Sample records for lime kiln alumina

  1. Wood Residues as Fuel Source for Lime Kilns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azarniouch, M. K.; Philp, R. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    product discharge end of the lime kiln. Thus far we have carried out two series of tests using two different pilot-scale kilns and dry limestone in the first test series and mill produced lime mud in the second test series. Mill scale trials have just been...

  2. Wood Residues as Fuel Source for Lime Kilns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azarniouch, M. K.; Philp, R. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main obstacles to total energy self sufficiency of kraft mills appears to be the fossil fuel requirements of the lime kilns. If an economical technology can be developed which allows fossil fuel to be replaced in whole or in part by wood...

  3. Control of Lime Kiln Heat Balance is Key to Reduced Fuel Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramm, D. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the various heat loads in a pulp mill lime sludge kiln, pointing out which heat loads cannot be reduced and which heat loads can, and how a reduction in energy use can be achieved. In almost any existing rotary lime sludge...

  4. A cement kiln flue-dust evaluated as a soil liming material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacha, Raimund

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CEMENT KILN FLUE-DUST EVALUATED AS A SOIl LIMING MATERIAL A Thesis by RAIMUND STACHA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE 1973 NJSbj t...:~StlCh tt A CEMENT KILN FLUE-DUST EVALUATED AS A SOIL I IMING MATERIAL A Thesis by RAIMUND STACHA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Me er) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) 1973 ABSTRACT A...

  5. Cement kiln flue dust as a source of lime and potassium in four East Texas soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, Warren David

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (18) a 5. 3 (84) a 4. 8 (76) a 4. 2 (66) a 3. 8 (61) a 5. 2 (82) a 4. 1 (64) a 5. 0 (80) a *Duncan's Multiple Range Test. ? = . 05. Differences in yield due to rate of applied lime material followed by the same letter are not significantly...CEMENT KILN FLUE DUST AS A SOURCE OF LIME AND POTASSIUM IN FOUR EAST TEXAS SOILS A Thesis by WARREN DAVID POOLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  6. Lime kiln source characterization: Lime manufacturing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toney, M.L.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this testing program is to obtain uncontrolled and controlled hydrogen chloride (HCl) and speciated hydrocarbon Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) emissions data from lime production plants to support a national emission standard for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP). This report presents data from the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. FTIR source testing was conducted for the following purposes: Quantify HCl emission levels; and Gather screening (i.e., qualitative) data on other HAP emissions.

  7. Control of Lime Kiln Heat Balance is Key to Reduced Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramm, D. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kiln, it is possible to save hundreds of thousands of dollars in fuel annually by paying attention to the proper operating details....

  8. A cement kiln flue-dust evaluated as a soil liming material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacha, Raimund

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production. The present lime study includes several of the predominate acid soil types in Texas. They should aid in furnishing soil testing laboratories with information which would facilitate better lime recommendations to Texas farmers as well... not determined. The present studies which include several of the predominate acid soil types in Texas should evaluate the usefulness of this local material as well as to further lime research in Texas to benefit soil test recommendations. 14 MATERIALS...

  9. Solar heated rotary kiln

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shell, Pamela K. (Tracy, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar heated rotary kiln utilized for decomposition of materials, such as zinc sulfate. The rotary kiln has an open end and is enclosed in a sealed container having a window positioned for directing solar energy into the open end of the kiln. The material to be decomposed is directed through the container into the kiln by a feed tube. The container is also provided with an outlet for exhaust gases and an outlet for spent solids, and rests on a tiltable base. The window may be cooled and kept clear of debris by coolant gases.

  10. Sugarcane juice extraction and preservation, and long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granda Cotlear, Cesar Benigno

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    New technologies, such as an efficient vapor-compression evaporator, a stationary lime kiln (SLK), and the MixAlco process, compelled us to re-evaluate methods for producing sugar from cane. These technologies allow more water and lime to be used...

  11. Rotary kiln seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotary seal used to prevent the escape of contaminates from a rotating kiln incinerator. The rotating seal combines a rotating disc plate which is attached to the rotating kiln shell and four sets of non-rotating carbon seal bars housed in a primary and secondary housing and which rub on the sides of the disc. A seal air system is used to create a positive pressure in a chamber between the primary and secondary seals to create a positive air flow into the contaminated gas chamber. The seal air system also employs an air inlet located between the secondary and tertiary seals to further insure that no contaminates pass the seal and enter the external environment and to provide makeup air for the air which flows into the contaminated gas chamber. The pressure exerted by the seal bars on the rotating disc is controlled by means of a preload spring. The seal is capable of operating in a thermally changing environment where the both radial expansion and axial movement of the rotating kiln do not result in the failure of the seal.

  12. Solar-heated rotary kiln

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shell, P.K.

