National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for lime ls limestone

  1. Retrofit costs for lime/limestone FGD and lime spray drying at coal-fired utility boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmel, T.E.; Jones, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper gives results of a research program the objective of which was to significantly improve engineering cost estimates currently being used to evaluate the economic effects of applying SO2 controls to existing coal-fired utility boilers. The costs of retrofitting conventional lime/limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (L/LS FGD) and lime spray drying (LSD) FGD at 100-200 coal-fired power plants are being estimated under this program. The retrofit capital cost estimating procedures used for L/LS FGD and LSD FGD make two cost adjustments to current procedures used to estimate FGD costs: cost adders (for items not normally included in FGD system costs; e.g., demolition and relocation of existing facilities) and cost multipliers (to adjust capital costs for site access, congestion, and underground obstructions).

  2. Laboratory evaluation of limestone and lime neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings solution. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate a two-step neutralization scheme for treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings solutions. Tailings solutions from the Lucky Mc Mill and Exxon Highland Mill, both in Wyoming, were neutralized with limestone, CaCO/sub 3/, to an intermediate pH of 4.0 or 5.0, followed by lime, Ca(OH)/sub 2/, neutralization to pH 7.3. The combination limestone/lime treatment methods, CaCO/sub 3/ neutralization to pH 4 followed by neutralization with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to pH 7.3 resulted in the highest quality effluent solution with respect to EPA's water quality guidelines. The combination method is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested in our studies. Neutralization experiments to evaluate the optimum solution pH for contaminant removal were performed on the same two tailings solutions using only lime Ca(OH)/sub 2/ as the neutralizing agent. The data indicate solution neutralization above pH 7.3 does not significantly increase removal of pH dependent contaminants from solution. Column leaching experiments were performed on the neutralized sludge material (the precipitated solid material which forms as the acidic tailings solutions are neutralized to pH 4 or above). The sludges were contacted with laboratory prepared synthetic ground water until several effluent pore volumes were collected. Effluent solutions were analyzed for macro ions, trace metals and radionuclides in an effort to evaluate the long term effectiveness of attenuating contaminants in sludges formed during solution neutralization. Neutralized sludge leaching experiments indicate that Ca, Na, Mg, Se, Cl, and SO/sub 4/ are the only constituents which show solution concentrations significantly higher than the synthetic ground water in the early pore volumes of long-term leaching studies.

  3. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shen, Ming-Shing (Rocky Point, NY); Yang, Ralph T. (Middle Island, NY)

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  4. LS-PrePost

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LS-PrePost Training Course Introductory Course: Developing Compute-efficient, Quality Models with LS-PrePost 3 on the TRACC Cluster A central point for computational structural mechanics training provides all the US organizations doing transportation related research with awareness and accessibility to the latest approaches, methods, software training and best practices that can be applied to the wide variety of transportation research needed to ensure a viable transportation infrastructure.

  5. using-ls-opt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using LS-OPT® on the TRACC Cluster Jan. 20-21, 2010 Argonne TRACC Dr. Cezary Bojanowski Announcement pdficon small Dr. Ronald F. Kulak This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. "> LS-OPT is the optimization tool that allows the user, through the graphical interface, to structure the design process, explore the design space and compute optimal

  6. Lime Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Lime Wind Facility Lime Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Joseph Millworks Inc...

  7. Indiana's Trenton limestone geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith, B.D.

    1981-03-01

    The term Trenton limestone is the stratigraphic designation for a unit in northern Indiana composed of both limestone and dolomite. The Trenton is Middle Ordovician (Champlainian) in age and related clearly to the position of the Cincinnati arch. The limestone is thickest in northern Indiana and thins toward the southeast. Isopach maps of the Trenton limestone and the Maquoketa group above it indicate that the Cincinnati arch did not exist as a positive structural influence to sedimentation until after Ordovician time. Preliminary results of an ongoing study of the Trenton reservoir suggest that second and tertiary recovery there will be limited. Because of the low density of drilling on the Trenton's north flank, however, large areas remain virtually untested; more structural or stratigraphic traps similar to those of the Urbana field could exist. A better definition of the distribution of the dolomite facies will lead to a more accurate assessment of the Trenton's potential.

  8. ls-dyna-training-course

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LS-DYNA® Training Course November 17 - 19, 2008 Argonne TRACC Dr. Ronald F. Kulak Announcement pdficon small This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. "> The US Department of Transportation-funded Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center at Argonne National Laboratory held training courses on (1) the finite element code LS-DYNA®

  9. LIME 0.5

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-01-14

    LIME 0.5 is an initial version of a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes. LIME by itself is not a code for doing multiphysics simulations. Instead, LIME provides the key high-level software, a flexible but defined approach, and interface requirements for a collection of (potentially disparate) physics codes to be combined with strong coupling (when needed) though non-linear solution methods (e.g. JFNK, fixed point), thus creating a new multi-physics simulation capability customized for amore » particular need. ! ! The approach taken is designed to! •! preserve and leverage any important specialized algorithms and/or functionality an existing application may provide,! •! minimize the requirements barrier for an application to participate,! •! work within advanced solver frameworks (e.g. as extensions to the Trilinos/NOX nonlinear solver libraries, PETSc, . . .),! Of note is that components/physics codes that can be coupled within LIME are NOT limited to:! •! components written in one particular language,! •! a particular numerical discretization approach ( e.g. Finite Element), or! •! physical models expressed as PDEʼs.!« less

  10. LimeAmps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LimeAmps Jump to: navigation, search Name: LimeAmps Place: California Product: California-based energy management company. References: LimeAmps1 This article is a stub. You can...

  11. LS9 Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Zip: 94080 Region: Bay Area Sector: Biofuels Product: Uses synthetic biology to develop biofuels from traditional feedstocks Website: www.ls9.com Coordinates:...

  12. LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd (formerly LG Industrial Systems) Place: Anyang,...

  13. modeling-and-simulation-with-ls-dyna

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling and Simulation with LS-DYNA®: INSIGHTS INTO MODELING WITH A GOAL OF PROVIDING CREDIBLE PREDICTIVE SIMULATIONS Feb. 11-12, 2010 Argonne TRACC Dr. Ronald F. Kulak Announcement pdficon small This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Most applications of LS-DYNA are for complex, and often combined, physics where nonlinearities due to large deformations and material response, including failure, are the norm. Often the goal of such

  14. Fly ash chemical classification based on lime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.

    2007-07-01

    Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Salt Selection for the LS-VHTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, D.F.; Clarno, K.T.

    2006-07-01

    Molten fluorides were initially developed for use in the nuclear industry as the high temperature fluid-fuel for a Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The Office of Nuclear Energy is exploring the use of molten fluorides as a primary coolant (rather than helium) in an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) design, also know as the Liquid-Salt cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This paper provides a review of relevant properties for use in evaluation and ranking of candidate coolants for the LS-VHTR. Nuclear, physical, and chemical properties were reviewed and metrics for evaluation are recommended. Chemical properties of the salt were examined for the purpose of identifying factors that effect materials compatibility (i.e., corrosion). Some preliminary consideration of economic factors for the candidate salts is also presented. (authors)

  16. Role of mag-enhanced lime scrubbing in the FGD industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, M.; College, J.; Smith, K.; Stowe, D.H.

    1997-12-31

    The mag-enhanced lime scrubbing process has been in commercial use in the US since the early 1970`s. At present over 14,000 MW of coal-fired utility plants in the US burning high sulfur coal (2.5--4.0% S) utilize this process with an excellent emission compliance and cost performance record to date. Dravo Lime Company (DLC) being the largest supplier of lime to this industry continues to conduct extensive R and D in this area and provides technical support service to these users. The success of the mag-enhanced lime process is largely attributed to the dual alkali effect of the Mg-Ca ions with a very distinct role for the highly soluble Mg ion in the scrubber liquor. It is well known that the high solubility of the magnesium ions provides alkalinities in the scrubbing liquor far in excess of the limestone systems. As a result of this high alkalinity liquor the mag-lime scrubbers need a much lower liquid to gas ratio, have lower scrubber pressure drop, consume lower parasitic load, are able to handle very high inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations, show little scaling tendency, etc. The scrubbers, recirculation pumps, piping, etc., are much smaller and the systems have lower capital and operating costs over comparable limestone systems. This system typically has a high availability and the process is less severe mechanically on the scrubber, pumps, nozzles, piping than comparable limestone processes. DLC`s patented ThioClear{reg_sign} process is an improvement over the conventional Thiosorbic process in use today. The ThioClear process while providing all of the advantages of the Thiosorbic process uses a nearly clear liquor to scrub and can use an innovative Horizontal Scrubber at gas velocities of up to 7.62--9.14 m/s (25--30 FPS). This process produces an excellent quality gypsum for wall board, cement or other applications and can also produce valuable Mg(OH){sub 2} as by-product. This paper discusses the merits of Thiosorbic/ThioClear processes, innovations with respect to the scrubber design, cost advantages and the freedom to choose a lower cost higher S coal while easily meeting or exceeding the regulatory requirements in the industry.

  17. pLS101 plasmid vector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacks, S.A.; Balganesh, T.S.

    1985-02-19

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb ma1M gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb Tcr DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. pLS010 plasmid vector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacks, Sanford A. (Brookhaven, NY); Balganesh, Tanjore S. (Upton, NY)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb malM gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb T.sub.c r DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems.

  19. Arsenic removal in conjunction with lime softening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khandaker, Nadim R.; Brady, Patrick V.; Teter, David M.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2004-10-12

    A method for removing dissolved arsenic from an aqueous medium comprising adding lime to the aqueous medium, and adding one or more sources of divalent metal ions other than calcium and magnesium to the aqueous medium, whereby dissolved arsenic in the aqueous medium is reduced to a lower level than possible if only the step of adding lime were performed. Also a composition of matter for removing dissolved arsenic from an aqueous medium comprising lime and one or more sources of divalent copper and/or zinc metal ions.

  20. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi , Gibran L

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

  1. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  2. 85-GAL DRUM AND NUCFIL-007LS FILTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JB WOODBURY

    2009-06-30

    {sm_bullet} 55-gallon drums were overpacked into 85-gallon drums {sm_bullet} ANucFiI-007LS long-stem filter was installed- NucFiI certified the use of NucFiI-007LS filters in 8S-gallon drums as DOT 7AType A - Wood wedges were used during the tests to center and . stabilize the inner 55-gallon drums {sm_bullet} During inspection, afew filters were found to be loose, canted, and/or with RTV seals broken - No contamination or loss of container integrity {sm_bullet} Discovered in November 2008 U.

  3. Lime Energy formerly Electric City Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    integrator of energy savings technologies and building automation systems. Specialist in demand response systems. References: Lime Energy (formerly Electric City Corporation)1...

  4. Lime slurry use at the Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, L.E.; Hughes, R.W.; Baggett, G.

    1996-04-01

    The use of lime slurry at the IWPF demonstrated many benefits. Hazardous chemical use was reduced, solids handling was improved, water quality was enhanced and there has been a cost savings. The lime slurry also enabled the plant to begin treating the soluble oil waste, which we were not able to do in the past.

  5. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  6. Limestone County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Limestone County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

  7. The effect of additives on lime dissolution rates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khang, S.J.

    1996-07-31

    Based on the previous years` studies concerning the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal by spray dryers with high sulfur coal flue gas, the work for year five included investigations of lime dissolution rates at different slaking conditions and with the effect of additives. The prominent additives that have significant effects on lime dissolution rates were tested with the mini pilot spray drying absorber to see their effects on spray drying desulfurization applications. The mechanisms of these additive effects along with the properties of hygroscopic additives have been discussed and incorporated into the spray drying desulfurization model ``SPRAYMOD-M.`` Slaking conditions are very important factors in producing high quality lime slurry in spray drying desulfurization processes. At optimal slaking conditions, the slaked lime particles are very fine (3-5{mu}m) and the slaked lime has high BET surface areas which are beneficial to the desulfurization. The slaked lime dissolution rate experiments in our study are designed to determine how much lime can dissolve in a unit time if the initial lime surface area is kept constant. The purpose of the dissolution rate study for different additives is to find those effective additives that can enhance lime dissolution rates and to investigate the mechanisms of the dissolution rate enhancement properties for these additives. The applications of these additives on spray drying desulfurization are to further verify the theory that dissolution rate is a rate limiting step in the whole spray drying desulfurization process as well as to test the feasibility of these additives on enhancing SO{sub 2} removal in spray dryers.

  8. Regeneration of lime from sulfates for fluidized-bed combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Middle Island, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

    1980-01-01

    In a fluidized-bed combustor the evolving sulfur oxides are reacted with CaO to form calcium sulfate which is then decomposed in the presence of carbonaceous material, such as the fly ash recovered from the combustion, at temperatures of about 900.degree. to 1000.degree. C., to regenerate lime. The regenerated lime is then recycled to the fluidized bed combustor to further react with the evolving sulfur oxides. The lime regenerated in this manner is quite effective in removing the sulfur oxides.

  9. N"I. L-S- Rad. Mat. DU

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    N"I. L-S- Rad. Mat. DU DU (UF4) Enr. U. Norm. U Thorium 3/4 Ti Alloy Subtotals Commercial/ (1958-1971) TOTALS EXHIBIT 3 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PROCESSED AT NL-ALBANY PLANT, 1958-1982: GROSS SUMMARY OF INFORMATION FROM NUCLEAR MATERIAL TRANSACTION REPORTS (DOE/NRC Form 741 and Predecessor Forms) Material Net Weight (Pounds) DOE-Owned Canadian Supplied L/ Gov.-owned 5,660,914.3 0 2,469,268.2 100,686.l 7.7 57,358.Z 336,754 38,090.4 0 1,813 0 8,328,130.2 336,761.7 .8,328,130.2 336,761.7 2,603,763

  10. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Panuwat Taerakul; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker

    2005-10-01

    Four lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples were collected from a spreader stoker boiler and measured for their concentrations of 16 U.S. EPA specified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results showed that the total measured PAH concentration correlated with the organic carbon content of the LSD ash. Each LSD ash sample was then separated using a 140 mesh sieve into two fractions: a carbon-enriched fraction ({gt}140 mesh) and a lime-enriched fraction ({lt}140 mesh). Unburned carbon was further separated from the carbon-enriched fraction with a lithiumheteropolytungstate (LST) solution. PAH measurements on these different fractions showed that unburned carbon had the highest PAH concentrations followed by the carbon-enriched fraction, indicating that PAHs were primarily associated with the carbonaceous material in LSD ash. However, detectable levels of PAHs were also found in the lime-enriched fraction, suggesting that the fine spray of slaked lime may sorb PAH compounds from the flue gas in the LSD process. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Barley seedling growth in soils amended with fly ash or agricultural lime followed by acidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renken, R.R.; McCallister, D.L.; Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Marx, D.B.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium-rich coal combustion fly ash can be used as an amendment to neutralize soil acidity because of its oxides and carbonate content, but its aluminum content could inhibit plant growth if soil pH values fall below optimal agronomic levels. This study measured root and shoot growth of an acid-sensitive barley (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Kearney') grown in the greenhouse on three naturally acid soils. The soils were either untreated or amended with various liming materials (dry fly ash, wet fly ash, and agricultural lime) at application rates of 0, .5, 1, and 1.5 times the recommended lime requirement, then treated with dilute acid solutions to simulate management-induced acidification. Plant growth indexes were measured at 30 days after planting. Root mass per plant and root length per plant were greater for the limed treatments than in the acidified check. Root growth in the limed treatments did not differ from root growth in the original nonacidified soils. Top mass per plant in all limed soils was either larger than or not different from that in the original nonacidified soils. Based on top mass per plant, no liming material or application rate was clearly superior. Both fly ash and agricultural lime reduced the impact of subsequent acidification on young barley plants. Detrimental effects of aluminum release on plant growth were not observed. Calcium-rich fly ash at agronomic rates is an acceptable acid-neutralizing material with no apparent negative effects.

  12. Stabilization of Oklahoma expensive soils using lime and class C fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhler, R.L.; Cerato, A.B.

    2007-01-15

    This study uses lime and class C fly ash, an industrial byproduct of electric power production produced from burning lignite and subbituminous coal, to study the plasticity reduction in highly expensive natural clays from Idabel, Oklahoma. This study is important, especially in Oklahoma, because most of the native soils are expansive and cause seasonal damage to roadways and structures. The addition of lime or fly ash helps to arrest the shrinkage and swelling behavior of soil. Four soil samples with the same AASHTO classification were used in this study to show shrinkage variability within a soil group with the addition of lime and class C fly ash. The plasticity reduction in this study was quantified using the linear shrinkage test. It was found that soils classified within the same AASHTO group had varying shrinkage characteristics. It was also found that both lime and fly ash reduced the lienar shrinkage, however, the addition of lime reduced the linear shrinkage to a greater degree than the same percentage of class C fly ash. Even though it takes much less lime than fly ash to reduce the plasticity of a highly expansive soil, it may be less expensive to utilize fly ash, which is a waste product of electric power production. Lime also has a lower unit weight than fly ash so weight percentage results may be misleading.

  13. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  14. Hydration mechanisms of ternary Portland cements containing limestone powder and fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Weerdt, K.; Haha, M. Ben; Le Saout, G.; Kjellsen, K.O.; Justnes, H.; Lothenbach, B.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of minor additions of limestone powder on the properties of fly ash blended cements was investigated in this study using isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and pore solution analysis. The presence of limestone powder led to the formation of hemi- and monocarbonate and to a stabilisation of ettringite compared to the limestone-free cements, where a part of the ettringite converted to monosulphate. Thus, the presence of 5% of limestone led to an increase of the volume of the hydrates, as visible in the increase in chemical shrinkage, and an increase in compressive strength. This effect was amplified for the fly ash/limestone blended cements due to the additional alumina provided by the fly ash reaction.

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    England Lime Co - CT 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW ENGLAND LIME CO. (CT.10) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: NELCO (Magnesium Division) CT.10-1 Location: Canaan , Connecticut CT.10-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.10-1 Site Operations: AEC source for magnesium and calcium. Conducted limited tests to evaluate potential for recovery of magnesium from uranium residues. CT.10-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  16. Distribution of arsenic and mercury in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panuwat Taerakul; Ping Sun; Danold W. Golightly; Harold W. Walker; Linda K. Weavers

    2006-08-15

    The partitioning of As and Hg in various components of lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples from a coal-fired boiler was characterized to better understand the form and fate of these elements in flue gas desulfurization byproducts. LSD ash samples, collected from the McCracken Power Plant on the Ohio State University campus, were separated by a 140-mesh (106 {mu}m) sieve into two fractions: a fly-ash-/unburned-carbon-enriched fraction (> 106 {mu}m) and a calcium-enriched fraction (< 106 {mu}m). Unburned carbon and fly ash in the material > 106 {mu}m were subsequently separated by density using a lithium heteropolytungstate solution. The concentrations of As and Hg were significant in all fractions. The level of As was consistently greater in the calcium-enriched fraction, while Hg was evenly distributed in all components of LSD ash. Specific surface area was an important factor controlling the distribution of Hg in the different components of LSD ash, but not for As. Comparing the LSD ash data to samples collected from the economizer suggests that As was effectively captured by fly ash at 600{sup o}C, while Hg was not. Leaching tests demonstrated that As and Hg were more stable in the calcium-enriched fraction than in the fly-ash- or carbon-enriched fractions, potentially because of the greater pH of the leachate and subsequently greater stability of small amounts of calcium solids containing trace elements in these fractions. 37 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Sulfur dioxide capture in the combustion of mixtures of lime, refuse-derived fuel, and coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churney, K.L.; Buckley, T.J. . Center for Chemical Technology)

    1990-06-01

    Chlorine and sulfur mass balance studies have been carried out in the combustion of mixtures of lime, refuse-derived fuel, and coal in the NIST multikilogram capacity batch combustor. The catalytic effect of manganese dioxide on the trapping of sulfur dioxide by lime was examined. Under our conditions, only 4% of the chlorine was trapped in the ash and no effect of manganese dioxide was observed. Between 42 and 14% of the total sulfur was trapped in the ash, depending upon the lime concentration. The effect of manganese dioxide on sulfur capture was not detectable. The temperature of the ash was estimated to be near 1200{degrees}C, which was in agreement with that calculated from sulfur dioxide capture thermodynamics. 10 refs., 12 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. The effect of additives on lime dissolution rates. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.; Wang, J.

    1995-02-01

    In spray dryer flue gas desulfurization, lime slurry is injected into a spray dryer where it contacts with the hot flue gas and desulfurization occurs. This process is complex owing to the heat and mass transfer which must take place. One of the most important fundamental steps in the scrubbing process is the rate at which lime dissolves from the solid particle in the slurry drop and becomes available for reaction with the absorbed sulfur dioxide. This dissolution rate to a large extent controls the degree of reactivity and is the rate controlling step for this process. However, studies on this dissolution rate have been very few and its magnitude under a variety of operating conditions is not well known. This research has as its objective, the study and understanding of the lime dissolution rate. This understanding should lead to a better method of predicting and optimizing spray dryer performance for flue gas desulfurization.

  19. Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2005-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

  20. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition.

  1. An experimental investigation of the mass-transfer mechanisms in sulfur dioxide absorption in lime solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markussen, J.M.

    1991-04-01

    The experiments were performed at gas temperatures from 24 to 114C using a wetted-wall column apparatus with SO{sub 2} concentrations ranging from 1800 to 7350 ppM, calcium concentrations of 2.82 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1. 25 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} gmol/cm{sup 3}, and column heights of 14 to 29 cm. Inlet SO{sub 2} content had a significant effect on rate of SO{sub 2} absorption, with the average absorption flux increasing with increasing SO{sub 2} gas concentration. Increasing gas temperature did not significantly affect the rate of SO{sub 2} absorption. Presence of lime in solution enhanced the average SO{sub 2} absorption flux and appeared to maintain the SO{sub 2} absorption capacity of the liquid, thereby negating the effect of decreasing SO{sub 2} solubility in water with increasing temperature. Slight increases in both the system`s gas-phase resistances and enhancement factors were observed with increasing gas temperature. Under the conditions studied, the mass-transfer resistance in the SO{sub 2}-lime solution system was predominantly liquid-phase controlled, with observed gas-phase resistances ranging up to 42% of total. Comparison to literature shows that the system mass-transfer mechanism can be dominated by either the gas-phase resistance or the liquid-phase resistance, depending upon the gas-liquid contact times. Thus, results support the need to incorporate both gas- and liquid-phase mass-transfer resistances when modeling the absorption of SO{sub 2} in lime solutions and lime slurries, such as that occurring in the constant rate drying stage of the spray drying flue gas desulfurization process.

  2. An experimental investigation of the mass-transfer mechanisms in sulfur dioxide absorption in lime solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markussen, J.M.

    1991-04-01

    The experiments were performed at gas temperatures from 24 to 114C using a wetted-wall column apparatus with SO[sub 2] concentrations ranging from 1800 to 7350 ppM, calcium concentrations of 2.82 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] to 1. 25 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] gmol/cm[sup 3], and column heights of 14 to 29 cm. Inlet SO[sub 2] content had a significant effect on rate of SO[sub 2] absorption, with the average absorption flux increasing with increasing SO[sub 2] gas concentration. Increasing gas temperature did not significantly affect the rate of SO[sub 2] absorption. Presence of lime in solution enhanced the average SO[sub 2] absorption flux and appeared to maintain the SO[sub 2] absorption capacity of the liquid, thereby negating the effect of decreasing SO[sub 2] solubility in water with increasing temperature. Slight increases in both the system's gas-phase resistances and enhancement factors were observed with increasing gas temperature. Under the conditions studied, the mass-transfer resistance in the SO[sub 2]-lime solution system was predominantly liquid-phase controlled, with observed gas-phase resistances ranging up to 42% of total. Comparison to literature shows that the system mass-transfer mechanism can be dominated by either the gas-phase resistance or the liquid-phase resistance, depending upon the gas-liquid contact times. Thus, results support the need to incorporate both gas- and liquid-phase mass-transfer resistances when modeling the absorption of SO[sub 2] in lime solutions and lime slurries, such as that occurring in the constant rate drying stage of the spray drying flue gas desulfurization process.

  3. Petrography study of two siliceous limestones submitted to alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monnin, Y. . E-mail: monnin@ensm-douai.fr; Degrugilliers, P.; Bulteel, D.; Garcia-Diaz, E.

    2006-08-15

    This study presents the contribution of petrography to the comprehension of the alkali-silica reaction mechanism applied to two siliceous limestones. A petrography study was made on the two aggregates before reaction to define their relative proportions and types of reactive silica and to observe their distribution in the microstructure. Then a model reactor, constituted by the reactive siliceous limestone aggregate, portlandite and NaOH, was used to measure the swelling due to reaction of the silica with alkalis and the free expansion of the aggregates. The volume evolution between both aggregates was very different and could be explained by the preliminary petrographic study. It appears that the swelling of the aggregates is conditioned by the microstructure of the carbonated matrix, the quantity and the distribution of the reactive silica.

  4. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  5. Dynamic response of CSM composite plates - simulation using material No. 58 in LS-DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilkhu, S.S.; Founas, M.; Fong, W.; Agaram, V.

    1997-12-31

    The paper deals with finite element simulations of transverse impact response of plates made from continuous strand mat(CSM) glass/acrylic composite which is a potential candidate for making light weight automotive body panels. Two impact tests on the plates which result in two very different kinds of response, a drop tower test and a dart test, have been simulated using anisotropic material damage model No. 58 in LS-DYNA3D. In view of the results obtained in this study, the authors discuss the suitability of material model No. 58 for simulations of impact response in a bending environment.

  6. In-place stabilization of pond ash deposits by hydrated lime columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chand, S.K.; Subbarao, C.

    2007-12-15

    Abandoned coal ash ponds cover up vast stretches of precious land and cause environmental problems. Application of suitable in situ stabilization methods may bring about improvement in the geotechnical properties of the ash deposit as a whole, converting it to a usable site. In this study, a technique of in-place stabilization by hydrated lime columns was applied to large-scale laboratory models of ash ponds. Samples collected from different radial distances and different depths of the ash deposit were tested to study the improvements in the water content, dry density, particle size distribution, unconfined compressive strength, pH, hydraulic conductivity, and leachate characteristics over a period of one year. The in-place stabilization by lime column technique has been found effective in increasing the unconfined compressive strength and reducing hydraulic conductivity of pond ash deposits in addition to modifying other geotechnical parameters. The method has also proved to be useful in reducing the contamination potential of the ash leachates, thus mitigating the adverse environmental effects of ash deposits.

  7. The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2008-09-30

    The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (<5 {micro}m), interlocking crystals that faithfully preserve depositional fabrics; and (2) porous, coarser (>100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

  8. Design of Refractory Linings for Balanced Energy Efficiency, Uptime, and Capacity in Lime Kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorog, John Peter; Hemrick, James Gordon; Walker, Harold; Leary, William R; Ellis, Murray

    2014-01-01

    The rotary kilns used by the pulp and paper industry to regenerate lime in the Kraft process are very energy intensive. Throughout the 90 s, in response to increasing fuel prices, the industry used back up insulation in conjunction with the high alumina brick used to line the burning zones of their kilns. While this improved energy efficiency, the practice of installing insulating brick behind the working lining increased the inner wall temperatures. In the worst case, due to the increased temperatures, rapid brick failures occurred causing unscheduled outages and expensive repairs. Despite these issues, for the most part, the industry continued to use insulating refractory linings in that the energy savings were large enough to offset any increase in the cost of maintaining the refractory lining. Due to the dramatic decline in the price of natural gas in some areas combined with mounting pressures to increasing production of existing assets, over the last decade, many mills are focusing more on increasing the uptime of their kilns as opposed to energy savings. To this end, a growing number of mills are using basic (magnesia based) brick instead of high alumina brick to line the burning zone of the kiln since the lime mud does not react with these bricks at the operating temperatures of the burning zone of the kiln. In the extreme case, a few mills have chosen to install basic brick in the front end of the kiln running a length equivalent to 10 diameters. While the use of basic brick can increase the uptime of the kiln and reduce the cost to maintain the refractory lining, it does dramatically increase the heat losses resulting from the increased operating temperatures of the shell. Also, over long periods of time operating at these high temperatures, damage can occur in the shell. There are tradeoffs between energy efficiency, capacity and uptime. When fuel prices are very high, it makes sense to insulate the lining. When fuel prices are lower, trading some thermal efficiency for increased uptime and capacity seems reasonable. This paper considers a number of refractory linings in an effort to develop optimized operating strategies that balance these factors. In addition to considering a range of refractory materials, the paper examines other factors such as the chain area, discharge dams and other operating variables that impact the service life of the refractory lining. The paper provides recommendations that will help mill personnel develop a strategy to select a refractory lining that is optimized for their specific situation.

  9. Study the performance of photogalvanic cells for solar energy conversion and storage: Rose Bengal-D-Xylose-NaLS system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangotri, K.M.; Bhimwal, Mahesh Kumar

    2010-07-15

    The Rose Bengal is used as photosensitizer with D-Xylose as reductant and sodium lauryl sulphate (NaLS) as surfactant for the enhancement of the conversion efficiency and storage capacity of photogalvanic cell for its commercial viability. The observed value of the photogeneration of photopotential was 885.0 mV and photocurrent was 460.0 {mu}A whereas maximum power of the cell was 407.10 {mu}W. The observed power at power point was 158.72 {mu}W and the conversion efficiency was 1.52%. The fill factor 0.3151 was experimentally determined at the power point of the cell. The rate of initial generation of photocurrent was 63.88 {mu}A min{sup -1}. The photogalvanic cell so developed can work for 145.0 min in dark on irradiation for 165.0 min, i.e. the storage capacity of the photogalvanic cell is 87.87%. A simple mechanism for the photogeneration of photocurrent has also been proposed. (author)

  10. Diagenetic features of Trenton Limestone in northern Indiana: petrographic evidence for Late (Mesogenetic) Dolostone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fara, D.R.

    1986-08-01

    Three conventional cores of the entire Trenton section were examined in detail by in-depth visual description, analysis of more than 250 thin sections, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The cores are located in the northern half of Indiana where they span the major dolostone pinch-out that is the trap for the prolific Trenton oil and gas field. The Trenton Limestone is completely dolomitized in northern Indiana. Dolostone abundance decreases to the south where the dolostone is restricted to the upper few feet of the formation. Two major types of dolostone are recognized. The top 5-20 ft of the Trenton cores consists of medium crystalline nonporous xenotopic ferroan dolostone. Mesogenetic dewatering of the overlying Maquoketa shale is the proposed dolomitizing mechanisms for this ferroan dolostone cap. Below the ferroan dolostone cap in northern Indiana is coarsely crystalline dolostone, which consists of thin intercalated subfacies of porous idiotopic and nonporous xenotopic dolostone. This is the dominant dolostone type and is the reservoir in the Trenton field. The coarsely crystalline dolostone postdates the ferroan dolostone cap, chert nodule formation, and initial pressure solution. Therefore, this dolostone is considered to have formed relatively late in the diagenetic history of the Trenton under mesogenetic conditions. In the northernmost core, nearly all of the secondary dolomitic porosity is plugged by poikilotopic gypsum and minor amounts of calcite and celestite. Other diagenetic features observed in Trenton are also discussed, including silicification, ferroan calcite cement, upper Trenton contact formation, hardgrounds, and pressure solution.

  11. rothman_ls.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3 (2014) 4684 - 4707 Energy Procedia GHGT-12 Geochemical impacts of carbon dioxide, brine, trace metal and organic leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing limestone aquifer Diana H. Bacon3'* *, Zhenxue Daib, Liange Zhengc "Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA bLos Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA cLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA Abstract An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater

  13. Hydrothermal dolomitization of Jurassic-Cretaceous limestones in the southern Alps (Italy): Relation to tectonics and volcanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervato, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Dolomitization has affected up to 750m of the Jurassic and Cretaceous pelagic carbonate sequence of the southern continental margin of the Alpine Tethys; the sequence crops out in the southern Alps of Italy (Monti Lessini). Late Paleocene to Miocene extrusion of basaltic tuffs, breccias, and lavas was contemporaneous with the dolomitization was was associated with extensive tectonism in an ancient back-arc basin. More than 200 samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, stable isotope ratios (carbon, oxygen, strontium), and clay mineralogy. The dolomite contains 40% to 50% MgCO{sub 3}. In thin sections, the crystal size distribution is unimodal (about 100 {mu}m), possibly indicating a single nucleation for the main crystallization phase. The {delta}{sup 13}C of the dolomite is not appreciably different from the undolomitized pelagic limestone (+1.0{per thousand} to +2.0{per thousand} Peedee belemnite (PDB)). The {delta}{sup 18}O variation (-5.0{per thousand} to -13.0{per thousand} PDB) is due to temperature variation in the system. The {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio in the dolomite (0.70839-0.70867) is consistent with the ratio in late Oligocene-Miocene marine water. Clay minerals in limestone and dolomite differ in the presence of neoformed Mg-chlorite, indicating a maximum temperature of about 150C for dolomitization. The dolomite is suggested to have a hydrothermal origin. The heat flow associated with the volcanism allowed marine water to penetrate the system and circulate in convective cells through the tectonic breccias, locally dolomitizing the limestone.

  14. Regional analysis of rhythmic bedding in the Fort Hays limestone member, Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous), US western interior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laferriere, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a regional stratigraphic investigation of the rhythmically bedded Fort Hays limestone member of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico indicate at least two levels of cyclicity. Regional development of these cycles strongly supports the hypothesis that they are climatic in origin. Departures from simple cyclical patterns resulted from sedimentary effects of Late Cretaceous orogenic activity, erosional events associated with eustatic sea level changes, diagenetic modification, and possibly from interference between orbital parameters having different periodicities. The vulnerability of Milankovitch-type cyclicity to overprinting by tectono-sedimentologic effects makes units such as the Fort Hays useful as indicators of subtle tectonic activity. Regional thickness changes in groups of shale-limestone couplets were identified, correlated, and mapped in the subsurface using geophysical well log information in order to locate subtle structural elements that influenced Fort Hays sedimentation. In the Denver-Julesburg Basin of Colorado and western Kansas, thinning of the section between Fort Hays marker horizons occurs dominantly along northeastwardly trending belts that resulted apparently from Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental Arch. Isotopic and petrographic analyses were conducted on pelagic (carbonate matrix) and benthic (inoceramid bivalve) constituents of selected shale/limestone couplets. These data suggest that there was little difference in temperature or salinity between times of terrigenous detrital input and times of nearly pure carbonate deposition. Isotopic information from matrix samples suggests a westward decrease in salinity of surface water in the Western Interior Sea. Isotopic data from largely unaltered inoceramid bivalves indicate bottom-water conditions of near-normal marine salinity.

  15. Formation of calcium aluminates in the lime sinter process. [Extraction of alumina from fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, K.S.

    1980-03-01

    A study of the formation of several calcium aluminates from pure components in the lime sinter process was undertaken to determine the kinetics of formation and subsequent leaching using a dilute sodium carbonate solution. The composition CaO 61.98%, SiO/sub 2/ 26.67%, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 11.53% was used. Isothermal sintering runs of 0.2 to 10.0 h were carried out at 1200, 1250, 1300, and 1350/sup 0/C. When the sintering temperature was below the eutectic temperature (1335/sup 0/C), the ternary mixture behaved like two binary systems, i.e. CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and CaO-SiO/sub 2/. Only one compound, 3CaO.SiO/sub 2/, was formed between CaO and SiO/sub 2/. With lower sintering temperature and shorter sintering time, the ..beta..-phase was dominant. However, when both temperature and time increased, more and more of the ..beta..-C/sub 2/S was transformed into the ..gamma..-phase. Several different aluminates were formed during the sintering of CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The compounds CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 3CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were observed at all tested sintering temperatures, while the 5CaO.3Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ phase was found only at 1200/sup 0/C and 12CaO.7Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ at 1250/sup 0/C or higher. The first compound formed between CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was probably 12CaO.7Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, but the amount did not increase immediately with time. The first dominant compound between CaO and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was CaO.3Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. When the calcium ion diffused through the product layer of CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 3CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was formed. If unreacted Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were present after the formation of CaO.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO.2Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ would form. Subsequent leaching of the sinters showed that the extractable alumina in the products increased with both sintering temperature and time, reaching a max of about 90%. These extraction data corresponded very well to the quantities of aluminates in the sinters. 59 figures, 13 tables.

  16. Recovery of aluminum oxide by the Ames lime-soda sinter process: scale-up using a rotary kiln

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.; Harnby, N.

    1985-01-01

    The Ames Lime-Soda Sinter Process provides a means for recovering aluminum oxide from power plant fly ash while producing a residue that can be used in the manufacture of sulfate resistant (Type V) portland cement. The process has been fully researched and its feasibility is now being demonstrated through pilot plant scale investigation. This paper reports results of the pelletized feed preparation by agglomeration in a rotary pan granulator, continuous feed sintering in an electrically heated rotary kiln, and product recovery from the clinker by aqueous extraction, desilication of the filtrate, and precipitation of a hydrated aluminum oxide. Results from earlier bench-scale research have been found to apply consistently to the pilot plant scale work.

  17. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  18. On how differently the quasi-harmonic approximation works for two isostructural crystals: Thermal properties of periclase and lime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erba, A. Dovesi, R.; Shahrokhi, M.; Moradian, R.

    2015-01-28

    Harmonic and quasi-harmonic thermal properties of two isostructural simple oxides (periclase, MgO, and lime, CaO) are computed with ab initio periodic simulations based on the density-functional-theory (DFT). The more polarizable character of calcium with respect to magnesium cations is found to dramatically affect the validity domain of the quasi-harmonic approximation that, for thermal structural properties (such as temperature dependence of volume, V(T), bulk modulus, K(T), and thermal expansion coefficient, α(T)), reduces from [0 K-1000 K] for MgO to just [0 K-100 K] for CaO. On the contrary, thermodynamic properties (such as entropy, S(T), and constant-volume specific heat, C{sub V}(T)) are described reliably at least up to 2000 K and quasi-harmonic constant-pressure specific heat, C{sub P}(T), up to about 1000 K in both cases. The effect of the adopted approximation to the exchange-correlation functional of the DFT is here explicitly investigated by considering five different expressions of three different classes (local-density approximation, generalized-gradient approximation, and hybrids). Computed harmonic thermodynamic properties are found to be almost independent of the adopted functional, whereas quasi-harmonic structural properties are more affected by the choice of the functional, with differences that increase as the system becomes softer.

  19. Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinsky, F.T. (Pure Air, Allentown, PA (United States)); Ross, J. (Northern Indiana Public Service Co., Hammond, IN (United States)); Dennis, D.S. (United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Denver, CO (United States). Stearns-Roger Div.); Huston, J.S. (Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Warren NJ (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO{sub 2} will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO{sub 2} is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. LS8548 2..5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RFP plasma using a newly developed fast Faraday rotation diagnostic. This diagnos- tic technique is also directly applicable to other toroidal confinement devices, in...

