,B) ((A)>(B)}?;(A) : (B)) ANSI Standard Libra* *ries undefine

  5. Sheridan, S.C. and L.S. Kalkstein, 1998: Health watch/warning systems in urban areas. World Resource Review, 10, 375-383.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    excessive heat, in increasing morbidity and mortality in urban areas (Pennsylvania Emergency Management has been shown to be a statistically significant predictor of elevated human mortality during hot on buildings (Kalkstein and Davis 1989). Also, wind speed is a desiccating factor and adds heat load

  6. LS-DOSTM update from 6.3.0 to 6.3.1 Copyright 1990 MISOSYS, Inc., All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    no customer service number. The ID command will generate "No service contract" when invoked. This indicates that there is no telephone support of 6.3.1 and no customer support beyond the 30-day warranty period unless a service contract has been purchased. LIST: The LIST command's display output has been enhanced to default to paged

  7. A study of some of the factors influencing the laboratory determination of the relative permeability-saturation relationship for large diameter limestone cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Roy M

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are several relative permeability curves for porous media. Although much experimental work has been done on the flow of heterogeneous fluids through porous med. ia there is insuffici. ent, data to allow the prediction of the relative permeabi11ty-saturation... med. ia. His experiments were made w1th water flowing through horizontal sand filter bed, s and resulted. in his formulation that the rate of flow of a fluid. through a porous medium is proportional to the pressure or hydraulic gradient...

  8. The effect of metals and soil pH on the growth of Rhododendron and other alpine plants in limestone soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaisheva, Maria V

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhododendrons are economically important plants in horticulture, and many species are threatened in the wild by habitat degradation. It is therefore doubly important that their nutritional needs should be understood.

  9. THE COMPOSITION OF BRYOPHYTE COMMUNITIES ON LIMESTONE VERSUS BASALT SUBSTRATES IN COASTAL AND MID-ELEVATION FORESTS OF MO'OREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jasper

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and macronutrients, like phosphorous, (Bailey 1996) which isP=0.0034). Lastly, the phosphorous concentration isin a higher pH. Finally, phosphorous levels were 3ppm higher

  10. Reductive Biotransformation of Fe in Shale-Limestone Saprolite Containing Fe(III) Oxides and Fe(II)/Fe(III) Phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Smith, Steven C.; Dong, Hailiang

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A <2.0-mm fraction of a mineralogically complex subsurface sediment containing goethite and Fe(II)/Fe(III) phyllosilicates was incubated with Shewanella putrefaciens (strain CN32) and lactate at circumneutral pH under anoxic conditions to investigate electron acceptor preference and the nature of the resulting biogenic Fe(II) fraction. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttle, was included in select treatments to enhance bioreduction and subsequent biomineralization. The sediment was highly aggregated and contained two distinct clast populations: i) a highly weathered one with “sponge-like” internal porosity, large mineral crystallites, and Fe-containing micas, and ii) a dense, compact one with fine-textured Fe-containing illite and nano-sized goethite, as revealed by various forms of electron microscopic analyses. Approximately 10 to 15% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 over 60 d in media without AQDS, whereas 24% and 35% of the Fe(III)TOT was bioreduced by CN32 after 40 and 95 d in media with AQDS. Little or no Fe2+, Mn, Si, Al, and Mg were evident in aqueous filtrates after reductive incubation. Mössbauer measurements on the bioreduced sediments indicated that both goethite and phyllosilicate Fe(III) were partly reduced without bacterial preference. Goethite was more extensively reduced in the presence of AQDS whereas phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction was not influenced by AQDS. Biogenic Fe(II) resulting from phyllosilicate Fe(III) reduction remained in a layer-silicate environment that displayed enhanced solubility in weak acid. The mineralogic nature of the goethite biotransformation product was not determined. Chemical and cryogenic Mössbauer measurements, however, indicated that the transformation product was not siderite, green rust, magnetite, Fe(OH)2, or Fe(II) adsorbed on phyllosilicate or bacterial surfaces. Several lines of evidence suggested that biogenic Fe(II) existed as surface associated phase on the residual goethite, and/or as a Fe(II)-Al coprecipitate. Sediment aggregation and mineral physical and/or chemical factors were demonstrated to play a major role on the nature and location of the biotransformation reaction and its products.