    1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar heated rotary kiln utilized for decomposition of materials, such as zinc sulfate is disclosed. The rotary kiln has an open end and is enclosed in a sealed container having a window positioned for directing solar energy into the open end of the kiln. The material to be decomposed is directed through the container into the kiln by a feed tube. The container is also provided with an outlet for exhaust gases and an outlet for spent solids, and rests on a tiltable base. The window may be cooled and kept clear of debris by coolant gases.

  13. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  14. Influence of the composition of cement kiln dust on its interaction with fly ash and slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaunsali, Piyush, E-mail: chaunsa2@illinois.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Peethamparan, Sulapha, E-mail: speetham@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699 (United States)] [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cement kiln dust (CKD), a by-product of the cement industry, contains significant amounts of alkali, free lime, chloride and sulfate. Wide variation reported in the chemical composition of CKDs limits their potential application as a sustainable binder component in concrete. In the current study, the performance of two different CKDs as components in a novel binder is evaluated. Several binders are developed by blending CKDs with fly ash or slag. Binders with 70% CKD were prepared at a water-to-binder ratio of 0.4, and heat-cured at 75 °C to accelerate the strength development. The hydration progress was monitored using X-ray diffraction, and morphological examination was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ettringite and calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) were identified as the main hydration products in the hardened binder system. Strength development of CKD-based binder was found to be significantly influenced by its free lime and sulfate contents. -- Highlights: •Interaction of cement kiln dust with fly ash and slag was explored. •CKD with higher free lime and sulfate content increased the strength of binder. •C-S-H like reaction gel with fibrillar morphology is observed in CKD-based binders.

  15. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a vertical shaft kiln at another cement manufacturingrotary kiln or vertical shaft kiln in a cement plant. Baseda vertical shaft kiln (VSK) at another cement manufacturing

  16. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  17. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi\t, Gibran L

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of MAT in the US lime industry. This estimate showed that 7.3 TBTU/year could be saved, with reduction of 270 MMlbs of CO2 emissions, and $29 MM/year in economic savings. Taking into account estimates for MAT implementation in the US cement industry, an additional 39 TBTU/year, 3 Blbs of CO2 and $155 MM/year could be saved. One of the main remaining barriers to commercialization of MAT for the lime and cement industries is the sheer size of production. Through this project, it was realized that a production size MAT rotary calciner was not feasible, and a different approach was adapted. The concept of a microwave post heat section located in the upper portion of the cooler was devised and appears to be a more realistic approach for MAT implementation. Commercialization of this technology will require (1) continued pilot scale calcining demonstrations, (2) involvement of lime kiln companies, and (3) involvement of an industrial microwave equipment provider. An initial design concept for a MAT post-heat treatment section was conceived as a retrofit into the cooler sections of existing lime rotary calciners with a 1.4 year payback. Retrofitting will help spur implementation of this technology, as the capital investment will be minimal for enhancing the efficiency of current rotary lime kilns. Retrofits would likely be attractive to lime manufacturers, as the purchase of a new lime kiln is on the order of a $30 million dollar investment, where as a MAT retrofit is estimated on the order of $1 million. The path for commercialization lies in partnering with existing lime kiln companies, who will be able to implement the microwave post heat sections in existing and new build kilns. A microwave equipment provider has been identified, who would make up part of the continued development and commercialization team.

  18. JV Task-Long-Kiln NOx Reduction Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Folkedahl; Joshua Strege; Darren Schmidt; Lingbu Kong

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field sampling was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at two Lafarge North America cement kiln locations in Canada. Emissions including SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and particulate were measured and reported at various locations throughout the kilns. At each site data were collected on two kilns during field sampling. However, only Kiln 1 at the Ravena site was utilized for modeling efforts. Experimental work was then conducted to estimate the effectiveness of various NO{sub x} control techniques on limiting both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions in cement kiln exhaust. Theory-based models were constructed to estimate both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions from cement kilns. These models were then applied to estimating the impact of various NO{sub x} control strategies on kiln exhaust emissions. The sulfur model constructed as part of this work was successful at predicting SO{sub 2} emissions and sulfur capture in the Alpena kiln. This model is designed to run as a postprocessing step that uses the output of a NO{sub x} model as input. With an accurate NO{sub x} model, the sulfur model may prove to be a valuable tool in estimating the impact of kiln modifications on sulfur emissions. The NO{sub x} model was also applied to model several operating scenarios on three of Lafarge's kilns: Alpena 20/21, Alpena 22/23, and Ravena 1. The predictions of the flue gas temperature at the kiln feed end, the kiln shell heat loss, the quality of clinker, and the excess O{sub 2} in the flue gas are consistent with the audit data. The developed simulation tool in this project has proven to be an effective way to investigate the NO{sub x} emissions, to optimize kiln performance, and to assess changes in operating condition on kiln performance.