  1. Partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal at a medium temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu

    2005-12-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the reactivity of partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal. Sulfation tests were performed at 550{sup o}C using a fixed bed reactor under conditions simulating economizer zone injection flue gas desulfurization. Activation experiments were conducted with water or steam using a range of temperatures between 100 and 550{sup o}C. The results showed that the reactivity of the sorbents was closely related to the content of Ca(OH){sub 2} formed in the activation process, which varied with the water or steam temperature. The sulfur dioxide capture capacity of Ca(OH){sub 2} in the sorbent is higher than that of CaO at a medium temperature. Water or steam temperatures in the range of 100-200{sup o}C are favorable to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2} from CaO. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Carbonaceous fuel combustion with improved desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Middle Island, NY); Shen, Ming-shing (Rocky Point, NY)

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides adsorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. The iron oxide present in the spent limestone is found to catalyze the regeneration rate of the spent limestone in a reducing environment. Thus both the calcium and iron components may be recycled.

  3. Evaluation of Ohio fly ash/hydrated lime slurries and Type 1 cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. Pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.; Meyers, G.R.

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this year`s work included an evaluation of the performance of fly ash/hydrated lime as well as hydrated cement sorbents for spray drying adsorption (SDA) of SO{sub 2} from a simulated high-sulfur flue gas. These sorbents were evaluated for several different hydration methods, and under different SDA operating conditions. In addition, the physical properties of surface area and porosity of the sorbents was determined. The most reactive fly ash/hydrated lime sorbent studied was prepared at room temperature with milled fly ash. Milling fly ash prior to hydration with lime did have a beneficial effect on calcium utilization. No benefit in utilization was experienced either by hydrating the slurries at a temperature of 90{degrees}C as compared to hydration at room temperature, or by increasing hydration time. While the surface areas varied greatly from sorbent to sorbent, the pore size distributions indicated ``ink bottle`` pores with surface porosity on the order of 0.5 microns. No correlation could be drawn between the surface area of the sorbents and calcium utilization. These results suggest that the composition of the resulting sorbent might be more important than its surface area. The most effective sorbent studied this year was produced by hydrating cement for 3 days at room temperature. This sorbent provided a removal efficiency and a calcium utilization over 25 percent higher than baseline results at an approach to saturation temperature of 30{degrees}F and a stoichiometric ratio of 0.9. A maximum SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of about 90 percent was experienced with this sorbent at an approach to saturation temperature of 20{degrees}F.

  4. Regeneration of FGD waste liquors: Production of ammonium and potassium sulfate mixed fertilizer. Quarterly technical report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, A.D.; Kwon, T.M.

    1993-12-01

    Precipitation and hydrolysis of the N-S compounds in the waste scrubbing liquor provided by Dravo Lime Co. was investigated. Precipitation of N-S compounds by a metathetical reaction with potassium sulfate was performed in continuous crystallizers. A preliminary operation showed that compared to a typical Mixed-Suspension-Mixed-Product-Removal (MSMPR) crystallizer, the Double-Draw-Off (DDO) crystallizer was superior by increasing the average size of the precipitated crystals of N-S compounds from 173 {mu}m to 218 {mu}m. However, the hydrolysis characteristics of the precipitated crystals were not dependent upon crystallizer type. A brief description of a new process which uses lime/limestone for precipitation of N-S compounds in the scrubbing liquor is presented. Preliminary investigations showed the lime/limestone process is efficient in precipitating N-S compounds and the precipitated crystals were shown to be more easily hydrolyzed than potassium salts of N-S compounds. This lime/limestone process is a novel process which seems better than the K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} process because one does not need to purchase/introduce a new chemical additive to precipitate in the lime/limestone Fe-EDTA wet scrubbing processes. Up to the present, the authors focused on developing the K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} process following their original proposal. However, the new lime/limestone process seems more advantageous in terms of economy and environmental safety. Therefore, it seems desirable changing research phase and putting an emphasis on the development of the lime/limestone process. Future study will include investigation of the DDO crystallizer operation to increase the size of precipitated crystals and thus to enhance their processibility. This study seems to be essential to the new lime/limestone process since the precipitated crystals are relatively small in size and thus poor in filterability.

  5. Validation of in vitro cell models used in drug metabolism and transport studies; genotyping of cytochrome P450, phase II enzymes and drug transporter polymorphisms in the human hepatoma (HepG2), ovarian carcinoma (IGROV-1) and colon carcinoma (CaCo-2, LS180) cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon, Esther F.A.; Bosch, Tessa M.; Deenen, Maarten J.; Levink, Rianne; Wal, Everdina van der; Meerveld, Joyce B.M. van; Bijl, Monique; Beijnen, Jos H. |; Schellens, Jan H.M. |; Meijerman, Irma . E-mail: I.Meijerman@pharm.uu.nl

    2006-02-15

    Human cell lines are often used for in vitro biotransformation and transport studies of drugs. In vivo, genetic polymorphisms have been identified in drug-metabolizing enzymes and ABC-drug transporters leading to altered enzyme activity, or a change in the inducibility of these enzymes. These genetic polymorphisms could also influence the outcome of studies using human cell lines. Therefore, the aim of our study was to pharmacogenotype four cell lines frequently used in drug metabolism and transport studies, HepG2, IGROV-1, CaCo-2 and LS180, for genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes and drug transporters. The results indicate that, despite the presence of some genetic polymorphisms, no real effects influencing the activity of metabolizing enzymes or drug transporters in the investigated cell lines are expected. However, this characterization will be an aid in the interpretation of the results of biotransformation and transport studies using these in vitro cell models.

  6. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-04

    Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

  7. Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindley, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

  8. Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindley, T.

    1988-04-05

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

  9. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  10. Coolside waste management demonstration OCDO grant agreement No. CDO/D-902-9. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    The objectives of this project were to evaluate the potential utilization in road construction of wastes produced from the Coolside, LIMB (limestone injection multi-stage burner) and FBC (fluidized-bed combustion) processes, and to specify criteria for landfill disposal of waste from the Coolside process. These three processes are considered to be clean coal technologies. The Coolside process involves injecting an aqueous slurry of hydrated lime into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater in a coal-fired boiler. The hydrated lime captures sulfur dioxide from the flue gas producing anhydrous calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate, which are collected along with the unused hydrated lime and fly ash. The LIMB process involves injection of lime or hydrated lime directly into the furnace to capture sulfur dioxide. The waste consists principally of anhydrous calcium sulfate, lime, and fly ash. Both processes were demonstrated successfully at the Edgewater Station of Ohio Edison in Lorrain, OH, from 1989 to 1992. Circulating fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) is a commercial technology which combines steam generation with SO{sub 2} control by burning coal in a circulating bed of limestone. The waste, chemically similar to LIMB waste, is produced by bleed-off of the bed material and by collection of the flue dust. All three processes produce a dry solid waste, which must either be used or disposed of and managed to ensure environmental compliance and economic feasibility. The project was completed in June 1996.

  11. Limestone County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ardmore, Alabama Athens, Alabama Decatur, Alabama Elkmont, Alabama Huntsville, Alabama Lester, Alabama Madison, Alabama Mooresville, Alabama Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  12. Retrofit costs for SO sub 2 and NOx control options at 200 coal-fired plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This 5-volume report gives the results of site-specific cost estimations for retrofitting six control technologies to coal-fired power plants. The six technologies were: lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization, lime spray drying, coal switching and cleaning, furnace and duct sorbent injection, low NOx combustion or natural gas reburning, and selective catalytic reduction. Volume 1 gives the methodology. The other four volumes each cover 5-7 specific states east of the Mississippi River. Maine, Vermont, Rhode Island, and Connecticut are not included.

  13. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

    2009-01-20

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  14. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-08-30

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  15. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

    2010-07-13

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  16. The Design of Superconducting Wiggler Beamline BL7 at SAGA-LS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamoto, M.; Sumitani, K.; Okajima, T.

    2010-06-23

    A new hard X-ray beamline has been designed at Saga Light Source. The beamline, named BL7, uses a newly developed 4-Tesla superconducting wiggler as a light source in order to cover a wide energy range to 30 keV. This beamline has a simple optics: a double-crystal monochromator and a Rh-coated bent-cylindrical mirror and can supply a focused beam with a photon flux about 1x10{sup 10} photons/s and a sub-millimeter size. Several experiments will be performed in the experimental station: e.g. protein crystallography; X-ray micro computed tomography; X-ray absorption fine structure measurement.

  17. Online Luminosity Measurement at CMS for Energy Frontier Physics after LS1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickland, David P.

    2015-09-20

    This proposal was directed towards the measurement of Bunch-by-Bunch and Total Luminosity in the CMS experiment using Single-Crystal Diamond (sCVD) installed close to the Interaction Point - known as the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, or BCM1F detector. The proposal was successfully carried out and in February 2015 CMS installed its upgraded BCM1F detector. At first collisions in June 2015 the BCM1F was used as the primary luminometer, then in August 2015 a Van De Meer scan has been carried out and the detailed luminometer calibration is under study. In all aspects of performance measurement the upgraded detector has satisfied its design parameters and as an overview of its performance in this report will show, we have high expectations that the detector will be a powerful addition to the luminosity measurement at CMS and LHC. The proposed upgrade of BCM1F was a collaboration of CMS Institutes in Germany (DESY-Zeuthen) and the USA (Princeton) and of CERN itself.

  18. Flue gas desulfurization: Physicochemical and biotechnological approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, R.A.; Biswas, R.; Chakrabarti, T.; Devotta, S.

    2005-07-01

    Various flue gas desulfurization processes - physicochemical, biological, and chemobiological - for the reduction of emission of SO{sub 2} with recovery of an economic by-product have been reviewed. The physicochemical processes have been categorized as 'once-through' and 'regenerable.' The prominent once-through technologies include wet and dry scrubbing. The wet scrubbing technologies include wet limestone, lime-inhibited oxidation, limestone forced oxidation, and magnesium-enhanced lime and sodium scrubbing. The dry scrubbing constitutes lime spray drying, furnace sorbent injection, economizer sorbent injection, duct sorbent injection, HYPAS sorbent injection, and circulating fluidized bed treatment process. The regenerable wet and dry processes include the Wellman Lord's process, citrate process, sodium carbonate eutectic process, magnesium oxide process, amine process, aqueous ammonia process, Berglau Forchung's process, and Shell's process. Besides these, the recently developed technologies such as the COBRA process, the OSCAR process, and the emerging biotechnological and chemobiological processes are also discussed. A detailed outline of the chemistry, the advantages and disadvantages, and the future research and development needs for each of these commercially viable processes is also discussed.

  19. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  20. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  1. Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS), Executable Model and Source Model (version 4. 0) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29

    The Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS) Cost Model is an IBM PC cost model that can be used to estimate the cost of installing SO2, NOx, and particulate matter control systems at coal-fired utility electric generating facilities. The model integrates various combinations of the following technologies: physical coal cleaning, coal switching, overfire air/low NOx burners, natural gas reburning, LIMB, ADVACATE, electrostatic precipitator, fabric filter, gas conditioning, wet lime or limestone FGD, lime spray drying/duct spray drying, dry sorbent injection, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, and pulverized coal burning boiler. The model generates capital, annualized, and unitized pollutant removal costs in either constant or current dollars for any year.

  2. Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS), Executable Model (Version 4. 0) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29

    The Integrated Air Pollution Control System (IAPCS) Cost Model is an IBM PC cost model that can be used to estimate the cost of installing SO2, NOx, and particulate matter control systems at coal-fired utility electric generating facilities. The model integrates various combinations of the following technologies: physical coal cleaning, coal switching, overfire air/low NOx burners, natural gas reburning, LIMB, ADVACATE, electrostatic precipitator, fabric filter, gas conditioning, wet lime or limestone FGD, lime spray drying/duct spray drying, dry sorbent injection, pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated gasification combined cycle, and pulverized coal burning boiler. The model generates capital, annualized, and unitized pollutant removal costs in either constant or current dollars for any year.

  3. Performance and economics of a spray-dryer FGD system used with high-sulfur coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D.; Farber, P.S.

    1986-04-01

    Flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems based on spray drying to offer advantages over wet lime/limestone systems in a number of areas: low energy consumption, low capital cost, high reliability, and production of a dry waste that is easily handled and disposed of. Uncertainties regarding the performance and economics of such systems for control of high-sulfur-coal emissions have slowed adoption of the technology in the Midwest and East. This paper summarizes 4 years, operating and research experience with that system and describes the current research program, which includes an indepth characterization of an industrial scale dry scrubber with 3.5% sulfur coal.

  4. Development and evaluation of lime enhanced refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlsson, O.O.

    1996-12-31

    The disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) is of increasing concern for municipalities and state governments throughout the US. There are two technologies currently in use for the combustion of MSW: (1) mass burning in which unprocessed MSW is burned in a heat recovery furnace, and (2) a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) product, which consists of the organic (combustible) fraction of MSW which has been processed to produce a more homogeneous fuel product than raw MSW. The RDF is either marketed to outside users or combusted on-site in a dedicated or existing furnace. In an attempt to alleviate the problems encountered with RDF as a feedstock, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of North Texas (UNT) under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a multi-phase research study to investigate the development of a low-cost binder that would improve the quality of RDF pellets.

  5. Lessons Learned Following the Successful Decommissioning of a Reaction Vessel Containing Lime Sludge and Technetium-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, P. M.; Watson, D. D.; Hylko, J. M.

    2002-02-25

    This paper documents how WESKEM, LLC utilized available source term information, integrated safety management, and associated project controls to safely decommission a reaction vessel and repackage sludge containing various Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The decommissioning activities were segmented into five separate stages, allowing the project team to control work related decisions based on their knowledge, experience, expertise, and field observations. The information and experience gained from each previous stage and rehearsals contributed to modifying subsequent entries, further emphasizing the importance of developing hold points and incorporating lessons learned. The hold points and lessons learned, such as performing detailed personal protective equipment (PPE) inspections during sizing and repackaging operations, and using foam-type piping insulation to prevent workers from cutting or puncturing their PPE on sharp edge s or small shards generated during sizing operations, minimized direct contact with the Tc-99. To prevent the spread of contamination, the decommissioning activities were performed inside a containment enclosure connected to negative air machines. After performing over 235 individual entries totaling over 285 project hours, only one first aid was recorded during this five-stage project.

  6. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more » leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  7. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Canfield, OH); Farthing, George A. (Washington Township, OH)

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  8. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Canfield, OH); Farthing, George A. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  9. Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maibodi, M. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper discusses the impacts of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments related to acid rain controls, as they apply to industrial boilers. Emphasis is placed on explaining the Title IV provisions of the Amendments that permit nonutility sources to participate in the SO{sub 2} allowance system. The allowance system, as it pertains to industrial boiler operators, is described, and the opportunities for operators to trade and/or sell SO{sub 2} emission credits is discussed. The paper also reviews flue gas desulfurization system technologies available for industrial boiler operators who may choose to participate in the system. Furnace sorbent injection, advanced silicate process, lime spray drying, dry sorbent injection, and limestone scrubbing are described, including statements of their SO{sub 2} removing capability, commercial status, and costs. Capital costs, levelized costs and cost-effectiveness are presented for these technologies.

  10. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  11. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  12. Verification of simplified procedures for site-specific SO sub 2 and NOx control cost estimates. Final report, March 1988-May 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmel, T.E.; Maibodi, M.

    1990-02-01

    The report documents results of an evaluation to verify the accuracy of simplified procedures for estimating sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) retrofit control costs and performance for 200 SO2-emitting coal-fired power plants in the 31-state eastern region. Initially, detailed retrofit studies were conducted for 12 coal-fired plants in Ohio, Kentucky, and the Tennessee Valley Authority system. Because detailed studies are expensive and time-consuming, results from the 12-plant study were used to develop simplified procedures which require less time, data, and preparation effort. The evaluation compared the costs for a number of plants estimated using the simplified procedures to costs estimated using detailed procedures, actual retrofit costs, and more detailed cost estimates provided by utility companies. Based on the evaluation, recommendations for changes to the simplified procedures were developed. Control technologies addressed in the report are conventional lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization, lime spray drying, furnace sorbent injection, duct spray drying, coal switching, physical coal cleaning, and selective catalytic reduction. In general, it was found that the simplified procedures can be used to generate improved cost performance estimates based on generally available information.

  13. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of Streptococcus pneumontae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacks, S.A.

    1990-10-02

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252. 9 figs.

  14. Recombinant plasmids for encoding restriction enzymes DpnI and DpnII of streptococcus pneumontae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacks, Sanford A. (Brookhaven, NY)

    1990-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA cassettes containing genes encoding either the DpnI or DpnII restriction endonucleases from Streptococcus pneumoniae are cloned into a streptococcal vector, pLS101. Large amounts of the restriction enzymes are produced by cells containing the multicopy plasmids, pLS202 and pLS207, and their derivatives pLS201, pLS211, pLS217, pLS251 and pLS252.

  15. Mark A. McCall | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Lime Rock Partners, a private equity firm focused on the energy sector. He also served as Lime Rock's General Counsel from 1998 to 2010. Before joining Lime Rock Partners, ...

  16. Columbia County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jamison City, Pennsylvania Jerseytown, Pennsylvania Lightstreet, Pennsylvania Lime Ridge, Pennsylvania Locustdale, Pennsylvania Mainville, Pennsylvania Mifflinville,...

  17. Yavapai-Apache Nation - Forest Biomass Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Daystar Consulting, LLC - - Program Consultant Program Consultant Leonard Gold, L.S. Gold & Associates, Leonard Gold, L.S. Gold & Associates, Utility Consultant Utility ...

  18. Sorbent preparation/modification/additives. Final report, September 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudich, M.E.; Venkataramakrishnan, R.

    1994-02-01

    Sorbent preparation techniques used today have generally been adapted from techniques traditionally used by the lime industry. Traditional dry hydration and slaking processes have been optimized to produce materials intended for use in the building industry. These preparation techniques should be examined with an eye to optimization of properties important to the SO{sub 2} capture process. The study of calcium-based sorbents for sulfur dioxide capture is complicated by two factors: (1) little is known about the chemical mechanisms by which the standard sorbent preparation and enhancement techniques work, and (2) a sorbent preparation technique that produces a calcium-based sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in one regime of operation [flame zone (>2400 F), in-furnace (1600--2400 F), economizer (800--1100 F), after air preheater (<350 F)] may not produce a sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in the other reaction zones. Again, an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of sorbent enhancement is necessary if a systematic approach to sorbent development is to be used. As a long-term goal, an experimental program is being carried out for the purpose of (1) defining the effects of slaking conditions on the properties of calcium-based sorbents, (2) determining how the parent limestone properties of calcium-based sorbents, and (3) elucidating the mechanism(s) relating to the activity of various dry sorbent additives. An appendix contains a one-dimensional duct injection model with modifications to handle the sodium additives.

  19. Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

  20. Power-plant fly-ash utilization: a chemical processing perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) deals with the management of solid and hazardous wastes, and encourages energy and resource recovery. Recent research has indicated that solid wastes from coal combustion, including fly ash, could be classified as hazardous under present EPA definitions. The seriousness of this possibility has been recognized and new rules for coal ash waste disposal are being considered. Ames Laboratory research on fly ash utilization as an alternative to disposal includes extraction of metals from the ash and discovery of uses for the process residues. Recovery of alumina and iron oxides by physical and chemical processing would permit large scale utilization of fly ash and help reduce dependency on imports. One of the processes investigated uses a lime-soda sinter method to form soluble aluminate compounds from mixtures of fly ash, limestone, and soda ash. The aluminates are extracted, treated to remove silicates, and precipitated: the precipitate is calcined to metallurgical grade alumina. The extract residue shows promise as a raw material for the production of Portland cement. Process economics are presented, and the effects of alumina and silica contents of the fly ash, sintering temperatures and time, and sales credits for by-products are discussed.

  1. Second survey of dry SO/sub 2/ control systems. Final report Mar-Sep 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, M.E.; Shareef, S.A.

    1981-02-01

    The report is an updated assessment of dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Current and recently completed research, development, and commercial activities in the U.S. since October 1979, are reviewed including: (1) spray dryers with a fabric filter or an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), (2) dry injection of alkaline material into flue gas combined with particulate collection in an ESP or fabric filter, and (3) combustion of coal/alkali fuel mixtures. Spray drying remains the only commercially applied dry FGD process. Since the last survey, completed late in 1979, eight utility and two industrial spray drying systems have been sold. Nine of them use lime as the sorbent, and nine use a fabric filter for particulate collection. Removal guarantees for so/sub 2/ range from 62 to 85%, depending on coal sulfur content. Two full-scale industrial spray drying systems are currently operating. The first large utility system is scheduled for startup early in 1981. Several publicly and privately funded pilot-scale programs have been completed in the past year. EPA is currently funding three such programs (two spray drying and one dry injection), as well as development of two combustion modification processes for SO2 control (combustion of coal/limestone pellets and of a pulverized coal/alkali mixture in a low-NOx burner). The DoE and others are studying dry injection on a pilot scale.

  2. Dry FGD (flue-gas desulfurization) at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livengood, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    Flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems based on spray drying are a relatively recent addition to the spectrum of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) control options available to utility and industrial boiler operators. Such systems appear to offer advantages over wet lime/limestone systems in a number of areas: low energy consumption, low capital cost, high reliability, and production of a dry waste that is easily handled and disposed of. These advantages have promoted rapid acceptance of dry scrubbers for applications using western low-sulfur coal, but uncertainties regarding the performance and economics of such systems for control of high-sulfur-coal emissions have slowed adoption of the technology in the Midwest and East. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) we have had more than eight years of operating experience with an industrial-scale dry scrubber used with a boiler firing high-sulfur (3.5%) midwestern coal. This paper describes our operating experience with that system and summarizes several research programs that have utilized it. 7 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. L3:VRI.PSS.P1.01 Rod Schmidt SNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P1.01 Rod Schmidt SNL Completed: 10/29/10 CASL-U-2010-0006-000 Introduction to LIME: A Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for Coupling Codes 1 Rod Schmidt Sandia National Labs LIME version 0.6 Oct 29, 2010 CASL-U-2010-0006-000 2 Outline * Some Multi-physics Coupling Issues and Terms * Background on LIME Development * Description of LIME * Use of LIME to create multi-physics applications CASL-U-2010-0006-000 3 What do we mean by "coupled" physics? * The solution of one

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Control lines and salt-stressed lines (6 lines each) grown in minimal medium LS4D or LS4D + 100 mM NaCl were transferred for 1200 generations. The salt tolerance was tested with ...

  5. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [sup [epsilon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, R.L.

    1999-06-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) [sup [epsilon

  6. Gas turbines and acid rain - Looking at some solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, W.

    1989-01-01

    This article examines the technology available for reducing the sulfur emissions of gas turbines that are implicated in the production of acid rain. The alternatives reviewed are limestone scrubbing, spray dryer absorption and limestone injection into boilers. The last process is not feasible for gas turbines and of the other two the author recommends limestone scrubbing.

  7. Distributed Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributed Power Inc Place: Lime Rock, Connecticut Zip: 6039 Product: Focused on distributed generation power technology. References: Distributed Power Inc1 This article is a...

  8. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marinated pork tenderloin with pineapple salsa - Green rice - Margarita cake with key lime cream cheese frosting Friday, March 6 Dinner - Avgolemono soup - Herb-crusted lamb...

  9. Fermilab Today | Tip of the Week Archive | 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lots that will not receive snow removal service. These areas are highlighted with lime-green safety cones. November 12, 2012 Computer Caution with laser pointers There are...

  10. Howard County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Howard County, Iowa Chester, Iowa Cresco, Iowa Elma, Iowa Lime Springs, Iowa Protivin, Iowa Riceville, Iowa Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  11. Elk Grove Village, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Elk Grove Village, Illinois Lime Energy formerly Electric City Corporation References US Census Bureau Incorporated...

  12. 2014 PowerPoint template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Addition of lime to the residuals will precipitate the leaching uranium * How can this information be used in modeling Retrievals System Plan 7 Points of Interest * Current...

  13. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

  14. University of Greenwich | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenwich Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Greenwich Address: Old Royal Naval College, 30 Park Row, London, Greenwich SE10 9LS, United Kingdom Year Founded: 1890...

  15. Future Energy Yorkshire | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yorkshire Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Yorkshire Place: Leeds, United Kingdom Zip: LS11 5AE Sector: Services Product: Leeds-based, wholly owned subsidiary of...

  16. Carbon Compliance Acquisition 16 Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compliance Acquisition 16 Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Compliance Acquisition 16 Limited Place: United Kingdom Zip: LS12DS Product: Security broking and fund...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... New York Support Office, New York, NY (United States) North American Aviation, Inc. ... garnets (1) ferromagnetic resonance (1) graphene (1) iron oxides (1) l-s coupling (1) ...

  18. pftp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    features proxy timeread hfeatures sendport timewrite idle mpget tput image mpput trace lcd pappend type lfappend pget user lfget pput umask lfput put verbose ls pwd ? ftp> help...

  19. Sunuser | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: Sunuser Name: Sunuser Address: 157 Buslingthorpe Lane, Leeds, LS7 2DQ Place: Leeds, United Kingdom Sector: Solar Product: Solar thermal Year Founded: 1982 Phone Number: 0800...

  20. Temperature effects on the behavior of liquid hydrogen isotopes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    liquid hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical-shell directly driven inertial confinement fusion target Kim, K.; Mok, L.S. 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; LASER TARGETS;...

  1. Analysis5_.PDF

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    The Livezey and Smith Findings In a paper published in January 1999, 1 Robert Livezey and Thomas Smith (LS) of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ...

  2. MDL Ambiente Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MDL Ambiente Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: MDL Ambiente Ltd. Place: Leeds, England, United Kingdom Zip: LS1 2DS Product: The organisation prepares project design documents...

  3. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As

  4. 3.27 Why Dinosaurs Are Extinct

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Walter Alvarez discovered a layer of red clay between fossil- containing limestone deposits in Italy. His father, Nobel laureate Luis Alvarez, suggested how to analyze it. ...

  5. X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography for the Durability Characterization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography for the Durability Characterization of Limestone Aggregate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography for...

  6. Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    component required to maintain observed calcite saturation and high Pco2 pressures was carbon presumably derived from underlying Paleozoic limestones. Phase rule constraints...

  7. Microsoft Word - EPAct_TRS_Greene Co Site_final_20140915.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 6 Figure 4: Structure contour map on a persistent limestone unit within ... 2) plugging and perforation to improve efficiency An Evaluation of Fracture Growth and ...

  8. Mining Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These mined minerals include coal, metals such as iron, copper, or zinc, and industrial minerals such as potash, limestone, and other crushed rocks. Oil and natural gas extraction ...

  9. Stratigraphic Boundaries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tectonics Mississippian-Pennsylvanian; Pleistocene, 1.6 to 1.25 Ma Limestone-Madera Formation "MIPu"; Rhyolitic tuff-Intracaldera Bandelier Tuff (upper Tshirege "Qbt" and...

  10. Caldera Rim Margins | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tectonics Mississippian-Pennsylvanian; Pleistocene, 1.6 to 1.25 Ma Limestone-Madera Formation "MIPu"; Rhyolitic tuff-Intracaldera Bandelier Tuff (upper Tshirege "Qbt" and...

  11. Gypsum treated fly ash as a liner for waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivapullaiah, Puvvadi V.; Baig, M. Arif Ali

    2011-02-15

    Fly ash has potential application in the construction of base liners for waste containment facilities. While most of the fly ashes improve in the strength with curing, the ranges of permeabilities they attain may often not meet the basic requirement of a liner material. An attempt has been made in the present context to reduce the hydraulic conductivity by adding lime content up to 10% to two selected samples of class F fly ashes. The use of gypsum, which is known to accelerate the unconfined compressive strength by increasing the lime reactivity, has been investigated in further improving the hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic conductivities of the compacted specimens have been determined in the laboratory using the falling head method. It has been observed that the addition of gypsum reduces the hydraulic conductivity of the lime treated fly ashes. The reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the samples containing gypsum is significantly more for samples with high amounts of lime contents (as high as 1000 times) than those fly ashes with lower amounts of lime. However there is a relatively more increase in the strengths of the samples with the inclusion of gypsum to the fly ashes at lower lime contents. This is due to the fact that excess lime added to fly ash is not effectively converted into pozzolanic compounds. Even the presence of gypsum is observed not to activate these reactions with excess lime. On the other hand the higher amount of lime in the presence of sulphate is observed to produce more cementitious compounds which block the pores in the fly ash. The consequent reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of fly ash would be beneficial in reducing the leachability of trace elements present in the fly ash when used as a base liner.

  12. Fuel gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Tonawanda, NY); Shen, Ming-Shing (Rocky Point, NY)

    1981-01-01

    A method for removing sulfurous gases such as H.sub.2 S and COS from a fuel gas is disclosed wherein limestone particulates containing iron sulfide provide catalytic absorption of the H.sub.2 S and COS by the limestone. The method is effective at temperatures of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C. in particular.

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and non-profit customers of Central Hudson. The progam utilizes the services of Lime Energy to install new lighting fixtures with Central Hudson covering up to 70% of the...

  14. L2:VRI.P3.01 John Turner ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P3.01 John Turner ORNL Completed: 93011 CASL-U-2011-0017-002 SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-8524 Unlimited Release Printed November, 2011 An Introduction to LIME 1.0 and its Use in...

  15. CX-006214: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lime Lakes EnergyCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 07/05/2011Location(s): Barberton, OhioOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  16. CX-010517: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program- Lime Lakes Energy, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.20 Date: 06/14/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. Discovery of a ternary pseudobrookite phase in the earth-abundant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Discovery of a ternary pseudobrookite phase in the earth-abundant TiZnO system Authors: Perry, Nicola H. ; Stevanovic, Vladan ; Lime, Linda Y. ; Mason, Thomas O. 1 ; CSM) ...

  18. Preparation of Gd Loaded Liquid Scintillator for Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yayun; Zhang Zhiyong

    2010-05-12

    Gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator (Gd-LS) is an excellent target material for reactor antineutrino experiments. Ideal Gd-LS should have long attenuation length, high light yield, long term stability, low toxicity, and should be compatible with the material used to build the detector. We have developed a new Gd-LS recipe in which carboxylic acid 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoic acid is used as the complexing ligand to gadolinium, 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 1,4-bis[2-methylstyryl]benzene (bis-MSB) are used as primary fluor and wavelength shifter, respectively. The scintillator base is linear alkyl benzene (LAB). Eight hundred liters of Gd-LS has been synthesized and tested in a prototype detector. Results show that the Gd-LS has high quality and is suitable for underground experiments in large quantity. Large scale production facility has been built. A full batch production of 4 t Gd-LS has been produced and monitored for several months. The production of 180 t Gd-LS will be carried out in the near future.

  19. Chemical and mineralogical characterizations of LD converter steel slags: A multi-analytical techniques approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waligora, J.; Bulteel, D.; Degrugilliers, P.; Damidot, D.; Potdevin, J.L.; Measson, M.

    2010-01-15

    The use of LD converter steel slags (coming from Linz-Donawitz steelmaking process) as aggregates in road construction can in certain cases lead to dimensional damage due to a macroscopic swelling that is the consequence of chemical reactions. The aim of this study was to couple several analytical techniques in order to carefully undertake chemical and mineralogical characterizations of LD steel slags and identify the phases that are expected to be responsible for their instability. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalyses revealed that LD steel slags mainly contain calcium silicates, dicalcium ferrites, iron oxides and lime. However, as a calcium silicate phase is heterogeneous, Raman microspectrometry and transmitted electron microscopy had to be used to characterize it more precisely. Results showed that lime is present under two forms in slag grains: some nodules observed in the matrix whose size ranges from 20 to 100 {mu}m and some micro-inclusions, enclosed in the heterogeneous calcium silicate phase whose size ranges from 1 to 3 {mu}m. It was also established that without the presence of magnesia, lime is expected to be the only phase responsible for LD steel slags instability. Nevertheless, the distribution of lime between nodules and micro-inclusions may play a major role and could explain that similar amounts of lime can induce different instabilities. Thus, it appears that lime content of LD steel slags is not the only parameter to explain their instability.

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetin, Bora; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Li, Lin

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the evaluation of leaching potential of fly ash-lime mixed soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This objective is met with experimental and numerical analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn leaching decreases with increase in fly ash content while Ba, B, Cu increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu while Zn increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical analysis predicted lower field metal concentrations. - Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of unpaved road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater impacts of barium, boron, copper, and zinc leaching. This objective was met by a combination of batch water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted on soil alone, fly ash alone, and URM-fly ash-lime kiln dust mixtures. The results indicated that an increase in fly ash and lime content has significant effects on leaching behavior of heavy metals from URM-fly ash mixture. An increase in fly ash content and a decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu whereas Zn leaching was primarily affected by the fly ash content. Numerically predicted field metal concentrations were significantly lower than the peak metal concentrations obtained in laboratory column leach tests, and field concentrations decreased with time and distance due to dispersion in soil vadose zone.

  1. computational-structural-mechanics-training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table of Contents Date Location Training Course: HyperMesh and HyperView April 12-14, 2011 Argonne TRACC Argonne, IL Introductory Course: Developing Compute-efficient, Quality Models with LS-PrePost® 3 on the TRACC Cluster October 21-22, 2010 Argonne TRACC West Chicago, IL Modeling and Simulation with LS-DYNA®: Insights into Modeling with a Goal of Providing Credible Predictive Simulations February 11-12, 2010 Argonne TRACC West Chicago, IL Introductory Course: Using LS-OPT® on the TRACC

  2. Identification of an Archean marine oxygen oasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riding, Dr Robert E; Fralick, Dr Philip; Liang, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    The early Earth was essentially anoxic. A number of indicators suggest the presence of oxygenic photosynthesis 2700 3000 million years (Ma) ago, but direct evidence for molecular oxygen (O2) in seawater has remained elusive. Here we report rare earth element (REE) analyses of 2800 million year old shallowmarine limestones and deep-water iron-rich sediments at Steep Rock Lake, Canada. These show that the seawater from which extensive shallow-water limestones precipitated was oxygenated, whereas the adjacent deeper waters where iron-rich sediments formed were not. We propose that oxygen promoted limestone precipitation by oxidative removal of dissolved ferrous iron species, Fe(II), to insoluble Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, and estimate that at least 10.25 M oxygen concentration in seawater was required to accomplish this at Steep Rock. This agrees with the hypothesis that an ample supply of dissolved Fe(II) in Archean oceans would have hindered limestone formation. There is no direct evidence for the oxygen source at Steep Rock, but organic carbon isotope values and diverse stromatolites in the limestones suggest the presence of cyanobacteria. Our findings support the view that during the Archean significant oxygen levels first developed in protected nutrient-rich shallow marine habitats. They indicate that these environments were spatially restricted, transient, and promoted limestone precipitation. If Archean marine limestones in general reflect localized oxygenic removal of dissolved iron at the margins of otherwise anoxic iron-rich seas, then early oxygen oases are less elusive than has been assumed.

  3. Ironmaking Process Alternative Screening Study, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockwood Greene, . .

    2005-01-06

    Iron in the United States is largely produced from iron ore mined in the United States or imported from Canada or South America. The iron ore is typically smelted in Blast Furnaces that use primarily iron ore, iron concentrate pellets metallurgical coke, limestone and lime as the raw materials. Under current operating scenarios, the iron produced from these Blast Furnaces is relatively inexpensive as compared to current alternative iron sources, e.g. direct iron reduction, imported pig iron, etc. The primary problem the Blast Furnace Ironmaking approach is that many of these Blast furnaces are relatively small, as compared to the newer, larger Blast Furnaces; thus are relatively costly and inefficient to operate. An additional problem is also that supplies of high-grade metallurgical grade coke are becoming increasingly in short supply and costs are also increasing. In part this is due to the short supply and costs of high-grade metallurgical coals, but also this is due to the increasing necessity for environmental controls for coke production. After year 2003 new regulations for coke product environmental requirement will likely be promulgated. It is likely that this also will either increase the cost of high-quality coke production or will reduce the available domestic U.S. supply. Therefore, iron production in the United States utilizing the current, predominant Blast Furnace process will be more costly and would likely be curtailed due to a coke shortage. Therefore, there is a significant need to develop or extend the economic viability of Alternate Ironmaking Processes to at least partially replace current and declining blast furnace iron sources and to provide incentives for new capacity expansion. The primary conclusions of this comparative Study of Alternative Ironmaking Process scenarios are: (1) The processes with the best combined economics (CAPEX and OPEX impacts in the I.R.R. calculation) can be grouped into those Fine Ore based processes with no scrap charge and those producing Hot Metal for charge to the EAF. (2) A pronounced sensitivity to Steel Scrap Cost was felt less by the Hot Metal Processes and the Fine Ore Processes that typically do not utilize much purchased scrap. (3) In terms of evolving processes, the Tecnored Process (and in particular, the lower-operating cost process with integral co-generation of electrical power) was in the most favorable groupings at all scrap cost sensitivities. (4) It should be noted also that the Conventional Blast Furnace process utilizing Non-Recovery coke (from a continuous coking process with integral co-generation of electrical power) and the lower-capital cost Mini Blast Furnace also showed favorable Relative Economics for the low and median Scrap Cost sensitivities. (5) The lower-cost, more efficient MauMee Rotary Hearth Process that uses a Briquetted Iron Unit Feed (instead of a dried or indurated iron ore pellet) also was in the most favorable process groupings. Those processes with lower-cost raw materials (i.e. fine ore and/or nonmetallurgical coal as the reductant) had favorable combined economics. In addition, the hot metal processes (in part due to the sensible heat impacts in the EAF and due to their inherently lower costs) also had favorable combined economics.

  4. Resources for Macromolecular Crystallography | Advanced Photon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Time GUP Login Proposal Calendar Publications Database CAT Websites: BioCARS GMCA-CAT IMCA-CAT LRL-CAT LS-CAT NE-CAT SBC-CAT SER-CAT Reports and Presentations: Stuctural Bio...

  5. Onzo Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: WC2H 8LS Product: Onzo develops displays providing real-time data on energy consumption. Coordinates: 51.506325, -0.127144 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Exploratory Well At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Allis, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An approximate discharge of hot geothermal fluid of about 5 ls is estimated from the models, this equates to a loss of about 56 MW. References R. G. Allis, Stuart D. Johnson,...

  7. Microsoft Word - Appendix A.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    a separate sheet.) Fernald Preserve BAP W4 Hamilton County 5-24-2011 U.S. Department of Energy OH 1 MK, LS, SMB Plateau in NE corner None 0-2% X X Regional precipitation is...

  8. Electratech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electratech Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electratech Place: Leeds, United Kingdom Zip: LS17 6HZ Product: Developer of a multi-way extension lead for use with all electrical...

  9. Yorkshire Windpower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Windpower Jump to: navigation, search Name: Yorkshire Windpower Place: Leeds, United Kingdom Zip: LS14 3H5 Sector: Wind energy Product: Formed to develop and own wind farms in the...

  10. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cray XE6 Cray XC30 Lower is better * Pre-release version of AcuSolve from Altair 26 LS-DYNA benchmark Two car crash simulation, 2.4M elements, Hybrid parallel 1400 2800 5600 11200...