  11. High-volume natural volcanic pozzolan and limestone powder as partial replacements for portland cement in self-compacting and sustainable concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the resulting self-compacting concrete (SCC). Petrographicity, which satisfy self-compacting concrete criteria withoutcement in self-compacting and sustainable concrete K. Celik

  12. The civic forum in ancient Israel : the form, function, and symbolism of city gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frese, Daniel Allan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a small strip of lime plaster flooring found inside the 4the other half had a lime plaster finish (Ussishkin, “Areaa few patches of lime plaster were found on top of the

  13. BBR Asphalt mixture creep test BBR Asphalt mixture creep size effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    and two aggregates, compacted to 4% air voids PG binder Modification Aggregate 58-34 SBS Granite 58-34 SBS Limestone 58-28 Unmodified Granite 58-28 Unmodified Limestone 64-34 Elvaloy Granite 64-34 Elvaloy Limestone 64-28 Unmodified Granite 64-28 Unmodified Limestone 64-28 SBS Granite 64-28 SBS Limestone #12;Three

  14. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  15. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

  16. Effects of the maximum soil aggregates size and cyclic wetting-drying on the stiffness of a lime-treated clayey soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and hydro-mechanical properties of compacted soils. Nevertheless, studies on the scale effect under climatic of treated soils, giving rise to changes in hydro-mechanical properties. This modification could be dependent system via evaporation) can give rise to significant change in soil hydro-mechanical properties

  17. Geology of the Loyal Valley-West area, Mason County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kmiecik, Jerome Gregory

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandstone Member. Gap Mountain Limestone Member Lion Mountain Limestone Member . 31 A'ilberns Formation . 32 Welge Sandstone Mexnber. Morgan Creek Limestone Member . Point Peak Shale Member 33 36 San Saba Limestone Member . Ox dovician Systexn... Saadstone Member. 25 Weathered Surface of the Cap Mountain Limestone Member . VII. Sandstone Bed in the Cap Mountain Limestone Member 30 Contact Be~eon the Lion Mountain and Welge Members . IX. Weathered Morgan Creek Limestoae Member 38 Bioherms...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - abandoned aggregate quarries Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ECONOMICAL... of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting Concrete Principle Investigator Name... limestone quarry in Wisconsin generates over...

  19. Product development of FGD recovered magnesium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeghly, J.H.; Babu, M.; Smith, K.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ThioClear FGD processes developed by the Dravo Lime Company (DLC) produce a high brightness gypsum and magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) by-product. Both originate as white precipitates from a solution of magnesium sulfate. The use of magnesium-enhanced lime avoids the mineral impurities from direct neutralization when using pulverized limestone rock. White, pure FGD synthetic gypsum can be used to produce higher value products such as mineral fillers and industrial plasters. This paper focuses on the product development of the Mg(OH){sub 2} by-product. Commercial Mg(OH){sub 2} sells at over $200/Ton for a variety of uses, most of which is wastewater treatment and a feedstock to make magnesium chemicals and refractories. Beneficial uses in the power plant are pH control of acidic coal pile stormwater runoff and bottom ash quench water. A future use being explored is injection into coal fired boilers to neutralize sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) to prevent stack gas opacity related emission problems and minimize air preheater corrosion and fouling. The objective of this project is to improve the purity and solids content of the by-product after it is separated from the gypsum. Several options were investigated to convert it into a more marketable or usable form. Test results and economic evaluations are reported during the different process steps needed to improve the product quality: (1) dissolving or washing out the gypsum impurity; (2) thickening the washed solids and using the overflow for makeup water within the FGD water balance; (3) finding the best means to dewater the washed, thickened slurry; and (4) repulp the dewatered cake into a stabilized slurry or dry it to powder. Flash drying the dewatered cake is compared to spray drying the thickened slurry. FGD Mg(OH){sub 2} is shown to have equal reactivity as an acid neutralization reagent on a Mg(OH){sub 2} molar basis to commercial Mg(OH){sub 2} products and other alkaline reagents. Its use for pH control in wastewater treatment is shown to produce a much smaller sludge volume than lime or sodium hydroxide.

  20. adult rat lung: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: . The correlation between LS alterations and airway obstruction in asthma has long been recognized in clinical). The LS signals were...

  1. ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high-temperature reactivity of CaO. Therefore, a sorbent prepared from dolomite withstands the effects of repeated sulfidation and regeneration better than one prepared from limestone. It was also determined that both the compressive strength and attrition resistance of core-in-shell pellets depend on shell thickness and that the compressive strength can be improved by reducing both the particle size and amount of limestone in the shell preparation mixture. A semiempirical model was also found which seems to adequately represent the absorption process. This model can be used for analyzing and predicting sorbent performance, and, therefore, it can provide guidance for any additional development which may be required. In conclusion, the overall objective of developing an economical, reusable, and practical material was largely achieved. The material appears suitable for removing CO{sub 2} from fuel combustion products as well as for desulfurizing hot coal gas.

  2. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  3. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, January - March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  4. Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

  5. SOXAL{trademark} pilot plant demonstration at Niagara Mohawk`s Dunkirk Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strangway, P.K. [Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 made it necessary to accelerate the development of scrubber systems for use by some utilities burning sulfur-containing fuels, primarily coal. While many types of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) systems operate based on lime and limestone scrubbing, these systems have drawbacks when considered for incorporation into long-term emissions control plans. Although the costs associated with disposal of large amounts of scrubber sludge may be manageable today, the trend is toward increased disposal costs. Many new SO{sub 2} control technologies are being pursued in the hope of developing an economical regenerable FGD system did recovers the SO{sub 2} as a saleable commercial product, thus minimizing the formation of disposal waste. Some new technologies include the use of exotic chemical absorbents which are alien to the utility industry and utilities` waste treatment facilities. These systems present utilities with new environmental issues. The SOXAL{trademark} process has been developed so as to eliminate such issues.