  19. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    BCR National Laboratory (BCRNL) has initiated a project aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using a rotary kiln, suitably modified, to burn Pennsylvania anthracite wastes, co-fired with high-sulfur bituminous coal. Limestone will be injected into the kiln for sulfur control, to determine whether high sulfur capture levels can be achieved with high sorbent utilization. The principal objectives of this work are: (1) to prove the feasibility of burning anthracite refuse, with co-firing of high-sulfur bituminous coal and with limestone injection for sulfur emissions control, in a rotary kiln fitted with a Universal Energy International (UEI) air injector system; (2) to determine the emissions levels of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} and specifically to identify the Ca/S ratios that are required to meet New Source Performance Standards; (3) to evaluate the technical and economic merits of a commercial rotary kiln combustor in comparison to fluidized bed combustors; and, (4) to ascertain the need for further work, including additional combustion tests, prior to commercial application, and to recommend accordingly a detailed program towards this end.

  20. The Needs of Texas Soils for Lime.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Agriculture. STS PAGE ............................................. What lime does 5 ............................................. Acidity of soils 7 ............................................. Sources of lime 8... of Texas soils for lime, as far as our present information permits. WHST LIME DOES Lime performs sereral functions in the soil, some of which are favor- able to increased crops and the maintenance of fertility, some favorable to certain crops...

  1. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lime Association (NLA), representing approximately 95% of U.S. commercial lime production, is very pleased to submit this letter in response to President Bush's challenge to...

  3. Cement kiln flue dust as a source of lime and potassium in four East Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, Warren David

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design on both sites. Yield, soil pH, plant and soil concentrations of K, Ca, and Mg were determined. Soil pH and extractable Ca increased with increasing rate of flue dust or calcite. Under field conditions, flue dust compared favorably with calcite... was similar to plant uptake from corresponding calcite + KC1 treatments. Soil pH and extractable soil K, Ca, and Mg increased with increased rate of flue dust treatment equally as well as from the corresponding calcite treatments. The flue dust was equal...

  4. Sulfate Induced Heave: Addressing Ettringite Behavior in Lime Treated Soils and in Cementitious Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochyil Sasidharan Nair, Syam Kumar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , due to the formation of expansive minerals like ettringite and thaumasite, has been recognized as a problem in Portland cement concrete, stabilized soils, weathered cements, alkaline fly ashes, FGD wastes, chromite ore processing residues and cement... moles of Ca2+, 2 moles of Al3+, 3 moles of SO42-, and 32 moles of water are required. Calcium ions are provided by lime, Portland cement, or fly ash; alumina is supplied by dissolution of oxyhydroxides and phyllosilicates; and sulfates are supplied...

  5. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  6. Effects of Lime and Carbonate of Lime on Acid Phosphate. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1917-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    question whether part of the readion does not take place in the filter paper, when the fertilizer is being washed with water to re- move the water-soluble phosphoric acid. To test this, we mixed carbonate of lime with acid phosphate and determined... EXPERIMENTS. We made some pot experiments to test the effect of lime on acid phosphate, but we are not altogether ea'tisfied with the mgy some of these crops grew. Details: Soils 3653, 4643, 4580, 4596, 4581, 4589, 4591. Additions : Ac 1 gram acid...

  7. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  8. The use of scrap tires in rotary cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumenthal, M. [Scrap Tire Management Council, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of scrap tires as a supplemental fuel in the United States Portland cement industry has increased significantly in the past six years. In 1990, there were two kilns using tire-derived fuel (TDF), today 30 kilns use TDF. The outlook for continued and expanded use of TDF in the U.S. cement industry should be considered favorable, with 15 kilns conducting tests to determine TDF`s applicability or in the permitting process. The Council`s estimates are that by the end of 1996, the cement industry could be consuming some 75-100 million of the 253 million annually generated scrap tires in the United States. This level of TDF usage will make the cement industry the largest market segments for scrap tires in the United States. While the long-term outlook is at present positive, there are a series of factors that have, and will likely continue to adversely impact the near-term usage of TDF. These issues, as well as the factors that are likely to positively impact the cement kiln TDF market are the subject of this presentation.

  9. The Needs of Texas Soils for Lime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1919-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drill or a lime spreader. Lime spreaders are sold by manufacturers of agricul- tural implements. Stone lime niay be placed in piles on the ground, covered with earth. allotred to .slake, and then spread, but this is not a very good method. The best..., clays and clay loams of East 1 Texas ancl the gulf coast section which experiments have shown to be acid. The chemist of tPfe Texas Experiment Station will test samples for aciclity free of charge. .As a rule, 1000 pounds per acre of lime-, stone...

  10. Structure of ?-Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding Of Transition Alumina Phases. Structure of -Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding Of Transition Alumina Phases....

  11. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Resources and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations National Lime Association The National Lime Association is the trade association for U.S. and Canadian manufacturers of high calcium quicklime, dolomitic...

  12. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrated lime to clay soils is one of the most common methods of soil stabilization. However, when sulfates are present in the soil, the calcium in the lime reacts with the sulfates to form ettringite, an expandable mineral...