  11. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=a; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm ; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  12. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050b

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=b; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  13. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=a; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm ; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  14. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050b

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=b; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  15. Lesotho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Lesotho Population 2,031,348 GDP 2,616,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LS 3-letter ISO code LSO Numeric ISO...

  16. Conduit Ventures Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Conduit Ventures Ltd Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC1N 8LS Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Focuses purely upon fuel cells and related hydrogen technologies. Opening an...

  17. NUREG/CR-6399

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Layout of CVN Specimen in 1--78Sp HB2 Nozzle Dropout (A212B) (Remainder block from manufacture of L-S operational assessment CVN specimens) 12 11 16" I I 4 ' 7 1 4" Dlstance...

  18. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    liquid hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical-shell directly driven inertial confinement fusion target","Kim, K.; Mok, L.S.","1984-05-01T04:00:00Z",6101909,"10.2172...

  19. Ak-Chin Indian Community - Biomass Feasibiltiy Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 19, 2005 2005 L. S. Gold & Associates, Inc. Page 2 October 19, 2005 AK-CHIN ... * Technical Contact: Leonard Gold, Manager Ak-Chin Energy Services L.S. Gold ...

  20. Conduit Ventures Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC1N 8LS Product: Venture capital funding for fuel cells and hydrogen. Phone Number: +44 (0) 20 7831 3131 Website: www.conduit-ventures....

  1. Technical Session III Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Coherent LS @ MIT (Graves) .pdf file (1.1MB) Terawatt X-ray FELs (Pellegrini) .pdf file (5.1MB) Advanced Beam Physics @ UCLA (Musumeci) .pdf file (1.3MB) Accelerator Modeling...

  2. TRACC Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of GUI for Structural Mechanics Codes The TRACC Cluster gives its users a lot of flexibility when it comes to requesting software version of LS-DYNA and computational resources for submitted jobs. To fully utilize that flexibility, users need to get familiar with on-line documentation of all the installed releases of different software and modules on the cluster. As on other LINUX based HPC systems, the submission and controlling of LS-DYNA is done through text commands. Especially

  3. Microsoft Word - ORNL-TM-2008-185.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vehicle Technologies, EE-2G 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY2009 EVALUATION OF THE 2008 LEXUS LS 600H HYBRID SYNERGY DRIVE SYSTEM Prepared by: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Mitch Olszewski, Program Manager Submitted to: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Systems Team Susan A. Rogers, Technology Development Manager January 2009 ORNL/TM-2008/185 Energy and Transportation Science Division EVALUATION OF THE 2008 LEXUS LS

  4. GUI for Structural Mechanics Codes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of GUI for Structural Mechanics Codes The TRACC Cluster gives its users a lot of flexibility when it comes to requesting software version of LS-DYNA and computational resources for submitted jobs. To fully utilize that flexibility, users need to get familiar with on-line documentation of all the installed releases of different software and modules on the cluster. As on other LINUX based HPC systems, the submission and controlling of LS-DYNA is done through text commands. Especially

  5. TRACC Papers at the 8th

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8th European LS-DYNA® Users Conference The research and development performed by the Computational Structural Mechanics staff has resulted in two papers that were presented at the 8th European LS-DYNA® Users Conference, Strasbourg, France May 23-24, 2011: Modeling of Cone Penetration Test Using SPH and MM-ALE Approaches by Ronald F. Kulak and Cezary Bojanowski Abstract The American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) Soil Cone Penetrometer Standard (S313.2) is designed to characterize

  6. CX-012445: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation CX(s) Applied: A11Date: 41878 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. Pinch valves fight clogging, leaking and wear in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, L.

    1982-12-01

    Pinch valves can provide a non-sticking, non-leaking, low maintenance system capable of controlling the flow of abrasive limestone slurries such as are found in flue gas desulphurisation units.

  8. ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Chapter 5 - Copper PDF icon Chapter 6 - Lead and Zinc PDF icon Chapter 7 - Gold and Silver PDF icon Chapter 8 - Phosphate PDF icon Chapter 9 - Limestone and Crushed ...

  9. Zeolitic Alteration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera Rim Margins Mississippian-Pennsylvanian; Pleistocene, 1.6 to 1.25 Ma Limestone-Madera Formation "MIPu"; Rhyolitic tuff-Intracaldera Bandelier Tuff (upper Tshirege "Qbt" and...

  10. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corral, M.A. Jr.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The water-bearing units of the intermediate aquifer consist of discontinuous sand, gravel, shell, and limestone and dolomite beds in the Tamiami Formation of late Miocene age and the Hawthorn Formation of middle Miocene age. Within parts of Polk, Manatee, Hardee, De Soto, Sarasota, and Charlotte Counties, sand and clay beds within the Tampa Limestone that are hydraulically connected to the Hawthorn Formation are also included in the intermediate aquifer. 15 refs.

  11. Climate Action Champions: Dubuque, IA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dubuque, IA Climate Action Champions: Dubuque, IA The City of Dubuque, Iowa, features a rich history, a diverse arts and cultural scene, and abundant natural beauty, including majestic limestone bluffs along the Mississippi riverfront. Sustainability is among the city’s top priorities for the future. | Photo courtesy of the City of Dubuque. The City of Dubuque, Iowa, features a rich history, a diverse arts and cultural scene, and abundant natural beauty, including majestic limestone bluffs

  12. Contaminant Leach Testing of Hanford Tank 241-C-104 Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Wang, Guohui; Buck, Edgar C.

    2015-10-01

    Leach testing of Tank C-104 residual waste was completed using batch and column experiments. Tank C-104 residual waste contains exceptionally high concentrations of uranium (i.e., as high as 115 mg/g or 11.5 wt.%). This study was conducted to provide data to develop contaminant release models for Tank C-104 residual waste and Tank C-104 residual waste that has been treated with lime to transform uranium in the waste to a highly insoluble calcium uranate (CaUO4) or similar phase. Three column leaching cases were investigated. In the first case, C-104 residual waste was leached with deionized water. In the second case, crushed grout was added to the column so that deionized water contacted the grout prior to contacting the waste. In the third case, lime was mixed in with the grout. Results of the column experiments demonstrate that addition of lime dramatically reduces the leachability of uranium from Tank C-104 residual waste. Initial indications suggest that CaUO4 or a similar highly insoluble calcium rich uranium phase forms as a result of the lime addition. Additional work is needed to definitively identify the uranium phases that occur in the as received waste and the waste after the lime treatment.

  13. Enhanced NO{sub x} removal in wet scrubbers using metal chelates. Final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Lani, B.; Berisko, D.; Schultz, C.; Carlson, W.; Benson, L.B.

    1992-12-01

    Successful pilot plant tests of simultaneous removal of S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a wet lime flue gas desulfurization system were concluded in December. The tests, at up to 1.5 MW(e) capacity, were conducted by the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company and Dravo Lime Company for the US Department of Energy at a pilot facility at the Miami Fort station of CG&E near Cincinnati, Ohio. The pilot plant scrubbed a slipstream of flue gas from Unit 7, a 530 MW coal-fired electric generating unit. Tests were conducted in three phases between April and December. The technology tested was wet scrubbing with Thiosorbic{reg_sign} magnesium-enhanced lime for S0{sub 2} removal and simultaneous NO scrubbing with ferrous EDTA, a metal chelate. Magnesium-enhanced lime-based wet scrubbing is used at 20 full-scale high-sulfur coal-fired electric generating units with a combined capacity of 8500 NW. Ferrous EDTA reacts with nitric oxide, NO, which comprises about 95% of NO{sub x} from coal-fired boilers. In this report, although not precise, NO and NO{sub x} are used interchangably. A major objective of the tests was to combine NO{sub x} removal using ferrous EDTA, a developing technology, with SO{sub 2} removal using wet lime FGD, already in wide commercial use. If successful, this could allow wide application of this NO{sub x} removal technology.

  14. The operation results with the modified charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.J.; Pi, Y.J.; Kim, J.R.; Lee, J.N.

    1996-12-31

    There will be another blast furnace, the production capacity of which is 3.0 million tonnes per year in 1999 and mini mill plant, the production capacity of which is 1.8 million tonnes per year in 1996 at Kwangyang Works. Therefore, the coke oven gas and burnt lime will be deficient and more sinter will be needed. To meet with these situations, the authors modified the charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant in April 1995. After the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace, the consumption of burnt lime and coke oven gas could be decreased and the sinter productivity increased in spite of the reduction of burnt lime consumption. This report describes the operation results with the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace in No. 2 sinter plant Kwangyang works.

  15. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

    1994-08-09

    A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500 C by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO[sub 3]. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed. 3 figs.

  16. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A process and system for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. A fluidized bed including lime particles is operated at a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. by blowing gas having 20%/70% oxygen upwardly through the bed particles at a rate sufficient to fluidize same. A toxic organic waste material is fed into the fluidized bed where the organic waste material reacts with the lime forming CaCO.sub.3. The off gases are filtered and cooled to condense water which is separated. A portion of the calcium carbonate formed during operation of the fluidized bed is replaced with lime particles. The off gases from the fluidized bed after drying are recirculated until the toxic organic waste material in the bed is destroyed.

  17. Use of RDF as a kiln fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    Refuse derived fuel (RDF) has been experimented with and/or proposed for use in kilns for the production of portland cement, lime, and expanded shale (a form of lightweight aggregate). Technological issues affecting the use of RDF in kilns are reviewed as are the results of trials in which RDF has been used as a kiln fuel. Three future research/demonstration projects for addressing the major unresolved issues are discussed. These projects are: a lime plant trial; a trial in a pre-calcining furnace; and an extended trial in a cement kiln.

  18. HEAVY METAL LOADED PLASTIC SCINTILLATING COMPOSITIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyman, M. Jr.

    1962-06-26

    Thls lnventlon relates to a plastlc sclntlllatlon composltlon havlng lncorporated ln the base plastlc a lead compound. Thls compound forms a haze- free sclntillator. The lead compound has the general formula (R/sub 4/) x from the group consisting of hydrogen, alky, and phenyl, R4 ls selected from the group conslstlng of acrylyl and methacryiyl radlcals, and x ls a number from 0,5 to 1; however, when R/sub 1/, R/sub 2/, and R/sub 3/ are all hydrogen the x ls equal to 1. The phosphor ln the sclntlllatlng compositlon and the lead compound can be dlssolved ln a polymerlc resln selected from the group conslsting of polyvinyl toluene and copolymers of vlnyl toluene and cyclohexyl methacrylate. (AEC)

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  20. CX-006090: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri Independent Energy Efficiency Program: Mississippi Lime - Variable Frequency Drive and Fan Upgrade at Peerless PlantCX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1Date: 06/17/2011Location(s): St. Genevieve, MissouriOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  2. Study of in-duct spray drying using condensation aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W.J.R.; Chang, S.M.; Adikesavalu, R. )

    1992-06-01

    Sulfur removal efficiency of in-duct spray drying is limited by sorbent content and surface properties of the sorbent-water aerosol. It was the purpose of this study to improve the sulfur removal efficiency for in-duct spray drying by injecting condensation aerosol instead of conventional dispersion aerosol. The program was composed of three phases. In Phase I, a novel pulsed fluid bed feeder was developed and was used to feed hydrated lime for subsequent experiments. A small condensation aerosol generator was then built, which produces a lime-water condensation aerosol by condensing steam on lime particles. The results show that novel lime-water aerosols less than 10 microns were generated. The central task in Phase II was to simulate experimentally in-duct spray drying using condensation aerosols and compare the results with those using dispersion aerosols reported in the literature. A small entrained-flow reactor was constructed to simulate an in-duct spray dryer. The condensation aerosol was then introduced to the reactor at various approach to saturation temperature, calcium/sulfur stoichiometry and sulfur dioxide concentration for desulfurization study. The results show that we have improved the sulfur removal efficiency for in-duct spray drying to 90 percent or above. Thus we have met and exceeded the stated project goal of 70 percent sulfur removal. A comprehensive computer code was employed to calculate sulfur removal efficiency in Phase III.

  3. Study of in-duct spray drying using condensation aerosol. Final report, June 16, 1990--June 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W.J.R.; Chang, S.M.; Adikesavalu, R.

    1992-06-01

    Sulfur removal efficiency of in-duct spray drying is limited by sorbent content and surface properties of the sorbent-water aerosol. It was the purpose of this study to improve the sulfur removal efficiency for in-duct spray drying by injecting condensation aerosol instead of conventional dispersion aerosol. The program was composed of three phases. In Phase I, a novel pulsed fluid bed feeder was developed and was used to feed hydrated lime for subsequent experiments. A small condensation aerosol generator was then built, which produces a lime-water condensation aerosol by condensing steam on lime particles. The results show that novel lime-water aerosols less than 10 microns were generated. The central task in Phase II was to simulate experimentally in-duct spray drying using condensation aerosols and compare the results with those using dispersion aerosols reported in the literature. A small entrained-flow reactor was constructed to simulate an in-duct spray dryer. The condensation aerosol was then introduced to the reactor at various approach to saturation temperature, calcium/sulfur stoichiometry and sulfur dioxide concentration for desulfurization study. The results show that we have improved the sulfur removal efficiency for in-duct spray drying to 90 percent or above. Thus we have met and exceeded the stated project goal of 70 percent sulfur removal. A comprehensive computer code was employed to calculate sulfur removal efficiency in Phase III.

  4. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

    1983-08-09

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  5. Collins.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I MPACTS a nd C LIMES (Inves'ga'on o f M agnitudes a nd P robabili'es o f A brupt C limate T ransi'ons) (Center a t L BNL f or I ntegra've M odeling o f t he E arth S ystem)...

  6. Duct injection technology prototype development: Nozzle development Subtask 4.1, Atomizer specifications for duct injection technology. Topical report 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Babcock & Wilcox has conducted a program to identify atomizers appropriate for successful in-duct injection of humidification water and lime slurries. The purpose of this program was to identify and quantify atomizer spray and performance criteria that affect the operations and reliability of the in-duct SO{sub 2} removal process, and compare commercially available atomizers to these criteria.

  7. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxgenase large subunit .epsilon. n-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bishosphatase .epsilon. n-methyltransferase activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, Robert L. (Lexington, KY)

    2001-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltansferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  8. Isolated spinach ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase and method of inactivating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphatase carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase activity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, Robert L. (Lexington, KY)

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) from a plant which has a des(methyl) lysyl residue in the LS is disclosed. In addition, the full-length cDNA clones for Rubisco LSMT are disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of inactivating the enzymatic activity of Rubisco LSMT are also disclosed.

  9. developing-compute-efficient

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing Compute-efficient, Quality Models with LS-PrePost® 3 on the TRACC Cluster Oct. 21-22, 2010 Argonne TRACC Dr. Cezary Bojanowski Dr. Ronald F. Kulak This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Announcement pdficon small The LS-PrePost Introductory Course was held October 21-22, 2010 at TRACC in West Chicago with interactive participation on-site as well as remotely via the Internet. Intended primarily for finite element analysts with

  10. Green your Back to School Shopping List! | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green your Back to School Shopping List! Green your Back to School Shopping List! August 23, 2013 - 10:06am Addthis Save energy and money while buying school supplies this year. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/Ls9907 Save energy and money while buying school supplies this year. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/Ls9907 Agatha Wein Communications Specialist, State Energy Program How can I participate? You can save energy and money this fall by simply reducing, reusing, and recycling school

  11. Mineral resources of the Cross Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Moffat County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K.V.; Frisken, J.G.; Kulik, D.M.; Thompson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Cross Mountain Wilderness Study Area, in northwestern Colorado, contains high-purity limestone suitable for industrial and agricultural use; dolomitic limestone suitable for agricultural use; and limestone, dolomite, sandstone, and sand and gravel suitable for use as construction materials. There has been no mining within this study area. This entire study area has a low mineral resource potential for sediment-hosted copper in the Uinta Mountain Group, and parts of this study area have a low resource potential for sandstone-type uranium-vanadium in sedimentary rocks. The entire study area has a low resource potential for all other metals and geothermal resources. It has a high energy resource potential for oil and gas in the eastern part of the area and moderate potential elsewhere. This study area has no mineral resource potential for coal.

  12. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  13. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W. ); Sehgal, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  14. Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD waste liquors. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, A.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Unrau, E.

    1994-12-31

    During this quarterly period, an experimental investigation was performed to study the precipitation kinetics and hydrolysis characteristics of calcium imido disulfonate crystals (CaADS). The CaADS crystals were precipitated by a metathetical reaction of lime, supplied by Dravo Lime Co., with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste liquor. Before approaching for the continuous Double Draw-Off (DDO) crystallization studies, the influence of a Dravo lime slurry on the precipitation characteristics of N-S compounds will be established. A series of N-S compound batch crystallization studies were completed in a wide range of pH (7.0--9.0), and the influence of pH on the amount of lime required, as well as the amount of precipitate obtained, was investigated. Although the amount of precipitate increased with increase in solution pH, the safe or optimum pH for the precipitation of CaADS lies in the vicinity of 8.2 to 8.3. For studying the crystallization characteristics of CaADS crystals, a bench scale 7.0 liter DDO crystallizer was built. DDO crystallizer is found to be superior compared to Mixed Suspension Mixed Product Removal (MSMPR) crystallizer. The precipitated crystals were analyzed for elemental composition by chemical analysis. The crystals were also examined under optical microscope for their morphological features. The present studies confirmed our prediction that N-S compounds in the waste liquor can be precipitated by a reaction with lime slurry. The precipitated crystals were mostly calcium imido disulfonate.

  15. Reclamation of acidic copper mine tailings using municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, M.T.; Thompson, T.L.; Bengson, S.A.

    1998-12-31

    Reclamation of copper mine tailings in a cost effective, successful, and sustainable manner is an ongoing area of evaluation in the arid southwest. A study was initiated in September, 1996 near Hayden, Arizona to evaluate the use of municipal biosolids for reclaiming acidic copper mine tailings (pH of 2.5 to 4.0). The main objectives of the study were to (1) define an appropriate level of biosolids application for optimum plant growth, and (2) evaluate the effects of green waste and lime amendments. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with four biosolid rates of 20, 70, 100 and 135 dry tons/acre, three amendment treatments (none, green waste, and green waste plus lime); with three replications. Non-replicated controls (no treatment, green waste only and lime only) were included for comparison. Shortly after biosolids incorporation to a depth of 10--12 inches, composite soil samples (0--12 inches) of each plot were taken. Biosolids incorporation increased the pH of the tailings (>5.75) and additional increases in pH were noted with lime application. In January 1997, the plots were seeded and sprinkler irrigation was commenced. A total of 4.47 inches of rainfall and 3.8 inches of irrigation were applied until harvest in May 1997. Data from the first growing season indicates optimum growth (>66 lbs/acre) at biosolids rates of 70--100 dry tons/acre. There was a significant positive effect on growth of green waste and lime amendments. Surface NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in biosolids amended plots were greatly reduced (from 23 to 6 mg/kg) by addition of green waste. There was no evidence for NO{sub 3}N leaching below 12 inches.

  16. Shell appraising deepwater discovery off Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherer, M. ); Lambers, E.J.T.; Steffens, G.S. )

    1993-05-10

    Shell International Petroleum Co. Ltd. negotiated a farmout in 1990 from Occidental International Exploration and Production Co. for Block SC-38 in the South China Sea off Palawan, Philippines, following Oxy's discovery of gas in 1989 in a Miocene Nido limestone buildup. Under the terms of the farmout agreement, Shell became operator with a 50% share. Following the disappointing well North Iloc 1, Shell was successful in finding oil and gas in Malampaya 1. Water 700-1,000 m deep, remoteness, and adverse weather conditions have imposed major challenges for offshore operations. The paper describes the tectonic setting; the Nido limestone play; the Malampaya discovery; and Shell's appraisal studies.

  17. Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2007-03-31

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O{sub 2} fired MTF pilot testing and a subsequent retrofit design study of oxygen firing and CO{s

  18. Simple Lookup Service

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-05-01

    Simple Lookup Service (sLS) is a REST/JSON based lookup service that allows users to publish information in the form of key-value pairs and search for the published information. The lookup service supports both pull and push model. This software can be used to create a distributed architecture/cloud.

  19. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95 1956KA1D S.L. Kameny, Phys. Rev. 103 (1956) 358 1956KI1B Kimura, Kumabe, Miyake, Ogata and Miyasita, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 11 (1956) 1211 1956KI1C L.S. Kisslinger, Phys. Rev....

  20. Beamline 4-ID-C Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    double exchange interactions and pressure tuning of magnetism in 3d-5d double perovskite Sr2FeOsO6," LS.I. Veiga, G. Fabbris, M. van Veenendaal, N.M. Souza-Neto, H.L. Feng,...

  1. Y.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... l-s2cT25i j.11 the i;np.i.ler- r:g-;iLn-Led 55 gcr.-10-q 1;-3acl;?ing -;;nk. ... datcrcn-t , TCiZ.

  2. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweighting MateriaLs annual progress report 2009 Contents � 1. Introduction � Introduction.........................................................................................................................................................1-1 2. Automotive Metals - Wrought A. Thermomechanical Processing Design for Lightweight Materials....................................................................2-1 B. Development of High-Volume Warm Forming of Low-Cost Magnesium

  3. OPAL opacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    We have continued to improve and update the OPAL opacity code. Addition of intermediate coupling has further increases the opacity over earlier LS coupling results. A corresponding states method has been used to extend the tables in both X and Z. This has allowed the calculation and distribution of extensive opacity tables for several different sets of metal abundance.

  4. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  5. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-STOR-TRSM-OneNev

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NEVADA LINE Using advanced electric transmission towers, One Nevada Line improves grid reliability and delivers renewable electricity to high demand areas. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNERS LS Power Associates, NV Energy & John Hancock LOCATION Eastern Nevada LOAN AMOUNT $343 Million ISSUANCE DATE February 2011 TRANSMISSION CAPACITY 600 MW TRANSMISSION LENGTH 235 Miles

  6. C. SIrENET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    m. 61 12!?1/37 C. SIrENET PR jwnlrn RB-JUTA,000LffiBe kw4LV ID TM Ca#lsSION KSII~ ELECTRIC CL@'. VlTiiuFsf MRCS PL#il CMWIE-IELLa CYcLOTml FK

  7. Geochemistry and sedimentation of organic matter in the Triassic-Liassic carbonate laminated source rocks of the Ragusa basin (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosse, E.; Loreau, J.P.; Frixa, A.

    1988-08-01

    The Noto and Streppenosa formations of the Ragusa basin (southeastern Sicily) are considered the main source rocks for oil in this area. They display various styles of sedimentation in a generally carbonate context. The organic matter is basically of marine planktonic origin but with some variations, especially in terms of O/C ratio and kinetic behavior. Three main styles of sedimentation occurred within these formations: (1) laminates in a dominantly carbonate rock with thin recurrent interlayers of black shales; (2) alternating layers of marls and limestones, both containing interlayers of black shales and with occasional laminations in the limestones; and (3) silty shales, more or less rich in carbonates (30-70%). The highest petroleum potentials are neither strictly associated with the algal-sedimentary laminites nor with the basinal silty facies but with the black shales interbedded in the different facies or abruptly overlying limestones. In these black shales, oxygen-poor kerogens are dominant. Limestones of the alternated layers are generally organic lean (TOC < 1%), and oxygen-rich kerogens are dominant. The transition from one type of kerogen to the other occurs in the marly layers of the sequence. A tentative integration of both sedimentological and geochemical results is proposed, at the scale of the core, to interpret the respective influence of the depositional pattern and the diagenetic conditions on the content and nature of the kerogen in the source rocks.

  8. Core-in-shell sorbent for hot coal gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Akiti, Jr., Tetteh T.

    2004-02-10

    A core-in-shell sorbent is described herein. The core is reactive to the compounds of interest, and is preferably calcium-based, such as limestone for hot gas desulfurization. The shell is a porous protective layer, preferably inert, which allows the reactive core to remove the desired compounds while maintaining the desired physical characteristics to withstand the conditions of use.

  9. Method for the production of cementitious compositions and aggregate derivatives from said compositions, and cementitious compositions and aggregates produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minnick, L. John (Box 271, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462)

    1983-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing synthetic shaped cementitious compositions having high quality even without the addition of high energy binders, such as portland cement, through the use of the spent residue from a fluidized combustion bed of the type wherein limestone particles are suspended in a fluidized medium and sulfur oxides are captured, and pulverized coal fly ash.

  10. New methods of nozzle attachment to FRP spray headers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucher, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    The traditional method of attaching spray nozzles to FRP spray headers in the absorber tower of a wet limestone system has been through the use of 150 lb. Flanges. This paper will illustrate two additional methods (grooved adapters & adhesive bonded nozzles) and will demonstrate the cost saving associated versus the flanged option, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

  11. Petrology of Eocene rocks, southeastern Georgia coastal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, P.A.; Miller, J.A.

    1988-09-01

    Study of cores from a US Geological Survey test well in Wayne County indicates that Eocene strata represent an overall shallowing-upward, clastic-carbonate sequence. The 1397-ft (426-m) Eocene section is divided into three units: unnamed lower Eocene rocks, middle Eocene (Claibornian) Lisbon and Avon Park Formations, and upper Eocene (Jacksonian) Ocala Limestone.

  12. Early rifting deposition: examples from carbonate sequences of Sardinia (Cambrian) and Tuscany (Triassic-Jurassic), Italy: an analogous tectono-sedimentary and climatic context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cocozza, T.; Gandin, A.

    1987-05-01

    Lower Cambrian Ceroide Limestone (Sardinia) and Lower Jurassic Massiccio Limestone (Tuscany) belong to sequences deposited in analogous tectono-sedimentary context: the former linked to the Caledonian Sardic Phase, the latter to the Alpine Orogeny. Both units consist of massive pure limestone characterized by marginal and lagoonal sequences repeatedly interfingering in the same geological structure. This distribution indicates a morphology of the platforms composed of banks (marginal facies) and shallow basins (lagoonal facies) comparable with a Bahamian complex. Dolomitization affects patchily the massive limestone bodies, and karstic features, breccias, and sedimentary dikes occur at their upper boundary. Both units overlie early dolomite and evaporites (sabkha facies) containing siliciclastic intercalations in their lower and/or upper part and are unconformably covered by open-shelf red (hematitic), nodular limestone Ammonitico Rosso facies). The sedimentary evolution of the two sequences appears to have been controlled by synsedimentary tectonics whose major effects are the end of the terrigenous input, the bank-and-basin morphology of the platform, the irregular distribution of the dolomitization, and the nodular fabric of the overlying facies. The end of the Bahamian-type system is marked by the karstification of the emerged blocks and is followed by their differential sinking and burial under red-nodular facies. From a geodynamic viewpoint, sequences composed of Bahamian-like platform carbonates followed by Ammonitico Rosso facies imply deposition along continental margins subjected to block-faulting during an extensional regime connected with the beginning of continental rifting. Moreover, the variation from sabkha to Bahamian conditions suggests the drifting of the continent from arid to humid, tropical areas.

  13. Silica separation from reinjection brines at Monte Amiata geothermal plants, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitolo, S.; Cialdella, M.L. . Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica)

    1994-06-01

    A process for the separation of silica from geothermal reinjection brines is reported, in which the phases of coagulation, sedimentation and filtration of silica are involved. The effectiveness of lime and calcium chloride as coagulating agents has been investigated and the separating operations have been set out. Attention has been focused on Monte Amiata reinjection geothermal brines, whose scaling effect causes serious problems in the operation and maintenance of reinjection facilities. The study has been conducted using different amounts of added coagulants and at different temperatures, to determine optimal operating conditions. Though calcium chloride was revealed to be effective as a coagulant of the polymeric silica fraction, lime has also proved capable of removing monomeric dissolved silica at high dosages. Investigation on the behavior of coagulated brine has revealed the feasibility of separating the coagulated silica by sedimentation and filtration.

  14. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  15. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  16. L2:VRI.P2.02 John Turner ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-2195 Unlimited Release Printed March, 2011 A Theory Manual for Multi-physics Code Coupling in LIME Version 1.0 Roger Pawlowski, Roscoe Bartlett, Noel Belcourt, Russell Hooper, Rod Schmidt Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department

  17. Design and operating experience of the Holcomb Station dry scrubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emerson, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Holcomb Station dry flue gas desulfurization system has been operational since May, 1983. The lime based system, consisting of three spray drying absorbers and two baghouses, has met all regulatory compliance requirements and contractual guarantee values. Some serious operational problems were encountered during the startup of this system. This paper discusses these problems and subsequent solutions along with testing experience to-date. The availability of this system for the first quarter of 1985 was 99.51 percent.

  18. Mechanisms of dry SO/sub 2/ control processes. Final report Sep 80-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apple, C.; Kelly, M.E.

    1982-04-01

    The report discusses physical and chemical processes and reaction mechanisms for lime spray drying and dry injection of sodium compounds in dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. It includes: chemical reactions, physical changes, proposed reaction mechanisms and mathematical models, process parameters affecting reactions and their rates, and data needed to verify proposed reaction mechanisms and models. Published technical papers were the primary reference sources. The report focuses on coal-fired boiler dry FGD applications. Lime spray drying reactions are primarily gas/liquid-phase reactions, with SO/sub 2/ removal depending on moisture in the lime slurry droplet. Initially, the moisture content is high, and the reaction rate is controlled by diffusion of SO/sub 2/ to the droplet surface; most SO/sub 2/ removal occurs during this phase. As evaporation reduces the moisture, the dissolution of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ into ions limits the SO/sub 2/ removal rate. Later, the precipitation of CaSO/sub 3/.1/2 H/sub 2/O onto the surface of the lime particles retards diffusion of SO/sub 2/ to the unreacted sorbent. Injecting sodium compound powders into flue gas removes SO/sub 2/ via gas/solid reactions. First, NaHCO/sub 3/ is thermally decomposed to Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (small pores in the sorbent particles increase the particles' surface area and reactivity). Then the SO/sub 2/ reacts with Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 3/, starting at the particle surface.

  19. Borate Autocausticizing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Borate Autocausticizing Borate Autocausticizing New Technology Increases Energy Efficiency of Kraft Chemical Recovery Process and Causticizing Boron-based autocausticizing is a new, cost-effective technology to recover kraft pulping chemicals. Conceptually, the technology can be used to supply part or all of the sodium hydroxide requirements of the kraft process, supplementing or replacing the lime cycle. Because the de-carbonating reactions take place directly in the recovery boiler, instead of

  20. Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Sinquefeld; James Cantrell; Xiaoyan Zeng; Alan Ball; Jeff Empie

    2009-01-07

    The cost-benefit outlook of black liquor gasification (BLG) could be greatly improved if the smelt causticization step could be achieved in situ during the gasification step. Or, at a minimum, the increase in causticizing load associated with BLG could be mitigated. A number of chemistries have been proven successful during black liquor combustion. In this project, three in situ causticizing processes (titanate, manganate, and borate) were evaluated under conditions suitable for high temperature entrained flow BLG, and low temperature steam reforming of black liquor. The evaluation included both thermodynamic modeling and lab experimentation. Titanate and manganate were tested for complete direct causticizing (to thus eliminate the lime cycle), and borates were evaluated for partial causticizing (to mitigate the load increase associated with BLG). Criteria included high carbonate conversion, corresponding hydroxide recovery upon hydrolysis, non process element (NPE) removal, and economics. Of the six cases (three chemistries at two BLG conditions), only two were found to be industrially viable: titanates for complete causticizing during high temperature BLG, and borates for partial causticizing during high temperature BLG. These two cases were evaluated for integration into a gasification-based recovery island. The Larsen [28] BLG cost-benefit study was used as a reference case for economic forecasting (i.e. a 1500 tpd pulp mill using BLG and upgrading the lime cycle). By comparison, using the titanate direct causticizing process yielded a net present value (NPV) of $25M over the NPV of BLG with conventional lime cycle. Using the existing lime cycle plus borate autocausticizing for extra capacity yielded a NPV of $16M.

  1. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarno, Kevin; Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth; Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica extracted from oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumada, Takayuki Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2014-03-14

    Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica is examined via time-resolved reflectivity measurements. After optical breakdown was caused by irradiation of a pump pulse with fluence F{sub pump}?=?3.314.9?J/cm{sup 2}, the reflectivity oscillated with a period of 63??2 ps for a wavelength ??=?795?nm. The period was reduced by half for ??=?398?nm. We ascribe the oscillation to the interference between the probe pulses reflected from the front and rear surfaces of the photo-excited molten fused silica layer. The time-resolved reflectivity agrees closely with a model comprising a photo-excited layer which expands due to the formation of voids, and then separates into two parts, one of which is left on the sample surface and the other separated as a molten thin layer from the surface by the spallation mechanism. Such oscillations were not observed in the reflectivity of soda-lime glass. Whether the reflectivity oscillates or not probably depends on the layer viscosity while in a molten state. Since viscosity of the molten fused silica is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the soda-lime glass at the same temperature, fused silica forms a molten thin layer that reflects the probe pulse, whereas the soda-lime glass is fragmented into clusters.

  3. Preliminary characterization of the 100 area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biang, C.; Biang, R.; Patel, P.

    1994-06-01

    This characterization report is based on the results of sampling and an initial environmental assessment of the 100 Area of Argonne National Laboratory. It addresses the current status, projected data requirements, and recommended actions for five study areas within the 100 Area: the Lime Sludge Pond, the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond, the Coal Yard, the East Area Burn Pit, and the Eastern Perimeter Area. Two of these areas are solid waste management units under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (the Lime Sludge Pond and the Building 108 Liquid Retention Pond); however, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency has determined that no further action is necessary for the Lime Sludge Pond. Operational records for some of the activities were not available, and one study area (the East Area Burn Pit) could not be precisely located. Recommendations for further investigation include sample collection to obtain the following information: (1) mineralogy of major minerals and clays within the soils and underlying aquifer, (2) pH of the soils, (3) total clay fraction of the soils, (4) cation exchange capacity of the soils and aquifer materials, and (5) exchangeable cations of the soils and aquifer material. Various other actions are recommended for the 100 Area, including an electromagnetic survey, sampling of several study areas to determine the extent of contamination and potential migration pathways, and sampling to determine the presence of any radionuclides. For some of the study areas, additional actions are contingent on the results of the initial recommendations.

  4. Influence of the composition of cement kiln dust on its interaction with fly ash and slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaunsali, Piyush; Peethamparan, Sulapha

    2013-12-15

    Cement kiln dust (CKD), a by-product of the cement industry, contains significant amounts of alkali, free lime, chloride and sulfate. Wide variation reported in the chemical composition of CKDs limits their potential application as a sustainable binder component in concrete. In the current study, the performance of two different CKDs as components in a novel binder is evaluated. Several binders are developed by blending CKDs with fly ash or slag. Binders with 70% CKD were prepared at a water-to-binder ratio of 0.4, and heat-cured at 75 C to accelerate the strength development. The hydration progress was monitored using X-ray diffraction, and morphological examination was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ettringite and calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) were identified as the main hydration products in the hardened binder system. Strength development of CKD-based binder was found to be significantly influenced by its free lime and sulfate contents. -- Highlights: Interaction of cement kiln dust with fly ash and slag was explored. CKD with higher free lime and sulfate content increased the strength of binder. C-S-H like reaction gel with fibrillar morphology is observed in CKD-based binders.

  5. Filling and solidification with coupled heat transfer and stress analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D.J.; Khandhia, Y.

    1995-12-31

    A full filling and solidification simulation of the MCWASP 7 casting has been carried out using the commercial finite element (FE) analysis codes LS-DYNA3D and FIDAP. The two codes were used to carry out back-to-back analysis of the mould filling. Both codes track the free surface and predict filling times. LS-DYNA3D has been used both for the filling simulation and to carry out a coupled thermal and stress analysis of the casting during solidification, predicting cooling rates, residual stresses and as-cast shape. The methodology used and details of the FE models are summarized. Results are presented for comparison with the casting trial data (x-rays of filling and thermocouple data).

  6. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirali, A.A. ); Mills, K.C. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parameters on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.

  7. FY 2008 Annual Performance Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hyd rog en Tan k Res earc h, LLN L PH EN IX Ex pe rim en t, BN L Fu el Ce ll Re sea rch , AN L Ca rb on Se qu es tra tio n Re se ar ch , PN NL Hi gh Ex pl os iv es Ap pl ic at io ns Fa ci lit y, LL NL Com put er Sim ulat ion The ater , LAN L Al ga e Re se ar ch , NR EL Ad va nc ed Bio fue ls Re se arc h, LB NL T ra in in g Nuc lear Mat eria ls Sto rag e, SRS C o a l G a s if ic a ti o n R e s e a rc h , P N N L Cli ma te Mo de lin g, OR NL AnnuAl PerformAnce rePort fY 2008 Table of Contents

  8. Status of the SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaneyasu, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.

    2010-06-23

    The SAGA Light Source (SAGA-LS) is a synchrotron radiation facility consisting of a 255 MeV injector linac and a 1.4 GeV storage ring that is 75.6 m in circumference. The SAGA-LS has been stably providing synchrotron radiation to users since it first started user operation in February 2006. Along with the user operation, various machine improvements have been made over the past years, including upgrading the injector linac control system, replacing a septum magnet and constructing a beam diagnostic system. In addition to these improvements, insertion devices have been developed and installed. An APPLE-II type variable polarization undulator was installed in 2008. To address the demand from users for high-flux hard x-rays, a superconducting 4 T class wiggler is being developed. An experimental setup for generating MeV photons by laser Compton scattering is being constructed for beam monitoring and future user experiments.

  9. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Ferber, Mattison K; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That difference decreases with increasing elastic modulus mismatch between the sphere material and borosilicate This trend was opposite in soda-lime silicate glass; (5) Fracture in borosilicate glass occurs at lower velocities (i.e., easier) at 24{sup o} than at 0{sup o} (orthogonal) and 46{sup o} of impact for the same probability of failure. Though not analyzed yet, this suggests that a convolution of kinetic energy and friction is contributing to that trend; (6) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation RCIF. This likely is not a material property nor exclusive to borosilicate glass, rather, it is a statistical response of a combination of local, surface-located flaw and imposed tensile stress. Understanding of the surface flaw population and flaw positioning can likely enable prediction of spherical indentation RCIF; and (7) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Borofloat BS for impact kinetic energies up to {approx} 20 mJ. For kinetic energies between {approx} 20-150 mJ, fracture sometimes initiated. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 150 mJ. The energy values, and their boundaries, were much lower for BS glass than they were for soda-lime silicate glass.

  10. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  11. The Gas Flow from the Gas Attenuator to the Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2010-12-03

    The gas leak from the gas attenuator to the main beam line of the Linac Coherent Light Source has been evaluated, with the effect of the Knudsen molecular beam included. It has been found that the gas leak from the gas attenuator of the present design, with nitrogen as a working gas, does not exceed 10{sup -5} torr x l/s even at the highest pressure in the main attenuation cell (20 torr).

  12. Kinetics of combustion related processes at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1993-12-01

    This past year has seen an excursion into perhalomethane dissociation using the laser-schlieren (LS) technique, with work on CCl{sub 4} already published and on CF{sub 3}Cl under analysis. However, the author`s emphasis has again been on the study of relaxation and dissociation of large molecules using the converging/diverging nozzle method to generate very weak (low pressure) shock waves.