  6. Avoid stainless steel failures in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, J.P.; Schillmoller, C.M.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preventing pitting and localized corrosion is the key to success where low maintenance and high reliability are rime considerations in flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) designs. Knowing when to use a stainless steel, and when not to, is crucial. Operating parameters and environmental factors greatly affect alloy performance, especially pH, temperature, and chloride and oxygen levels. Failures of stainless steels can be avoided by understanding their limits in light of these variables. This article will focus on the capabilities of Types 316L, 317L, 317LM, 317LMN, 904L, and 6% Mo stainless steels and their applications, as well as provide details on unique combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the 22% Cr duplex and 25% Cr super-duplex stainless steels in acid chloride systems. Guidelines will be presented on methods to prevent intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and pitting and crevice corrosion, and what process steps can be taken to assure reasonable performance of marginal alloy selections. Emphasis will be on the lime/limestone wet scrubbing process and the quencher/absorber.

  7. Ordovician Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes}: Horizontal oil play in the southern Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent application of horizontal drilling technology to the Ordovician Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} zone in the southern Williston basin has resulted in a successful oil play, with more than 100 wells drilled in 1995 and 1996. The Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} reservoir is a dolomitized laminated carbonate with microsucrosic porosity of 8-25% and permeabilities in the range of 1-66 md. It occurs within the middle of three depositional cycles ({open_quotes}A,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}B,{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}C{close_quotes}) that form the upper Red River Formation. Each cycle consists of a lower burrowed limestone, middle laminated member, and capping anhydrite or lime mudstone. The {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} reservoir is confined to the {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} laminated member and consists of an upper portion, characterized by better reservoir quality, and a lower, less permeable portion. Horizontal drilling has the advantage of significantly increasing well-bore exposure to the upper, more permeable portion. Well data indicate the total Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} porosity zone has remarkable extent over parts of southwestern North Dakota, southeastern Montana, and northwestern South Dakota. Productivity from horizontal well displays considerable variation that can be correlated with structure/tectonic patterns and with reservoir petrophysical character.

  8. Discrete Element Modeling of Influences of Aggregate Gradation and Aggregate Properties on Fracture in Asphalt Mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoud, Enad Muhib Ahmad

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................ 65 Case I: A Blend of Soft Limestone and Hard Limestone ...... 65 Case II: A Blend of Sandstone and Soft Limestone .............. 68 Comparison of Case I and Case II Results... Strength ......................................................................... 44 3.6 Internal Force Changes with Change in Applied Load for Soft Limestone Mixtures ............................................................. 48 3...

  9. COMPARISON OF MICRO-INCH IN-PLANE AND OUT-OF-PLANE RESPONSE OF CRACKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    limestone quarries. In two locations, sensors that measure in-plane and normal displacement were installed

  10. S p e c i a lS p e c i a lS p e c i a lS p e c i a l G u e s tG u e s tG u e s tG u e s t I s s u eI s s u eI s s u eI s s u e CDQM, Volume 8, Number 3, 2005, pp. 55-61

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Gal, Irad E.

    . INTRODUCTION Most statistical process control (SPC) methods use a Shewhart type control chart to monitor, equivalently, its code length) can detect process changes that may be undetectable by traditional SPC methods of samples that are needed for reliable monitoring. Key words: Process control; Control charts; Stochastic

  11. CSE Citation Style for Bibliography/Works Cited Page (Name/Date) Simon N. 1995. Nature in danger: threatened habitats and species. New York (NY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    -2141. ________________________________________________________________________ Journal Article from a Subscription Database Waldner LS. 2008. The kudzu connection: exploring the link

  12. Chemical Consequences of Heme Distortion and the Role of Heme Distortion in Signal Transduction of H-NOX Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olea, Jr., Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scintillation liquid (MP Biomedicals) and measured with LS 650 (Beckman Coulter). Mass Spectrometry.

  13. On Hilbert after slide 4 1 echo $SHELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, David B.

    On Hilbert after slide 4 1 echo $SHELL 2 ls ­la /bin/*sh* 3 clear 4 ls 5 cat get 6 ls ­la get after slide 5 1 cat Rb 2 cat rnorm.R 3 ./R 4 ls ­la Rb 5 chmod +x Rb 6 cat Rb 7 man ls 8 ls ­c *.out 9 ls ­lc *.out 10 man head 11 ./Rb rnorm.R 12 clear On Hilbert after slide 7 1 cat res 2 man