  13. Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

  14. Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

  15. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Association (NLA) is pleased to report that between 2002 and 2008, the energy-related CO2 intensity of lime produced by NLA member companies has been reduced by an aggregate 5%....

  17. Combined archaeomagnetic and thermoluminescence study of a brick kiln excavated at Fontanetto Po (Vercelli, Northern Italy)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    : Rescue excavation Archaeomagnetism Thermoluminescence dating Kiln Italy a b s t r a c t A combined 1511 to 1614 AD, and a second one from 1768 to 1872 AD. Thermoluminescence (TL) study has been also perCombined archaeomagnetic and thermoluminescence study of a brick kiln excavated at Fontanetto Po

  18. Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Accepted Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary Date: 22 January 2014 Please cite this article as: L.G. Lauredan, H. Florian, D. Jean, A wall heat;1 A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled- rotary kilns with secondary air flow and recycled

  19. Method and apparatus for maximizing throughput of indirectly heated rotary kilns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Ralph L; Smoot, L. Douglas; Hatfield, Kent E

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for achieving improved throughput capacity of indirectly heated rotary kilns used to produce pyrolysis products such as shale oils or coal oils that are susceptible to decomposition by high kiln wall temperatures is disclosed. High throughput is achieved by firing the kiln such that optimum wall temperatures are maintained beginning at the point where the materials enter the heating section of the kiln and extending to the point where the materials leave the heated section. Multiple high velocity burners are arranged such that combustion products directly impact on the area of the kiln wall covered internally by the solid material being heated. Firing rates for the burners are controlled to maintain optimum wall temperatures.

  20. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Final report, March 15, 1990--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  1. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: GHG Inventory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Inventory Protocols Read the CO2 Emissions Calculation Protocol for the Lime industry (PDF 229 KB) Download Acrobat Reader...

  2. acid lime plants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acid lime plants First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Effects of Lime and Carbonate of Lime...

  3. Sulfate induced heave in lime stabilized soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bredenkamp, Sanet

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The electrical conductivity is then related to sulfate content in soils. Expansion tests were performed to determine the amount of expansion that occurs when lime is added to soils with different sulfate contents. A model that relates the amount of expansion...

  4. Effects of lime rate, lime ECCE, and B rate on rose clover and coastal bermudagrass dry matter yields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villavicencio Batres, Rodolfo

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that soil pH was only affected by lime rate at the soil surface after 5 months, indicates that CaCO3 andior the dissolution products of CaCO3 did not readily leach through the soil profile when the lime was surface applied. Lime ECCE Effects Soil pH (0...EFFECTS OF LIME RATE, LIME ECCE, AND B RATE ON ROSE CLOVER AND COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS DRY MATTER YIELDS A Thesis by RODOLFO VILLAVICENCIO BATRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfiliment...

  5. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air coefficient A summary of heat supply and use reported inmore than 25% of total heat supply to the kiln. Chemically

  6. LimeAmps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan City Yujiang RiverLijiangLimeAmps Jump to:

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alumina silica-alumina etude Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 (2004) 681686 PII: S0960-1317(04)71691-5 Summary: for silica, alumina, and titania aerogels. Silica and alumina aerogel cantilevers are fabricated on the basis... Silica Silica...

  8. Lime slurry use at the Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, L.E. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Kansas City, MO (United States). Kansas City Div.; Hughes, R.W. [Professional Services Group, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baggett, G. [Genex/Praxair, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of lime slurry at the IWPF demonstrated many benefits. Hazardous chemical use was reduced, solids handling was improved, water quality was enhanced and there has been a cost savings. The lime slurry also enabled the plant to begin treating the soluble oil waste, which we were not able to do in the past.

  9. Method for preparing Pb-. beta. ''-alumina ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hellstrom, E.E.

    1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic from Na-..beta..''-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  10. alumina: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    122 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  11. Synthesis of high porosity, monolithic alumina aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poco, J F; Satcher, J H; Hrubesh, L W

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many non-silica aerogels are notably weak and fragile in monolithic form. Particularly, few monolithic aerogels with densities less than 50kg/m3 have any significant strength. It is especially difficult to prepare uncracked monoliths of pure alumina aerogels that are robust and moisture stable. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis of strong, stable, monolithic, high porosity (>98% porous) alumina aerogels, using a two-step sol-gel process. The alumina aerogels have a polycrystalline morphology that results in enhanced physical properties. Most of the measured physical properties of the alumina aerogels are superior to those for silica aerogels for equivalent densities.