  13. Design Considerations for the Free-Electron Laser with Self-Seeding and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Current Enhanced SASE (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Design Considerations for the Free-Electron Laser with Self-Seeding and Current Enhanced SASE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design Considerations for the Free-Electron Laser with Self-Seeding and Current Enhanced SASE Authors: Zholents, A. [1] + Show Author Affiliations (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)) Publication Date: 2013-08-06 OSTI Identifier: 1096155 Report Number(s): ANL/APS/LS-335 DOE

  14. Aging Studies of VCE Dismantlement Returns (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: Aging Studies of VCE Dismantlement Returns Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aging Studies of VCE Dismantlement Returns VCE is an ethylene/vinyl acetate/vinyl alcohol terpolymer binder for filled elastomers which is designed to accept high filler loadings. Filled elastomer parts consist of the binder (VCE), a curing agent (Hylene MP, diphenol-4-4{prime}-methylenebis(phenylcarbamate)), a processing aid (LS, lithium stearate), and filler particles (typically

  15. Poster Presentations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Poster Presentations Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Poster Presentations Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page High Stability LINACs (Yu) .pdf file (284KB) Coherent LS @ MIT (Graves) .pdf file (1.2MB) XLD-2011 Workshops (Brock) .pdf file (2.6MB) Status of MAX IV (Ericksson) .pdf file (3.0MB) Multi

  16. Technical Session I Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    I Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session I Talks Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page CW VHF Photocathode Gun (Corlett) .pdf file (1.2MB) Wisconsin Superconducting RF Gun (Bisognano) .pdf file (933KB) R&D Studies for Next Generation LS (Williams) .pdf file (1.4MB) High Repetition

  17. Energy Dissipation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dissipation in Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence: Coherent Structures or "Nanoflares"? Vladimir Zhdankin 1 , Stanislav Boldyrev 1 , Jean Carlos Perez 2 , and Steven M. Tobias 3 1 Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA 2 Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA 3 Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK September 12, 2014 ABSTRACT We investigate

  18. Computational Structural Mechanics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    load-2 TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computational Structural Mechanics Overview of CSM Computational structural mechanics is a well-established methodology for the design and analysis of many components and structures found in the transportation field. Modern finite-element models (FEMs) play a major role in these evaluations, and sophisticated software, such as the commercially available LS-DYNA® code, is

  19. Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs)

  20. Oak Ridge Associated Universities

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER BLISS AND LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FACILITY BUFFALO, NEW YORK J. D. BERGER Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division DRAFT REPORT APRIL 1992 c -. ..". FlLS\COPY x_.. --. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER BLISS AND LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FACILITY 110 HOPKINS STREET BUFFALO, NEW YORK Prepared by J. D. Berger Environmental Survey and Site Assessment

  1. Feedback and Continuous Improvement Inspection Criteria and Approach - DOE Headquarters, CRAD 64-22

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Independent O\,ersight, the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Evaluations' mission is to assess the effectiveness of those environment, safety, and health systems and practices used by field organizations in implementing Integrated Safety Management and to provide clear, concise, and independent evaluatio~ls of performance in protecting our workers, the public, and the environment from the hazards associated with Department of Energy (DOE)

  2. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Controlled Ventilation in General Office Spaces in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Fisk, William

    2010-01-01

    A prototypical office building meeting the prescriptive requirements of the 2008 California building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) was used in EnergyPlus simulations to calculate the energy savings potential of demand controlled ventilation (DCV) in five typical California climates per three design occupancy densities and two minimum ventilation rates. The assumed minimum ventilation rates in offices without DCV, based on two different measurement methods employed in a large survey, were 38 and 13 L/s per occupant. The results of the life cycle cost analysis show DCV is cost effective for office spaces if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 38 L/s per person, except at the low design occupancy of 10.8 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 3 (north coast) and 6 (south Coast). DCV was not found to be cost effective if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 13 L/s per occupant, except at high design occupancy of 21.5 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 14 (desert) and 16 (mountains). Until the large uncertainties about the base case ventilation rates in offices without DCV are reduced, the case for requiring DCV in general office spaces will be a weak case. Under the Title 24 Standards office occupant density of 10.8 people per 100 m2, DCV becomes cost effective when the base case minimum ventilation rate is greater than 42.5, 43.0, 24.0, 19.0, and 18.0 L/s per person for climate zone 3, 6, 12, 14, and 16 respectively.

  3. DOFJNV/10845-16 UC-703 GROUNDWATER CHEMISTRY AT THE NEVADA TEST

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ,/ DOFJNV/10845-16 UC-703 GROUNDWATER CHEMISTRY AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE: Data and Preliminary Interpretations R F_ FI V_'Q Jut 19 OSTI _L,S ". _-.-a o o _ -_ Prepared by _.___ _._ _._ g_ " _-' -" o _ - _-z _ Jenny B. Chapman and Brad E Lyles ,-_o _o _-_ _ _'_ _,, .-*_ _ _ _- ¢ _.'_ o _ o._._ _ . _ __ _,_ =,_ = _-_ _ _ _ - n Submitted to __ _ _ =.a _ -__ ; _- _ DOE Nevada Operations Office, * = o_ ,, _ _-r_ _a _a_ o, . _ _ U.S. Department of Energy _. ,,, _' o" _ o _-- =

  4. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecke, Holger Svensson, Malin

    2008-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2{sup 6-1} experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO{sub 2} until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon.

  5. Tritium-compatible high-vacuum pumping system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffin, D.O.

    1982-04-01

    Large magnetic-fusion power reactors will require vacuum pumps with greater speeds and capacities for hydrogen and helium isotopes than any now available. Present fusion engineering efforts concentrate on DT-burning tokamaks, so pumps for these systems must perform reliably during prolonged exposure to radioactive tritium gas. A mechanical pumping train that exposes only tritium-compatible metals to the vacuum medium has been assembled. The system comprises a reciprocating metal-bellows compressor, a bellows-sealed, spiral-cavity, positive-displacement blower, and a canned-motor, magnetic-bearing turbopump. These pumps feature hermetic drives, and their pumping chambers contain no liquid metals, plastics, elastomers, or lubricants. The pumping system achieves vacuums as low as 1 mPa without cryogenics, and its pumping speed increases from 5 L/s at atmospheric pressure to 500 L/s below 100 mPa. Systems with ultimate pumping speeds of 5000 L/s can be assembled using larger pumps of the same design as those tested.

  6. The motional Stark effect diagnostic for ITER using a line-shift approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.; Yuh, H. Y.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2008-10-15

    The United States has been tasked with the development and implementation of a motional Stark effect (MSE) system on ITER. In the harsh ITER environment, MSE is particularly susceptible to degradation, as it depends on polarimetry, and the polarization reflection properties of surfaces are highly sensitive to thin film effects due to plasma deposition and erosion of a first mirror. Here we present the results of a comprehensive study considering a new MSE-based approach to internal plasma magnetic field measurements for ITER. The proposed method uses the line shifts in the MSE spectrum (MSE-LS) to provide a radial profile of the magnetic field magnitude. To determine the utility of MSE-LS for equilibrium reconstruction, studies were performed using the ESC-ERV code system. A near-term opportunity to test the use of MSE-LS for equilibrium reconstruction is being pursued in the implementation of MSE with laser-induced fluorescence on NSTX. Though the field values and beam energies are very different from ITER, the use of a laser allows precision spectroscopy with a similar ratio of linewidth to line spacing on NSTX as would be achievable with a passive system on ITER. Simulation results for ITER and NSTX are presented, and the relative merits of the traditional line polarization approach and the new line-shift approach are discussed.

  7. Changing ventilation rates in U.S. offices: Implications for health, work performance, energy, and associated economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

    2011-07-01

    This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

  8. Organic binders for iron ore pelletization and steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karkoska, D.; Sankey, E.; Anderson, R.

    1995-12-01

    Historically, bentonite has been used in the agglomeration process in North American iron ore plants. In 1986, Eveleth Mines replaced bentonite with Peridur, a carboxy methyl cellulose organic binder used in conjunction with 1% limestone. Since May of 1993, Allied Colloids` Alcotac FE8 has been used by Eveleth as the replacement for bentonite. This paper discusses the performance benefits obtained when bentonite was replaced with an organic binder. These totally synthetic binders are used in conjunction with limestone. The benefits of organic binders are: improved metallurgical parameters of the fired pellet, especially the reducibility, which results in more efficient use of gases in the blast furnace; reduced silica in the pellet, in the case of Eveleth Mines this was a reduction of 0.5%, a lower silica pellet reduces slag in the blast furnace; increased production in both the agglomeration/induration and steelmaking processes; and a decrease in coke consumption.

  9. MODELING UNDERGROUND STRUCTURE VULNERABILITY IN JOINTED ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. SWIFT; D. STEEDMAN

    2001-02-01

    The vulnerability of underground structures and openings in deep jointed rock to ground shock attack is of chief concern to military planning and security. Damage and/or loss of stability to a structure in jointed rock, often manifested as brittle failure and accompanied with block movement, can depend significantly on jointed properties, such as spacing, orientation, strength, and block character. We apply a hybrid Discrete Element Method combined with the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach to simulate the MIGHTY NORTH event, a definitive high-explosive test performed on an aluminum lined cylindrical opening in jointed Salem limestone. Representing limestone with discrete elements having elastic-equivalence and explicit brittle tensile behavior and the liner as an elastic-plastic continuum provides good agreement with the experiment and damage obtained with finite-element simulations. Extending the approach to parameter variations shows damage is substantially altered by differences in joint geometry and liner properties.

  10. Soil stabilization using oil shale solid wastes: Laboratory evaluation of engineering properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale solid wastes were evaluated for possible use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study was conducted and consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern shale can be used for soil stabilization if limestone is added during combustion. Without limestone, eastern oil shale waste exhibits little or no cementation. The testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented. 11 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Metallic species derived from fluidized bed coal combustion. [59 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natusch, D.F.S.; Taylor, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Samples of fly ash generated by the combustion of Montana Rosebud coal in an experimental 18 inch fluidized bed combustor were collected. The use of a heated cascade impactor permitted collection of size fractionated material that avoided condensation of volatile gases on the particles. Elemental concentration trends were determined as a function of size and temperature and the results compared to published reports for conventional power plants. The behavior of trace metals appears to be substantially different in the two systems due to lower operating temperatures and the addition of limestone to the fluidized bed. Corrosion of the impactor plates was observed at the highest temperature and lowest limestone feed rate sampled during the study. Data from the elemental concentration and leaching studies suggest that corrosion is most likely due to reactions involving sodium sulfate. However, it is concluded that corrosion is less of a potential problem in fluidized-bed systems than in conventional coal-fired systems.

  12. Proceedings of the international symposium on engineering in complex rock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This book contains over 100 papers. Some of the titles are: Rheology of rock-salt and its application for radioactive waste disposal purposes; A scale model study on the deformation around the drift in Korean inclined coal seam; Stabilization of a landslide in fractured marls and limestone; Dead Sea underground hydroelectric power station; and Rock mechanics in design of underground power house of lubuge hydropower project.

  13. TRANS4: a computer code calculation of solid fuel penetration of a concrete barrier. [LMFBR; GCFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, C. M.; Kumar, R.; Fink, J. K.

    1980-07-01

    The computer code, TRANS4, models the melting and penetration of a solid barrier by a solid disc of fuel following a core disruptive accident. This computer code has been used to model fuel debris penetration of basalt, limestone concrete, basaltic concrete, and magnetite concrete. Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the importance of various properties on the rate of penetration. Comparisons were made with results from the GROWS II code.

  14. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research may Predict How Carbon is Stored Underground Computer simulations conducted at the Molecular Foundry could help scientists make sense of a recently observed and puzzling wrinkle in one of nature's most important chemical processes. It turns out that calcium carbonate-the ubiquitous compound that is a major component of seashells, limestone, concrete, antacids and myriad other naturally and industrially produced substances-may momentarily exist in liquid form as it crystallizes from

  15. Gasification Systems Project Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Information Gasifier Optimization Archived Projects Agreement Number Project Title Performer Name Technology Area FE0023497 Alstom's Limestone Chemical Looping Gasification Process for High Hydrogen Syngas Generation Alstom Power, Inc Gasification Systems FE0023577 Advanced Gasifier and Water Gas Shift Technologies for Low Cost Coal Conversion to High Hydrogen Syngas Gas Technology Institute Coal & Coal-Biomass to Liquids, Gasification Systems FE0023915 Pilot Scale Operation and

  16. Method of feeding particulate material to a fluidized bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borio, Richard W. (Somers, CT); Goodstine, Stephen L. (Windsor, CT)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal spreader type feeder that supplies a mixture of particulate limestone and coal to the top of a fluidized bed reactor having a flow of air upward therethrough. Large particles of particulate matter are distributed over the upper surface of the bed to utilize the natural mixing within the bed, while fine particles are adapted to utilize an independent feeder that separates them from the large particles and injects them into the bed.

  17. Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fate and Transport of Uranium (VI) in Weathered Saprolite Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate sorption and transport of uranium (U) in the presence of saprolite derived from interbedded shale, limestone, and sandstone sequences. Sorption kinetics were measured at two initial concentrations (C0; 1, 10 mM) and three soil:solution ratios

  18. Page

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Page 1 Updated: March 2013 APPENDIX B U.S. PORT CODES District Port Code Code Name 01 PORTLAND, MAINE 01 Portland 02 Bangor (including Brewer) 03 Eastport (including Cutler, Lubec) 04 Jackman 05 Vanceboro 06 Houlton 07 Fort Fairfield 08 Van Buren 09 Madawaska 10 Fort Kent 11 Bath 12 Bar Harbor 15 Calais (including Robbinston) 18 Limestone 21 Rockland 22 Jonesport 27 Bridgewater 31 Portsmouth, NH 32 Belfast (including Bucksport, Sandy Point, Winterport) 52 Searsport 02 ST. ALBANS, VERMONT 01 St.

  19. DE-SC0004118 (Wong & Lindquist). Final Report: Changes of Porosity, Permeability and Mechanical Strength Induced by Carbon Dioxide Sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WONG, TENG-FONG; Lindquist, Brent

    2014-09-22

    In the context of CO{sub 2} sequestration, the overall objective of this project is to conduct a systematic investigation of how the flow of the acidic, CO{sub 2} saturated, single phase component of the injected/sequestered fluid changes the microstructure, permeability and strength of sedimentary rocks, specifically limestone and sandstone samples. Hydromechanical experiments, microstructural observations and theoretical modeling on multiple scales were conducted.

  20. Method for producing H.sub.2 using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1990-01-01

    A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300.degree. to 1400.degree. F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices.

  1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Protection Agency U.S. Environmental Protection Agency The City Hall in Austin, Texas was designed to reflect its natural surroundings. The four-story building incorporates local limestone, a waterfall and nonsymmetrical shapes, meant to reflect the waterways and canyons of the area. The building also includes amphitheater seating shaded by solar photovoltaic panels. An EPA Green Power Partner since September 2006, the City of Austin uses more than 370 million kilowatt-hours of

  2. Microsoft Word - Final_Range74_EA.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FINAL RANGE 74 TARGET COMPLEXES ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NEVADA TEST AND TRAINING RANGE, NEVADA July 2007 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT (FONSI) 1. Name of Action. RANGE 74 TARGET COMPLEXES, NEVADA TEST AND TRAINING RANGE, NEVADA 2. Description of Proposed Action and Alternatives The U.S. Air Force (Air Force) proposes to construct and operate three target complexes in mountainous terrain in Range 74 of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) at Saucer Mesa, Limestone Ridge, and Cliff

  3. Rivesville multicell fluidized bed boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    One objective of the experimental MFB at Rivesville, WV, was the evaluation of alternate feed systems for injecting coal and limestone into a fluidized bed. A continuous, uniform feed flow to the fluid bed is essential in order to maintain stable operations. The feed system originally installed on the MFB was a gravity feed system with an air assist to help overcome the back pressure created by the fluid bed. The system contained belt, vibrating, and rotary feeders which have been proven adequate in other material handling applications. This system, while usable, had several operational and feeding problems during the MFB testing. A major portion of these problems occurred because the coal and limestone feed control points - a belt feeder and rotary feeder, respectively - were pressurized in the air assist system. These control points were not designed for pressurized service. An alternate feed system which could accept feed from the two control points, split the feed into six equal parts and eliminate the problems of the pressurized system was sought. An alternate feed system designed and built by the Fuller Company was installed and tested at the Rivesville facility. Fuller feed systems were installed on the north and south side of C cell at the Rivesville facility. The systems were designed to handle 10,000 lb/hr of coal and limestone apiece. The systems were installed in late 1979 and evaluated from December 1979 to December 1980. During this time period, nearly 1000 h of operating time was accumulated on each system.

  4. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600/sup 0/C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30/sup 0/C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10/sup 0/C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients.

  5. Petrology of lower and middle Eocene carbonate rocks, Floridan aquifer, central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, P.A.; Miller, J.A.

    1984-09-01

    Study of cores from a US Geological Survey test well near Polk City, Florida, indicates that the Avon Park-Lake City (Claibornian) and Oldsmar (Sabinian) Limestones, which comprise most of the Floridan aquifer in central Florida, can be divided into six microfacies: foraminiferal mudstone, foraminiferal wackestone-packstone, foraminiferal grainstone, nodular anhydrite, laminated dolomicrite, and replacement dolomite. Dolomite containing variable amounts of nodular anhydrite forms more than 90% of the Avon Park-Lake city interval, whereas thte Oldsmar is chiefly limestone. Several episodes of dolomite formation are recognized. Laminated dolomicrite formed syngenetically in a supratidal-sabhka environment. Crystalline dolomite with nodular anhydrite formed early by replacement of limestone through reflux of dense, magnesium-rich brines. Replacement dolomite not associated with evaporites and containing limpid crystals probably formed later by a mixed-water process in the subsurface environment. Late diagenetic processes affecting crystalline dolomites include hydration of anhydrite to gypsum, partial dissolution of gypsum, minor alteration of gypsum to calcite, and dissolution of calcian dolomite cores in stoichiometric crystals. Crystalline dolomite and grainstone are the only rock types that have high enough porosities and permeabilities to provide significant yields of water. Medium and finely crystalline dolomites show best values of porosity and permeability because they have high percentages of intercrystal and moldic pores that are well connected. Filling of pores by anhydrite or gypsum can significantly reduce porosity and permeability.

  6. Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryn, S.

    1994-03-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

  7. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans -Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajans Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated limevolcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calciumaluminum-silicatehydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ? 0.80.9 and crystallization of strtlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ?90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strtlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ? 0.450.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-m strtlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.

  8. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  9. Petrochemical feedstock from basic oxygen steel furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, C.W.; Hardwick, W.E.

    1983-10-01

    Iron bath gasification in which coal, lime, steam and oxygen are injected into a bath of molten iron for the production of a medium-Btu gas is described. The process has its origin in basic oxygen steelmaking. It operates at high temperatures and is thus not restrictive on the type of coal used. The ash is retained in the slag. The process is also very efficient. The authors suggest that in the present economic climate in the iron and steel industry, such a plant could be sited where existing coal-handling, oxygen and steelmaking equipment are available.

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2013 Table 25. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2013 Company Name Plant Location Top Ten Manufacturers American Crystal Sugar Co MN, ND Archer Daniels Midland IA, IL, MN, NE Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc AL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, WI Cemex Inc AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX Dakota Gasification

  11. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  12. Discovery of a ternary pseudobrookite phase in the earth-abundant TiZnO

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Discovery of a ternary pseudobrookite phase in the earth-abundant TiZnO system Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Discovery of a ternary pseudobrookite phase in the earth-abundant TiZnO system Authors: Perry, Nicola H. ; Stevanovic, Vladan ; Lime, Linda Y. ; Mason, Thomas O. [1] ; CSM) [2] ; NWU) [2] ; MIT) [2] + Show Author Affiliations Stanford ( Publication Date: 2016-02-11 OSTI Identifier: 1238274 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource

  13. Development of vertically aligned ZnO-nanowires scintillators for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu Komori, Jun; Shimidzu, Kaiji; Izaki, Masanobu; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2015-02-23

    Newly designed scintillator of (0001)-oriented ZnO vertical nanowires (vnws) for X-ray imaging was prepared on a Ga-doped ZnO/soda-lime glass by electrodeposition, and the light emission feature was estimated in a synchrotron radiation facility. The ZnO-vnws scintillator revealed a strong light emission and improved resolution on CMOS image compared with that for the ZnO-layer scintillator, although the light emission performance was deteriorated in comparison to the Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12:}Ce{sup 3+}. The light emission property closely related to the nanostructure and the resultant photoluminescence characteristic.

  14. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  15. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  16. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  17. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  18. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  19. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  20. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  1. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  2. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2013" "Company Name","Plant Location" "Top Ten Manufacturers" "American Crystal Sugar Co","MN, ND" "Archer Daniels Midland","IA, IL, MN, NE" "Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc","AL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, WI" "Cemex Inc","AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX" "Dakota Gasification Company","ND" "Eastman Chemical

  4. An over view of excess heat production in the D/Pd system at SRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouch-Baker, S.; Hauser, A.; Jevtic, N.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments have been undertaken to demonstrate and quantify the rate of heat production of palladium cathodes loaded electrochemically with deuterium. Excess heat has been observed in these experiments at SRI on more than 40 occasions in accurate and stable isothermal mass flow calorimeters. The excess power appears to be correlated with at least three criteria: the degree of deuterium loading (specified as the atomic ratio D/Pd), the Lime for which high loading is maintained, the interfacial current density. The correlation between excess heat production and these three variables will be discussed. In addition, the results of experiments designed to search for further products of the heat producing reaction will he reported.

  5. PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Research & Development » R&D Highlights » PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate PPG Industries Develops a Low-Cost Integrated OLED Substrate With the help of DOE funding, PPG Industries, Inc., has developed a low-cost OLED substrate, using inexpensive soda-lime "float" glass that the company manufactures at high volume for the architectural industry. Float glass is thin sheet glass and is much less expensive than the borosilicate or

  6. Washingtori, DC.20585

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Departmeni of &ergy' ~ ,, Washingtori, DC.20585 ,' JAM 2'3: 199: " ,, The Honorable Peter G. Lawson First Selectman P.O. Box 155 Falls Village, Connecticut '06031 Dear Mayor 'Lawson: : Secretary of Energy 'Hazel O'Leary has announced a'new approach to openness in the Department of Energy (DOE) ,and itscommunications.with the,public. In support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward the enclosed information related to the former New England'Lime Co. site in your jurisdiction that

  7. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

  8. SU-E-T-138: Dosimetric Verification For Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Cranio-Spinal Irradiation Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goksel, E; Bilge, H; Yildiz, Yarar

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric feasibility of cranio-spinal irradiation with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT-CSI) technique in terms of dose distribution accuracy was investigated using a humanlike phantom. Methods: The OARs and PTV volumes for the Rando phantom were generated on supine CT images. Eclipse (version 8.6) TPS with AAA algorithm was used to create the treatment plan with VMAT-CSI technique. RapidArc plan consisted of cranial, upper spinal (US) and lower spinal (LS) regions that were optimized in the same plan. US field was overlapped by 3cm with cranial and LS fields. Three partial arcs for cranium and 1 full arc for each US and LS region were used. The VMAT-CSI dose distribution inside the Rando phantom was measured with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and film dosimetry, and was compared to the calculated doses of field junctions, target and OARs. TLDs were placed at 24 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated point doses. Planar doses for field junctions were verified with Gafchromic films. Films were analyzed in PTW Verisoft application software using gamma analysis method with the 4 mm distance to agreement (DTA) and 4% dose agreement criteria. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of -0.3% (range: -8% and 12%) when compared with calculated doses for the areas inside the treatment portal. The maximum dose difference was 12% higher in testicals that are outside the treatment region and 8% lower in lungs where the heterogeinity was higher. All planar dose verifications for field junctions passed the gamma analysis and measured planar dose distributions demonstrated average 97% agreement with calculated doses. Conclusion: The dosimetric data verified with TLD and film dosimetry shows that VMAT-CSI technique provides accurate dose distribution and can be delivered safely.

  9. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration. Quarterly report No. 8, August 17, 1992--November 16, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-27

    The CZD process involves injecting a finely atomized slurry of reactive lime into the flue gas duct work of a coal-fired utility boiler. The principle of the confined zone is to form a wet zone of slurry droplets in the middle of the duct confined in an envelope of hot gas between the wet zone and the duct walls. The lime slurry reacts with part of the SO{sub 2} in the gas, and the reaction products dry to form solid particles. A solids collector, typically an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) downstream from the point of injection, captures the reaction products along with the fly ash entrained in the flue gas. The goal of this demonstration is to prove the technical and economic feasibility of the CZD technology on a commercial scale. The process is expected to achieve 50% SO{sub 2} removal at lower capital and O&M costs than other systems. To achieve its objectives, the project is divided into the following three phases: Phase 1: Design and Permitting, Phase 2: Construction and Start-up, Phase 3: Operation and Disposition. Phase 1 activities were completed on January 31, 1991. Phase 2 activities were essentially concluded on July 31, 1991, and Phase 3a, Parametric Testing, was initiated on July 1, 1991. This Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers Phase 3b activities from August 17, 1992 through November 16, 1992.

  10. Barstow heliostat mirror glass characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lind, M.A.; Buckwalter, C.Q.

    1980-09-01

    The technical analysis performed on the special run of low iron float glass procured from the Ford Glass Division for the ten megawatt solar thermal/electric pilot power plant to be constructed at Barstow, California is discussed. The topics that are addressed include the optical properties and the relative durability of the glass. Two optical parameters, solar transmittance and optical flatness, were measured as referenced in the specification and found to be better than the stated tolerances. The average solar transmittance exceeded 0.890 transmittance units. The glass also exhibited optical angular flatness deviations less than +-1.0 mrad as required. Both qualitative and quantitative accelerated weathering tests were performed on the glass in order to compare its durability to other soda lime float glass and alternate composition glasses of interest to the solar community. In both the quantitative leaching experiments and the more qualitative room temperature and elevated temperature water vapor exposure experiments the heliostat glass exhibited the same characteristics as the other soda-lime silicate float glasses. As a final test for mirroring compatability, selected samples of the production run of the glass were sent to four different commercial manufacturers for mirror coating. None of the manufacturers reported any difficulty silvering the glass. Based on the tests performed, the glass meets or exceeds all optical specifications for the Barstow heliostat field.

  11. Advanced research and technology, direct utilization: recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil energy program. Technical progress report, 1 October 1980-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnet, G.; Weiss, S.J.; Murtha, M.J.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop methods to process fly ash for the separation and use of an iron-rich fraction, for the recovery of metals, primarily Al and Ti, and for use of the process residues. Research during this report period of the HiChlor process for the extraction of alumina and titania by high-temperature chlorination of a fly ash-reductant mixture included investigation of the simulation of the reactions as a design tool, the assembly of a unit to measure reaction kinetic rates and particle specific surface areas and porosities, and the design of equipment to measure necessary chloride product separation data. A pretreatment chlorination reaction using CO and Cl/sub 2/ was found to be capable of removing 80% of the iron with only minimal alumina and silica reaction. Development of the lime-soda sinter process includes the collection of data on the phenomenon of auto-disintegration of lime-fly ash sinters. Results indicate that it is the presence of minor constituents having +5 pr +6 valence cations of a size that can enter the lattice of the calcium silicate which prevent sinter auto-disintegration.

  12. Recovery of chemical values from waste gypsum. Final report, December 1989-August 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.A.; Litt, R.D.

    1992-10-15

    A two-stage, two reactor process is being developed to recover sulfur or sulfuric acid and lime from waste gypsum. Waste gypsum is produced by a variety of industries including chemical, fertilizer and electric utilities. Current environmental regulations are increasing the landfill disposal cost to $30/ton or more depending on specific local conditions. These costs are expected to increase and the quantity of waste gypsum is also expected to increase. The two-stage gypsum recovery process uses two separate fluidized bed reactors to (1) reduce the gypsum to calcium sulfide (CaS) and then (2) roast the sulfide with air producing a SO2-rich gas and regenerated CaO. Fluidization and elutriation problems in the first stage were overcome to achieve up to 85 percent conversion of gypsum to CaS. Reducing gas composition, temperature, and solids residence time were shown to be the primary parameters affecting the reactions. Additional work is needed to achieve even greater conversion and to demonstrate the integrated 2-stage operation. A preliminary economic evaluation indicated a 3-year payback could be achieved for a 1000 ton/day plant. The capital cost was estimated to be $8.5 million. Operating cost savings were based on reduced disposal cost, use/sale of sulfuric acid and use/sale of lime.

  13. NUCLEAR POWERED CO2 CAPTURE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S

    2008-09-22

    A process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere was recently proposed. This process uses a closed cycle of sodium and calcium hydroxide, carbonate, and oxide transformations to capture dilute CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and to generate a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} that is amenable to sequestration or subsequent chemical transformations. In one of the process steps, a fossil-fueled lime kiln is needed, which reduces the net CO{sub 2} capture of the process. It is proposed to replace the fossil-fueled lime kiln with a modified kiln heated by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. This will have the effect of eliminating the use of fossil fuels for the process and increasing the net CO{sub 2} capture. Although the process is suitable to support sequestration, the use of a nuclear power source for the process provides additional capabilities, and the captured CO{sub 2} may be combined with nuclear-produced hydrogen to produce liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or other technologies. Conceivably, such plants would be carbon-neutral, and could be placed virtually anywhere without being tied to fossil fuel sources or geological sequestration sites.

  14. Co-production of electricity and alternate fuels from coal. Final report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    The Calderon process and its process development unit, PDU, were originally conceived to produce two useful products from a bituminous coal: a desulfurized medium BTU gas containing primarily CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O; and a desulfurized low BTU gas containing these same constituents plus N{sub 2} from the air used to provide heat for the process through the combustion of a portion of the fuel. The process was viewed as a means for providing both a synthesis gas for liquid fuel production (perhaps CH{sub 3}OH, alternatively CH{sub 4} or NH{sub 3}) and a pressurized, low BTU fuel gas, for gas turbine based power generation. The Calderon coal process comprises three principle sections which perform the following functions: coal pyrolysis in a continuous, steady flow unit based on coke oven technology; air blown, slagging, coke gasification in a moving bed unit based on a blast furnace technology; and a novel, lime pebble based, product gas processing in which a variety of functions are accomplished including the cracking of hydrocarbons and the removal of sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and of particulates from both the medium and low BTU gases. The product gas processing unit, based on multiple moving beds, has also been conceived to regenerate the lime pebbles and recover sulfur as elemental S.

  15. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  16. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-27

    The confined zone dispersion (CZD) process involves flue gas post-treatment, physically located between a boiler's outlet and its particulate collector, which in the majority of cases is an electrostatic precipitator. The features that distinguish this process from other similar injection processes are: Injection of an alkaline slurry directly into the duct, instead of injection of dry solids into the duct ahead of a fabric filter. Use of an ultrafine calcium/magnesium hydroxide, type S pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime. This commercial product is made from plentiful, naturally occurring dolomite. Low residence time, made possible by the high effective surface area of the Type S lime. Localized dispersion of the reagent. Slurry droplets contact only part of the gas while the droplets are drying, to remove up to 50 percent of the S0{sub 2} and significant amounts of NO{sub x}. The process uses dual fluid rather than rotary atomizers. Improved electrostatic precipitator performance via gas conditioning from the increased water vapor content, and lower temperatures. Supplemental conditioning with S0{sub 3} is not believed necessary for satisfactory removal of particulate matter.

  17. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  18. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration. Volume 1, Quarterly report No. 4, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-27

    The confined zone dispersion (CZD) process involves flue gas post-treatment, physically located between a boiler`s outlet and its particulate collector, which in the majority of cases is an electrostatic precipitator. The features that distinguish this process from other similar injection processes are: Injection of an alkaline slurry directly into the duct, instead of injection of dry solids into the duct ahead of a fabric filter. Use of an ultrafine calcium/magnesium hydroxide, type S pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime. This commercial product is made from plentiful, naturally occurring dolomite. Low residence time, made possible by the high effective surface area of the Type S lime. Localized dispersion of the reagent. Slurry droplets contact only part of the gas while the droplets are drying, to remove up to 50 percent of the S0{sub 2} and significant amounts of NO{sub x}. The process uses dual fluid rather than rotary atomizers. Improved electrostatic precipitator performance via gas conditioning from the increased water vapor content, and lower temperatures. Supplemental conditioning with S0{sub 3} is not believed necessary for satisfactory removal of particulate matter.

  19. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez Torres, M. Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C.

    2008-11-15

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

  20. Peripheral NN scattering from subtractive renormalization of chiral interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, E. F.; Szpigel, S.; Timteo, V. S.

    2014-11-11

    We apply five subtractions in the Lippman-Schwinger (LS) equation in order to perform a non-perturbative renormalization of chiral N3LO nucleon-nucleon interactions. Here we compute the phase shifts for the uncoupled peripheral waves at renormalization scales between 0.1 fm{sup ?1} and 1 fm{sup ?1}. In this range, the results are scale invariant and provide an overall good agreement with the Nijmegen partial wave analysis up to at least E{sub lab} = 150 MeV, with a cutoff at ? = 30 fm{sup ?1}.

  1. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The cryostat vacuum thermally insulating the SRF cavities need only reduce the convective heat load such that heat loss is primarily radiation through several layers of multi-layer insulation and conductive end-losses which are contained by 5{sup o}K thermal transitions. Prior to cool down rough vacuum {approx}10{sup -5} torr range is established and maintained by a dedicated turbomolecular pump station. Cryopumping by the cold mass and heat shields reduces the insulating vacuum to 10{sup -7} torr range after cool down.

  2. Deviation from high-entropy configurations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deviation from high-entropy configurations in the atomic distributions of a multi-principal-element alloy Louis J. Santodonato1,2 * (8ls@ornl.gov) Yang Zhang3 * (zhyang@illinois.edu) Mikhail Feygenson4 Chad M. Parish5 Michael C. Gao6,7 Richard J.K. Weber8,9 Joerg C. Neuefeind4 ZhiTang2 Peter K. Liaw2 * (pliaw@utk.edu) 1. Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 2. Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 3.

  3. U

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    subchitted manuscript has teen authored , b a contractor of the U. S. Government u % ; contract No. W-31-10BENG-38. Accordingly, the U . S. Government retains a i nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of t h i s 1 contribution, or allow others to do 90. for U . S. Government purpose. Introduction LS-168 March, 1991 Ju Wang Design of Kicker Magnet and Power Supply Unit for Synchrotron Beam Injection By J U WANG To inject beams from the positron accumulator

  4. Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advances in Computational Methods for X-Ray Optics III Authors: Sanchez del Rio M. ; Chubar O. Publication Date: 2014-08-24 OSTI Identifier: 1165955 Report Number(s): BNL--107140-2014-CP R&D Project: LS001 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-98CH10886 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: SPIE; San Diego, CA; 20140824 through 20140829 Research Org:

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IJCEL-2369 Unclassified - Chemistry D i s t r i b u t i o n UNIVERSITY O F CALIFORML4 Radiation Laboratory Contract No. M-7405- eng - 40 THE P A T H O F CARBON I N PHdGSYNTHESIS .BI. T H E CYCLIC REGENERATION O F CARBON DIOXIDE ACCEPTOR J. A , Bassham, &Ae A. Benson, Lorel D. K r ~ r ~ Anne Z. Harris, A. T. Wilson and M. Calvin October, 1953 Berkeley, California -2- UCRL-2369 Unclassified-Ghemistry Distribution THE P A T H O F CARBON I N P H O T O S Y N T H F S LS , IMI . THE CYCLIC

  6. Technical Session III Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    III Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session III Talks Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Echo-7 (Raubenheimer) .pdf file (732KB) Coherent LS @ MIT (Graves) .pdf file (1.1MB) Terawatt X-ray FELs (Pellegrini) .pdf file (5.1MB) Advanced Beam Physics @ UCLA (Musumeci) .pdf file (1.3MB)

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  9. Microsoft Word - Document5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 ARM STM Radiative Processes Working Group Breakout Session 1:00 - 1:05 Dave Turner: Welcome 1:05 - 1:15 Qiang Fu (new PI): Radiative Constraints in Tropical UT/LS 1:15 - 1:25 Dong Huang: Brief overview of cloud tomography IOP 1:25 - 1:35 Sally McFarlane: RPWG translator report 1:35 - 1:45 Peter Kiedron: Rotating shadowband spectrometer update 1:45 - 1:55 Connor Flynn: Shortwave spectrometer (SWS) update 1:55 - 2:05 Sasha Marshak: Impact on the SWS cloud analysis 2:05 - 2:15 All: Discussion on

  10. I~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    __, I,- __.j .^,, ~~.,l~, _I.x__ . ,,,,, ,_^_ ,,_xx,. ,~.__~_x -,-.. _1 ,.,., - I~ .c \ -- - g-' . @ ~--~Z~, Ls-u &. 0 -*,- hiK ,,-& b TO FILE ' = .-. r. AUG 2 9 1945 A~TPPHC~~~ METALS COPUDOP~TIO~ '* ~,ci~ly~1~~ 41 BROAD STREET (In duplicate) November 6, 1942 The District Engineer, u. s . Zngineer Office, Zanhattarn District, P. 0. 30x 4.2, Station P., i?C:: York, X.Y. Attention: Idajo- Thomas T. Crenshav:. Gentlemen: Classification Cancc!!A ZG? ;~yp~~ Follo~5.nS our conversation of

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  12. Microsoft Word - 45237 FINAL_Rulison_Risk_Report eq

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sc Po Fu Pr Jeffr Jenn Febr Publ reenin otentia uture N roject R rey I. Daniel y B. Chapm ruary 2011 ication No. ng Ass al Hum Natur Ruliso ls man 45237 Prepar Divisio Desert Prepar S. M. S U.S. D sessme man-H al-Ga on in W red by on of Hydro t Research In red for Stoller Corp Department o ent of Health s Drill Weste logic Scienc nstitute, Nev oration, Offi of Energy, G Risk ling N ern Co ces, Las Veg vada System fice of Legac Grand Junctio L from Near olorad gas, NV of Higher E cy Managem on,

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    l D +;$ Iohn !Y. Ruch, Dlrector Feed Msterlal€ Dlvtslon - OR A. J, Breglla, Dlrector Ilsalth Prot€e$on Engtneerlng Dlv1slon, EASL. lnf CoIIIIMINAUON SLRVEY Ar FTACTwE MEtl\LS, INC., SETMOUR, ?HNEcT"Yt IfSH:AIB fiurnmafv Accompanted bf lr{r. A. Grella of tleactlve lrtetals, on Octcber 2l , 1964e l vtetted the Selnaour t'aclllty, Iorurerly occupled by Reactlve l\'tetals, to perforn ttre gunrey reguesied ln your telagram to Dr. Sartey <iated Octcb€.r 7. We lnspeeted all 'qoals that

  14. Bright reddish-orange emission and good piezoelectric properties of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-modified (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3}-based lead-free piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Jigong; Xu, Zhijun Chu, Ruiqing; Li, Wei; Du, Juan

    2015-05-21

    Reddish orange-emitting 0.948(K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3}-0.052LiSbO{sub 3}-xmol%Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} (KNN-5.2LS-xSm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with good piezoelectric properties were fabricated in this study, and the photoluminescence and electrical properties of the ceramics were systematically studied. Results showed that Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} substitution into KNN-5.2LS induces a phase transition from the coexistence of orthorhombic and tetragonal phases to a pseudocubic phase and shifts the polymorphic phase transition (PPT) to below room temperature. The temperature stability and fatigue resistance of the modified ceramics were significantly improved by Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} substitution. The KNN-5.2LS ceramic with 0.4?mol. % Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited temperature-independent properties (25150?C), fatigue-free behavior (up to 10{sup 6} cycles), and good piezoelectric properties (d{sub 33}{sup *?}=?230?pm/V, d{sub 33}?=?176 pC/N, k{sub p}?=?35%). Studies on the photoluminescence properties of the samples showed strong reddish-orange emission upon blue light excitation; these emission intensities were strongly dependent on the doping concentration and sintering temperature. The 0.4?mol. % Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-modified sample exhibited temperature responses over a wide temperature range of 10443?K. The maximum sensing sensitivity of the sample was 7.5??10{sup ?4} K at 293?K, at which point PPT occurred. A relatively long decay lifetime ? of 1.271.40?ms and a large quantum yield ? of 0.170.19 were obtained from the Sm-modified samples. These results suggest that the KNN-5.2LS-xSm{sub 2}O{sub 3} system presents multifunctional properties and significant technological potential in novel multifunctional devices.