  14. Condensation and pattern formation in cold exciton gases L.V. Butov1,2, L.S. Levitov3, A.V. Mintsev1,2, B.D. Simons4, A.L. Ivanov5,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    (1990) X. Zhu, P.B. Littlewood, M. Hybertsen, T. Rice, PRL 74, 1633 (1995) the ground state near phase transition Butov et al. J. de Physique 3, 167 (1993) PRL 73, 304 (1994) PRB 58, 1980 (1998-gas of excitons Butov et al. PRL 86, 5608 (2001) PRL 87, 216804 (2001) shrinkage of spatially localized exciton

  15. (MIRU2005)!W2005 G/7 7n 2hA--Ns$rMxMQ$7$?0"F07?%l%s%8%;%s%5$+$iF@$i$l$k 3 !857Au=$I--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    $l$F$$$k!%ÂĄBJ*BN%b%G%j%s %0$N5;=Q$O!$3X=Q!$;:6H!$%(%s%?!ÂĄ%F%$%s%a%s%H$J$IB?$/$NJ, Ln$GI,MW$H$5$l!$$^$?GH5Z8z2L$,4--BT

  16. U01HG004279 (D.M.M.), U01HG004261 (E.L.), U01HG004274 (S.H.), and U41HG004269 (L.S.). Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .T.N.), the Indiana Genomics Initiative (T.C.K.), H. Smith and the NIDDK genomics core laboratory (B.O.), NIH R01HG

  17. DANE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    of 6000 l/s. We give 2 examples: Example I C = 3000 l/s Area = 3000 l/s Area 4000 cm2 S = 4.7 104 l/s at k = 1 S = 6000 l/s at k = 0.12 The gas load of 4.2 10-5 Torr vessels connected to the chamber via 10" conflat flanges (20 cm opening) having a conductance of 3000 l

  18. Production of ritual material culture in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic period in Jordan : some methods for analytical investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennallack, Kathleen Celia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near East: Experimental lime-plaster production at the Pre-just like bone, charcoal, plaster, and anything else thatsuch as studies of lime plaster (Goren and Goring-Morris

  19. MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diluting and using emulsions Dormant spraying Dry lime-sulphur Dusting D N Oils Dormant oils European red Insects on plums Introduction ..- [ron-sulphate-lime mixture I .ead arsenate Leaf-curl I ,eaf hoppers Leaf

  20. Anaerobic fermentation of rice straw and chicken manure to carboxylic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agbogbo, Frank Kwesi

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, 80% lime-treated rice straw and 20% lime-treated chicken manure were used as substrates in rotary fermentors. Countercurrent fermentation was performed at various volatile solid loading rates (VSLR) and liquid residence times (LRT...

  1. Conversion of Waste Biomass into Useful Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtzapple, M.

    Waste biomass includes municipal solid waste (MSW), municipal sewage sludge (SS), industrial biosludge, manure, and agricultural residues. When treated with lime, biomass is highly digestible by a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms. Lime...

  2. ForPeerReview Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    of industrial7 processes, e.g., lime production waste, steelworks slags, coal combustion residues, Solvay8

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aurantifolia swingle para Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    avo- cado (Persea americana Mill.) acid lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), and potato (Solanum... aurantifolia, Solanum tuberosum, PLU, postharvest, produce labeling...

  4. EXPOS 20: HUMAN DEATH AND DISEASE--ACHTERBERG SPRING 2012: 2-4 IIDDEEAASS && SSTTRRUUCCTTUURREE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    of possible "ideas", aka fruits: Apple; Banana; Cranberry; Fig; Kiwi; Lime; Nectarine; Pear; Pitaya; Raspberry don't like Banana Apple Cranberry Fig Kiwi Lime Nectarine Raspberry Pear Pitaya Student 3 Fruits I Cranberry Fig Kiwi Nectarine Banana Pear Pitaya Raspberry Lime Possible type of thesis: Fruits can grow

  5. Ann. For. Sci. 63 (2006) 861869 861 c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    due to acid rain and soil acidification [39, 40]. The ex- pected positive effects of forest liming, experimental acid irrigation, acid irrigation + liming, normal irrigation, and normal irrigation + liming. The elemental concentrations of the acid irrigated treatment did not differ significantly from the normal

  6. Advanced product recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied to 72,000 MW of US, coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed form the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its industry and commercialization advisor, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner, Tufts, plans to develop and scale-up an advanced, byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, catalytic process for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, they have planned a structured program including: market/process/cost/evaluation; lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and utility review. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning.

  7. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO[sub x] to molecular nitrogen (N[sub 2]) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO[sub x] emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO[sub x]. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO[sub 4], an injection temperature of about 1230[degrees]C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H[sub 2]0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

  8. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Environmental monitoring quarterly report No. 9, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO{sub 4}, an injection temperature of about 1230{degrees}C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H{sub 2}0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

  9. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Environmental monitoring quarterly report No. 8, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Coal Technology implies the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Coal combustion results in the emission of two types of acid rain precursors: oxides of sulfur (sox) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}). This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. Gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO{sub 4}, an injection temperature of about 1230{degrees}C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H{sub 2}O added for humidification. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

  10. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Coal Technology implies the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Coal combustion results in the emission of two types of acid rain precursors: oxides of sulfur (sox) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]). This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions. Gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO[sub x] to molecular nitrogen (N[sub 2]) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO[sub x] emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO[sub x]. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO[sub 4], an injection temperature of about 1230[degrees]C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H[sub 2]O added for humidification. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

  11. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

  12. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  13. Nutrients and Nutrient Nutrient cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Randall J.