  12. The effect of additives on lime dissolution rates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khang, S.J.

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the previous years` studies concerning the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal by spray dryers with high sulfur coal flue gas, the work for year five included investigations of lime dissolution rates at different slaking conditions and with the effect of additives. The prominent additives that have significant effects on lime dissolution rates were tested with the mini pilot spray drying absorber to see their effects on spray drying desulfurization applications. The mechanisms of these additive effects along with the properties of hygroscopic additives have been discussed and incorporated into the spray drying desulfurization model ``SPRAYMOD-M.`` Slaking conditions are very important factors in producing high quality lime slurry in spray drying desulfurization processes. At optimal slaking conditions, the slaked lime particles are very fine (3-5{mu}m) and the slaked lime has high BET surface areas which are beneficial to the desulfurization. The slaked lime dissolution rate experiments in our study are designed to determine how much lime can dissolve in a unit time if the initial lime surface area is kept constant. The purpose of the dissolution rate study for different additives is to find those effective additives that can enhance lime dissolution rates and to investigate the mechanisms of the dissolution rate enhancement properties for these additives. The applications of these additives on spray drying desulfurization are to further verify the theory that dissolution rate is a rate limiting step in the whole spray drying desulfurization process as well as to test the feasibility of these additives on enhancing SO{sub 2} removal in spray dryers.

  13. Regeneration of lime from sulfates for fluidized-bed combustion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Middle Island, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized-bed combustor the evolving sulfur oxides are reacted with CaO to form calcium sulfate which is then decomposed in the presence of carbonaceous material, such as the fly ash recovered from the combustion, at temperatures of about 900.degree. to 1000.degree. C., to regenerate lime. The regenerated lime is then recycled to the fluidized bed combustor to further react with the evolving sulfur oxides. The lime regenerated in this manner is quite effective in removing the sulfur oxides.

  14. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August l986 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis by EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chair of Commi e) T D. eynol s (Member) Michael T. Lo necker (Member) Donald Mc...

  15. Alumina forming iron base superalloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  16. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  17. Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping. [H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, F-1 alumina, sodium fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficient removal of UF/sub 6/ from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications.

  18. Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae, and for other species. Keywords: Ocean acidification; Pacific oyster; Larval stages; Hydrated lime; Shellfish No.: 577 Title of Project: Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition

  19. Electrolytic Cell For Production Of Aluminum From Alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradford, Donald R (Underwood, WA); Barnett, Robert J. (Goldendale, WA); Mezner, Michael B. (Sandy, OR)

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolytic cell for producing aluminum from alumina having a reservoir for collecting molten aluminum remote from the electrolysis.

  20. Zinc recovery by ultrasound acid leaching of double kiln treated electric arc furnace dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrera Godinez, J.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to convert 70,000 tons a year of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust into an environmentally safe or recyclable product has encouraged studies to reclaim zinc from this waste material. Successful characterization of a double-kiln calcine, produced from EAF dust, has shown that the calcine pellets consisted mainly of zinc oxide plates with some iron oxide particles. Preliminary leaching tests using hydrochloric and sulfuric acids indicated that this calcine is suitable for selective ultrasound leaching of zinc. A factorially designed screening test using hydrochloric acid showed that ultrasound significantly lowered iron dissolution and increased zinc dissolution, thus enhancing the selective leaching of zinc. Ultrasound, temperature, air bubbling rate and acidity increased the sulfuric acid selectivity, while fluorosilicic acid was not selective. Reactor characterization through ultrasonic field measurements led to the selection of reactor and ultrasound bath, which were utilized to enhance the selectivity of a laboratory scale sulfuric acid leaching of a double-kiln treated electric arc furnace dust. Results indicated that ultrasonic leaching of this calcine is a satisfactory technique to selectively separate zinc from iron. After further iron removal by precipitation and cementation of nickel, it was possible to electrowin zinc from the leach liquor under common industrial conditions, with current efficiencies from 86% through 92% being observed. Calcine washing showed that a substantial chloride removal is possible, but fluoride ion in the electrolyte caused deposit sticking during electrowinning.

  1. Study of Alumina in Austenitic Stainless Steels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chung

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    to that of chromium; while in a corrosive environment both form a stable oxide layer to prevent critical loss of mass of the parent material. However, alumina scales have a much higher thermodynamic stability in addition to the orders of magnitude slower in growth...

  2. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Quarterly report No. 1, April 16, 1990--July 15, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    BCR National Laboratory (BCRNL) has initiated a project aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using a rotary kiln, suitably modified, to burn Pennsylvania anthracite wastes, co-fired with high-sulfur bituminous coal. Limestone will be injected into the kiln for sulfur control, to determine whether high sulfur capture levels can be achieved with high sorbent utilization. The principal objectives of this work are: (1) to prove the feasibility of burning anthracite refuse, with co-firing of high-sulfur bituminous coal and with limestone injection for sulfur emissions control, in a rotary kiln fitted with a Universal Energy International (UEI) air injector system; (2) to determine the emissions levels of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} and specifically to identify the Ca/S ratios that are required to meet New Source Performance Standards; (3) to evaluate the technical and economic merits of a commercial rotary kiln combustor in comparison to fluidized bed combustors; and, (4) to ascertain the need for further work, including additional combustion tests, prior to commercial application, and to recommend accordingly a detailed program towards this end.