  15. CABLE AOORIs*. HICRONIZER. MOORLblOWN. NEW ,SRIEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NEW ALBANY ROAD . MOORESTOWN . NEW ]ERSEY CABLE AOORIs*. HICRONIZER. MOORLblOWN. NEW ,SRIEY be returned further obliga- may desire any patent protection, provi#ed; however, that the costa in connectSo& with the pregaration;~~fillrig nnd prosecution of the same shall be entirely: at ?SG,~~e~enS.e ,of our..company. This provision, how- ever, ls.' subJect:to eny.~prlor'arra~cmont between your Institu- tion and the government with respect to inventions and p?j,tents. ,.: 3,ri 'I :: .:v:ri :!:!p,

  16. I'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fou4 ,...-, ,/' / / I' ,/* ,I ,/' 4 ft ,,/- ,/ ./ "' /, 3: :GSD : mh Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. Cantiague Z.oad, P.O. Uox 75 iiicksvill~, I.cng Island. :!.a~ York <; 1. 5,756 lbs. of Fernsld rojeot slugs. 2. 10,000 lbs. rujeoted powder metallurgy slugs. 3. 5,3!;5 lbs. uranium scrap and sludge*. *Th'Ls material, we unc?srstanct, h4S alreedy been shi$ped and this cmfims nuthor.jeatioiito do 80.. %rthar,~in ncxord with the conver&ntion with bir. IStz ws are cancelling your order

  17. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Ferber, Mattison K

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

  18. Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

  19. Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 11, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.; Bhatt, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) when the caking bituminous coals are used with diluents, only 20% Pittsburgh No. 8 coal can be added to the diluent swhile 40% Illinois No. 6 could be added due to the higher free swelling index of the Pittsburgh No. 8; (2) When limestone is used as a diluent, considerably more sulfur is retained in the char than when using sand; (3) when the char from an experiment using limestone is recycled as the diluent for another experiment, the char continually retains additional sulfur through at least three recycles; (4) decomposition of the limestone and reduction is indicated by the high concentrations of CO observed at 900/sup 0/C; (5) increasing the coal feed rate by a factor of 4 from 2.4 to 10.7 lb/hr at low H/sub 2//Coal ratios (approx. = 0.6) results in no appreciable change in gaseous HC yields (approx. = 27%) or concentration (approx. = 45%) but higher BTX yields (1.1% vs. 5.4%); (6) although only one experiment was conducted, it appears that hydrogasification of untreated New Mexico sub-bituminous coal at 950/sup 0/C does not give an increase in yield over hydrogasification at 900/sup 0/C; (7) the hydrogasification of Wyodak lignite gives approximately the same gaseous HC yields as that obtained from North Dakota lignite but higher BTX yields particularly at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi (9% vs. 2%); (8) treating New Mexico sub-bituminous coal with NaCO/sub 3/ does not increase its hydrogasification qualities between 600/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C at 1000 psi but does decrease the BTX yield.

  20. Mild gasification technology development process: Task 3, Bench-scale char upgrading study, February 1988--November 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carty, R.H.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Knight, R.A.; Wootten, J.M.; Duthie, R.G.

    1990-12-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop mild gasification technology and co-product utilization. The objective of Task 3 was to investigate the necessary steps for upgrading the mild gasification char into potential high-market-value solid products. Recommendations of the Task 1 market survey section formed the basis for selecting three value-added solid products from mild gasification char: form coke, smokeless fuel, and activated adsorbent char. The formation and testing for the form coke co-product involved an evaluation of its briquette strength and reactivity. The measured tensile strength and reactivity of the form coke sample briquettes were in the range of commercial coke, and development tests on a larger scale are recommended. The reaction rate of the form coke carbon with carbon dioxide at 1825{degree}F was measured using a standard procedure. A smokeless fuel briquette with limestone added to control sulfur can be made from mild gasification char in a simple manner. Test results have shown that briquettes with limestone have a heating value comparable to other solid fuels and the limestone can retain up to 88% of the sulfur during combustion in a simple bench-scale combustion test, almost all of it as a stable calcium sulfate. Adsorbent chars were prepared with a standard steam activation procedure and tested for a variety of pertinent property and performance values. Such adsorbents may be better suited for use in some areas, such as the adsorption of low-molecular-weight substances, because of the smaller pore sizes measured in the char. 5 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Removal of H{sub 2}S by spray-calcined calcium acetate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimmo, W.; Agnew, J.; Hampartsoumian, E.; Jones, J.M.

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of wet-spraying calcium acetate as an alternative to limestone and dolomite for the desulfurization of flue gases (in particular, H{sub 2}S removal from coal gas) has been investigated by experimental studies using drop tube (DTR) and fixed-bed flow reactors (FBR). Calcium acetate solution was spray-calcined in the DTR at temperatures of 1073 and 1323 K. At the lower temperature, conversions approaching 80% were found at the longest residence time studied, 0.8 s. On the other hand, the higher temperature condition initially showed a much greater rate of calcination, indicated by greater conversion at shorter residence times, but was then followed by a much slower rate beyond 0.4 s. The final degree of conversion was in the region of 70%. Batches of spray-calcined calcium acetate (SCA), limestone, and dolomite, prepared in the DTR at 1323 K, to 70% conversion, were sulfided in the FBR at temperatures of 873 and 1173 K to assess their relative sulfur capture reactivities. Significantly higher conversions were achieved by the spray-calcined material, especially at the higher FBR temperature (1173 K) where a difference in conversion of more than 40% was observed. The physical structure of the particles formed from wet-spray calcination were determined by electron microscopy and showed highly porous cenospheres with large internal voids and an outside surface characterized by blowholes of between 1 and 10 {micro}m in diameter. As a consequence, the available surface area for reaction with H{sub 2}S is greater than with limestone or dolomite, producing a 4-fold difference in the level of particle conversion.

  2. Paint Rock and southwest Paint Rock fields, Concho County, Texas: Strawn analogs of modern island carbonate facies of Ambergris Cay, Belize

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, A.M.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1987-02-01

    Lower Strawn (Desmoinesian Goen Limestone) reservoirs at Paint Rock and Southwest Paint Rock fields are a complex of carbonate and associated facies interpreted as having been deposited in various environments on and around large, emergent islands on shallow carbonate shelves. The origin and geometries of the component lithofacies in these fields, and their reservoir diagenetic histories, are similar to those presently accumulating on Ambergris Cay, a linear island complex on the northern shelf of Belize. Paint Rock field originated as a narrow, elongate Chaetetes reef trend that formed the foundation on which the overlying island facies were deposited. As on Ambergris Cay, these reef limestones developed extensive porosity during postdepositional subaerial exposure due to meteoric leaching. In contrast, Southwest Paint Rock field is cored by older island deposits rather than reef limestones. With ensuing stillstand or subsequent sea level rise, beach grainstones were deposited along the windward and leeward margins of the foundation highs in these fields. Tight lagoonal micrites and coals (peat-swamp facies) comprise the inner island facies, and are locally associated with porous supratidal dolomites. These island complexes are transected locally by tidal channels that are filled with nonporous micrites. Repeated sea level fluctuations during the history of these fields resulted in a characteristic cyclic stratigraphy of stacked island facies and reservoirs. The reservoirs in the field are developed in the bedrock or older island cores, as well as in the overlying beach facies and supratidal dolomites. These fields are mappable as linear stratigraphic traps with low-relief closure, and are readily identified by subsurface geologic and facies analyses. Similar shelf island-type fields analogous to these strawn and Holocene Belizean examples are found throughout the Midland basin and Eastern shelf.

  3. Method of production H/sub 2/ using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulson, L.E.

    1988-05-13

    A method of producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300/degree/ to 1400/degree/F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices. 1 fig.

  4. Hybrid fluidized bed combuster

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantesaria, Prabhudas P. (Windsor, CT); Matthews, Francis T. (Poquonock, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A first atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed furnace is combined with a second turbulent, circulating fluidized bed furnace to produce heat efficiently from crushed solid fuel. The bed of the second furnace receives the smaller sizes of crushed solid fuel, unreacted limestone from the first bed, and elutriated solids extracted from the flu gases of the first bed. The two-stage combustion of crushed solid fuel provides a system with an efficiency greater than available with use of a single furnace of a fluidized bed.

  5. Mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Qinjin; Wang, Moran; Mukherjee, Partha P; Lichtner, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multi-physicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO{sub 2} saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occuning at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multi-physicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

  6. Alabama Profile

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alabama State Energy Profile Alabama Quick Facts In 2013, Alabama ranked 17th in the nation in the number of producing natural gas wells. Mobile, Alabama was the fourth-largest seaport for exporting U.S. coal in 2013. Coking coal used in the steelmaking process accounted for 82% of total exported coal. The three reactors at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant in Limestone County, Alabama have a combined generating capacity of 3,310 megawatts, second in capacity only to Arizona's Palo Verde plant.

  7. Trenton strata in western Illinois Basin, Brown and Schuyler Counties, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pochel, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Trenton strata in the western Illinois basin are very good prospects for oil exploration. Much drilling has been done in the area but, as yet, no producing wells have been completed. Oil stains and some tars have been found in some samples from most wells. The Trenton in the area of Brown and Schuyler Counties is a fine-grained limestone that underlies the Maquoketa Shale at an average depth of 800 ft (244 m). Because of its position near the edge of the Illinois basin, the stratigraphy varies considerably and inconsistencies are present in most samples viewed.

  8. Pumped storage job is a rocky challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setzer, S.W.

    1994-03-07

    Georgia mountain lives up to its rugged name as excavators fight some unexpected ground conditions. When settlers pushed into the remote valleys of far northwestern Georgia, they had no idea just how apt the name given one odd geologic formation would become to a new generation of pioneers. Rocky Mountain`s 700 ft of diagonally upthrusting limestone, shale and sandstone layers have become the main antagonists in a decade-long struggle to place an 848-Mw pumped storage power project in and around the mountain.

  9. Pueblo of Jemez Geothermal Feasibility Study Fianl Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Kelley; N. Rogers; S. Sandberg; J. Witcher; J. Whittier

    2005-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of developing geothermal energy on the Pueblo of Jemez, with particular attention to the Red Rocks area. Geologic mapping of the Red Rocks area was done at a scale of 1:6000 and geophysical surveys identified a potential drilling target at a depth of 420 feet. The most feasible business identified to use geothermal energy on the reservation was a greenhouse growing culinary and medicinal herbs. Space heating and a spa were identified as two other likely uses of geothermal energy at Jemez Pueblo. Further geophysical surveys are needed to identify the depth to the Madera Limestone, the most likely host for a major geothermal reservoir.

  10. Water/rock interaction efficiency and seawater dolomitization in the Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cander, H.S. )

    1990-05-01

    The Floridan aquifer has often been proposed as a system of extensive meteoric carbonate diagenesis and mixing zone dolomitization. However, the dominance of marine isotope (C, O, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) and trace element (Sr, Fe, Mn) compositions in dolomites and limestones in the Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan aquifer, suggests that the very active low temperature meteoric groundwater system has, over the past 40 m.y., been an inefficient mechanism of diagenesis. {delta}{sup 18}O values of all but two replacement dolomites sampled range from +2.0 to +5.1 (PDB) with high Sr concentrations (90-325 ppm), indicating dolomitization by near-normal marine water involving no significant interaction with meteoric groundwater. The two {delta}{sup 18}O-depleted (0.0 {plus minus} 1) dolomites have low Sr concentrations ({approximately}100 ppm) suggesting limited recrystallization in meteoric water. Several dolomite samples have radiogenic {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr compositions (0.70810-0.70883 {plus minus} 2), but have heavy oxygen isotope compositions (> +2.0) and high Sr concentrations (<200 ppm) suggesting precipitation from cold Miocene age or younger seawater that circulated through the Florida platform. Most limestone stable isotope compositions cluster around marine values (({delta}{sup 18}O = {minus}1 to +1, PDB) {delta}{sup 13}C = +0.5 to +2.5) and have Eocene seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr compositions (0.70775 {plus minus} 2 to 0.70779 {plus minus} 2) with 400 to 500 ppm Sr. Isotopic compositions of limestones from the east coast of Florida are all within these ranges. Only some limestones from central Florida and the west coast contain depleted stable isotopic compositions and low Sr concentrations. The sample with the most depleted stable isotope values has a radiogenic {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr composition (0.70870 {plus minus} 2), suggesting that diagenetic meteoric water migrated through post-Miocene strata.

  11. Characterizing toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant demonstrating the AFGD ICCT Project and a plant utilizing a dry scrubber/baghouse system: Bailly Station Units 7 and 8 and AFGD ICCT Project. Final report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dismukes, E.B.

    1994-10-20

    This report describes results of assessment of the risk of emissions of hazardous air pollutants at one of the electric power stations, Bailly Station, which is also the site of a Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating the Pure Air Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization process (wet limestone). This station represents the configuration of no NO{sub x} reduction, particulate control with electrostatic precipitators, and SO{sub 2} control with a wet scrubber. The test was conducted September 3--6, 1993. Sixteen trace metals were determined along with 5 major metals. Other inorganic substances and organic compounds were also determined.

  12. Boston's McCormack Building Gets Makeover | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boston's McCormack Building Gets Makeover Boston's McCormack Building Gets Makeover November 4, 2010 - 10:53am Addthis Maya Payne Smart Former Writer for Energy Empowers, EERE Constructed from 1931 to 1933, the U.S. Post Office and Courthouse in Boston created quite a buzz with its Art Deco design. A departure from the Classical Revival style popular among federal buildings of the time, its aluminum windows, unadorned granite and limestone base and stepped parapets illustrated its modernity. But

  13. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for testing including: (a) Danian chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream limestone, (c) Indiana limestone, (d) Ekofisk chalk, (e) Oil Creek sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. During the second quarter experiments were begun on these rock types. A series of reconnaissance experiments have been carried out on all but the Ekofisk (for which there is a preliminary data set already inhouse). A series of triaxial tests have been conducted on the Danian chalk, the Cordoba Cream limestone, the Indiana limestone, and sand samples to make a preliminary determination of the deformational mechanisms present in these samples.

  14. New interpretations of Paleozoic stratigraphy and history in the northern Laramie Range and vicinity, Southeast Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sando, W.J.; Sandberg, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Biostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic studies of the Paleozoic sequence in Southeast Wyoming indicate the need for revision of the ages and nomenclature of Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian formations. The Paleozoic sequence begins with a quartzarenite of Devonian age referred to the newly named Fremont Canyon Sandstone, which is overlain by the Englewood Formation of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age. The Englewood is succeeded by the Madison Limestone of Early and Late Mississippian age, which is overlain disconformably by the Darwin Sandstone Member (Pennsylvanian) of the Casper and Hartville formations. This sequence represents predominantly marine deposition in near-shore environments marginal to the ancient Transcontinental Arch.

  15. From:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Development Oversight vs Midwest Farmer Heartache Date: Sunday, September 21, 2014 2:51:40 PM FERC needs to mandate transmission lines are be within existing right of ways such as utility and highway corridors as intended by our legislature in S1462. FERC needs to mandate these lines are to be buried using current technology such as HVDC Light Line, following the best practices in Canada and Europe. In Missouri this is north of the fragile Karst limestone formations or within Highway 36.

  16. Hydrogeochemistry and hydrogeology of the Canino Hydrothermal System (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiodini, G.; Giaquinto, S.; Frondini, F.; Santucci, A. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the Canino area, central Italy, is characterized by the discharge of a large quantity of Ca-SO{sub 4} thermal waters, the total flow rate of which is estimated to be 200 l/s. Ten to twenty l/s of the thermal flow are of an Na-Cl component from a deep source, which was identified by means of the B, Cl, Cs, Na, and Li contents of the waters. The Canino Na-Cl fluids have ratios among these species close to those of the geothermal fluids of Latera. The Canino hydrothermal system, which is located within buried carbonate structures, is therefore made up of a shallower zone, where the Ca-SO{sub 4} hydrotype is prevalent, and another deeper zone where an Na-Cl brine is present. For the sulphate fluids circulating in the upper levels of the system, a temperature of 70-100{degrees} C has been estimated, while a possible higher enthalpy resource may be represented by the chloride aqueous solutions circulating at deeper levels.

  17. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  18. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-28

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  19. The Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-06-26

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  20. Measuring consistent masses for 25 Milky Way globular clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmig, Brian; Seth, Anil; Ivans, Inese I.; Anderton, Tim; Gregersen, Dylan; Strader, Jay; Caldwell, Nelson

    2015-02-01

    We present central velocity dispersions, masses, mass-to-light ratios (M/Ls ), and rotation strengths for 25 Galactic globular clusters (GCs). We derive radial velocities of 1951 stars in 12 GCs from single order spectra taken with Hectochelle on the MMT telescope. To this sample we add an analysis of available archival data of individual stars. For the full set of data we fit King models to derive consistent dynamical parameters for the clusters. We find good agreement between single-mass King models and the observed radial dispersion profiles. The large, uniform sample of dynamical masses we derive enables us to examine trends of M/L with cluster mass and metallicity. The overall values of M/L and the trends with mass and metallicity are consistent with existing measurements from a large sample of M31 clusters. This includes a clear trend of increasing M/L with cluster mass and lower than expected M/Ls for the metal-rich clusters. We find no clear trend of increasing rotation with increasing cluster metallicity suggested in previous work.

  1. Mode Initialization for On-line Estimation of Power System Electromechanical Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Trudnowski, Daniel; Pierre, John W.

    2009-03-18

    Measurement-based mode estimation methods are utilized to estimate electromechanical modes of a power system using phasor measurement units (PMU) data. These methods need to extract a certain amount of information before they can give useable mode estimation. Traditionally, the information is gathered solely from measurement data. Priori mode information from other resources (e.g. model eigenvalue analysis, engineering knowledge) are not fully utilized. For real time application, this means that mode estimation takes time to converge. By adding a mode regularization term in the objective function, this paper proposes a mode initialization method to include priori mode information in a regularized robust recursive least squares (R3LS) algorithm for on-line mode estimation. The proposed method is tested using a simple model, a 17 machine model and is shown to be able to shorten the convergence period of the R3LS algorithm. The proposed method is also applied on the measurement data recorded right before a major power outage in the western North American Grid on August 10th 1996 to show its potential applica-tion in detecting an approaching small signal stability problem.

  2. Toluene pyrolysis studies and high temperature reactions of propargyl chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, R.D.; Chen, H.; Qin, Z.

    1993-12-01

    The main focus of this program is to investigate the thermal decompositions of fuels that play an important role in the pre-particle soot formation process. It has been demonstrated that the condition of maximum soot yield is established when the reaction conditions of temperature and pressure are sufficient to establish a radical pool to support the production of polyaromatic hydrocarbon species and the subsequent formation of soot particles. However, elevated temperatures result in lower soot yields which are attributed to thermolyses of aromatic ring structures and result in the bell-shaped dependence of soot yield on temperature. The authors have selected several acyclic hydrocarbons to evaluate the chemical thermodynamic and kinetic effects attendant to benzene formation. To assess the thermal stability of the aromatic ring, the authors have studied the pyrolyses of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene and pyridine. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF) is employed to analyze the reaction zone behind reflected shock waves. Reaction time histories of the reactants, products, and intermediates are constructed and mechanisms are formulated to model the experimental data. The TOF work is often performed with use of laser schlieren densitometry (LS) to measure density gradients resulting from the heats of various reactions involved in a particular pyrolytic system. The two techniques, TOF and LS, provide independent and complementary information about ring formation and ring rupture reactions.

  3. OIT geothermal system improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J.

    1996-08-01

    Three geothermal wells drilled during the original campus construction vary from 396 m (1,300 ft) to 550 m (1,800 ft). These wells supply all of the heating and part of the cooling needs of the 11-building, 62,200 m{sup 2} (670,000 ft{sup 2}) campus. The combined capacity of the well pumps is 62 L/s(980 gpm) of 89{degrees}C (192{degrees}F) geothermal fluids. Swimming pool and domestic hot water heating impose a small but nearly constant year-round flow requirement. In addition to heating, a portion of the campus is also cooled using the geothermal resource. This is accomplished through the use of an absorption chiller. The chiller, which operates on the same principle as a gas refrigerator, requires a flow of 38 L/s (600 gpm) of geothermal fluid and produces 541 kW (154 tons) of cooling capacity (Rafferty, 1989). The annual operating costs for the system is about $35,000 including maintenance salary, equipment replacement and cost of pumping. This amounts to about $0.05 per square foot per year.

  4. Spectroscopy at the high-energy electron beam ion trap (Super EBIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.

    1996-07-10

    The following progress report presents some of the x-ray measurements performed during the last year on the Livermore SuperEBIT facility. The measurements include: direct observation of the spontaneous emission of the hyperfine transition in ground state hydrogenlike holmium, {sup 165}Ho{sup 66{plus}}; measurements of the n {equals} 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies in neonlike thorium, Th{sup 80{plus}}, through lithiumlike thorium, Th{sup 87{plus}}, testing the predictions of quantum electrodynamical contributions in high-Z ions up to the 0.4{percent} level; measurements of the isotope shift of the n= 2 {r_arrow} 2 transition energies between lithiumlike through carbonize uranium, {sup 233}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}} and {sup 238}U{sup 89{plus}...86{plus}}, inferring the variation of the mean- square nuclear charge radius; and high-resolution measurements of the K{alpha} radiation of heliumlike xenon, Xe{sup 52 {plus}}, using a transmission-type crystal spectrometer, resolving for the first time the ls2p{sup 3}P{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} and ls2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} {r_arrow} 1S{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} transitions individually. 41 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  6. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 1, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kevin; Beeghly, Joel H.

    2000-11-30

    About 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable. This Executive Summary describes efforts to dewater the magnesium hydroxide and gypsum slurries and then process the solids into a more user friendly and higher value form. To eliminate the cost of solids disposal in its first generation Thiosorbic® system, the Dravo Lime Company developed the ThioClear® process that utilizes a magnesium based absorber liquor to remove S02 with minimal suspended solids. Magnesium enhanced lime is added to an oxidized bleed stream of thickener overflow (TOF) to produce magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] and gypsum (CaS04 • 2H20), as by-products. This process was demonstrated at the 3 to 5 MW closed loop FGD system pilot plant at the Miami Fort Station of Cinergy, near Cincinnati, Ohio with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-91-6. A similar process strictly for'recovery and reuse of Mg(OH)2 began operation at the Zimmer Station of Cinergy in late 1994 that can produce 900 pounds of Mg(OH)2 per hour and 2,600 pounds of gypsum per hour. This by-product plant, called the Zimmer Slipstream Magnesium Hydroxide Recovery Project Demonstration, was conducted with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-921-004. Full scale ThioClear® plants began operating in 1997 at the 130 MW Applied Energy Services plant, in Monaca, PA, and in year 2000 at the 1,330 MW Allegheny Energy Pleasants Station at St. Marys, WV.

  7. Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Spitzer

    2011-03-11

    This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

  8. Fluosorbent injection by-products. Final report, January 1997 through December 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Sid

    2000-02-29

    Few, if any, economical alternatives exist for small coal-fired boilers that require a flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) system which does not generate wastes. A new duct-injection technology, called "Fluesorbent," was developed to help fill this gap. Fluesorbent was intentionally designed so that the saturated S02-sorbent materials can be used as beneficial soil amendments after they were used for FGD. A. Project Objective: The objective of this project was to demonstrate in the field that saturated Fluesorbent materials can be utilized beneficially on agricultural and grass lands. B. Project Results: The results of this project suggest that, indeed, saturated Fluesorbent has excellent potential as a commercial soil amendment for crops, such as alfalfa and soybeans, and for turf. Yields of alfalfa and turf were substantially increased in field testing on acidic soils by one-time applications of Fluesorbent FGD by-products. In the first two years of field testing, alfalfa yields on field plots with the FGD by-products were approximately 40% greater than on plots treated with an equivalent amount of agricultural lime. In a third, drought-influenced year, the gains were smaller. Turf grass growth was fully twice that of untreated plots and more than 10% greater than with ag-lime. A small farm trial with a modified version of the Fluesorbent by-product increased soybean yield by 25%. A small trial with corn, however, indicated no significant improvement. Even though the Fluesorbent contained fly ash, the alfalfa and turf grown in FGD-treated plots contained significantly lower levels of heavy metals than that grown in untreated or lime-treated plots. In a project greenhouse experiment, the fly ashes from five different coal boilers from around Ohio produced equivalent yields when mixed with Fluesorbent, indicating wide potential applicability of the new technology. The Fluesorbent materials were also found to be easy to extrude into pellets for use with mixed fertilizers. The by-product FGD materials also showed good potential as a granular substrate for turning volatile liquid herbicides into a dry, spreadable form. It was also shown that a significant amount of other fertilizer compounds, such as elemental sulfur, could be successfully incorporated into the pelleted products, if desired.

  9. Multiple dolomitization events in Triassic Latemar buildup, the Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.N.

    1988-01-01

    Partially dolomitized grainstones of the Middle Triassic Latemar buildup (Dolomites, northern Italy) exhibit a range of texturally distinct dolomite types. Petrographic and field observations of spatial associations and cross-cutting relationships among dolomites allow unravelling of the paragenesis of dolomitization events. Three generations of dolomite are preserved in the Latemar. Microdolomite, the earliest generation, occurs as replacement of allochems and as cement in thin (5-15 cm) exposure caps of meter-scale subtidal cycles. These dolomite crusts are texturally and chemically analogous to the Holocene supratidal crusts of Florida and the Bahamas. Saddle dolomite cements, the second generation, fill or line pores and fractures through the platform. The final generation is massive replacement of limestone by coarse, crystalline dolomite, which occupies a 2-3 km/sup 3/ mushroom-shaped zone in the center of the buildup and includes a wide array of fabrics. Here, subtidal limestones are altered to porous sucrosic dolomite, while microdolomite caps are altered to dense dolomite mosaics. Saddle dolomite cements remain as relics surrounded by replacement rhombs. Two important conclusions are (1) early dolomite is preserved as poorly ordered microdolomite (unless overprinted by a later dolomitization event) and accounts for an insignificant volume of the Latemar dolomite, and (2) saddle dolomite cements, often regarded as late-stage burial, occur before massive replacement.

  10. Bridging the Gap between Chemical Flooding and Independent Oil Producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan McCool; Tony Walton; Paul Whillhite; Mark Ballard; Miguel Rondon; Kaixu Song; Zhijun Liu; Shahab Ahmed; Peter Senior

    2012-03-31

    Ten Kanas oil reservoirs/leases were studied through geological and engineering analysis to assess the potential performance of chemical flooding to recover oil. Reservoirs/leases that have been efficiently waterflooded have the highest performance potential for chemical flooding. Laboratory work to identify efficient chemical systems and to test the oil recovery performance of the systems was the major effort of the project. Efficient chemical systems were identified for crude oils from nine of the reservoirs/leases. Oil recovery performance of the identified chemical systems in Berea sandstone rocks showed 90+ % recoveries of waterflood residual oil for seven crude oils. Oil recoveries increased with the amount of chemical injected. Recoveries were less in Indiana limestone cores. One formulation recovered 80% of the tertiary oil in the limestone rock. Geological studies for nine of the oil reservoirs are presented. Pleasant Prairie, Trembley, Vinland and Stewart Oilfields in Kansas were the most favorable of the studied reservoirs for a pilot chemical flood from geological considerations. Computer simulations of the performance of a laboratory coreflood were used to predict a field application of chemical flooding for the Trembley Oilfield. Estimates of field applications indicated chemical flooding is an economically viable technology for oil recovery.

  11. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G. )

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  12. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  13. Waste tires as auxiliary fuel for cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, J.

    1987-01-01

    The subject I have been asked to speak about is the utilization of scrap tires as an auxiliary fuel for cement kilns. My experience with scrap tires began five years ago when we performed a technical and economic evaluation for tire pyrolysis. I work for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory which is supported by the Department of Energy. My interest in scrap tires continued; in 1984 the Department of Energy and the Portland Cement Association jointly sponsored a conference on the utilization of scrap tires in cement kilns. Most of my remarks today are based upon that conference along with some current information in the US. Mr. Sladek requested that I speak on the combustion process, the progress to date, and the factors that impede or encourage implementation of using scrap tires in cement kilns. For discussion purposes it would help if we had a common understanding of the cement manufacturing process. Cement is made by heating a mixture of finely ground limestone and silica from clay or sand to about 1450/degree/C in a large rotating kiln. The heat causes the limestone to decarbonate and subsequently react with the silica to form calcium silicates. 5 figs.

  14. Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

    1996-09-01

    Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

  15. Aquifer Characteristics Data Report for the Weldon Spring Site chemical plant/raffinate pits and vicinity properties for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report describes the procedures and methods used, and presents the results of physical testing performed, to characterize the hydraulic properties of the shallow Mississippian-Devonian aquifer beneath the Weldon Spring chemical plant, raffinate pits, and vicinity properties. The aquifer of concern is composed of saturated rocks of the Burlington-Keokuk Limestone which constitutes the upper portion of the Mississippian-Devonian aquifer. This aquifer is a heterogeneous anisotropic medium which can be described in terms of diffuse Darcian flow overlain by high porosity discrete flow zones and conduits. Average hydraulic conductivity for all wells tested is 9.6E-02 meters/day (3.1E-01 feet/day). High hydraulic conductivity values are representative of discrete flow in the fractured and weathered zones in the upper Burlington-Keokuk Limestone. They indicate heterogeneities within the Mississippian-Devonian aquifer. Aquifer heterogeneity in the horizontal plane is believed to be randomly distributed and is a function of fracture spacing, solution voids, and preglacial weathering phenomena. Relatively high hydraulic conductivities in deeper portions of the aquifer are though to be due to the presence of widely spaced fractures. 44 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. ); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. ); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. )

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  17. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M.; Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T.; Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  18. Rhythmic bedding patterns for locating structural features, Niobrara Formation, United States western interior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laferriere, A.P.; Hattin, D.E.

    1989-05-01

    Milankovitch-type bedding cycles are well developed in the Upper Cretaceous Fort Hays Limestone Member, Niobrara Formation. These time-equivalent cycles can be correlated across much of Colorado, Kansas, and northeastern New Mexico by combining subsurface and outcrop data. Documentation of thickness variations within the regionally persistent Fort Hays bedding sequences furnishes a basis for fine-scale analysis of Late Cretaceous crustal movements within the eastern ramp region of the Western Interior foreland basin. Regional thickness changes in groups of shale-limestone couplets were correlated and mapped in outcrop and in the subsurface to locate structural elements that influenced Fort Hays deposition. In the Denver-Julesburg basin of Colorado and western Kansas, up to 6.1 m (20 ft) of thinning of the section occurs dominantly along northeastwardly trending belts formed during Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental arch. Mapping of these small-scale thickness changes in the Fort Hays demonstrates that Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental arch was not restricted to the northern part of the Denver-Julesburg basin. Additional structures may occur as far south as the Colorado-New Mexico border. A northwestwardly thinning trend is also apparent and may have resulted from increased compaction and diagenesis, reduction of sediment input during transgression, or from uplift in the vicinity of the Colorado Front Range. 8 figures.

  19. Water quality evaluation and geochemical assessment of iron, manganese, and arsenic in a landfill site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pisigan, R.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Several monitoring wells at a landfill site were sampled for water quality parameters to determine the nature of groundwater contamination. The landfill, located beneath a limestone and dolomitic bedrock, has been used for about 20 years for trash and garbage disposal. The monitoring parameters include major cations and anions, as well as iron, manganese, arsenic, and other parameters measured in the field to characterize the subsurface conditions. Groundwater samples collected near the landfill and downgradient locations had higher levels of iron, manganese, arsenic, alkalinity, hardness than those samples from an upgradient well. The downgradient and on-site samples were also more acidic and turbid, The dissolved oxygen data tend to suggest reducing conditions in the leachate environment. The elevated groundwater concentrations of the three metals, especially iron, were most probably caused by the acidity generated by carbon dioxide and organic acids released from microbial degradation of organic compounds dumped into the landfill. The acidic pH led to the dissolution of iron, manganese, and arsenic bearing mineral phases. The buffering reactions of limestone and dolomite to neutralize the acidic degradation products increased the hardness cations, Ca{sup +2} and Mg{sup +2}. Inorganic speciation modeling indicates that iron, manganese, and arsenic predominantly exist as Fe {sup +2}, Mn{sup +2}, and H{sub 3}AsO{sub 3}. The possible presence of organic complexes of iron was discussed, but could be modeled due to lack of appropriate equilibrium constant data.

  20. Results of combustion and emissions testing when co-firing blends of binder-enhanced densified refuse-derived fuel (b-dRDF) pellets and coal in a 440 MW{sub e} cyclone fired combustor. Volume 3: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlsson, O.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains the data resulting from the co-firing of b-dRDF pellets and coal in a 440-MW{sub e} cyclone-fired combustor. These tests were conducted under a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The CRADA partners included the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Otter Tail Power Company, Green Isle Environmental, Inc., XL Recycling Corporation, and Marblehead Lime Company. The report is made up of three volumes. This volume contains other supporting information, along with quality assurance documentation and safety and test plans. With this multi-volume approach, readers can find information at the desired level of detail, depending on individual interest or need.

  1. Results of combustion and emissions testing when co-firing blends of binder-enhanced densified refuse-derived fuel (b-dRDF) pellets and coal in a 440 MW{sub e} cyclone fired combustor. Volume 2: Field data and laboratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlsson, O.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains the data resulting from the co-firing of b-dRDF pellets and coal in a 440-MW{sub e} cyclone-fired combustor. These tests were conducted under a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The CRADA partners included the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Otter Tail Power Company, Green Isle Environmental, Inc., XL Recycling Corporation, and Marblehead Lime Company. The report is made up of three volumes. This volume contains the field data and laboratory analysis of each individual run. With this multi-volume approach, readers can find information at the desired level of detail, depending on individual interest or need.

  2. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quartery report, August 1994--November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    This first quarterly report describes work during the first three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSO and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR)). The report states the goals of the project - both general and specific - and then describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. All of this work has been organizational and developmental in nature. No data has yet been collected. Technical details and data will appear for the first time in the second quarterly report and be the major topic of subsequent reports.

  3. Recycled materials in geotechnical applications. Geotechnical special publication No. 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Elton, D.J.

    1998-07-01

    Recycled materials have the potential for use in a variety of geotechnical and geoenvironmental applications. This proceedings contains 15 papers on field applications and laboratory testing related to recycled materials. Papers cover: geotechnics of industrial by-products; paper mill sludge for landfill cover; mitigation of void development under bridge approach slabs using rubber tire chips; tire shreds as lightweight fill for embankments and retaining walls; performance of a highway embankment and hydraulic barriers constructed using waste foundry sand, and recycled materials; lagoon-stored lime for embankment; construction and demolition debris for base and subbase applications; fly ash for fill, pavement, earth structures and aggregate; compaction of contaminated soils-reuse as a road base material; and database on beneficial reuse of foundry by-products; and more.

  4. Geotechnical characterization of some Indian fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.K.; Yudhbir

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the findings of experimental studies with regard to some common engineering properties (e.g., grain size, specific gravity, compaction characteristics, and unconfined compression strength) of both low and high calcium fly ashes, to evaluate their suitability as embankment materials and reclamation fills. In addition, morphology, chemistry, and mineralogy of fly ashes are studied using scanning electron microscope, electron dispersive x-ray analyzer, x-ray diffractometer, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. In high calcium fly ash, mineralogical and chemical differences are observed for particles, {gt}75 {mu} m and the particles of {lt} 45 {mu} m size. The mode and duration of curing significantly affect the strength and stress-strain behavior of fly ashes. The geotechnical properties of fly ash are governed by factors like lime content (CaO), iron content (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and loss on ignition. The distinct difference between self-hardening and pozzolanic reactivity has been emphasized.

  5. High temperature chemically resistant polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    High temperature chemically resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites consist of about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder. The binder is polymerized in situ from a liquid vinyl-type monomer or mixture of vinyl containing monomers such as triallylcyanurate, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylamide, methacrylamide, methyl-methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene. About 5 to 40% by weight of a reactive inorganic filler selected from the group consisting of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate and mixtures containing less than 2% free lime, and about 48 to 83% by weight of silica sand/ and a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other orgaic peroxides and combinations to initiate polymerization of the monomer in the presence of the inorganic filers are used.

  6. Phosphorus removal from slow-cooled steelmaking slags: Grain size determination and liberation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fregeau-Wu, E.; Iwasaki, I.

    1995-07-01

    The major obstacle in recycling steelmaking slags to the blast furnace is their phosphorus content. Removal of the phosphorus, which is primarily associated with the silicate and phosphate phases, would allow for greater recycle of these slags for their iron, manganese, and lime contents. Calculations show that separation of the silicates from the oxide phases would remove nearly 90% of the phosphorus from the slag. The variable grain size of the as-received slag made liberation by fine grinding difficult. Therefore, slow-cooling experiments were undertaken to improve the grain size distribution. The grain size distributions were determined using in-situ image analysis. The samples were ground to their apparent liberation size and high gradient magnetic separation was used to separate the magnetic oxides from the nonmagnetic silicates and phosphates. Liberation analysis and modeling was performed on selected separation products for discussion of benefication characteristics.

  7. Incorporation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mortars - Influence of microstructure in the hardened state properties and photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, S.S.

    2013-01-15

    The environmental pollution in urban areas is one of the causes for poor indoor air quality in buildings, particularly in suburban areas. The development of photocatalytic construction materials can contribute to clean the air and improve sustainability levels. Previous studies have focused mainly in cement and concrete materials, disregarding the potential application in historic buildings. In this work, a photocatalytic additive (titanium dioxide) was added to mortars prepared with aerial lime, cement and gypsum binders. The main goal was to study the way that microstructural changes affect the photocatalytic efficiency. The photocatalytic activity was determined using a reactor developed to assess the degradation rate with a common urban pollutant, NO{sub x}. The laboratory results show that all the compositions tested exhibited high photocatalytic efficiency. It was demonstrated that photocatalytic mortars can be applied in new and old buildings, because the nanoadditives do not compromise the mortar hardened state properties.