    : 38,000 Fossil Fuels:Fossil Fuels: 25,000,00025,000,000 Limestone,Limestone, Dolomite:Dolomite: 18 to atmosphere currently exceed outputs because of - Fossil fuel burning - Vegetation burning - Reduced primary

  14. Allan J. Dyson: Managing the UCSC Library, 1979-2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyson, Allan J.; Reti, Irene; Regional History Project, UCSC Library

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there are underground caverns. Limestone . . . Reti: Yes.they bridged the caved-in cavern by putting the pillars inthere was a giant limestone cavern underneath and they had

  15. BY EWEN CALLAWAY he iconic status of Archaeopteryx, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    up in limestone quarries in Bavaria, southern Germany, in the early 1860s. Until recently, they were

  16. MONITORING OF CRACKS ON THE BELL TOWER OF ST. ANASTASIA CATHEDRAL IN ZADAR CROATIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    stones of limestone, the older part from the local quarries, while the newer part mainly from the quarry

  17. Geology of the Homer Martin Ranch Area, Mason County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pool, Alexander Stuart

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandstone Nember. ~. . . ~ Cap Mountain Limestone Member ~. . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ Lion Mountain Sandstone Member. . . ~ ~ ~ . , ~ e ~ 36 WQberns Formation ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 45 Welge Sandstone Member. Morgan Creek L1mestone Member... membered' the Hickory sandstone member, the Cap Mountain limestone member, and the Lion Nountain sandstone member. The Wilberns formation consists of four members: the Welge sandstone member, the Morgan Creek limestone member, the Point Peak shale...

  18. Influence of the Summer Marine Layer on Maritime Chaparral and Implications for Conservation Policy in the California Coastal Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasey, Michael Charles

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N.J. , Cornell, H.V. , Comita, L.S. , Davies, K.F. ,N.J. , Cornell, H.V. , Comita, L.S. , Davies, K.F. ,

  19. Plant-Water Relations in Seasonally Dry Tropical Montane Cloud Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Gregory Rubin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Science 322: 258-261. Comita LS, Engelbrecht BMJ. 2009.258-269. Engelbrecht BMJ, Comita LS, Condit R, Kursar TA,my research. I thank Liza Comita and Donie Bret-Harte for

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - area strategy part Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Learning Strategy ARIES Lab, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Saskatchewan, Summary: in doing so 27. In summary, LS-LS is based on four areas of previous...

  1. The vitamin D receptor is present in caveolae-enriched plasma membranes and binds 1 alpha,25(OH)(2)-vitamin D-3 in vivo and in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huhtakangas, J A; Olivera, C J; Bishop, J E; Zanello, L P; Norman, Anthony W

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measured by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The histogramby liquid scintillation spectrometry (LS6500, Beckmandetermined by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Determining

  2. On Optimal Slicing of Parallel Programs Markus Muller-Olm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂŒller-Olm, Markus

    On Optimal Slicing of Parallel Programs Markus Mšuller-Olm Universitšat Dortmund, FB Informatik, LS

  3. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [sup [epsilon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, R.L.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) [sup [epsilon

  4. DEGREES, MAJORS, AND OPTIONS This is a list of the degrees, majors, and options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    &S) Asian Studies* (L&S) Astronomy - Physics* (L&S) Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences* (L&S) Biochemistry* (L to the degree are shown. These degree titles appear on the student's transcript and on the diploma. The major titles and any applicable options appear only on the student's transcript. The school

  5. Vegetative regeneration in selected south Texas shrubs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flinn, Robert C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Study Site. Regenerative Structure Description. Sprouting Potential of Roots. Motte Regeneration. Regrowth Comparison. Shrub Stem Classification. . 13 . . . 14 16 17 17 18 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. Regenerative Morphology Desert Yaupon Lime... varying regenerative responses of south Texas shrubs following burning. Lime pricklyash (~n~xlum tacaara (L. ) Sarg. ) suffered the least mortality (4%) while the highest mortality (40%) occurred with lotebush. Lime pricklyash sprouted vigorous- ly...

  6. Ammonia volatilization from surface application of ammonium sulfate to carbonate systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feagley, Sam Edward

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from surface application of' ammonium fertilizers to calcareous soils 7 Ammonia Volatilization from Limed, Acid Soil Comparison of ammonia vole, tilization from different ammonium fertilizers Other factors affecting ammonia volatilization 10...-Newman-Keul's multiple range analysis of ammonia volatilization from a limed, acid soil supporting Coastal bermudagrass as affected by calcium carbonate . 58 Student-Newman-Keul's multiple range analysis of ammonia volatilization i'rom a limed. , acid soil supporting...