  3. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Nanometric Alumina Suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuanping Li

    2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Colloidal processing is an effective and reliable approach in the fabrication of the advanced ceramic products. Successful colloidal processing of fine ceramic powders requires accurate control of the rheological properties. The accurate control relies on the understanding the influences of various colloidal parameters on the rheological properties. Almost all research done on the rheology paid less attention to the interactions of particle and solvent. However, the interactions of the particles are usually built up through the media in which the particles are suspended. Therefore, interactions of the particle with the media, the adsorbed layers on the particle surface, and chemical and physical properties of media themselves must influence the rheology of the suspension, especially for the dense suspensions containing nanosized particles. Relatively little research work has been reported in this area. This thesis addresses the rheological properties of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions, and paying more attention to the interactions between particle and solvent, which in turn influence the particle-particle interactions. Dense nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions with low viscosity were achieved by environmentally-benign fructose additives. The rheology of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions and its variation with the particle volume fraction and concentration of fructose were explored by rheometry. The adsorptions of solute (fructose) and solvent (water) on the nanometric alumina particle surfaces were measured and analyzed by TG/DSC, TOC, and NMR techniques. The mobility of water molecules in the suspensions and its variation with particle volume fractions and fructose additive were determined by the {sup 17}O NMR relaxation method. The interactions between the nanometric alumina particles in water and fructose solutions were investigated by AFM. The results indicated that a large number of water layers were physically bound on the particles' surfaces in the aqueous suspension. The viscosity of the suspension increases dramatically when the solid volume fraction exceeds 30 vol.%. The overlap of physically adsorbed water layers at this level causes the sharp increase in viscosity. Fructose molecules can weaken the interactions between the particle surfaces and water molecules, as a consequence, they release some bound water layers from the surfaces to the bulk medium. It is believed that fraction of the water that is bound by the solid surface is reduced hence becoming available for flow. The oxygen-17 relaxation time decreased with the increase of particle volume fractions in the suspension. Fructose addition increased the overall water mobility in the suspension. Only part of the alumina particle surfaces was covered with fructose molecules. This adsorption of fructose molecules on the particle surfaces increased the pH of the suspension with a concomitant decrease in {zeta}-potential of the alumina nanoparticles. The interactions between the nanometric alumina particles in water to a large extent can be explained by the DLVO theory. However, the interactions between particles in fructose solutions cannot be well described by the DLVO theory. The interaction forces (magnitude and range) as well as adhesive force and surface tension between nanometric alumina particles were decreased with the fructose concentration.

  4. Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass is one of the most promising feedstocks for producing biofuels through fermentation processes. Among lignocellulose choices, poplar wood is appealing because of high energy potential, above-average carbon mitigation potential, fast growth... KINETIC MODELING AND ASSESSMENT OF LIME PRETREATMENT OF POPLAR WOOD A Dissertation by ROCIO SIERRA RAMIREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  5. High-surface-area hydrated lime for SO2 control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; Moran, D.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States). Minerals Engineering Section)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1986, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), has been developing a process to produce high-surface-area hydrated lime (HSAHL) with more activity for adsorbing SO2 than commercially available hydrated lime. HSAHL prepared by the ISGS method as considerably higher surface area and porosity, and smaller mean particle diameter and crystallite size than commercial hydrated lime. The process has been optimized in a batch, bench-scale reactor and has been scaled-up to a 20--100 lb/hr process optimization unit (POU). Experiments have been conducted to optimize the ISGS hydration process and identify key parameters influencing hydrate properties for SO2 capture (surface area, porosity, particle size, and crystallite size). The known how is available to tailor properties of hydrated limes for specific SO2 removal applications. Pilot-scale tests conducted with the HSAHL under conditions typical of burning high-sulfur coals have achieved up to 90% SO2 capture in various DSI systems. The removal results are enough to bring most high-sulfur coals into compliance with acid rain legislation goals for the year 2000. The focus of the POU program is to generate critical engineering data necessary for the private sector to scale-up the process to a commercial level and provide estimates of the optimal cost of construction and operation of a commercial plant. ISGS is currently participating in a clean coal technology program (CCT-1) by providing 50 tons of HSAHL for a demonstration test at Illinois Power's Hennepin station in January 1993.

  6. A simple procedure to prepare spherical {alpha}-alumina powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Hongyu [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Ning Guiling [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)], E-mail: ninggl@dlut.edu.cn; Gan Zhihong; Lin Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical {alpha}-alumina powders were prepared by the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide in a hydrolysis system consisting of octanol and acetonitrile. Diverse solvents to dissolve reactant formed diverse hydrolysis systems and affected particle shape of {alpha}-alumina powders. The precursors crystallized to {gamma}-alumina at 1000 deg. C and converted to {alpha}-alumina at 1150 deg. C without intermediate phases. The particle morphology of precursor was retained after it crystallized to {alpha}-alumina. The heating rate influenced the particle shape and the state of agglomeration during calcination process. The thermal properties of the precursors were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. X-ray diffraction technique was used to confirm the conversion of crystalline phase of alumina powders from amorphous to {alpha}-phase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphologies and size of the precursors and products.