  8. FGD system capital and operating cost reductions based on improved thiosorbic scrubber system design and latest process innovations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Tseng, S.; Babu, M.

    1994-12-31

    Dravo Lime Company has operated the Miami Fort wet scrubber FGD pilot test unit since late 1989 and has continued in-house R&D to improve the economics of the magnesium-enhanced scrubbing process. Areas investigated include the scrubber configuration, flue gas velocity, spray nozzle type, droplet size, mist eliminator design, additives to inhibit oxidation, improved solids dewatering, etc. Also tested was the forced oxidation Thioclear process. The data gathered from the pilot plant and in-house programs were used to evaluate the capital and operating costs for the improved systems. These evaluations were made with eye towards the choices electric utilities will need to make in the near future to meet the Phase II emission limits mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. Some of the process modifications investigated, for example, the dewatering improvements apply to potential beneficial retrofit of existing FGD systems today.

  9. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 3, Product development of gypsum, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kevin; Beeghly, Joel H.

    2000-11-30

    In the way of background information about 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first generation process begun in 1973, called the Thiosorbic® Process, was a technical breakthrough that offered significantly improved operating and performance characteristics compared with competing FGD technologies. The process is described as Flow Diagram "A" in Figure 1. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the sludge solids for compunction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable.

  10. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 2, Product development of magnesium hydroxide, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kevin; Beeghly, Joel H.

    2000-11-30

    In the way of background information about 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first generation process begun in 1973, called the Thiosorbic® Process, was a technical breakthrough that offered significantly improved operating and performance characteristics compared with competing FGD technologies. The process is described as Flow Diagram "A" in figure 1. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the sludge solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable.

  11. Process and system for treating waste water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olesen, Douglas E.; Shuckrow, Alan J.

    1978-01-01

    A process of treating raw or primary waste water using a powdered, activated carbon/aerated biological treatment system is disclosed. Effluent turbidities less than 2 JTU (Jackson turbidity units), zero TOC (total organic carbon) and in the range of 10 mg/l COD (chemical oxygen demand) can be obtained. An influent stream of raw or primary waste water is contacted with an acidified, powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture. Lime is then added to the slurry to raise the pH to about 7.0. A polyelectrolyte flocculant is added to the slurry followed by a flocculation period -- then sedimentation and filtration. The separated solids (sludge) are aerated in a stabilization sludge basin and a portion thereof recycled to an aerated contact basin for mixing with the influent waste water stream prior to or after contact of the influent stream with the powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture.

  12. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Swift, William M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO.sub.2 gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO.sub.2 gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO.sub.2 absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described.

  13. Thermal and chemical remediation of mixed wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

    1997-12-16

    A process is described for treating organic waste materials without venting gaseous emissions to the atmosphere which includes oxidizing the organic waste materials at an elevated temperature not less than about 500 C with a gas having an oxygen content in the range of from about 20% to about 70% to produce an oxidation product containing CO{sub 2} gas. The gas is then filtered to remove particulates, and then contacted with an aqueous absorbent solution of alkali metal carbonates or alkanolamines to absorb a portion of the CO{sub 2} gas from the particulate-free oxidation product. The CO{sub 2} absorbent is thereafter separated for further processing. A process and system are also disclosed in which the waste materials are contacted with a reactive medium such as lime and product treatment as described. 8 figs.

  14. Characterization of patinas by means of microscopic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez-Calvo, C.

    2007-11-15

    Many stone-made historic buildings have a yellowish layer called 'patina' on their external surface. In some cases, it is due to the natural ageing of the stone caused by chemical-physical reactions between the surface of the stone and the environment, and in other cases it is the result of biological activity. The origin of these patinas can be also be due to ancient protective treatments. The use of organic additives, such as protein-based compounds, in lime or gypsum-based patinas is a traditional technique, which has been used in past centuries for the conservation and protection of stone materials. The thinness of the patinas ensures that microscopic techniques are irreplaceable for their analysis. Optical Microscopy, Fluorescence Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy together with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer, and Electron Microprobe are the microscopic techniques used for the characterization of these coverings, providing very useful information on their composition, texture and structure.

  15. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed ??Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material? and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12? pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  16. Simulation of spray drying absorber for removal of HC1 in flue gas from incinerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchida, S.; Tsuchiga, K.

    1984-04-01

    A theoretical study on the spray drying absorber in an HC1 removal process by lime slurries has been performed with a mathematical model which describes heat and mass transfer and fluid flows in the absorber. From heat and mass balances and a force balance for a moving droplet in the absorber, a set of first-order, nonlinear differential equations relating the amount of water, the gas and droplet temperatures, the drop velocity, the HC1 partial pressure, etc., along the axial direction of the tower was formulated. These relationships were numerically solved to give characteristic profiles in the tower. The results of the simulation based on this model were compared with experimental data and showed satisfactory agreement.

  17. Dry scrubbing oxides and particulate contaminants from hot gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quee, J. A.; Haak, M. P.

    1985-03-12

    Sulfur dioxides are dry scrubbed from a flue gas by introducing minute droplets containing a liquid, such as water, and an alkali or alkaline reactant, such as lime, into the spray zone in the primary spray drying chamber of a spray dryer and concurrently contacting these droplets with the hot flue gas. The droplets are partially dried to a tacky condition before reaching a foraminous collecting member extending through the primary spray drying chamber and collect on the collecting member as a moist, porous mat. As the flue gas continues to flow through the mat, the mat serves as a filter for removing fly ash and other particulate matter and remaining sulfur oxides react with unreacted particles of the reactant and reactive ingredients of the fly ash particles in the mat.

  18. Follow that mercury!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linero, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

  19. ENERGY EFFICIENCY CHALLENGES ADDRESSED THROUGH THE USE OF ADVANCED REFRACTORY CERAMIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Refractory ceramics can play a critical role in improving the energy efficiency of traditional industrial processes through increased furnace efficiency brought about by the employment of novel refractory systems and techniques. Examples of advances in refractory materials related to aluminum, gasification, glass, and lime are highlighted. Energy savings are realized based on reduction of chemical reactions, elimination of mechanical degradation caused by the service environment, reduction of temperature limitations of materials, and elimination of costly installation and repair needs. Key results of projects resulting from US Department of Energy (DOE) funded research programs are discussed with emphasis on applicability of these results to high temperature furnace applications and needed research directions for the future.

  20. Technical work plan for Surface Impoundments Operable Unit engineering support studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a comprehensive work plan which, when utilized as a data collection guide for field activities, will provide the necessary information required to complete a report on geotechnical properties of the sediments contained in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Detailed guidance is provided for the following activities: collection of samples from the impoundments; compressive strength testing of the raw sediments; compressive strength testing of the structurally modified (lime and cement additives) sediments; testing for sediment physical properties and settling rates; testing for sediment dewatering characteristics; testing for radiation activity during the field work; testing for polymer additions that may enhance settling. The work plan additionally provides guidance and examples for the preparation of documents necessary to establish readiness for safe and satisfactory performance of the field activities. An outline for the format requested for a report of these data is also provided.

  1. Mechanical resilience and cementitious processes in Imperial Roman architectural mortar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jackson, Marie D.; Landis, Eric N.; Brune, Philip F.; Vitti, Massimo; Chen, Heng; Li, Qinfei; Kunz, Martin; Wenk, Hans -Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2014-12-15

    The pyroclastic aggregate concrete of Trajan’s Markets (110 CE), now Museo Fori Imperiali in Rome, has absorbed energy from seismic ground shaking and long-term foundation settlement for nearly two millenia while remaining largely intact at the structural scale. The scientific basis of this exceptional service record is explored through computed tomography of fracture surfaces and synchroton X-ray microdiffraction analyses of a reproduction of the standardized hydrated lime–volcanic ash mortar that binds decimeter-sized tuff and brick aggregate in the conglomeratic concrete. The mortar reproduction gains fracture toughness over 180 d through progressive coalescence of calcium–aluminum-silicate–hydrate (C-A-S-H) cementing binder with Ca/(Si+Al) ≈more » 0.8–0.9 and crystallization of strätlingite and siliceous hydrogarnet (katoite) at ≥90 d, after pozzolanic consumption of hydrated lime was complete. Platey strätlingite crystals toughen interfacial zones along scoria perimeters and impede macroscale propagation of crack segments. In the 1,900 year old mortar, C-A-S-H has low Ca/(Si+Al) ≈ 0.45–0.75. Dense clusters of 2- to 30-µm strätlingite plates further reinforce interfacial zones, the weakest link of modern cement-based concrete, and the cementitious matrix. These crystals formed during long-term autogeneous reaction of dissolved calcite from lime and the alkali-rich scoriae groundmass, clay mineral (halloysite), and zeolite (phillipsite and chabazite) surface textures from the Pozzolane Rosse pyroclastic flow, erupted from the nearby Alban Hills volcano. The clast-supported conglomeratic fabric of the concrete presents further resistance to fracture propagation at the structural scale.« less

  2. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

  3. Habitat of oil in the Lindsborg field, Salina basin, north-central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D. )

    1991-03-01

    The Lindsborg field was discovered in 1938, and is now 14 mi in length and 1-2 mi in width. It has a projected ultimate recovery of 16 MMBO. Three pay zones (5-20 ft thick) produce in the field. The Simpson pay zone (Middle Ordovician) is a well-rounded, quartzitic sandstone that is interpreted to be a paralic, high-energy shelf deposit. The Viola pay (Middle Ordovician) appears to be a dolomitic, lime grainstone but no cores are available to confirm this. The uppermost pay zone, the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa, is a finely laminated, vuggy, cherry dolomite interpreted to have been deposited as a subtidal lime mudstone in a restricted lagoon. The Simpson and Viola pays are structurally trapped in culminations along the crest of the Lindsborg anticline. Although the Maquoketa pay is structurally trapped with the other pay zones in the southern half of the field, its locus of production in the north half of the fields extends 100 ft vertically down the western flank of the anticline. The trapping mechanism is unclear due to lack of core control and modern logging suites, but it may be subtle updip diagenetic change from vuggy to nonvuggy dolomite. The Simpson and Maquoketa oils are geochemically distinct. Both may reflect efficient local source-to-reservoir migration from originally rich but marginally mature Ordovician and Devonian shales that contact each pay zone. If oil in the Lindsborg field is locally generated, the prospectivity of the relatively unproductive and underexplored Salina basin may be enhanced.

  4. Incorporation of trace elements in Portland cement clinker: Thresholds limits for Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gineys, N.; Aouad, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Damidot, D.

    2011-11-15

    This paper aims at defining precisely, the threshold limits for several trace elements (Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn) which correspond to the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a standard clinker whilst reaching the limit of solid solution of its four major phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF). These threshold limits were investigated through laboratory synthesised clinkers that were mainly studied by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The reference clinker was close to a typical Portland clinker (65% C{sub 3}S, 18% C{sub 2}S, 8% C{sub 3}A and 8% C{sub 4}AF). The threshold limits for Cu, Ni, Zn and Sn are quite high with respect to the current contents in clinker and were respectively equal to 0.35, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 wt.%. It appeared that beyond the defined threshold limits, trace elements had different behaviours. Ni was associated with Mg as a magnesium nickel oxide (MgNiO{sub 2}) and Sn reacted with lime to form a calcium stannate (Ca{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}). Cu changed the crystallisation process and affected therefore the formation of C{sub 3}S. Indeed a high content of Cu in clinker led to the decomposition of C{sub 3}S into C{sub 2}S and of free lime. Zn, in turn, affected the formation of C{sub 3}A. Ca{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}Al{sub 4}O{sub 15} was formed whilst a tremendous reduction of C{sub 3}A content was identified. The reactivity of cements made with the clinkers at the threshold limits was followed by calorimetry and compressive strength measurements on cement paste. The results revealed that the doped cements were at least as reactive as the reference cement.

  5. Application of holographic neural networks for flue gas emissions prediction in the Burnaby incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Dockrill, P.; Clements, B.

    1997-12-31

    This article describes the development of a parametric prediction system (PPS) for various emission species at the Burnaby incinerator. The continuous emissions monitoring system at the Burnaby incinerator is shared between three boilers and therefore actual results are only available 5 minutes out of every 15 minutes. The PPS was developed to fill in data for the 10 minutes when the Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) is measuring the other boilers. It bases its prediction on the last few actual readings taken and parametrically predicts CO, SO2 and NOx. The Burnaby Incinerator is located in the commercial/industrial area of South Burnaby, British Columbia. It consists of three separate lines, each burning ten tonnes of garbage per hour and producing about three tonnes of steam for every tonne of garbage burned. The air pollution control system first cools the combustion products with water injection and then scrubs them with very fine hydrated lime. Carbon is added to the lime to enhance the scrubbing of the combustion products. The CEM monitors the levels of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and opacity. In 1996, an expert system was installed on one of boilers at the Burnaby Incinerator plant to determine if it could improve the plant=s operations and reduce overall emission. As part of the expert system, the PPS was developed. Holographic Neural Technology (HNeT), developed by AND Corporation of Toronto, Ontario, is a novel neural network technology using complex numbers in its architecture. Compared to the traditional neural networks, HNeT has some significant advantage. It is more resilient against converging on local minima; is faster training and executing; less prone to over fitting; and, in most cases, has significantly lower error. Selection of independent variabs, training set preparation, testing neural nets and other related issue will be discussed.

  6. Vulnerability of Karangkates dams area by means of zero crossing analysis of data magnetic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunaryo, E-mail: sunaryo.geofis.ub@gmail.com; Susilo, Adi

    2015-04-24

    Study with entitled Vulnerability Karangkates Dam Area By Means of Zero Crossing Analysis of Data Magnetic has been done. The study was aimed to obtain information on the vulnerability of two parts area of Karangkates dams, i.e. Lahor dam which was inaugurated in 1977 and Sutami dam inaugurated in 1981. Three important things reasons for this study are: 1). The dam age was 36 years old for Lahor dam and 32 years old for Sutami dam, 2). Geologically, the location of the dams are closed together to the Pohgajih local shear fault, Selorejo local fault, and Selorejo limestone-andesite rocks contact plane, and 3). Karangkates dams is one of the important Hydro Power Plant PLTA with the generating power of about 400 million KWH per year from a total of about 29.373MW installed in Indonesia. Geographically, the magnetic data acquisition was conducted at coordinates (112.4149oE;-8.2028oS) to (112.4839oE;-8.0989oS) by using Proton Precession Magnetometer G-856. Magnetic Data acquisition was conducted in the radial direction from the dams with diameter of about 10 km and the distance between the measurements about 500m. The magnetic data acquisition obtained the distribution of total magnetic field value in the range of 45800 nT to 44450 nT. Residual anomalies obtained by doing some corrections, including diurnal correction, International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) correction, and reductions so carried out the distribution of the total magnetic field value in the range of -650 nT to 700 nT. Based on the residual anomalies, indicate the presence of 2 zones of closed closures dipole pairs at located in the west of the Sutami dam and the northwest of the Lahor dam from 5 total zones. Overlapping on the local geological map indicated the lineament of zero crossing patterns in the contour of residual anomaly contour with the Pohgajih shear fault where located at about 4 km to the west of the Sutami dam approximately and andesite-limestone rocks contact where located at about 6 km to the west of the Lahor dam approximately. These shown a possible of vulnerability on geohazards at the west zone of the Karangkates (Lahor-Sutami) dams area if there are triggers by the vibration (earthquake) on the Pohgajih shear fault, andesite-limestone contact plane, and instability rocks on two zones of closed closure dipole pairs area. Reality, on the location of the study shown some local landslide at the several locations and the main road that need considering for disaster mitigation.

  7. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, R.L.

    1998-03-03

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) {epsilon}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 5 figs.

  8. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit N-methyltransferase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, Robert L. (Lexington, KY)

    1998-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .epsilon.N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  9. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, Robert L. (Lexington, KY)

    1999-01-01

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS) .sup..epsilon. N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the .epsilon.-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed.

  10. Crashworthiness Assessment of Auto-body Members Considering the Fabrication Histories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Hoon; Song, Jung-Han; Kim, Kee-Poong; Kim, Hyun-Sub

    2005-08-05

    This paper is concerned with crashworthiness of auto-body members considering the effect of fabrication. Most auto-body members are fabricated with sheet metal forming process and welding process that induce fabrication histories such as the plastic work hardening, non-uniform thickness distribution and residual stress. Crash simulation is carried out for auto-body members with LS-DYNA3D in order to identify the fabrication effect on the crashworthiness. The analysis calculated crash mode, the reaction force and the energy absorption for crashworthiness assessment with the forming effect. The result shows that the crash analysis with considering the forming history leads to a different result from that without considering the forming effect. The analysis results demonstrate that the design of auto-body members should be carried out considering the forming history for accurate assessment of the crashworthiness.

  11. Impact analysis of spent fuel jacket assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aramayo, G.A.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the analyses performed in support of the reracking of the High Flux Isotope Reactor pool, it became necessary to prove the structural integrity of the spent fuel jacket assemblies subjected to gravity drop that result from postulated accidents associated with the handling of these assemblies while submerged in the pool. The spent fuel jacket assemblies are an integral part of the reracking project, and serve to house fuel assemblies. The structure integrity of the jacket assemblies from loads that result from impact from a height of 10 feet onto specified targets has been performed analytically using the computer program LS-DYNA3D. Nine attitudes of the assembly at the time of impact have been considered. Results of the analyses show that there is no failure of the assemblies as a result of the impact scenarios considered.

  12. Impact Analysis of a Dipper-Type and Multi Spring-Type Fuel Rod Support Grid Assemblies in PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, K.N.; Yoon, K.H.; Park, K.J.; Park, G.J.; Kang, B.S.

    2002-07-01

    A spacer grid is one of the main structural components in a fuel assembly of a Pressurized light Water Reactor (PWR). It supports fuel rods, guides cooling water, and maintains geometry from external impact loads. A simulation is performed for the strength of a spacer grid under impact load. The critical impact load that leads to plastic deformation is identified by a free-fall test. A finite element model is established for the nonlinear simulation of the test. The simulation model is tuned based on the free-fall test. The model considers the aspects of welding and the contacts between components. Nonlinear finite element analysis is carried out by a software system called LS/DYNA3D. The results are discussed from a design viewpoint. (authors)

  13. Explicit Analysis of Transversely Anisotropic and Axisymmetric Sheet Metal Forming Process Using 6-component Barlat Yield Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jinyan; Sun Jixian; Chen Jun

    2005-08-05

    In most FEM codes, the isotropic-elastic and transversely anisotropic-elastoplastic model using Hill's yield function has been widely adopted in 3D shell elements (modified to meet the plane-stress condition) and 3D solid elements. However, when the 4-node quadrilateral axisymmetric element is used for 2D sheet metal forming simulation, the above transversely anisotropic model is not available in FEM code LS-DYNA3D. A novel approach for the explicit analysis of transversely anisotropic and axisymmetric sheet metal forming using 6-component Barlat yield function is elaborated in detail in this paper. The related formula and parameters are derived directly. Numerical results obtained using the new model fit well with the Hill solution.

  14. RCC Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 TABLE B.2 SCHEDULE OF QUANTITIES AND TARGET COST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 TABLE B.2 SCHEDULE OF QUANTITIES AND TARGET COST Section B 593 CLIN 1 CLIN 2 CLIN 3 CLIN 4 100 Area 100-B/C Area FR - 100 B/C Area Design 1.03.01.04.01 Fld. Rem.-100 B/C Area Design 1 LS $702,783 $702,783 Confirmatory Sampling Sites 1.03.01.01.03 Fld. Rem.-Conf Sampling Sites-100 B/C 10 EA $838,517 $838,517 Liquid Waste Site Remediation 1.03.01.02.04 Fld. Rem.-Liquid Waste Sites-100-BC-1 0 TONS $322,870 $322,870 Waste Site Remediation 1.03.01.02.05 / 1.03.01.03.05

  15. Spin-orbit holds the heavyweight title for Pu and Am: Exchange regains it for Cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, K; der Laan, G v; Soderlind, P

    2008-01-10

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The 5f electrons in Cm are near an LS coupling scheme. (2) This coupling scheme allows for a large spin polarization of the 5f electrons, which in turn stabilizes the Cm III crystal structure. (3) Results for Cm show us the recipe for magnetic stabilization of the crystal structure of metals: (A) The metal must be near the itinerant-localized transition where multiple crystal structures have close energies; (B) The metal is just on the magnetic side of the transition; and (C) There must be a magnetic moment large enough to overcome the energy difference between crystal structures, thus dictating the atomic geometry. (4) These results solidify our understanding of magnetically-stabilized metals, showing us where to look for engineered materials with magnetic applications.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of New Hybrid Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED): Europium-picrate-triethylene oxide Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjidan, M. A. Mohd; Abu Zakaria, N. Z. A.; Abd. Majid, W. H. [Solid State Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kusrini, Eny; Saleh, M. I. [School of Chemical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2009-07-07

    Thin-film light emitting devices based on organic materials have attracted vast interest in applications such as light emitting diode (LED) and flat-panel display. The organic material can be attached with inorganic material to enhance the performance of the light emitting device. A hybrid OLED based on a new complex of europium picrate (Eu-pic) with triethylene oxide (EO3) ligand is fabricated. The OLED is fabricated by using spin coating technique with acetone as the solvent and aluminum as the top electrode. The optical, photoluminescence (PL) and electrical properties of the sample are carried out by UV-Vis spectroscopy (Jasco V-750), luminescence spectroscopy (Perkin Elmer LS-500) and source measure unit (SMU)(Keithly), respectively.

  17. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-05

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  18. New Soft X-ray Beamline (BL10) at the SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, D.; Setoyama, H.; Okajima, T.

    2010-06-23

    A new soft X-ray beamline (BL10) at the SAGA Light Source (SAGA-LS) was constructed at the end of 2008. Commissioning of this new beamline started at the beginning of 2009. Synchrotron radiation from a variably polarizing undulator (APPLE-II) can be used in this beamline. The obtained light is monochromatized by a varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator with the variable included angle mechanism. Its designed resolving power and photon flux are 3,000-10,000 and 10{sup 12}-10{sup 9} photons/s at 300 mA, respectively. The performance test results were generally satisfactory. An overview of the optical design of the beamline and the current status of commissioning are reported.

  19. Formability Prediction Of Aluminum Sheet In Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leppin, Christian; Daniel, Dominique; Shahani, Ravi; Gese, Helmut; Dell, Harry

    2007-05-17

    In the following paper, a full mechanical characterization of the AA6016 T4 aluminum alloy car body sheet DR100 is presented. A comprehensive experimental program was performed to identify and model the orthotopic elasto-plastic deformation behavior of the material and its fracture characteristics including criteria for localized necking, ductile fracture and shear fracture. The commercial software package MF GenYld + CrachFEM in combination with the explicit finite element code Ls-Dyna is used to validate the quality of the material model with experiments, namely, prediction of the FLD, deep drawing with a cross-shaped punch and finally, analysis of a simplified hemming process using a solid discretization of the problem. The focus is on the correct prediction of the limits of the material in such processes.

  20. Growth, structural and optical characterization of L-histidine 4-nitrophenolate (LHPNP) single crystals for NLO applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, M.; Ramachandran, K.; Anandan, P.; Arivanandhan, M. E-mail: royhaya@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp; Hayakawa, Y. E-mail: royhaya@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp

    2014-10-15

    Using slow evaporation solution growth technique, single crystals of L-histidine-4-nitro phenolate has been grown from the solution. Structural analyses were carried out by powder x-ray diffraction, FT-Raman, Fourier Transform Infrared and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectral methods to conform the grown crystals. Thermal stability of the grown crystals was studied by thermo-gravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA). UV-Vis spectral analysis has been carried out to find the transparency of the grown crystal. Nonlinear optical property has been confirmed by Kurtz powder technique. The PL measurements were carried out in Perkin Elmer LS 55 Luminescence spectrometer using 410 nm as excitation wavelength. The observed properties have confirmed that the grown crystal is suitable for nonlinear optical applications.

  1. Cloning and developmental expression of pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit epsilon N-methyltransferase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, R.L.

    1999-02-02

    The gene sequence for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) large subunit (LS){sup {epsilon}}N-methyltransferase (protein methylase III or Rubisco LSMT) is disclosed. This enzyme catalyzes methylation of the {epsilon}-amine of lysine-14 in the large subunit of Rubisco. In addition, a full-length cDNA clone for Rubisco LSMT is disclosed. Transgenic plants and methods of producing same which (1) have the Rubisco LSMT gene inserted into the DNA, and (2) have the Rubisco LSMT gene product or the action of the gene product deleted from the DNA are also provided. Further, methods of using the gene to selectively deliver desired agents to a plant are also disclosed. 8 figs.

  2. Spin and orbital moments of nanoscale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} epitaxial thin film on MgO/GaAs(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W. Q.; Xu, Y. B. E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Wong, P. K. J.; Maltby, N. J.; Li, S. P.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, R. E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Du, J.; You, B.; Wu, J.; Bencok, P.

    2014-04-07

    Nanoscale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} epitaxial thin film has been synthesized on MgO/GaAs(100) spintronic heterostructure, and studied with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. We have observed a total magnetic moment (m{sub l+s}) of (3.32 ± 0.1)μ{sub B}/f.u., retaining 83% of the bulk value. Unquenched orbital moment (m{sub l}) of (0.47 ± 0.05)μ{sub B}/f.u. has been confirmed by carefully applying the sum rule. The results offer direct experimental evidence of the bulk-like total magnetic moment and a large orbital moment in the nanoscale fully epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MgO/GaAs(100) heterostructure, which is significant for spintronics applications.

  3. ORNL/RASA-86/ L9

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Qq {8 oL'/7 8.-uf*t^* l/fii ORNL/RASA-86/ L9 COMPREHENSIVE MDIOLOGICAL $JRVEY OF OFF-SITE PROPERTY O NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE LEWISTON, NE}J YORK Access to the lnformatlon ln this report ls llmlted to those l n d l c a t e d o n t h e d l s t r l b u t l o n l l s t a n d t o D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y and Departnent of Energy Contractors Thi! roport w!! preprtcd a! an account of wott lponlot€d by an agency ot the Unatcd Stttos Govrrnmant. Naithcr thcU nited StltttGovcrnmrnt nor any

  4. Oak Ridge Associated

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    l/s1 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated 'Universities Prepared for Division of Remedial Action Froiects ilJ..S. Department of Energy N( , /7 C O M P R E H E N S I V E R A D I O L O G I C A L S U R V E Y O F F . S I T E P R O P E R T Y F N I A G A R A F A L L S S T O R A G E S I T E L E W I S T O N , N E W Y O R K J. D. BERGER Radiologieal Site Assessment Program . Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT February 1984 COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAI SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY F

  5. Rffi

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rffi Prepared by s l/s r Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Remedial Action Projects U.S. Department of Energy CO]IIPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY O F F - S I T E P R O P E R T Y S NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE L E W T S T O N , N E W Y O R K J . D . B E R G E R R a d i o l o g i c a l . S i t e A s s e s s m e n t P r o g r a m Idanpower Education, Research, and Trai.ning Division FINAL REPORT February 1984 COMPREIIENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SI'RVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY S NIAGARA

  6. Update on the OPAL opacity code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.; Wilson, B.G.

    1990-02-23

    Persisting discrepancies between theory and observation in a number of astrophysical properties has led to the conjecture that opacity databases may be inaccurate. The OPAL opacity code has been developed to address this question. The physical basis of OPAL removes several of the approximations present in past calculations. For example, it utilizes a much larger and more detailed set of atomic data than was used to construct the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library. This data is generated online, in LS or intermediate coupling, from prefitted analytic effective potentials and is of similar quality as single configuration, relativistic, self-consistent-field calculations. The OPAL code has been used to calculate opacities for the solar core and for Cepheid variable stars. In both cases, significant increases in the opacity compared to the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library were found. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Update on the opal opacity code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.; Wilson, B.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Persisting discrepancies between theory and observation in a number of astrophysical properties has led to the conjecture that opacity databases may be inaccurate. The OPAL opacity code has been developed to address this question. The physical basis of OPAL removes several of the approximations present in past calculations. For example, it utilizes a much larger and more detailed set of atomic data than was used to construct the los Alamos Astrophysical Library. This data is generated online, in LS or intermediate coupling, from prefitted analytic effective potentials and is of similar quality as single configuration, relativistic, self-consistent-field calculations. The OPAL code has been used to calculate opacities for the solar core and for Cepheid variable stars. In both cases, significant increases in the opacity compared to the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library were found.

  8. ERYLFIUM OM PANY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ERYLFIUM OM PANY 3714 CI-XIESTER /%"EXUE J &CO-74 -L;s C+SSIFICATION CANCELLED OR April 22, 1947 Dear 3. 3elmore: Xith reference to Contract X- 7401 ens 78, supp1emstit 11 calJi?Jg for 5000 pounds of SP ?eO 1350X, we have shipped 5000 pounds to the A. C. Spark E' lU~ co. in i?int i~i0hige.n. There were two s!lipi%ents made against this order. GE/L Kc. The first shipmast was ;lade on i.i)ril 12, ,A947 via ~rnili7c.y eqress on K,' -23305 copies .;; -"5 and ~$7 of which are enclosed.

  9. I\r'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r' ( g-.] ic' fz .; w .fl ! : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X-~ Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-~n,~-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :. , ::; /. 1 httetii OP J xl-. P, 3. 2gp C+~t~Sil;lsXl t ?~~$Tly~lf .t: GA.3 L?wjpnaJiQn Of p-3&7:2-Liop 9.0";:7~+50 s' , -ir ,.,,3 iashlla+im it i3 our da3irs 20 be rslia-T.73 of _"\L:t&?T --:wzk&ili* of the SC1298 ' _ _ Zj31Wf end i~i3sio~~31.3 rsskeri31ii izxLi.c~~t&

  10. LEd:JCD

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LEd:JCD TO- 54 k-sour R3scsrck Fouadatlon 0f$..&+0is$tlstituta of TecGJlow Tecmolocy Csilter 10 Zest 35th Stmet ', c!xk3go lo, I3.Umie Atteqtion: MC. R. c. Barrall Gentlemen: Reference is wada to (a) your appUcetio0 of 3awe~ q,' 1959, rrqlacst~alirpn~tonori~200gsr;ls~hi~4~ched oranlm, (b) our a-q.4 of Z'ebmazy 6, lYS9, ke<wthg eddi- tiona1 'L+lmrQdiEp ia 'Support of your applJcatloD, (c) ycxu.r telqr3a of Eqtember 29, 1959, reque5tlng reneval of ~cense sm-49 -vc+biTt cksnga. Since'va kaem

  11. N;-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    / N;-23 ;:v,c, li .' ;[kai-itrl~~:CarnpbClJiLibr;:-:,, b;;;: :,::::j:t;;< 1.2 d~teyr,i:.? if ~,r".'.~i! cz! .~ i : ?r;sL:". :;,;! ir!,jlc;.+.< Jo; ,d': ;y;.;yt;.: i;, ij&i;h:;-;',.'. F';;:,:':+:,<, e;~,<. tt,(j i&:per,iour dlrcu~~~o~;:~enclbsed~ioLs~~lsrsnary 6f:nly:telephono.rntbrv,$ewsr I.. '.: Tklth yori.and:.threei:fo~raRnM.clnp1oyees1 rihese 4nterviews:were conducted Ias, part of the Department~of Energy's (DOE) Foneerly~Utilized:Sftes ~Remedial Actldn Program

  12. OFFICZ OF OCCUPAIIOXAL EILhLlH h SAFZETY JAXRS FORRESTAL CAMPUS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ? --. - -;; _~ . .' f - . . j . OFFICZ OF OCCUPAIIOXAL EILhLlH h SAFZETY JAXRS FORRESTAL CAMPUS T ;ebruzr) 28, E m Hr. Robert B. szcr, knzper Energy Researcil 6 Dzvelopni AdTr&&izti.a c!!.cag5 o~~ratiors o"-r;ce ' smo SolJal czss .A,~~ila2 kg"zm?., IL 60435' . E: Plh-su~7rq bo~z l.ED/JgC - Pzlurr fiai . Ikac M r. BEi==: k5 SiicaZed in P~CJY~S~ k. &cst RSDO~S~ *a \'O'JT ~E::~ET C? FEh--*---- 3 3.977) Iwzer zw&e ls-4 ::' (I ' s .- -- - -- . . . . a.; i) we he been perf0m

  13. Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System User`s Guide, June 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitus, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Jatko, W.B.; Manges, W.W.; Treece, D.A.

    1993-06-01

    The Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (LS-FICS) uses a Sun workstation controlling a Lenzar ElectroOptics Opacity 1000 imaging system to digitize fingerprint card images to support the Federal Bureau of Investigation`s (FBI`s) Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) program. The system also supports the operations performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory- (ORNL-) developed Image Transmission Network (ITN) prototype card scanning system. The input to the system is a single FBI fingerprint card of the agreed-upon standard format and a user-specified identification number. The output is a file formatted to be compatible with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) draft standard for fingerprint data exchange dated June 10, 1992. These NIST compatible files contain the required print and text images. The LS-FICS is designed to provide the FBI with the capability of scanning fingerprint cards into a digital format. The FBI will replicate the system to generate a data base of test images. The Host Workstation contains the image data paths and the compression algorithm. A local area network interface, disk storage, and tape drive are used for the image storage and retrieval, and the Lenzar Opacity 1000 scanner is used to acquire the image. The scanner is capable of resolving 500 pixels/in. in both x and y directions. The print images are maintained in full 8-bit gray scale and compressed with an FBI-approved wavelet-based compression algorithm. The text fields are downsampled to 250 pixels/in. and 2-bit gray scale. The text images are then compressed using a lossless Huffman coding scheme. The text fields retrieved from the output files are easily interpreted when displayed on the screen. Detailed procedures are provided for system calibration and operation. Software tools are provided to verify proper system operation.

  14. Novel CO2 Foam Concepts and Injection Schemes for Improving CO2 Sweep Efficiency in Sandstone and Carbonate Hydrocarbon Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Hirasaki, George; Johnston, Keith

    2015-02-05

    We explored cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic surfactants to identify candidates that have the potential to satisfy all the key requirements for CO2 foams in EOR. We have examined the formation, texture, rheology and stability of CO2 foams as a function of the surfactant structure and formulation variables including temperature, pressure, water/CO2 ratio, surfactant concentration, salinity and concentration of oil. Furthermore, the partitioning of surfactants between oil and water as well as CO2 and water was examined in conjunction with adsorption measurements on limestone by the Hirasaki lab to develop strategies to optimize the transport of surfactants in reservoirs.

  15. Inversion Breakup in Small Rocky Mountain and Alpine Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Pospichal, Bernhard; Eisenbach, Stefan; Weihs, P.; Clements, Craig B.; Steinacker, Reinhold; Mursch-Radlgruber, Erich; Dorninger, Manfred

    2004-08-01

    Comparisons are made between the post-sunrise breakup of temperature inversions in two similar closed basins in quite different climate settings, one in the eastern Alps and one in the Rocky Mountains. The small, high-altitude, limestone sinkholes have both experienced extreme temperature minima below -50C. On undisturbed clear nights, temperature inversions reach to 120 m heights in both sinkholes, but are much stronger in the drier Rocky Mountain basin (24K versus 13K). Inversion destruction takes place 2.6 to 3 hours after sunrise and is accomplished primarily by subsidence warming associated with the removal of air from the base of the inversion by the upslope flows that develop over the sidewalls. Differences in inversion strengths and post-sunrise heating rates are caused by differences in the surface energy budget, with drier soil and a higher sensible heat flux in the Rocky Mountain sinkhole.

  16. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  17. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Final report, May--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program of ``emerging clean coal technologies`` under the categories of ``in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen`` as well as ``post-combustion clean-up.`` The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  18. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. )

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  19. Process for recovery of aluminum from carbonaceous waste products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapolyi, L.

    1984-03-13

    A carbonaceous waste product, preferably containing 30 to 60% mineral substances, 35 to 55% carbonaceous materials, 5 to 20% water, and having a calorific value of 2,000 to 3,500 k cal/kg is fired to produce thermal energy and a combustion residue. The residue is adjusted, if necessary, by addition of mineral containing additives so that it contains 15 to 50% alumina, 15 to 20% silica and 13 to 45% other oxides (mainly iron oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide). Sufficient limestone is added to produce a mixture containing 1.8 to 2.2 moles of calcium oxide per mole of silica and 1.1 to 1.3 moles of calcium oxide per mole of alumina. The mixture is then sintered. The total energy requirements of the sintering step are supplied by the energy generated in the firing step. Useful products such as cement and cast stone can be produced from the sintered product.

  20. Procedures control total mud losses while drilling in deep water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewar, J. ); Halkett, D. )

    1993-11-01

    In the deepwater (830-1,000 m) drilling program offshore Philippines, reefal limestones were encountered in which total mud losses could be expected because of the presence of large fractures. The danger was that a sudden drop in hydrostatic head (resulting from the losses) could allow any natural gas to enter the well bore quickly. The gas could then migrate up the well bore and form hydrates in the blowout preventers (BOPs). Once hydrates form, they are difficult to remove and can make a BOP stack inoperable. To combat this potential problem, containment procedures were developed to cope with these fluid losses. The philosophy behind the procedures was to prevent hydrocarbons from entering the well bore and, if they did enter, to ensure that they did not move up the well bore and into the riser. Additionally, procedures were developed to allow drilling to continue during the losses and the curing of losses.

  1. Pre-Feasibility Analysis of Pellet Manufacturing on the Former Loring Air Force Base Site. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsberger, R.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Lands initiative, engaged the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct feasibility studies to assess the viability of developing renewable energy generating facilities on contaminated sites. This site, in Limestone, Maine -- formerly the location of the Loring Air Force Base but now owned by the Aroostook Band of Micmac -- was selected for the potential to produce heating pellets from woody feedstock. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource to evaluate based on abundant woody-biomass resources available in the area. NREL also evaluates potential savings from converting existing Micmac property from oil-fired heating to pellet heating.

  2. Process for generating electricity in a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasper, Stanley (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for generating electricity using a gas turbine as part of a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor system wherein coal is fed as a fuel in a slurry in which other constituents, including a sulfur sorbent such as limestone, are added. The coal is combusted with air in a pressurized combustion chamber wherein most of the residual sulfur in the coal is captured by the sulfur sorbent. After particulates are removed from the flue gas, the gas expands in a turbine, thereby generating electric power. The spent flue gas is cooled by heat exchange with system combustion air and/or system liquid streams, and the condensate is returned to the feed slurry.