  7. Geomicrobiology Journal, 24:655669, 2007 Copyright c Taylor & Francis LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    Poorly controlled landfilling of chromite ore processing residue (COPR), particularly highly alkaline lime process is still generating chromium contaminated wastes in countries such as China, Russia, India

  8. University of Arizona Technology and Research Initiative Fund 2010/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    : cartridge membrane filtration; EDR: electrodialysis reversal; PLS: partial lime softening; GMF: granular: membrane microfiltration; CA: chemical addition; RO: reverse osmosis; PS: permeate stabilization; CF

  9. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

  10. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    products (NAICS 3272) Wood products (NAICS 321) Cement and Lime (NAICS 32731, 32741) Plastic and rubber products (NAICS 326) Construction (NAICS 23) Iron and steel (NAICS 3311-...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - african oil bean Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corn Soup... Michigan Bean Soup Mexican Tomato Lime Soup Moroccan Vegetable Stew Potato, Spinach & Tomato Soup ... Source: Shyy, Wei - Department of Aerospace Engineering,...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural field amended Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ecosystem Function in Alluvial Tailings after Biosolids and Lime Addition Summary: . Field...

  13. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as an oil landfarm. Landfarming was an acceptable industry practice that used lime and fertilizer to biodegrade waste oils containing the contaminant trichloroethene (TCE), a...

  14. (Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3), unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; Bolivia, 9%; Italy 6%; and other, 7%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/02 Borates: Refined lime and energy requirements wi

  15. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

  16. Nuclear spin-orbit interaction from chiral pion-nucleon dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, N

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the two-loop approximation of chiral perturbation theory, we calculate the momentum and density dependent nuclear spin-orbit strength $U_{ls}(p,k_f)$. This quantity is derived from the spin-dependent part of the interaction energy $\\Sigma_{spin} = {i\\over 2} \\vec \\sigma \\cdot (\\vec q \\times\\vec p) U_{ls}(p,k_f)$ of a nucleon scattering off weakly inhomogeneous isospin symmetric nuclear matter. We find that iterated $1\\pi$-exchange generates at saturation density, $k_{f0}=272.7 $MeV, a spin-orbit strength at $p=0$ of $U_{ls}(0,k_{f0})\\simeq 35$ MeVfm$^2$ in perfect agreement with the empirical value used in the shell model. This novel spin-orbit strength is neither of relativistic nor of short range origin. The potential $V_{ls}$ underlying the empirical spin-orbit strength $\\widetilde U_{ls}= V_{ls} r_{ls}^2$ becomes a rather weak one, $V_{ls}\\simeq 17$ MeV, after the identification $r_{ls}= m_\\pi^{-1}$ as suggested by the present calculation. We observe however a strong $p$-dependence of $U_{ls}(p,k_{f...

  17. THE ACCIMA PROJECT COUPLED MODELING OF THE HIGH SOUTHERN LATITUDES K.M. Hines1* , D.H. Bromwich1,2, L.-S. Bai1, J.P. Nicolas1,2, D.M. Holland3, J.M. Klinck4, M. Dinniman4, C. Yoo3, and E.P. Gerber3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    THE ACCIMA PROJECT ­ COUPLED MODELING OF THE HIGH SOUTHERN LATITUDES K.M. Hines1* , D.H. Bromwich1 including surface and bottom layer formulations; as well as procedures for data assimilation. Numerical balance of the Antarctic ice sheet is critical for projecting global sea-level change. Also, Antarctica

  18. Late Pennsylvanian cyclic sedimentary units of the Brownwood area, north-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hojnacki, Robert Stephen

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these sediments. However, sh1fting sediment sources do play a m1nor role in creating variations within each cycle. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank Dr. Thomas E. Yancey, my committee chai r- man, for his geologic advice and guidance, both general.... The dual limestone cycle has a generalized lithologic sequence, in ascending order, of 1) nonmarine and/or shoreline clastics; 2) transgressive limestone; 3) marine shales, which may include phosphatic shales; 4) regressive limestone; 5) nonmarine...

  19. Probabilistic analysis of air void structure and its relationship to permeability and moisture damage of hot mix asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelblanco Torres, Adhara

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    with thickness for field cores. ..............................27 5 Difference in air void content with thickness for SGC limestone cores. .............28 6 Difference in air void content with thickness for SGC granite cores...................29 7 Examples... distribution for SGC granite cores. ............46 x FIGURE Page 20 Permeability vs. PSP using Lognormal distribution for SGC limestone cores....47 21 Permeability vs. PSP using Weibull distribution for SGC limestone cores...

  20. Intern experience at Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qureshi, Athar Jabbar, 1951-

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    to transport a very highly concentrated limestone slurry. In addition, feasibility and engineering studies were performed to evaluate different alternatives to transport coal, copper and phosphate slurry pipelines. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author would like... LIST OF TABLES Tables Page 1. System Input Parameters for Optimization Program ...... 11 2. Optimum Economic Design of Iron Ore Pipeline .......... 13 3. Effect of Thinners on Limestone Slurry Rheology ....... 25 4. Rheology of Limestone Slurry...