  7. Electrolytic cell for production of aluminum from alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradford, Donald R; Barnett, Robert J.; Mezner, Michael B.

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolysis of alumina dissolved in a molten salt electrolyte employing inert anode and cathodes, the anode having a box shape with slots for the cathodes.

  8. alumina core fabricated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and toughening of carbon nanotube reinforced alumina nanocomposite fabricated by Materials Science Websites Summary: Strengthening and toughening of carbon nanotube reinforced...

  9. alumina capillaries mcp: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    418 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  10. alkalized alumina process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    137 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  11. alumina untuk bahan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    126 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  12. anodic alumina membranes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    307 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  13. alumina coatings operating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    185 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  14. alumina sol addition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    262 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  15. aqueous nanometric alumina: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. Eugene 165 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  16. alumina vliyanie ionnogo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    122 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  17. alumina nanosize powders: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    226 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  18. alumina films formed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    217 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  19. anodic porous alumina: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tsaros 388 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  20. alumina zirconia composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frank 202 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  1. alumina pillared bentonite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    214 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  2. aluminas zirconias joints: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    275 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  3. alumina batteries status: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    350 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  4. anodic alumina membrane: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    307 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  5. anodic alumina formed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    234 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  6. alumina determinacion espectrografica: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    123 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  7. anodic alumina films: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    268 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  8. alumina physically loaded: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Luke M. 184 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  9. anodic alumina template: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    445 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  10. anodic alumina supported: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    240 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  11. alumina based capacitive: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caspar H. 453 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  12. anodic alumina templates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    445 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  13. aluminas sinterizadas visando: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    122 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  14. alumina scale spallation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    234 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  15. alumina zinc oxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donald L. 420 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  16. Infiltration of nickel into alumina compact by electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, Yoshihiro; Kyoda, Hideharu; Iwamoto, Takayuki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ni metal was electrodeposited into pores of an alumina compact in the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate/urea/ethylene glycol/ammonium sulfate. The Ni{sup 2+} ions in pores of the alumina compact deposited in proportion to t{sup 0.45}-t{sup 0.61} of deposition time (t) on Au electrode sputtered on the alumina surface. The deposition rate of Ni was higher for direct current than pulsed current Nickel grew dendritically in the alumina pores.

  17. Interaction potentials for alumina and molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous and liquid alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Interaction potentials for alumina and molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous and liquid for preventing crystalliza- tion and giving chemical stability and durability to a glaze, for instance. Due been identified.4 A review of these crystal structures and their pre- cursors can be found in the work

  18. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was provided by two more tubing pumps. Fluid surfaces were protected from COE contamination by a constant pressure nftrogen blanket. The reactor was operated for a period of time greater than or equal to lD hydraulic retentfon times or 7 times the ratio..., the ultra-high lime process has been proposed as a method to eliminate the constituents of chemical scale which reduce the recycle capacity of water in cooling systems. Reported herein are the results of a bench scale reactor study designed to evaluate...

  19. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Actively Brazed Alumina Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosking, F.M.; Cadden, C.H.; Stephens, J.J.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Vianco, P.V.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Alumina (94 and 99.8% grade compositions) was brazed directly to itself with gold-based active brazing alloys (ABA's) containing vanadium additions of 1,2 and 3 weight percent. The effects of brazing conditions on the joint properties were investigated. Wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, microstructure, hermeticity and tensile strength were determined. Wetting was fair to good for the ABA and base material combinations. Microanalysis identified a discontinuous Al-V-O spinel reaction product at the alumina-braze interface. Tensile strength results for 94% alumina were uniformly good and generally not sensitive to the vanadium concentration, with tensile values of 85-105 MPa. There was more variability in the 99.8% alumina strength results, with values ranging from 25-95 MPa. The highest vanadium concentration (3 wt. %) yielded the highest joint strength for the brazed 99.8% alumina. Failures in the 99.8% alumina samples occurred at the braze-alumina interface, while the 94% alumina specimens exhibited fracture of the ceramic substrate.

  20. Alumina-forming Austenitic Alloys Licensed | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAlumina and

  1. The effects of lime and amines on the aging of asphalts and recycling agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisneski, Mary Luvola

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    amounts of quick lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH),) on SHRP AAA-I and SHRP AAF-1. The second experiment was to determine the effects of three different amines and various amounts of CaO on aged SHRP AAA-I and SHRP AAF-I rejuvenated with ABM-F2, YBF-F2...