  3. The EPRI Laboratory experiments at ANL. [Vaporization of core-concrete mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, M.F.; Settle, J.L.; Leibowitz, L.; Johnson, C.E.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-10-28

    The vaporization of core-concrete mixtures is being measured using a transpiration method. Mixtures of stainless steel, concrete (limestone or basaltic) and urania (doped with La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO, BaO, and ZrO/sub 2/) are vaporized at 2150 - 2400 K from a zirconia crucible into flowing He - 6% H/sub 2/ gas. Up to 600 ppM H/sub 2/O is added to the gas to fix the partial molar free energy of oxygen in the range -420 kJ to -550 kJ. The fraction of the sample that is vaporized is determined by weight change and by chemical analyses on the condensates that are collected in an Mo condenser tube. The results are being used to test the thermodynemic data base and the underlying assumptions of computer codes used for prediction of release during the severe accident. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Soil stabilization using oil-shale solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Archeological Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Oil-shale solid wastes are evaluated for use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in durability and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern oil shale appears to be feasible for soil stabilization only if limestone is added during combustion. Testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented and the mechanisms of spent-shale cementation are discussed.

  5. Utilization of Estonian oil shale at power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ots, A. [Tallin Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Department

    1996-12-31

    Estonian oil shale belongs to the carbonate class and is characterized as a solid fuel with very high mineral matter content (60--70% in dry mass), moderate moisture content (9--12%) and low heating value (LHV 8--10 MJ/kg). Estonian oil shale deposits lie in layers interlacing mineral stratas. The main constituent in mineral stratas is limestone. Organic matter is joined with sandy-clay minerals in shale layers. Estonian oil shale at power plants with total capacity of 3060 MW{sub e} is utilized in pulverized form. Oil shale utilization as fuel, with high calcium oxide and alkali metal content, at power plants is connected with intensive fouling, high temperature corrosion and wear of steam boiler`s heat transfer surfaces. Utilization of Estonian oil shale is also associated with ash residue use in national economy and as absorbent for flue gas desulfurization system.

  6. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

  7. Experimental investigations of long-term interactions of molten UO/sub 2/ with MgO and concrete at Argonne National Laboratory. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, R.P.; Farhadieh, R.; Pedersen, D.R.; Gunther, W.H.; Purviance, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental work at Argonne is being performed to investigate the long-term molten-core-debris retention capability of the ex-vessel cavity following a postulated meltdown accident. The eventual objective of the work is to determine if normal structural material (concrete) or a specifically selected sacrificial material (MgO) located in the ex-vessel cavity region can effectively contain molten core debris. The materials under investigation at ANL are various types of concrete (limestone, basalt and magnetite) and commercially-available MgO brick. Results are presented of the status of real material experimental investigation at ANL into (1) molten UO/sub 2/ pool heat transfer, (2) long-term molten UO/sub 2/ penetration into concrete and (3) long-term molten UO/sub 2/ penetration into refractory substrates. The decay heating in the fuel has been simulated by direct electrical heating permitting the study of the long-term interaction.

  8. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  9. (Relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of trace elements during contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of major, minor, and trace elements during the contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks. The large contrasts in chemical potentials of SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and CaO across a granitic pluton-limestone contact may induce metasomatism. In addition, rare earth and transition metal elements may act as tracers, and their redistribution during metamorphism may record convective cooling processes. The results of this study may have an application toward the problem of radioactive waste disposal and the degree to which radioactive nuclides may be expected to migrate during geologically significant periods of time.

  10. A comparison of {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in localized evergreen and deciduous plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangel, R.C.

    1996-05-01

    A vegetation study at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) near Glen Rose, Texas was conducted in 1991 and 1992. The CPSES is a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by Texas Utilities Electric of Dallas, Texas. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requires the CPSES to routinely sample broadleaf vegetation in place of milk samples. Few commercial dairies exist in the vicinity. Broadleaf tree species are scarce because the climate and local limestone geology have produced a dry rolling hill topography. An evergreen juniper is the dominant tree species. Few broadleaves during the winter season have hindered year-round sampling. This study compares the environmental {sup 137}Cs concentrations between broadleaf and evergreen foliage at CPSES. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations from each vegetation location were also compared to the foliage {sup 137}Cs concentrations. The study`s objective was to determine if the deciduous and evergreen vegetation {sup 137}Cs concentrations are statistically the same.

  11. ''A ground water resources study of a Pacific Ocean atoll - Tarawa, Gilbert Islands,'' by J. W. Lloyd, J. C. Miles, G. R. Chessmand, and S. F. Bugg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatcraft, S.W.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-10-01

    Several inherent problems in the methodology employed in the ground water resource study of Tarawa Atoll (Lloyd, et al., 1981) are described. Studies of Enewetak Atoll have provided data that require a significantly different conceptual model of the atoll hydrogeology system. Comparison of well, lagoon, and ocean tidal observations with a mathematical model that assumes horizontal tidal propagation indicates that the observed results are more consistent with a system that is controlled by vertical coupling between the unconsolidated surface aquifer and an underlying aquifer of more permeable limestone. This indicates that most fresh water recharged to the aquifer migrates downward and mixes with the sea water in a deeper aquifer providing easy exchange with the ocean. Lloyd, et al., do not take tidal mixing or vertical transport into account and it therefore seems likely that fresh water inventories are significantly overestimated. Failure to include these significant loss terms in the island water budget may also account for calculated heads above ground level. (JMT)

  12. Multiple dolomitization events in Triassic latemar buildup, the dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.N.

    1988-02-01

    Partially dolomitized grainstones of the Middle Triassic Latemar buildup (Dolomites, northern Italy) exhibit a range of texturally distinct dolomite types. Petrographic and field observations of spatial associations and cross-cutting relationships among dolomites allow unravelling of the paragenesis of dolomitization events. Three generations of dolomite are preserved in the Latemar. Microdolomite, the earliest generation, occurs as replacement of allochems and as cement in thin (5-15 cm) exposure caps of meter-scale subtidal cycles. These dolomite crusts are texturally and chemically analogous to the Holocene supratidal crusts of Florida and the Bahamas. Saddle dolomite cements, the second generation, fill or line pores and fractures through the platform. The final generation is massive replacement of limestone by coarse, crystalline dolomite, which occupies a 2-3 km/sup 3/ mushroom-shaped zone in the center of the buildup and includes a wide array of fabrics. Here, subtidal limestones are altered to porous sucrosic dolomite, while microdolomite caps are altered to dense dolomite mosaics. Saddle dolomite cements remain as relics surrounded by replacement rhombs. Two important conclusions are (1) early dolomite is preserved as poorly ordered microdolomite (unless overprinted by a later dolomitization event) and accounts for an insignificant volume of the Latemar dolomite, and (2) saddle dolomite cements, often regarded as late-stage burial, occur before massive replacement. Standard textural classification of Latemar dolomites hindered the resolution of the timing of dolomitization events. Instead, paragenetic relationships provided a powerful tool for grouping dolomites into generations representing specific diagenetic events in specific dolomitizing environments.

  13. Geologic investigation of roof and floor strata: longwall demonstration, Old Ben Mine No. 24. Prediction of coal balls in the Herrin Coal. Final technical report: Part 2. [Mineralized peat balls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMaris, P.J.; Bauer, R.A.; Cahill, R.A.; Damberger, H.H.

    1983-04-01

    Coal-ball areas, large deposits of mineralized peat in the coal seam, obstructed longwall mining in the Herrin Coal at Old Ben Mine No. 24. In-mine mapping located coal balls under transitional roof - areas where the roof lithology alternates between the Energy Shale and the Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone. Specifically, coal balls occur under eroded exposures or windows of the marine Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone in the Energy Shale. Two types of coal-ball areas have been identified, based on stratigraphic position in the coal seam: type I is restricted to the top of the seam, and type II occurs at midseam and below. To predict the distribution of coal balls, as well as explain their formation, a depositional model was developed: First, freshwater sediments buried the Herrin peat. Decomposition of the sealed peat continued, producing high CO/sub 2/ partial pressures; then selective erosion took place as a river removed the cover along sinuous paths, cutting through to the peat in some places. With the seal broken, CO/sub 2/ was released, and freshwaters that contained Ca and Mg ions flushed out organic acids. Later, marine mud buried both the freshwater sediments and the exposed peat, which accounts for the transitional roof over the Herrin Coal and the coal balls under the marine shale windows in the Energy Shale. The depositional model was supported by the first comprehensive set of geochemical data for coal balls. Coal balls generally contained less than 4 percent organic carbon and very low levels of detrital minerals. Although individual sites of concentrated coal balls cannot be predicted, the specific linear roof exposures associated with these coal-ball areas can be identified by mapping. Based on previously mapped areas, the trends of these linear exposures can be projected.

  14. Mineralogical characterization of saprolite at the FRC background site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul; Brooks, Scott C

    2008-12-01

    The Field Research Center (FRC) including five contaminated sites and a clean background area was established in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program. This study investigates the mineralogy and mineralogical pathways of saprolite at the FRC background site to provide a fundamental basis for the remediation strategy for contaminated sites. The background site is underlain interbedded shales, siltstones, and limestones with nearly identical characteristics to the contaminated sites. Bulk samples of saprolite were collected by hand picking approximately at 1 m depth (C horizon) from the soil surface. The soil pH of 4.3 and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of 10.5 cmol/kg measured are in the range of the typical shallow depth saprolite layer in this area. Total Fe by citrate-bicarbonate-dithionate (CBD) and ammonium oxalate extractable (amorphous) were 17.6 and 0.61 g/kg, respectively. Total Mn extracted by NH{sub 2}OH{center_dot}HCl was 0.17 g/kg. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses indicate that quartz, illite, and microcline (K-feldspar) are the dominant minerals, occupying 95% of mineral composition. The saprolite samples analyzed have shown characteristics of oxic conditions overall, and the degrees of weathering for three sampling locations were various, most for S1 and least for S3, likely influenced either by the flow channels developed through saprolite or by seasonal fluctuation of the groundwater table. The source of the manganese oxide that observed from the site is likely to be Mn-rich muscovite in the shale or Mn-rich biotite in the blackish band in the limestone. The results such as abundant Mn and Fe contents identified encouraging prospects for conducting remediation projects in FRC sites.

  15. Sulfur capture by oil shale ashes under atmospheric and pressurized FBC conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kuelaots, I.; Ots, A. [Tallinn Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Dept.

    1995-12-31

    When oil shale contains large quantities of limestone, a significant auto-absorption of sulfur is possible under suitable conditions. The sulfur capture by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. The Ca/S molar ratios in the two oil shales studied were 8 (Estonian) and 10 (Israeli). The samples were first burned in a gas atmosphere containing O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2} if pressurized). After the combustion step, SO{sub 2} was added and sulfation started. The results with the oil shales were compared to those obtained with an oil shale cyclone ash from the Narva power plant in Estonia. In general, the results from the sulfur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized conditions showed that the oil shale cannot only capture its own sulfur but also significant amounts of additional sulfur of another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. For example from the runs at atmospheric pressure, the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} was about 70% for Israeli oil shale and about 55% for Estonian oil shale (850 C). For the cyclone ash the corresponding conversion was about 20%. In comparison it could be mentioned that under the same conditions the conversions of natural limestones are about 30%. The reason the cyclone ash was a poor sulfur absorbent was probably due to its temperature history. In Narva the oil shale was burned at a significantly higher temperature (1,400 C) than was used in the experiments (750 C and 850 C). This caused the ash to sinter and the reactive surface area of the cyclone ash was therefore decreased.

  16. Mesozoic stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the Exxon 975-1 well, Georges Bank Basin, U. S. North Atlantic outer continental shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W. . Quissett Labs.)

    1993-03-01

    The Exxon 975--1 well, located in the southeastern part of the Georges Bank Basin, was drilled to a total depth of 4,452 m relative to the Kelly Bushing. The oldest sediments penetrated by the well are Middle Jurassic (Bajocian-Early Bathonian), but unambiguous seismic correlations with the COST G--1 and G--2 wells show that about 6,860 m of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks rest on the Paleozoic basement at the 975--1 wellsite. The Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary in the well is placed at 1,673 m; the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary occurs at 384 m. Limestone is predominant below 3,966 m (Iroquois Formation), and at the intervals 3,810--3,246 m and 1,897--1,654 m (lower and upper tongues of the Abenaki Formation). Siliciclastics of the Mohican, undivided Mic Mac-Mohawk, Missisauga, Logan Canyon, and Dawson Canyon Formations dominate the remainder of the Mesozoic section. The Exxon 975--1 well penetrated updip, more terrestrial lithofacies than the COST G--2, Conoco 145--1, and Mobil 312--1 wells. Salt, anhydrite, dolomite, and the micritic textures of the carbonates in the Iroquois Formation of the Exxon 975--1 well suggest hypersaline restricted marine and supratidal depositional environments. The predominantly nonmarine deltaic siliciclastics of the Mohican, Misaine Shale, and Mic Mac-Mohawk units are thicker in the Exxon 975--1 well, whereas marine carbonates of the Scatarie and Bacarro Limestones are usually thinner than at the downdip (seaward) wellsites. Similarly, the Early Cretaceous Missisauga and Logan Canyon Formations represent lower delta plain (alluvial and swamp) and delta front (beach, bar, and lagoon) facies at the Exxon 975--1 wellsite, whereas correlative downdip facies represent shallow marine to delta front deposition.

  17. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W.L.

    1994-12-01

    Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestone result from complex interactions among paleotopography (deposition, concurrent structural deformation), sea level, and diagenesis. Analysis of reservoirs and surface and near-surface analogs has led to developing a {open_quotes}strandline grainstone model{close_quotes} in which relative sea-level stabilized during regressions, resulting in accumulation of multiple grainstone buildups along depositional strike. Resulting stratigraphy in these carbonate units are generally predictable correlating to inferred topographic elevation along the shelf. This model is a valuable predictive tool for (1) locating favorable reservoirs for exploration, and (2) anticipating internal properties of the reservoir for field development. Reservoirs in the Lansing-Kansas City limestones are developed in both oolitic and bioclastic grainstones, however, re-analysis of oomoldic reservoirs provides the greatest opportunity for developing bypassed oil. A new technique, the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett crossplot (formation resistivity vs. porosity) and its use in an integrated petrophysical characterization, has been developed to evaluate extractable oil remaining in these reservoirs. The manual method in combination with 3-D visualization and modeling can help to target production limiting heterogeneities in these complex reservoirs and moreover compute critical parameters for the field such as bulk volume water. Application of this technique indicates that from 6-9 million barrels of Lansing-Kansas City oil remain behind pipe in the Victory-Northeast Lemon Fields. Petroleum geologists are challenged to quantify inferred processes to aid in developing rationale geologically consistent models of sedimentation so that acceptable levels of prediction can be obtained.

  18. Verification of Steelmaking Slags Iron Content Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.Y. Hwang

    2006-10-04

    The steel industry in the United States generates about 30 million tons of by-products each year, including 6 million tons of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slag. The recycling of BF (blast furnace) slag has made significant progress in past years with much of the material being utilized as construction aggregate and in cementitious applications. However, the recycling of desulfurization and BOF/BOP slags still faces many technical, economic, and environmental challenges. Previous efforts have focused on in-plant recycling of the by-products, achieving only limited success. As a result, large amounts of by-products of various qualities have been stockpiled at steel mills or disposed into landfills. After more than 50 years of stockpiling and landfilling, available mill site space has diminished and environmental constraints have increased. The prospect of conventionally landfilling of the material is a high cost option, a waste of true national resources, and an eternal material liability issue. The research effort has demonstrated that major inroads have been made in establishing the viability of recycling and reuse of the steelmaking slags. The research identified key components in the slags, developed technologies to separate the iron units and produce marketable products from the separation processes. Three products are generated from the technology developed in this research, including a high grade iron product containing about 90%Fe, a medium grade iron product containing about 60% Fe, and a low grade iron product containing less than 10% Fe. The high grade iron product contains primarily metallic iron and can be marketed as a replacement of pig iron or DRI (Direct Reduced Iron) for steel mills. The medium grade iron product contains both iron oxide and metallic iron and can be utilized as a substitute for the iron ore in the blast furnace. The low grade iron product is rich in calcium, magnesium and iron oxides and silicates. It has a sufficient lime value and can be utilized for acid mine drainage treatment. Economic analysis from this research demonstrates that the results are favorable. The strong demand and the increase of price of the DRI and pig iron in recent years are particularly beneficial to the economics. The favorable economics has brought commercial interests. ICAN Global has obtained license agreement on the technology from Michigan Tech. This right was later transferred to the Westwood Land, Inc. A demonstration pilot plant is under construction to evaluate the technology. Steel industry will benefit from the new supply of the iron units once the commercial plants are constructed. Environmental benefits to the public and the steel industry will be tremendous. Not only the old piles of the slag will be removed, but also the federal responsible abandoned mines from the old mining activities can be remediated with the favorable product generated from the process. Cost can be reduced and there will be no lime required, which can avoid the release of carbon dioxide from lime production process.

  19. Effect of curing conditions on the geotechnical and geochemical properties of CFBC ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, A.E.

    1999-07-01

    Western Research Institute, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center, initiated a multi-year program to examine the relationship between CFBC ash chemistry and geotechnical properties as they relate to ash disposal and utilization. Four CFBC facilities supplied ash from their units for the study representing high-sulfur (4%) and medium-sulfur (1.8%) bituminous coal. Sub-bituminous coal (0.9% sulfur) and petroleum coke (5--6% sulfur) fired ashes were also included in the study. The ashes were composed principally of large quantities of anhydrite (CaSO{sub 4}) and lime (CaO) and minor amounts of calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). The ash curing study addressed the impact of curing conditions (sealed and saturated curing and 23 C and 5 C curing temperature) on the geochemical and geotechnical properties of the ash. The strength development and expansion varied with the type and characteristics of the ashes. The expansion appeared to be inversely related to strength development. As the strength decreased under saturated curing, the expansion increased significantly. The application of 5 C saturated curing resulted in further strength loss and increased expansion. The hydration reaction products appeared to be principally the hydration of lime (CaO) to portlandite (Ca[OH]{sub 2}), the hydration of anhydrite (CaSO{sub 4}) to gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center{underscore}dot} 2H{sub 2}O), and the precipitation of ettringite (Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 2}[SO{sub 4}]{sub 3}[OH]{sub 12} {center{underscore}dot} 26H{sub 2}O) from the soluble calcium, sulfates and alumina. No thaumasite was noted in the specimens. The ashes appeared to follow one of several hydration reaction trends: (1) ettringite-only development, (2) ettringite and/or gypsum early followed by later gypsum formation, or (3) gypsum-only formation. Testing confirmed that the hydration reaction chemistry was related to geotechnical properties of the ashes. Strength development and expansion appeared to be related to ettringite and/or gypsum formation. The expansion increased with saturated curing and appeared to be predominantly gypsum based. A pore filling model was found to be consistent with the observed relationships between hydration phases (ettringite and gypsum) and strength development and expansion, as well as SEM observations and void reduction observations.

  20. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

  1. Control of emissions from cofiring of coal and RDF. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghunathan, K.; Bruce, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Research has been conducted toward developing technology for co-firing of coal with municipal solid waste (MSW) in order to reduce emissions of chlorinated organic compounds, particularly polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDDs and PCDFs). Previous bench- and pilot-scale research has shown that presence of SO{sub 2} can inhibit the PCDD and PCDF formation, and suggested co-firing high-sulfur coal with refuse derived fuel (RDF) to reduce the emissions. The objective of this research is to identify the effect of process and co-firing options in reducing PCDD and PCDF yield from waste combustion. Two types of municipal waste based fuels were used: a fluff refuse-derived fuel (simply referred to as RDF) and a densified refuse derived fuel (dRDF). The coal used was high-sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal. Experiments were conducted in US EPA`s recently constructed Multi-Fuel Combustor (MFC), a state-of-the-art facility with fuel handling and combustion release rates representative of large field units. The MFC was fired, at varying rates, with RDF/dRDF and coal, and sampled for PCDD and PCDF. Tests were conducted over a range of process variables such as lime injection, HCl concentration, flue gas temperature, quench, and residence time so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of waste combustors. The data are used for developing a comprehensive statistical model for PCDD and PCDF formation and control.

  2. Design, operation, and performance of a modern air pollution control system for a refuse derived fuel combustion facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, E.H.; Azzinnari, C.

    1997-12-01

    The Robbins, Illinois refuse derived fuel combustion facility was recently placed into service. Large and new, the facility is designed to process 1600 tons of waste per day. Twenty-five percent of the waste, or 400 tons per day, is separated out in the fuel preparation process. The remaining 1200 tons per day is burned in two circulating fluidized bed boilers. The system is designed to meet new source performance standards for municipal waste combustion facilities, including total particulate, acid gases (HCl, SO{sub 2}, HF), heavy metals (including mercury), and dioxins. The system utilizes semi-dry scrubbers with lime and activated carbon injected through dual fluid atomizers for control of acid gases. Final polishing of acid gas emissions, particulate control, heavy metals removal, and control of dioxins is accomplished with pulse jet fabric filters. This paper discusses the design of the facility`s air pollution control system, including all auxiliary systems required to make it function properly. Also discussed is the actual operation and emissions performance of the system.

  3. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, November 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This second quarterly report describes work during the second three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSI) and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR). The report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the acquisition of by-product samples and their initial analysis. Other efforts during the second quarter have been directed toward identifying the first hazardous waste samples and preparing for their treatment and analysis. Relatively little data has yet been collected. Major presentation of technical details and data will appear for the first time in the third quarterly report. The activity on the project during the second quarter of Phase One, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into seven areas: (1) Acquiring by-products, (2) Analyzing by-products, (3) Identifying, analyzing and treating suitable hazardous wastes, (4) Carrying out the quality assurance/quality control program, (5) Developing background, and (6) Initiating public relations

  4. Use of an Individual Plant Examination (IPE) to enhance outage management. Phase 1, Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putney, B.; Averett, M.; Riley, J.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor-Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m{sup 3} internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h{sup {minus}1} was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fueb were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO{sub 2}, and No{sub x}. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions Erom traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for afl fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  5. Use of an Individual Plant Examination (IPE) to enhance outage management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putney, B.; Averett, M.; Riley, J. )

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor-Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m[sup 3] internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h[sup [minus]1] was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fueb were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO[sub 2], and No[sub x]. Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions Erom traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for afl fuels in the early stages of combustion.

  6. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine induustrial plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100[degrees]F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600[degrees]F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  7. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  8. Density Profiles in Sputtered Molybdenum Thin Films and Their Effects on Sodium Diffusion in Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Mansfield, L.; Young, M.; Yan, Y.; Contreras, M.; Noufi, R.; Terry Jr., F. L.; Levi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) thin films were sputtered onto soda lime glass (SLG) substrates. The main variable in the deposition parameters, the argon (Ar) pressure p{sub Ar}, was varied in the range of 6-20 mTorr. Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was performed to find out that the dielectric functions {var_epsilon} of the Mo films were strongly dependent on p{sub Ar}, indicating a consistent and significant decrease in the Mo film density {rho}{sub Mo} with increasing p{sub Ar}. This trend was confirmed by high-angle-annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. {var_epsilon} of Mo was then found to be correlated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles of Sodium (Na) in the Cu(In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x})Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layer grown on top of Mo/SLG. Therefore, in situ optical diagnostics can be applied for process monitoring and optimization in the deposition of Mo for CIGS solar cells. Such capability is demonstrated with simulated optical transmission and reflectance of variously polarized incident light, using {var_epsilon} deduced from SE.

  9. Soldering of Thin Film-Metallized Glass Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.; Glass, S.J.

    1999-03-31

    The ability to produce reliable electrical and structural interconnections between glass and metals by soldering was investigated. Soldering generally requires premetallization of the glass. As a solderable surface finish over soda-lime-silicate glass, two thin films coatings, Cr-Pd-Au and NiCr-Sn, were evaluated. Solder nettability and joint strengths were determined. Test samples were processed with Sn60-Pb40 solder alloy at a reflow temperature of 210 C. Glass-to-cold rolled steel single lap samples yielded an average shear strength of 12 MPa. Solder fill was good. Control of the Au thickness was critical in minimizing the formation of AuSn{sub 4} intermetallic in the joint, with a resulting joint shear strength of 15 MPa. Similar glass-to-glass specimens with the Cr-Pd-Au finish failed at 16.5 MPa. The NiCr-Sn thin film gave even higher shear strengths of 20-22.5 MPa, with failures primarily in the glass.

  10. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer hasmore » the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.« less

  11. Acidogenic fermentation of corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, R.

    1981-01-01

    Corn stover was fermentd by anaerobic acidogenic bacteria to produce volatile (C2-C6) organic acids. Mild pretreatment with dilute alkali solutions produced a two-fold increase in fermentability. A mixture of lime and sodium carbonate was found to be a better pretreatment agent than sodium hydroxide. Methane generation was inhibited by low temperature less than or equal to 25 degrees Celcius and high solids greater than or equal to 2.5% (w/v) fermentation. Volatile acid yields of 0.5-0.55 g acetic acid equivalent/g dry ash-free (DAF) stover could be obtained in batch fermentations. Several extractants and extraction solvents for organic acids were found to be nontoxic to acidogenic fermentation. The data show that acidogenic fermentation can produce useful volatile fatty acids in high yields from a complex lignocellulosic feedstock. These fermentation are nonsterile, need no stirring, and are easy to run. Moreover, cellulose, pentosans, and other carbohydrates are directly utilized by acidogenic bacteria. Hence, acidogenic fermentation could be useful in converting biomass to chemical feedstocks and fuel.

  12. Properties of Cu(In,Ga,Al)Se{sub 2} thin films fabricated by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hameed, Talaat A.; Cao, Wei; Mansour, Bahiga A.; Elzawaway, Inas K.; Abdelrazek, El-Metwally M.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2015-05-15

    Cu(In,Ga,Al)Se{sub 2} (CIGAS) thin films were studied as an alternative absorber layer material to Cu(In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x})Se{sub 2}. CIGAS thin films with varying Al content were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Si(100) and soda-lime glass substrates at 350?C, followed by postdeposition annealing at 520?C for 5 h in vacuum. The film composition was measured by an electron probe microanalyzer while the elemental depth profiles were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that CIGAS films are single phase with chalcopyrite structure and that the (112) peak clearly shifts to higher 2? values with increasing Al content. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed dense and well-defined grains, as well as sharp CIGAS/Si(100) interfaces for all films. Atomic force microscopy analysis indicated that the roughness of CIGAS films decreases with increasing Al content. The bandgap of CIGAS films was determined from the optical transmittance and reflectance spectra and was found to increase as Al content increased.

  13. Mercury control challenge for industrial boiler MACT affected facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-15

    An industrial coal-fired boiler facility conducted a test program to evaluate the effectiveness of sorbent injection on mercury removal ahead of a fabric filter with an inlet flue gas temperature of 375{sup o}F. The results of the sorbent injection testing are essentially inconclusive relative to providing the facility with enough data upon which to base the design and implementation of permanent sorbent injection system(s). The mercury removal performance of the sorbents was significantly less than expected. The data suggests that 50 percent mercury removal across a baghouse with flue gas temperatures at or above 375{sup o}F and containing moderate levels of SO{sub 3} may be very difficult to achieve with activated carbon sorbent injection alone. The challenge many coal-fired industrial facilities may face is the implementation of additional measures beyond sorbent injection to achieve high levels of mercury removal that will likely be required by the upcoming new Industrial Boiler MACT rule. To counter the negative effects of high flue gas temperature on mercury removal with sorbents, it may be necessary to retrofit additional boiler heat transfer surface or spray cooling of the flue gas upstream of the baghouse. Furthermore, to counter the negative effect of moderate or high SO{sub 3} levels in the flue gas on mercury removal, it may be necessary to also inject sorbents, such as trona or hydrated lime, to reduce the SO{sub 3} concentrations in the flue gas. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Silicon Oxynitride Thin Film Barriers for PV Packaging (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Glick, S. H.; Terwilliger, K. M.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Keyes, B. M.; Gedvilas, L. M.; Pern, F. J.

    2006-10-03

    Dielectric, adhesion-promoting, moisture barriers comprised of silicon oxynitride thin film materials (SiOxNy with various material stoichiometric compositions x,y) were applied to: 1) bare and pre-coated soda-lime silicate glass (coated with transparent conductive oxide SnO2:F and/or aluminum), and polymer substrates (polyethylene terephthalate, PET, or polyethylene napthalate, PEN); plus 2) pre- deposited photovoltaic (PV) cells and mini-modules consisting of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film PV technologies. We used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process with dilute silane, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide/oxygen gas mixtures in a low-power (< or = 10 milliW per cm2) RF discharge at ~ 0.2 Torr pressure, and low substrate temperatures < or = 100(degrees)C, over deposition areas ~ 1000 cm2. Barrier properties of the resulting PV cells and coated-glass packaging structures were studied with subsequent stressing in damp-heat exposure at 85(degrees)C/85% RH. Preliminary results on PV cells and coated glass indicate the palpable benefits of the barriers in mitigating moisture intrusion and degradation of the underlying structures using SiOxNy coatings with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm.

  15. Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

    2009-12-10

    New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

  16. Applications of high-temperature solar heat to the production of selected fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beall, S.E. Jr.; Bamberger, C.E.; Goeller, H.A.

    1981-07-01

    An attempt is made to judge whether solar heat in the 500 K to 2500 K temperature range might be economical for some important fuel- and chemical-production processes. Previous work in related areas is reviewed and the chemicals aluminum oxide (and bauxite), calcium sulfate (and gypsum), and calcium oxide (lime) chosen for detailed study. In addition to reviewing the energy needs of the more common bulk chemicals, several innovative processes requiring heat in the 1500 to 2500 K range were investigated. Hydrogen production by several thermochemical means, carbon monoxide production by thermochemical and direct thermal dissociation, and nitrogen fixation by direct thermal reaction of nitrogen and oxygen in air were considered. The engineering feasibility of the processes is discussed. The problem of matching the conventional and innovative processes to a high-temperature solar supply is studied. Some solar-thermal power plants of current designs are examined and several advanced concepts of highly concentrating systems are considered for very high-temperature applications. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  17. Letter Report for Characterization of Biochar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, James E.

    2013-04-09

    On 27 November 2012, a bulk biochar sample was received for characterization of selected physical and chemical properties. The main purpose of the characterization was to help determine the degree to which biochar would be suitable as a soil amendment to aid in growth of plants. Towards this end, analyses to determine specific surface, pH, cation-exchange capacity, water retention, and wettability (i.e. surface tension) were conducted. A second objective was to determine how uniform these properties were in the sample. Towards this end, the sample was separated into fractions based on initial particle size and on whether the material was from the external surface or the internal portion of the particle. Based on the results, the biochar has significant liming potentials, significant cation-retention capacities, and highly variable plant-available moisture retention properties that, under the most favorable circumstances, could be helpful to plants. As a consequence, it would be quite suitable for addition to acidic soils and should enhance the fertility of those soils.

  18. Sodium-Doped Molybdenum Targets for Controllable Sodium Incorporation in CIGS Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, L. M.; Repins, I. L.; Glynn, S.; Carducci, M. D.; Honecker, D. M.; Pankow, J.l W.; Young, M. R.; DeHart, C.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Beall, C. L.; To, B.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells is enhanced when Na is incorporated in the CIGS absorber layer. This work examines Na incorporation in CIGS utilizing Na-doped Mo sputtered from targets made with sodium molybdate-doped (MONA) powder. Mo:Na films with varying thicknesses were sputtered onto Mo-coated borosilicate glass (BSG) or stainless steel substrates for CIGS solar cells. By use of this technique, the Na content of CIGS can be varied from near-zero to higher than that obtained from a soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate. Targets and deposition conditions are described. The doped Mo films are analyzed, and the resulting devices are compared to devices fabricated on Mo-coated SLG as well as Mo-coated BSG with NaF. Completed devices utilizing MONA exceeded 15.7% efficiency without anti-reflective coating, which was consistently higher than devices prepared with the NaF precursor. Strategies for minimizing adhesion difficulties are presented.

  19. Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) films with varying gallium ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claypoole, Jesse; Peace, Bernadette; Sun, Neville; Dwyer, Dan; Eisaman, Matthew D.; Haldar, Pradeep; Efstathiadis, Harry

    2015-09-05

    Cu(In1-x,Gax)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers were deposited on molybdenum (Mo) coated soda-lime glass substrates with varying Ga content (described as Ga/(In+Ga) ratios) with respect to depth. As the responsible mechanisms for the limitation of the performance of the CIGS solar cells with high Ga contents are not well understood, the goal of this work was to investigate different properties of CIGS absorber films with Ga/(In+Ga) ratios varied between 0.29 and 0.41 (as determined by X-ray florescence spectroscopy (XRF)) in order to better understand the role that the Ga content has on film quality. The Ga grading in the CIGS layer has the effect causing a higher bandgap toward the surface and Mo contact while the band gap in the middle of the CIGS layer is lower. Also, a wider and larger Ga/(In+Ga) grading dip located deeper in the CIGS absorber layers tend to produce larger grains in the regions of the films that have lower Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. It was found that surface roughness decreases from 51.2 nm to 41.0 nm with increasing Ga/(In+Ga) ratios. However, the surface roughness generally decreases if the Ga grading occurs deeper in the absorber layer.

  20. Sodium-Doped Molybdenum Targets for Controllable Sodium Incorporation in CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, L. M.; Repins, I. L.; Glynn, S.; Carducci, M. D.; Honecker, D. M.; Pankow, J.; Young, M.; DeHart, C.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Beall, C. L.; To, B.

    2011-07-01

    The efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells is enhanced when Na is incorporated in the CIGS absorber layer. This work examines Na incorporation in CIGS utilizing Na-doped Mo sputtered from targets made with sodium molybdate-doped (MONA) powder. Mo:Na films with varying thicknesses were sputtered onto Mo-coated borosilicate glass (BSG) or stainless steel substrates for CIGS solar cells. By use of this technique, the Na content of CIGS can be varied from near-zero to higher than that obtained from a soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate. Targets and deposition conditions are described. The doped Mo films are analyzed, and the resulting devices are compared to devices fabricated on Mo-coated SLG as well as Mo-coated BSG with NaF. Completed devices utilizing MONA exceeded 15.7% efficiency without anti-reflective coating, which was consistently higher than devices prepared with the NaF precursor. Strategies for minimizing adhesion difficulties are presented.

  1. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, January 20, 1995--January 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compaan, A.D.; Bohn, R.G.; Contreras-Puente, G.

    1996-05-01

    This annual report covers the second year of a 3-year NREL subcontract with the University of Toledo that is focused on improvements in efficiency for radio frequency (rf)-sputtered CdS/CdTe solar cells. In earlier work supported by NREL, the University of Toledo established the viability of two new deposition methods for CdS/CdTe solar cells by fabricating cells with efficiencies greater than 10% at air mass (AM) 1.5 on soda lime glass for all-sputtered cells and also for all-laser-deposited cells. Most of the effort has been placed on radio frequency sputtering (RFS) because it was judged to be more economical and more easily scaled to large-area deposition. However, laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) has remained the method of choice for the deposition of CdCl{sub 2} layers and also for the exploration of new materials such as the ternary alloys including CdS{sub x} Te{sub 1{minus}x} and dopants such as Cu in ZnTe.

  2. Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)] [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

    1998-06-01

    The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

  3. Structural and optical properties of (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline thin film alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J. H.; Shafarman, W. N.; Birkmire, R. W.; McCandless, B. E.

    2014-06-14

    The structural and optical properties of pentenary alloy (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} polycrystalline thin films were characterized over the entire compositional range at a fixed (Cu?+?Ag)/(In?+?Ga) ratio. Films deposited at 550?C on bare and molybdenum coated soda-lime glass by elemental co-evaporation in a single-stage process with constant incident fluxes exhibit single phase chalcopyrite structure, corresponding to 122 spacegroup (I-42d) over the entire compositional space. Unit cell refinement of the diffraction patterns show that increasing Ag substitution for Cu, the refined a{sub o} lattice constant, (Ag,Cu)-Se bond length, and anion displacement increase in accordance with the theoretical model proposed by Jaffe, Wei, and Zunger. However, the refined c{sub o} lattice constant and (In,Ga)-Se bond length deviated from theoretical expectations for films with mid-range Ag and Ga compositions and are attributed to influences from crystallographic bond chain ordering or cation electronegativity. The optical band gap, derived from transmission and reflection measurements, widened with increasing Ag and Ga content, due to influences from anion displacement and cation electronegativity, as expected from theoretical considerations for pseudo-binary chalcopyrite compounds.

  4. Rudimentary, low tech incinerators as a means to produce reactive pozzolan out of sugar cane straw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martirena, Fernando . E-mail: f.martirena@enet.cu; Middendorf, Bernhard; Day, Robert L.; Gehrke, Matthias; Roque, Pablo; Martinez, Lesday; Betancourt, Sergio

    2006-06-15

    The ashes of agricultural wastes from the processing of sugar cane are recognized as having pozzolanic properties. Burning of these wastes under controlled conditions, e.g. temperature and residence time results in significant improvement in reactivity. There are many reports of low-tech incinerators that have been successfully used to produce reactive rice husk ash in Asia. The paper presents the results of the evaluation of a rudimentary incinerator where sugar cane straw is burnt in order to obtain a reactive ash. The incinerator is designed and constructed according to state-of-the-art recommendations for this kind of device. Various burning trials were performed in order to obtain ash for the experiment. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on powdered ash shows significant presence of amorphous (glassy) material. Lime-pozzolana pastes were prepared. The pastes were subjected to X-ray diffraction, thermo-gravimetric analysis, chemical titration, and SEM observation, as a means to examine the pozzolanicity of the ash via the progress with time of calcium hydroxide consumption, and changes in the pore size distribution and strength. Calcium silicate hydrate phases are the main reaction product of the pozzolanic reaction. The long residence time of the ash in the burning chamber seems to be the reason for the fairly low reactivity of the ash; the reactivity of the ash was not significantly improved in comparison with that of the ash burnt in uncontrolled conditions in the open air.

  5. HYDRAULIC AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MCU SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2008-03-19

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF), located in the Z-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), is used for the disposal of low-level radioactive salt solution. The SDF currently contains two vaults: Vault 1 (6 cells) and Vault 4 (12 cells). Additional disposal cells are currently in the design phase. The individual cells of the saltstone facility are filled with saltstone., Saltstone is produced by mixing the low-level radioactive salt solution, with blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement or lime to form a dense, micro-porous, monolithic, low-level radioactive waste form. The saltstone is pumped into the disposal cells where it subsequently solidifies. Significant effort has been undertaken to accurately model the movement of water and contaminants through the facility. Key to this effort is an accurate understanding of the hydraulic and physical properties of the solidified saltstone. To date, limited testing has been conducted to characterize the saltstone. The primary focus of this task was to estimate the hydraulic and physical properties of MCU (Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit) saltstone relative to two permeating fluids. These fluids included simulated groundwater equilibrated with vault concrete and simulated saltstone pore fluid. Samples of the MCU saltstone were prepared by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and allowed to cure for twenty eight days prior to testing. These samples included two three-inch diameter by six inch long mold samples and three one-inch diameter by twelve inch long mold samples.