  1. Structural discordance between neogene detachments and frontal sevier thrusts, central Mormon Mountains, southern Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wernicke, Brian; Walker, J. Douglas; Beaufait, Mark S.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonanza King Formation. Between the Keystone-Muddy Mountain and Gass Peak-Wheeler Pass thrusts is a broad, regional synclinorium consisting of miogeoclinal rocks which have been folded and faulted on small thrusts. N W E s Fig. 6. Axes...-groned, thin-to rneclum- bedded chert), toward top fossaliferous, locally cross-laminated SULTAN LIMESTONE (216 m) CRYSTAL PASS LIMESTONE (69m) Lrnestone, hght c, lroy, ophonit, laminated sandstone marker bedneer top VALENTINE LIMESTONE (79m) Lm...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - argillite Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blanca Fault in the Western Peninsular Ranges of Baja Summary: lithologies including ash flows, ash fall tuffs, limestones, volcaniclastic sandstones, and argillites. All...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - als tracer zur Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering, Reservoir Simulation Research Collection: Fossil Fuels 50 Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer Summary: and described by...

  4. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

  5. Geophysical constraints on sediment dispersal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers; Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modest because the source rock lithology is limestone-consis- tent with its source rock composition and longsources of silica in sediments are the weathering of rocks

  6. Coal Gasification Systems Solicitations

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    Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas; FE0023577 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation; FE0023497 OTM-Enhanced...

  7. Scripta Fac. Sci. Nat. Univ. Masaryk. Brun., Volume 36, Geology. Brno, 2007. 57 The Early Miocene micromammalian assemblage from Mokr 1/2001 Turtle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horacek, Ivan

    and in deposits of the main brown coal seam (Merkur-North) or in the limestone quarry and erosive relicts of hot

  8. Newsletter of the IUCN/SSC Caprinae Specialist Group In this issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    of a female group was 5.1 (n=32). The Aladaglar are limestone mountains on the border of Konya plain, not far

  9. Effects of Acid Additives on Spent Acid Flowback through Carbonate Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasir, Ehsaan Ahmad

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Limestone and the non-emulsifying agent M-NEA the worst for Texas Cream Chalk for spent acid recovery after gas flowback....

  10. Understanding Water and Solute Fluxes in Diverse Catchments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godsey, Sarah

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chalk, limestone, shale, unconsolidated sediments montane/mixed forest, residential unconsolidated alluvium sandstone,broadleaf forest/swamp unconsolidated sediments 25 f 100 h,i

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - afterburning cessation mechanisms Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ; Materials Science 88 Control Perennial Guide B-815 Summary: or limestone bedrock. Soils dis- turbed by farming or mechanical brush control prac- tice often develop dense......

  12. Building Stones

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    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ancient Egyptian limestone quarries: A petrological survey.pp. 195 - 212. 2001 Ancient quarries near Amarna. Egyptian36 - 38. 2010 An early Roman quarry for anhydrite and gypsum

  13. CX-006239: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CX-006239: Categorical Exclusion Determination Structure Replacement, Guernsey Rural Substation to Limestone Substation, Platte County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date:...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous aluminum powder Sample Search...

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    slag... by limestone powder and BFS can lower the cost and enhance the greenness of concrete, since the production Source: Li, Victor C. - Departments of Civil and Environmental...

  15. Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Soil Test Report The following information is being provided for farmers. For consumer soil test fertility status of the soil in each field can invest wisely in fertilizer and lime to produce the most economical crop yields. A soil test provides the needed information about soil pH, lime need and available

  16. Sprays and Spraying

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    Paddock, F.B. (Floyd B.)

    1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................... Fly Poison 13 ..................................... Contact Insecticides 14 ................................... Lime Sulfur Wash 14 ................................... Kerosene Emlllsion 17' .......................... Commercial Tobacco Extract...-SULFI MIXTURES. I Amount of ~ilutiin Number of Gallons of Water to One Gallon 'of Lime-Sulfur Solution. Reading on Hydrometer. For San Jose For Summer / Scale of Winter I For Blister Mite. 1 Spraying of I Strength. I I I I 1 Kerosene Emulsion. Kerosene...

  17. Tropical Fruit Ambrosia Makes 6 servings

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    Florida, University of

    Tropical Fruit Ambrosia Makes 6 servings 1 jar (26 oz.) mixed tropical fruit, drained 1 large coconut Lettuce leaves Directions: 1. In a large bowl, combine the tropical fruit and banana. 2. In a small bowl, stir together the yogurt, lime zest, and lime juice until blended. 3. Spoon over the fruit

  18. APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS Erbium implanted thin film photonic materials

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    Polman, Albert

    , phosphosilicate, borosilicate, and soda-lime glasses , ceramic thin films Al2O3, Y2O3, LiNbO3 , and amorphous. Phosphosilicate glass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 C. Soda-lime silicate glass Er-doped thin film photonic materials is described. It focuses on oxide glasses pure SiO2

  19. Characterization and stabilization of arsenic in water treatment residuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Hun Young

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -arsenic compounds. However, it is suggested that the ordinary Portland cement (OPC) should be added with the lime for the long term stabilization because lime can be slowly consumed when directly exposed to atmospheric CO2. The solidification and stabilization (S...