  6. Multiple-use marketing of lignite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudson, C.L.

    1993-09-01

    Marketing of lignite faces difficulties due to moisture and sulfur contents, as well as the sodium content, of the ash. The purpose of this study is to determine the economic viability of multiple-use marketing of lignite as a method to increase the use of North Dakota lignite by recapturing lost niche markets. Multiple-use marketing means using lignite and sulfur-capturing additives to clean agricultural wastewater followed by either direct steam and power generation or briquetting to produce a higher-Btu compliance fuel. Cooperative ownership of the resulting business by a coal company and an agriculture processing company helps ensure that lignite remains the coal of choice, especially when the ``good`` attributes of lignites are maximized, while the agricultural company obtains cleaner wastewater and a long-term supply of coal at a set price. The economic viabilities of the following scenarios were investigated: (1) Agriprocessing wastewater treatment using lignite and an additive followed by (2) the production of compliance fuel for resale or on-site cogeneration of steam and electricity. Laboratory tests were performed utilizing potato-processing plant wastewater with lignite and lime sludge.

  7. BUILDING MATERIALS MADE FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael W. Grutzeck; Maria DiCola; Paul Brenner

    2006-03-30

    Flue gas desulphurization (FGD) materials are produced in abundant quantities by coal burning utilities. Due to environmental restrains, flue gases must be ''cleaned'' prior to release to the atmosphere. They are two general methods to ''scrub'' flue gas: wet and dry. The choice of scrubbing material is often defined by the type of coal being burned, i.e. its composition. Scrubbing is traditionally carried out using a slurry of calcium containing material (slaked lime or calcium carbonate) that is made to contact exiting flue gas as either a spay injected into the gas or in a bubble tower. The calcium combined with the SO{sub 2} in the gas to form insoluble precipitates. Some plants have been using dry injection of these same materials or their own Class C fly ash to scrub. In either case the end product contains primarily hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}O) with smaller amounts of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). These materials have little commercial use. Experiments were carried out that were meant to explore the feasibility of using blends of hannebachite and fly ash mixed with concentrated sodium hydroxide to make masonry products. The results suggest that some of these mixtures could be used in place of conventional Portland cement based products such as retaining wall bricks and pavers.

  8. Ca(OH)[sub 2]/fly ash sorbents for SO[sub 2] removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C.S.; Shih, S.M. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, the reactivity of Ca(OH)[sub 2]/fly ash sorbent with SO[sub 2] is studied by using a fixed-bed differential reactor under the conditions simulating the bag filters of the spray-drying flue gas desulfurization. The source of fly ash and the sorbent preparation conditions affect the reactivity of the sorbent. The reactivity of the sorbent was found to be closely related to the content of the calcium silicate hydrate formed in the sorbent preparation. The sorbent has a much higher utilization of Ca(OH)[sub 2] than that of pure Ca(OH)[sub 2] sorbent, and in some range of Ca(OH)[sub 2] content the sorbent also has a higher SO[sub 2] capture capacity per unit weight of sorbent than that of pure lime. The fly ash from the Shin-Da plant of the Taiwan Power Company produced the best sorbent of all fly ashes in this study. The higher ratio of fly ash/Ca(OH)[sub 2], the higher slurrying temperature, the longer slurrying time, and the smaller particles of fly ash enhance the utilization of Ca(OH)[sub 2], but the water/solid ratio has an optimal value. The relative humidity in the reactor has a significant effect on the reactivity of Ca(PH)[sub 2]/fly ash sorbents, but the effect of the sulfation temperature is subtle.

  9. Model for flue-gas desulfurization in a circulating dry scrubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neathery, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    A simple model was developed to describe the absorption of SO{sub 2} in a circulating dry scrubbing (CDS) process, which is a semi dry, lime-based, flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) process that utilizes a circulating fluidized bed arrangement for contacting a sorbent with SO{sub 2}-laden flue gas under coolside conditions. The reaction chemistry is thought to be similar to that of spray-drying absorption. The liquid-phase mass-transfer coefficient was successfully modeled as a function of the sorbent particle spacing on the wetted surfaces. Gas-phase mass-transfer resistances were assumed to be insignificant. Due to the high surface area available in a CDS reactor, the evaporation rate of water from the slurry was modeled as constant-rate drying according to classic spray-dryer theory. However, the falling-rate and diffusion evaporation stages were negligible in CDS since sorbent particle bunching at the surface of the slurry is nonexistent.

  10. Influence of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the reaction of Ca(OH){sub 2} under spray-drying flue gas desulfurization conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C.S.; Shih, S.M.; Lee, C.D.

    1996-11-01

    The influence of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} in the flue gas on the reaction of hydrated lime sorbent with SO{sub 2} was studied using a fixed-bed differential reactor under conditions prevailing in the spray-drying flue gas desulfurization process. With the presence of CO{sub 2}, the sulfation and carbonation reactions of Ca(OH){sub 2} took place simultaneously until Ca(OH){sub 2} ceased to react. The CaCO{sub 3} produced reacted further to form CaSO{sub 3}{center_dot}{1/2}H{sub 2}O. The apparent sulfation rate, total reaction rate, and final total conversion of Ca(OH){sub 2} were greater than those for the case without CO{sub 2}. The final total conversion was about 1.45 times that for the latter case at the conditions of 1,000 ppm SO{sub 2}, 60 C, and 70% relative humidity. The same effect was observed whether CO{sub 2} was present with O{sub 2} or not. Kinetic expressions obtained by assuming chemical reaction control and considering the surface coverage by product crystals best represented the kinetic data.

  11. Sorbent utilization studies using a mini-pilot spray dryer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.; Yang, Q. )

    1992-07-01

    The objectives of project 1.5 were to design, construct and evaluate (by means of parametric testing) a mini-pilot spray dryer facility. To date, the mini-pilot facility has been designed and is currently 100% constructed. The unit was evaluated based on such parameters as air flow rate, uniformity, residence time, Ca(OH)[sub 2] Slurry concentration the nozzle can handle, heater's heating capacity and the baseline SO[sub 2] removal efficiency. The mini-pilot facility will allow research in all aspects of spray drying fluid gas desulfurization. The unit was designed for a nominal gas flow rate of 100 scfm (3 n[sup 3]/min) and will be able be used with either nozzle spray or rotary atomization. In addition, a theoretical modeling of spray drying has been completed. Results of the simulation indicate that counter-current (referring to air flow) spray pattern will benefit in overall SO[sub 2] removal with respect to co-current spray pattern. This result needs to be further tested in the pilot scale spray dryer. Baseline testing has indicated that the mini-pilot plant provides data which is comparable to that from the large scale spray dryer facility at the Electric Power Research Institute's High Sulfur Test Facility. The results of these baseline tests have shown that SO[sub 2] removal efficiency increases with a decrease in the approach to saturation temperature, or an increase in lime stoichiometric ratio (at a constant approach to saturation temperature).

  12. Pilot-scale test results of simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal using powdery form of LILAC absorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, H.; Ueno, T.; Tatani, A.

    1995-06-01

    Hokkaido Electric Power Company has developed a hot water curing process necessary to prepare highly efficient absorbent for FGD system using compound made from coal flyash. Hokkaido Electric Power Company and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries jointly initiated pilot-scale study in 1990 on a simple FGD system the so called LILAC FGD system named after this absorbent LILAC, an abbreviation of Lively Intensified Lime-Ash Compound. The pilot-scale study comprises two steps to develop both a spray drying process and a duct injection process. As a first step, the spray drying process employing a slurry form of LILAC absorbent was investigated and the results and features of this process were presented at `91 and `93 SO{sub 2} Control Symposiums. Second step referred to duct injection process using powdery LILAC absorbent. The test results indicated that the duct injection process is capable of simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal and the removal ability is affected by the flue gas conditions, such as SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} molar ratio, moisture content, gas velocity and so on.

  13. Thin transparent conducting films of cadmium stannate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xuanzhi (Golden, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Lakewood, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A process for preparing thin Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 films. The process comprises the steps of RF sputter coating a Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer onto a first substrate; coating a second substrate with a CdS layer; contacting the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer with the CdS layer in a water- and oxygen-free environment and heating the first and second substrates and the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 and CdS layers to a temperature sufficient to induce crystallization of the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer into a uniform single-phase spinel-type structure, for a time sufficient to allow full crystallization of the Cd.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 layer at that temperature; cooling the first and second substrates to room temperature; and separating the first and second substrates and layers from each other. The process can be conducted at temperatures less than 600.degree. C., allowing the use of inexpensive soda lime glass substrates.

  14. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - summary of seventeen plant-community studies at ten wetland crossings. Topical report, February 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dyke, G.D. |; Shem, L.M.; Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program, Argonne National Laboratory conducted field studies on 10 wetland crossings located in six states to document impacts of natural gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) on 15 wetland plant communities. This study is unique in the number, range, ages, and variety of wetland crossings surveyed and compared. Vegetation data and recorded observations were analyzed to reveal patterns associated with age, installation technology, maintenance practices, and wetland type. This report summarizes the findings of this study. Results revealed that ROWs of pipelines installed according to recent wetland regulations rapidly revegetated with dense and diverse plant communities. The ROW plant communities were similar to those in the adjacent natural areas in species richness, wetland indicator values, and percentages of native species. The ROW plant communities developed from naturally available propagules without fertilization, liming, or artificial seeding. ROWs contributed to increased habitat and plant species diversity in the wetland. There was little evidence that they degrade the wetland by providing avenues for the spread of invasive and normative plant species. Most impacts are temporal in nature, decreasing rapidly during the first several years and more slowly thereafter to the extent permitted by maintenance and other ROW activities.

  15. A Review of Major Non-Power-Related Carbon Dioxide Stream Compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Schmick, Mary T.

    2015-07-01

    A critical component in the assessment of long-term risk from geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) is the ability to predict mineralogical and geochemical changes within storage reservoirs as a result of rock-brine-CO2 reactions. Impurities and/or other constituents in CO2 source streams selected for sequestration can affect both the chemical and physical (e.g., density, viscosity, interfacial tension) properties of CO2 in the deep subsurface. The nature and concentrations of these impurities are a function of both the industrial source(s) of CO2, as well as the carbon capture technology used to extract the CO2 and produce a concentrated stream for subsurface injection and geologic sequestration. This article reviews the relative concentrations of CO2 and other constituents in exhaust gases from major non-energy-related industrial sources of CO2. Assuming that carbon capture technology would remove most of the incondensable gases N2, O2, and Ar, leaving SO2 and NOx as the main impurities, the authors then summarize the relative proportions of the remaining impurities assumed to be present in CO2 source streams that could be targeted for geologic sequestration. The summary is presented relative to five potential sources of CO2: 1) Flue Gas with Flue Gas Desulfurization, 2) Combustion Stack from Coke Production, 3) Portland Cement Kilns, 4) Natural Gas Combustion, and 5) Lime Production.

  16. Thermal energy storage apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, P.E.

    1980-04-22

    A thermal energy storage apparatus and method employs a container formed of soda lime glass and having a smooth, defectfree inner wall. The container is filled substantially with a material that can be supercooled to a temperature greater than 5* F., such as ethylene carbonate, benzophenone, phenyl sulfoxide, di-2-pyridyl ketone, phenyl ether, diphenylmethane, ethylene trithiocarbonate, diphenyl carbonate, diphenylamine, 2benzoylpyridine, 3-benzoylpyridine, 4-benzoylpyridine, 4methylbenzophenone, 4-bromobenzophenone, phenyl salicylate, diphenylcyclopropenone, benzyl sulfoxide, 4-methoxy-4prmethylbenzophenone, n-benzoylpiperidine, 3,3pr,4,4pr,5 pentamethoxybenzophenone, 4,4'-bis-(Dimethylamino)-benzophenone, diphenylboron bromide, benzalphthalide, benzophenone oxime, azobenzene. A nucleating means such as a seed crystal, a cold finger or pointed member is movable into the supercoolable material. A heating element heats the supercoolable material above the melting temperature to store heat. The material is then allowed to cool to a supercooled temperature below the melting temperature, but above the natural, spontaneous nucleating temperature. The liquid in each container is selectively initiated into nucleation to release the heat of fusion. The heat may be transferred directly or through a heat exchange unit within the material.

  17. Irradiation-induced Ag nanocluster nucleation in silicate glasses: Analogy with photography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espiau de Lamaestre, R.; Bea, H.; Bernas, H.; Belloni, J.; Marignier, J. L.

    2007-11-15

    The synthesis of Ag nanoclusters in soda lime silicate glasses and silica was studied by optical absorption and electron spin resonance experiments under both low (gamma ray) and high (MeV ion) deposited energy density irradiation conditions. Both types of irradiation create electrons and holes whose density and thermal evolution--notably via their interaction with defects--are shown to determine the clustering and growth rates of Ag nanocrystals. We thus establish the influence of redox interactions of defects and silver (poly)ions. The mechanisms are similar to the latent image formation in photography: Irradiation-induced photoelectrons are trapped within the glass matrix, notably on dissolved noble metal ions and defects, which are thus neutralized (reverse oxidation reactions are also shown to exist). Annealing promotes metal atom diffusion, which, in turn, leads to cluster nuclei formation. The cluster density depends not only on the irradiation fluence but also--and primarily--on the density of deposited energy and the redox properties of the glass. Ion irradiation (i.e., large deposited energy density) is far more effective in cluster formation, despite its lower neutralization efficiency (from Ag{sup +} to Ag{sup 0}) as compared to gamma photon irradiation.

  18. Results of the measurement survey of elevation and environmental media in surface impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Coe, R.H.C. III; Lawrence, J.D.; Winton, W.

    1998-07-01

    A measurement survey of the elevation and environmental media in impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during April 1998. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of Bechtel Jacobs Company. Measurement activities were conducted at selected locations in order to determine the depth and appearance of the sediment and describe the clay underlying the impoundments prior to remediation. The survey was a follow-up to a previous elevation survey. The survey included the following: collection of sediment/clay cores from selected locations in each impoundment; measurement and documentation of the elevation at the water surface, at the top of sediment, at the top of clay, and at the bottom of each core; visual inspection of each core by a soil scientist to confirm the presence of clay and not material such as fly ash and soda lime compacted over the last 50 years; measurement and documentation of the background beta-gamma radiation level at the time and location of collection of each core, the highest beta-gamma level along the sediment portion of each core, and the highest beta-gamma level along the clay portion of each core; measurement and documentation of the length of the clay and of the sediment portion of each core; photographic documentation of each core; and replacement of each core in the impoundment.

  19. Control strategies for an expert system at a municipal solid waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dockrill, P.; Zheng, L.; Clements, B.; Ram, K.; Boatwright, K.

    1997-12-31

    Optimal burning of municipal waste is challenging due to the unknown variability of the garbage and the strict limits on the emission streams. Proper operation relies upon procedures that are, to a certain extent, based upon previous experience. Therefore this is an excellent application for an expert system since they are designed to initiate operator actions before actual operator intervention is necessary. This paper briefly discusses the rationale for developing an expert system at the Burnaby Incinerator, Burnaby, British Columbia and how it was implemented. The Burnaby Incinerator, owned by the Greater Vancouver Regional District and operated by Montenay, Inc., was a test location for an expert system jointly funded by Environment Canada and the Panel for Energy Research and Development and developed by the CANMET Energy Technology Centre. The expert system was designed to perform a number of functions: identification of boiler upsets due to fuel variations, prediction of stack emissions and control of lime injection for SO{sub 2} emissions. These particular functions were chosen to smooth the boiler operation and reduce the cost of plant operation. The expert system is a PC based system using both commercial and developed software. It incorporates rule based and model based techniques and neural network technology. The results of the expert system project are presented.

  20. Characterization and modification of particulate properties to enhance filtration performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, T.R.; Robinson, M.S.; Vann Bush, P.

    1989-06-22

    This report describes the results of project activities that occurred during the period from March 1 through May 31, 1989. The organization of this report generally follows the outline of work presented in the Project Work Plan. Work performed during this period included tests under Task 2 -- Parametric Tests of Ashes and Fabrics, and Task 3 -- Survey of Methods to Modify Particle Filtration Properties. Discussion of the Task 2 work has been organized topically, rather than adhering to the activities specified in the Work Plan. Cohesive ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority's 160 MW Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustor at the Shawnee Plant in Paducah, Kentucky was obtained during this quarter and has been analyzed in the laboratory. The second phase of the abstract search and review of pertinent articles included in activity 3.1 is nearly complete. A summary of this phase of the literature search is included in this report. A variety of potential conditioning agents have been evaluated during this reporting period. These agents include sodium bicarbonate, hydrated lime, various grades of fine silica powder, gasifier char, glass beads and glass fibers. The three source ashes have been mixed with these agents in different concentrations and using various mixing techniques. These tests are continuing, and this report contains a summary of the combinations evaluated during this past quarter. 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53 gene expression levels compared to cell lines without p53 sequestration. Our data reveal the characteristic cytoplasmic sequestration of p53 by the heat shock protein mortalin in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines, as is the case for other cancers, such as glioblastomas and hepatocellular carcinomas.

  2. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facility??s production process.

  3. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.

    2001-04-01

    The oil and gas industry has encountered significant problems in the production of oil and gas from weak rocks (such as chalks and limestones) and from unconsolidated sand formations. Problems include subsidence, compaction, sand production, and catastrophic shallow water sand flows during deep water drilling. Together these cost the petroleum industry hundreds of millions of dollars annually. The goals of this first quarterly report is to document the progress on the project to provide data on the acoustic imaging and mechanical properties of soft rock and marine sediments. The project is intended to determine the geophysical (acoustic velocities) rock properties of weak, poorly cemented rocks and unconsolidated sands. In some cases these weak formations can create problems for reservoir engineers. For example, it cost Phillips Petroleum 1 billion dollars to repair of offshore production facilities damaged during the unexpected subsidence and compaction of the Ekofisk Field in the North Sea (Sulak 1991). Another example is the problem of shallow water flows (SWF) occurring in sands just below the seafloor encountered during deep water drilling operations. In these cases the unconsolidated sands uncontrollably flow up around the annulus of the borehole resulting in loss of the drill casing. The $150 million dollar loss of the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast resulted from an uncontrolled SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The first three tasks outlined in the work plan are: (1) obtain rock samples, (2) construct new acoustic platens, (3) calibrate and test the equipment. These have been completed as scheduled. Rock Mechanics Institute researchers at the University of Oklahoma have obtained eight different types of samples for the experimental program. These include: (a) Danian Chalk, (b) Cordoba Cream Limestone, (c) Indiana Limestone, (d) Ekofisk Chalk, (e) Oil Creek Sandstone, (f) unconsolidated Oil Creek sand, and (g) unconsolidated Brazos river sand. These weak rocks and sands are intended to represent analogs to the formations that present oil and gas engineers with problems during oil and gas production and drilling operations. A series of new axial acoustic sensors have been constructed (and tested) to allow measurement of compressional and shear wave velocities during high pressure triaxial tests on these weak rock and sand samples. In addition, equipment to be utilized over the next 18 months of the project have tested and calibrated. These include the load frames, triaxial pressure cells, pressure sensors, load cells, extensometers, and oscilloscopes have been calibrated and tested. The multichannel acoustic emission and acoustic pulse transmission systems have also been tested. Graduate research assistant, research faculty, and the laboratory technician have begun Tasks 4 and 5 which involve preparing the sand samples and rock samples for testing. The construction of the lateral acoustic sensors has also been started during this quarter as outlined in the project timeline. With the equipment having been tested and calibrated, and the samples now being prepared, the experiments are on schedule to be started in April, 2001.

  4. Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.; Fayek, M.; Goodell, P.; Ghezzehei, T.; Melchor, F.; Murrell, M.; Oliver, R.; Reyes-Cortes, I.A.; de la Garza, R.; Simmons, A.

    2008-08-01

    The Nopal I site in the Pena Blanca uranium district has a number of geologic and hydrologic similarities to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, making it a useful analogue to evaluate process models for radionuclide transport. The PB-1 well was drilled in 2003 at the Nopal I uranium deposit as part of a DOE-sponsored natural analogue study to constrain processes affecting radionuclide transport. The well penetrates through the Tertiary volcanic section down to Cretaceous limestone and intersects the regional aquifer system. The well, drilled along the margin of the Nopal I ore body, was continuously cored to a depth of 250 m, thus providing an opportunity to document the local stratigraphy. Detailed observations of these units were afforded through petrographic description and rock-property measurements of the core, together with geophysical logs of the well. The uppermost unit encountered in the PB-1 well is the Nopal Formation, a densely welded, crystal-rich, rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. This cored section is highly altered and devitrified, with kaolinite, quartz, chlorite, and montmorillonite replacing feldspars and much of the groundmass. Breccia zones within the tuff contain fracture fillings of hematite, limonite, goethite, jarosite, and opal. A zone of intense clay alteration encountered in the depth interval 17.45-22.30 m was interpreted to represent the basal vitrophyre of this unit. Underlying the Nopal Formation is the Coloradas Formation, which consists of a welded lithic-rich rhyolitic ash-flow tuff. The cored section of this unit has undergone devitrification and oxidation, and has a similar alteration mineralogy to that observed in the Nopal tuff. A sharp contact between the Coloradas tuff and the underlying Pozos Formation was observed at a depth of 136.38 m. The Pozos Formation consists of poorly sorted conglomerate containing clasts of subangular to subrounded fragments of volcanic rocks, limestone, and chert. Three thin (2-6 m) intervals of intercalated pumiceous tuffs were observed within this unit. The contact between the Pozos Formation and the underlying Cretaceous limestone basement was observed at a depth of 244.40 m. The water table is located at a depth of {approx}223 m. Several zones with elevated radioactivity in the PB-1 core are located above the current water table. These zones may be associated with changes in redox conditions that could have resulted in the precipitation of uraninite from downward flowing waters transporting U from the overlying Nopal deposit. All of the intersected units have low (typically submillidarcy) matrix permeability, thus fluid flow in this area is dominated by fracture flow. These stratigraphic and rock-property observations can be used to constrain flow and transport models for the Pena Blanca natural analogue.

  5. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM APPROACH FOR PLAY PORTFOLIOS TO IMPROVE OIL PRODUCTION IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly Seyler; John Grube

    2004-12-10

    Oil and gas have been commercially produced in Illinois for over 100 years. Existing commercial production is from more than fifty-two named pay horizons in Paleozoic rocks ranging in age from Middle Ordovician to Pennsylvanian. Over 3.2 billion barrels of oil have been produced. Recent calculations indicate that remaining mobile resources in the Illinois Basin may be on the order of several billion barrels. Thus, large quantities of oil, potentially recoverable using current technology, remain in Illinois oil fields despite a century of development. Many opportunities for increased production may have been missed due to complex development histories, multiple stacked pays, and commingled production which makes thorough exploitation of pays and the application of secondary or improved/enhanced recovery strategies difficult. Access to data, and the techniques required to evaluate and manage large amounts of diverse data are major barriers to increased production of critical reserves in the Illinois Basin. These constraints are being alleviated by the development of a database access system using a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach for evaluation and identification of underdeveloped pays. The Illinois State Geological Survey has developed a methodology that is being used by industry to identify underdeveloped areas (UDAs) in and around petroleum reservoirs in Illinois using a GIS approach. This project utilizes a statewide oil and gas Oracle{reg_sign} database to develop a series of Oil and Gas Base Maps with well location symbols that are color-coded by producing horizon. Producing horizons are displayed as layers and can be selected as separate or combined layers that can be turned on and off. Map views can be customized to serve individual needs and page size maps can be printed. A core analysis database with over 168,000 entries has been compiled and assimilated into the ISGS Enterprise Oracle database. Maps of wells with core data have been generated. Data from over 1,700 Illinois waterflood units and waterflood areas have been entered into an Access{reg_sign} database. The waterflood area data has also been assimilated into the ISGS Oracle database for mapping and dissemination on the ArcIMS website. Formation depths for the Beech Creek Limestone, Ste. Genevieve Limestone and New Albany Shale in all of the oil producing region of Illinois have been calculated and entered into a digital database. Digital contoured structure maps have been constructed, edited and added to the ILoil website as map layers. This technology/methodology addresses the long-standing constraints related to information access and data management in Illinois by significantly simplifying the laborious process that industry presently must use to identify underdeveloped pay zones in Illinois.

  6. No corrosion caused by coal chlorine found in AFBC pilot scale tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, K.; Pan, W.P.; Riley, J.T.; Liu, K.; Smith, S.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements of deposition and corrosion were made in the freeboard of a 3 m inner diameter pilot scale atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) during seven 1,000-hours tests using coals with chlorine (Cl) contents ranging from 0.026% up to 0.47% and sulfur contents ranging from 0.897{approximately}4.4%. Uncooled coupons of alloys 304, 309, 347 and a cooled tube of A210C medium carbon steel were exposed to the hot flue gases to investigate the effects of different coal compositions on deposition and corrosion behavior, if any. The uncooled coupons were installed at the tope of the freeboard to simulate the superheater tube conditions (1,020--1,100 F surface temperature), while the temperature of the cooled A210C test tube was controlled to match the conditions of the evaporator tubes. Specimens were removed for examination after 250, 500, 750, 1,000 hours of exposure and analyzed for deposit formation and corrosion. No chlorine was found in the corrosion scale or on the metal surfaces after any of the tests. High sulfur contents were found in the outer parts of the deposits, and appeared to be associated with calcium and magnesium suggesting that the fly ash may react further after being deposited on the surface of the metal. It was concluded that the limestone bed in the AFBC not only can capture the sulfur but also can effectively capture chlorine. This effect helps being the Cl in the AFBC flue gas down to a level of <50 ppm which is significantly lower than the 300{approximately}400 ppm expected from combustion of the coal in the absence of limestone. This reduction in chlorine species in the gas phase has possible implications for decreased corrosion problems not only in the freeboard, but also in the cold end of the boiler. No evidence was found in these tests that metal wastage or corrosion was accelerated, either directly or indirectly, by chlorine in the coal.

  7. Characterization of subsidence over multiple-lift longwall panels. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    This report presents the methodology and procedures utilized in installing and removing a surface subsidence monitoring net in remote, rugged, alpine terrain. Work on this project was performed by Mine Subsidence Engineering Company (MSE) and funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The original contract (73-month duration) called for the installation and monitoring of a surface subsidence net suitable for the characterization of subsidence over multiple lift longwall panels. However, because of DOE contract modifications, actual project work involved only the installation, baseline surveys, and subsequent removal of the subsidence monitoring net during the 24-month contract period. These activities are described herein, as well as the required permitting process. This report describes a successful methodology for permitting, installing and removing a surface subsidence monitoring net under conditions typical of those faced by many operators in the western US. This work was performed above Mid-Continent Resources' L.S. Wood No. 3 Mine, in Coal Basin, Pitkin and Gunnison Counties, Colorado, approximately five miles west of the town of Redstone.

  8. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNATURES IN BLACK HOLE FORMING CORE COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerd-Durn, Pablo; DeBrye, Nicolas; Aloy, Miguel A.; Font, Jos A.; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2013-12-20

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of collapsing stellar cores. Our initial model consists of a low metallicity rapidly-rotating progenitor which is evolved in axisymmetry with the latest version of our general relativistic code CoCoNuT, which allows for black hole formation and includes the effects of a microphysical equation of state (LS220) and a neutrino leakage scheme to account for radiative losses. The motivation of our study is to analyze in detail the emission of gravitational waves in the collapsar scenario of long gamma-ray bursts. Our simulations show that the phase during which the proto-neutron star (PNS) survives before ultimately collapsing to a black hole is particularly optimal for gravitational wave emission. The high-amplitude waves last for several seconds and show a remarkable quasi-periodicity associated with the violent PNS dynamics, namely during the episodes of convection and the subsequent nonlinear development of the standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). By analyzing the spectrogram of our simulations we are able to identify the frequencies associated with the presence of g-modes and with the SASI motions at the PNS surface. We note that the gravitational waves emitted reach large enough amplitudes to be detected with third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope within a Virgo Cluster volume at rates ? 0.1yr{sup 1}.

  9. Alternative Passive Decay-Heat Systems for the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2006-07-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a low-pressure, liquid-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The high-temperature (950 deg C) variant is defined as the liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR). The AHTR has the same safety goals and uses the same graphite-matrix coated particle fuel as do modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. However, the large AHTR power output [2400 to 4000 MW(t)] implies the need for a different type of passive decay-heat removal system. Because the AHTR is a low-pressure, liquid-cooled reactor like sodium-cooled reactors, similar types of decay-heat-removal systems can be used. Three classes of passive decay heat removal systems have been identified: the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system which is similar to that proposed for the General Electric S-PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor; the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system, which is similar to that used in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II; and a new pool reactor auxiliary cooling system. These options are described and compared. (author)

  10. Micelle-induced depletion interaction and resultant structure in charged colloidal nanoparticle system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-04-28

    The evolution of the interaction and the resultant structure in the mixed system of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactant decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10), undergoing phase separation, have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. The measurements have been carried out for a fixed concentration of nanoparticle (1?wt.?%) with varying concentration of surfactant (0 to 1?wt.?%), in the absence and presence of an electrolyte. It is found that the micelles of non-ionic surfactant adsorb on the nanoparticle in the absence of electrolyte (form stable system), whereas these micelles become non-adsorbing in the presence of electrolyte (show phase separation). The phase separation arises because of C12E10 micelles, causing depletion interaction between nanoparticles and leading to their aggregation. The interaction is modeled by double Yukawa potential accounting for attractive depletion as well as repulsive electrostatic forces. Both the interactions (attraction and repulsion) are found to be of long-range. The nanoparticle aggregation (phase separation) is governed by the increase in the magnitude and the range of the depletion attraction with the increase in the surfactant concentration. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are quite large in size (order of micron) and are characterized by the surface fractal having simple cubic packing of nanoparticles within the aggregates.

  11. Modified rubisco large subunit n-methyltransferase useful for targeting molecules to the active-site vicinity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houtz, Robert L. (Lexington, KY)

    2012-03-20

    The present invention generally relates to a modified Rubisco large subunit .sup..epsilon.N-Methyltransferase (Rubisco LSMT, or RLSMT). The present invention also relates to a modified RLSMT-carbonic anhydrase (RLSMT-CA). This modified RLSMT-CA improves the efficiency of the reduction of CO.sub.2 during photosynthesis, which may increase plant growth rates. The present invention also relates to nucleic acids encoding the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT. Also, the present invention relates to cells including the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT, plants containing the modified RLSMT-CA or modified RLSMT, and methods using compositions of the present invention. In addition, the present invention relates to antibodies conjugated to CA which may bind to Rubisco, and antibodies which bind a modified RLSMT-CA. The invention also relates to modified forms of the LS and SS of Rubisco where the modified forms are fusions with CA or biologically active fragments thereof. The present invention provides methods of altering Rubisco carboxylase activity and altering plant growth.

  12. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  13. Development of COTS ADC SEE Test System for the ATLAS LArCalorimeter Upgrade

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Xue -Ye; Chen, Hu -Cheng; Chen, Kai; Mead, Joseph; Liu, Shu -Bin; An, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Radiation-tolerant, high speed, high density and low power commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are planned to be used in the upgrade to the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter front end (FE) trigger readout electronics. Total ionization dose (TID) and single event effect (SEE) are two important radiation effects which need to be characterized on COTS ADCs. In our initial TID test, Texas Instruments (TI) ADS5272 was identified to be the top performer after screening a total 17 COTS ADCs from different manufacturers with dynamic range and sampling rate meeting the requirements of the FE electronics. Another interesting feature of ADS5272more » is its 6.5 clock cycles latency, which is the shortest among the 17 candidates. Based on the TID performance, we have designed a SEE evaluation system for ADS5272, which allows us to further assess its radiation tolerance. In this paper, we present a detailed design of ADS5272 SEE evaluation system and show the effectiveness of this system while evaluating ADS5272 SEE characteristics in multiple irradiation tests. According to TID and SEE test results, ADS5272 was chosen to be implemented in the full-size LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) demonstrator, which will be installed on ATLAS calorimeter during the 2014 Long Shutdown 1 (LS1).« less

  14. The tunneling solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a square-potential barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elci, A.; Hjalmarson, H. P.

    2009-10-15

    The exact tunneling solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation with a square-potential barrier are derived using the continuous symmetry group G{sub S} for the partial differential equation. The infinitesimal generators and the elements for G{sub S} are represented and derived in the jet space. There exist six classes of wave functions. The representative (canonical) wave functions for the classes are labeled by the eigenvalue sets, whose elements arise partially from the reducibility of a Lie subgroup G{sub LS} of G{sub S} and partially from the separation of variables. Each eigenvalue set provides two or more time scales for the wave function. The ratio of two time scales can act as the duration of an intrinsic clock for the particle motion. The exact solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation presented here can produce tunneling currents that are orders of magnitude larger than those produced by the energy eigenfunctions. The exact solutions show that tunneling current can be quantized under appropriate boundary conditions and tunneling probability can be affected by a transverse acceleration.

  15. Rolling Process Modeling Report: Finite-Element Prediction of Roll Separating Force and Rolling Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

    2014-04-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum (U-10Mo) alloy plate-type fuel for the U.S. high-performance research reactors. This work supports the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative. This report documents modeling results of PNNLs efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll separating forces and rolling defects. Simulations were performed using a finite-element model developed using the commercial code LS-Dyna. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel have been conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll-pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. This report discusses various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., dog-boning and thickness non-uniformity).

  16. Simulation for analysis and control of superplastic forming. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Aramayo, G.A.; Simunovic, S.; Ludtka, G.M.; Khaleel, M.; Johnson, K.I.; Smith, M.T.; Van Arsdale, G.L.; Lavender, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    A joint study was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy-Lightweight Materials (DOE-LWM) Program. the purpose of the study was to assess and benchmark the current modeling capabilities with respect to accuracy of predictions and simulation time. Two modeling capabilities with respect to accuracy of predictions and simulation time. Two simulation platforms were considered in this study, which included the LS-DYNA3D code installed on ORNL`s high- performance computers and the finite element code MARC used at PNL. both ORNL and PNL performed superplastic forming (SPF) analysis on a standard butter-tray geometry, which was defined by PNL, to better understand the capabilities of the respective models. The specific geometry was selected and formed at PNL, and the experimental results, such as forming time and thickness at specific locations, were provided for comparisons with numerical predictions. Furthermore, comparisons between the ORNL simulation results, using elasto-plastic analysis, and PNL`s results, using rigid-plastic flow analysis, were performed.

  17. Design and Construction of the NSTX Bakeout, Cooling and Vacuum Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Dudek; M. Kalish; R. Gernhardt; R.F. Parsells; W. Blanchard

    1999-11-01

    This paper will describe the design, construction and initial operation of the NSTX bakeout, water cooling and vacuum systems. The bakeout system is designed for two modes of operation. The first mode allows heating of the first wall components to 350 degrees C while the external vessel is cooled to 150 degrees C. The second mode cools the first wall to 150 degrees C and the external vessel to 50 degrees C. The system uses a low viscosity heat transfer oil which is capable of high temperature low pressure operation. The NSTX Torus Vacuum Pumping System (TVPS) is designed to achieve a base pressure of approximately 1x10 (superscript -8) Torr and to evacuate the plasma fuel gas loads in less than 5 minutes between discharges. The vacuum pumping system is capable of a pumping speed of approximately 3400 l/s for deuterium. The hardware consists of two turbo molecular pumps (TMPs) and a mechanical pump set consisting of a mechanical and a Roots blower pump. A PLC is used as the control system to provide remote monitoring, control and software interlock capability. The NSTX cooling water provides chilled, de ionized water for heat removal in the TF, OH and PF, power supplies, bus bar systems, and various diagnostics. The system provides flow monitoring via a PLC to prevent damage due to loss of flow.

  18. Electroresistance and field effect studies on manganite based heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, P. S.; Khachar, Uma; Vagadia, Megha; Ravalia, Ashish; Katba, Savan; Kuberkar, D. G.

    2015-04-14

    Electronic properties of manganites are significantly important for various spintronic applications such as microelectronics, magnetic data storage, communication technologies, and memory devices. Influence of applied electric field on the room temperature charge transport in ZnO/La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/SrNb{sub 0.002}Ti{sub 0.998}O{sub 3} (SNTO) heterostructure has been investigated using field effect studies. Large negative and positive electroresistance has been observed in heterostructure under various possible circuit geometries. Field effect studies have been carried out using three different circuit geometries, namely: (i) ZnO as a control electrode (E{sub LZ}), (ii) SNTO as a control electrode (E{sub LS}), and (iii) shorted ZnO and SNTO as control electrodes (E{sub LZS}). For this, channel electric field (E{sub CH}) dependent variation in channel resistance (R{sub C}) (of manganite channel) and I-V (across manganite channel) under various control fields (E{sub C}) have been studied. Variation in barrier height (Φ{sub B}) with control field (E{sub C}) for different geometries has been discussed.

  19. Springback Prediction on Slit-Ring Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xiaoming; Shi, Ming F.; Ren Feng; Xia, Z. Cedric

    2005-08-05

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are increasingly being used in the automotive industry to reduce vehicle weight while improving vehicle crash performance. One of the concerns in manufacturing is springback control after stamping. Although computer simulation technologies have been successfully applied to predict stamping formability, they still face major challenges in springback prediction, particularly for AHSS. Springback analysis is very complicated and involves large deformation problems in the forming stage and mechanical multiplying effect during the elastic recovery after releasing a part from the die. Therefore, the predictions are very sensitive to the simulation parameters used. It is very critical in springback simulation to choose an appropriate material model, element formulation and contact algorithm. In this study, a springback benchmark test, the slit ring cup, is used in the springback simulation with commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) software, LS-DYNA. The sensitivity of seven simulation variables on springback predictions was investigated, and a set of parameters with stable simulation results was identified. Final simulations using the selected set of parameters were conducted on six different materials including two AHSS steels, two conventional high strength steels, one mild steel and an aluminum alloy. The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements for all six materials and a favorable result is achieved. Simulation errors as compared against test results falls within 10%.

  20. Springback Reduction in Stamping of Front Side Member with a Response Surface Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Jung-Han; Huh, Hoon; Kim, Se-Ho; Park, Sung-Ho

    2005-08-05

    Springback is a common phenomenon in sheet metal forming since the elastic recovery of the internal stresses is induced after removal of the tooling. The numerical analysis of springback is a complicated time-consuming job and its result is greatly effected by a type of the yield function, finite elements used and the constraint condition for eliminating a rigid body motion. In this paper, optimization of the draw-bead force is carried out utilizing the response surface method in order to reduce springback and improve shape accuracy of a deep drawn product. In the optimization process, the tendency of springback is evaluated qualitatively without springback simulation usually done with the implicit solving scheme. Instead of springback simulation, the amount of stress deviation along the thickness direction in the deep drawn product is used as an indicator of springback. The stamping process is analyzed for a front side member formed with advanced high strength steel (AHSS) sheets such as DP60. The analysis procedure fully covers the binder-wrap, stamping, trimming and springback processes with the commercial elasto-plastic finite element code LS-DYNA 3D. The effect of the restraining force of draw-beads is confirmed with the decreased stress deviation. The analysis result shown in the final springback simulation demonstrates that the present analysis provides a guideline for controlling the evolution of springback based on the finite element simulation of complicated auto-body members.