  20. ulty of Landsc cape Plannin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facu Ma Full-S Lime Me ulty of Landsc Departme Swedi aterial P Scale R e-Hemp easureme Pauli cape, Alnarp Print: SLU Service/Repro, Alnarp 2012 Cover: Hemp field in GrÀstorp, Sweden. Photo: P.B. de Bruijn #12;Material Properties and Full-Scale Rain Exposure of Lime-Hemp Concrete Walls. Measurements

  1. NIST Special Publication 1039r1 Liquid Flow Meter Calibrations with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Special Publication 1039r1 Liquid Flow Meter Calibrations with the 0.1 L/s and the 2.5 L Publication 1039r1 Liquid Flow Meter Calibrations with the 0.1 L/s and the 2.5 L/s Piston Provers Jodie G. Technol. Spec. Publ. 1039r1, 55 pages (December 2013) CODEN: NSPUE2 #12;Liquid Flow Meter Calibrations

  2. Published in TCS, 31(1), pp. 325388, 2004. Precise Interprocedural Dependence Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂŒller-Olm, Markus

    Programs # Markus MË?uller­Olm UniversitË?at Dortmund, FB Informatik, LS 5, 44221 Dortmund, Germany 1 programme. Email address: mmo@ls5.cs.uni­dortmund.de (Markus MË?uller­Olm). URL: http://ls5­www.cs.uni­dortmund.de/#mmo (Markus MË?uller­Olm). 1 Current a#liation: FernUniversitË?at in Hagen, FB Informatik, LG PI 5, Univer­ sit

  3. Pro-HEART – A Randomized Clinical Trial to Test the Effectiveness of a High Protein Diet Targeting Obese Individuals with Heart Failure: Rationale, Design and Baseline Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cardiomyopathy. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2006; 291:LS. Adiposity of the Heart*, Revisited. Ann Intern Med.left ventricular function. Heart. 2003; 89:1152–1156. [

  4. 2.1E Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factor Summary L V - L -- Daylight Factor Summary L V - M --Lighting Energy Reduction B y Daylight, Energy Reduction By Daylight, Building LS-J Daylight

  5. UNIX/LINUX REFERENCE CARD Basic File and Directory Manipulation

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    UNIX/LINUX REFERENCE CARD Basic File and Directory Manipulation ls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List directory contents cp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Link files cd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Change directory pwd

  6. DISCLAIMER : UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED - PLEASE CHECK THE STATUS...

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    IDM ITER Document Management software IS Interface Sheet ISO International Organization for Standardization LS Load Specification NB Neutral Beam NBI Neutral Beam...

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    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TRANSLOAD FACILITIES OVERVIEW July 25, 2007 . Engineered solutions for a complex world. INTRODUCING MHF LOGISTICAL SOLUTIONS...... MHF-LS is a leader in the packaging and...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal al nacer Sample Search Results

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    (MIT) Collection: Engineering 35 Understanding and Treating Childhood Bellyaches Pediatric and Adolescent Summary: ):60-68. 2. Walker LS, Lipani TA, Greene JW, et al....

  9. nature methods | VOL.10 NO.7 | JULY 2013 | 599 correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    for assistance with 3D printing and parts fabrication. J.S., L.S. and K.W.E. were supported by US National

  10. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.S. 2008. “Complete alternative fuel solution for cementKolyfetis, E. 2007. “Alternative Fuels & Raw Materials inof the workshop on Alternative Fuels & Alternative Raw

  11. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ls-used-transportation-5-activities Current search Search found 1 item Electricity Remove Electricity filter Science Education Remove Science Education filter Vehicles Remove...

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    ls-used-transportation-5-activities Current search Search found 1 item Electricity Remove Electricity filter Science Education Remove Science Education filter Alternative Fuel...

  18. Ethiopia: An Heretical Revolution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpers, Edward E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controdictioJ'ls t hat Ethiopia '" tl"aditUmal " oci e ty1s sai d , hoeever , l efort's Ethiopia sti ll s tands as an

  19. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Program GGE H2I HSCC Gasoline gallon equivalent Hawaii Hydrogen Initiative Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator ICE Internal combustion engine LDV Light-duty vehicle LS...

  20. ADAPTIVE CONSTRAINT REDUCTION FOR TRAINING SUPPORT ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    linear feasibility problems, and Luo and Sun [LS98] proposed a similar scheme for convex quadratic ...... LIBSVM: a library for support vector machines, 2001.