  2. Extension Bulletin E-1566 Revised September 2011 Facts About Soil Acidity and Lime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials to neutralize soil acidity. Pure calcium carbonate has a value of 100, and all other materials carbonate equivalent? Calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE) refers to the equivalent amount (pounds) of pure calcium carbonate in a ton or cubic yard of lime material. If a lime material has a NV of 85, it will have

  3. A study of the effects of repeated loadings and free water on the stability of a lime stabilized clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantos, Carl Thomas

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Sere Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Results . 9, Twe Percent Lime Triaxial Results . 10. Four Percent Lime Triaxial Results 37 37 40 LIST OF FIGURES 1. Triaxial Compression Device and Universal Testing Nachine . 2. Harvard Nlniature Compactor... Equipment 3. Typical Test Speoimens 4. Ltterberg Limits - Brasos River Clay 5. Modified JULS80 Compaction - Brasos River Clay 6. Nohr's Circles and Rupture Envelopes 7, 0 Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Test, 15 psi 45 47 48 Lateral Pressure 49 S...

  4. Removal of impurities from dry scrubbed fluoride enriched alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, L. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wedde, G. [ABB Environmental, Oslo (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pot-gas from an aluminum electrolytic cell is cleaned by a dry scrubbing process using fresh alumina as a scrubbing agent. This alumina is enriched with fluorides and trace impurities in a closed loop system with the pots. The only significant removal of the impurities is due to metal tapping. An improved technique has been developed that is more effective than earlier stripper systems. The impurity-rich fine fraction (< 10 {micro}m) of the enriched alumina is partly attached to the coarser alumina. That attachment has to be broken. Selective impact milling under special moderate conditions and air classifying have shown to be a cost effective process for the removal of impurities. For iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) about 30--70% can be removed by the separation of 0.5--1% of the alumina. Full scale tests have successfully confirmed these results.

  5. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Soda-Lime Silicate Glassmelts with Different Iron Contents Between 1100C and 1500C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Effective Thermal Conductivity of Soda-Lime Silicate Glassmelts with Different Iron Contents collected for soda- lime silicate glasses with iron content ranging from 0.008 to 1.1 wt% and temperatures, refractory walls wear more rapidly for clear glassmelts compared with colored ones.1 Soda-lime silicate glass

  6. Combination for electrolytic reduction of alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Lynnwood, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound is, a fluoride; oxide, or carbonate. The metal is nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath is employed in a combination including a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the instant bath during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum improves the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  7. INDEX OF REFRACTION OF SHOCK LOADED SODA-LIME GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, C. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185 (United States)

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Soda-lime glass (SLG) is a potential low-cost VISAR window for use at moderate shock pressures (up to 2430 GPa) where the material remains transparent. In order for SLG to be practical as a VISAR window, the correction factor, which describes the frequency correction related to the strain dependence of the refractive index, and hence the index of refraction itself, must be characterized as a function of pressure. Characterization data are reported in this paper and compared to previous results. The present data show good agreement with those of Dandekar [J. Appl. Phys. 84, 6614 (1998)] and separate study results by Gibbons and Ahrens [J. Geophys. Res. 76, 5489 (1971)] up to 7 GPa. However, at stresses over 7 GPa, marked discrepancies are evident between the present data and that of Gibbons and Ahrens. Differences in test methods may explain these discrepancies.

  8. In What Form is Lime Present in Portland Cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Claude W.

    1910-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain Si02.33a0, In his conclusions Hebuffat does not consider it of importance whether alit consists of pure Si02.3CaO or a crystalline compound of Si02.2CaO with 3a0 and an aluminate. He says the aluminate in Portland dement can­ not be Al 203.30a... Chemist follows: Si0 2, 23.20: A120 3, 8.10: P e 2 0 3 , 2.71: MgO, 1.00 S 0 3 > 1.20: CaO, 63.50. Total 100.71. On the basis of the calculation for uncombined lime given in a previous part of this paper, this cement con­ tains ? per cent...

  9. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D. (Albuquerque, NM); Stewart, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  10. A study of the rate of gain of strength in lime stabilized soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Sterling Ramsdell, Jr

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 37 ~ o ~ 4'7 APPEEDIX C. Electron Nicrographs . . . . . . . . . . . 75 LIST OF TABLES Table Page i. Cation-Exchange Capacity of Clay Minerals 15 2. Results of pH Test on Lime Treate Clay a o o o o o 3. X-Ray Diffraction Data 4... Triaxial Compressi. on Test Results 12. Triaxisl Compression Test Results 13. Triaxial Compression Test Results 14. Triaxial Compression Test Results 15. Triaxial Compression Test Results Least Squares Raw Soil. 1$ Lime Content 2$ Lime Content 4...

  11. Equations for predicting the layer stiffness moduli in pavement systems containing lime-flyash stabilized materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Shah Manzoor

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . progressive stiffening of some of the test sections. For low PI clayey soils, the optimum lime-flyash ratios for long term stiff- ness gains were found to be 0. 08 to 0. 5 using a minimum of 2C lime. For very low PI coarse sandy soils, 20 to 405 flyash... Analysis Number 3 Effect of Time on Lime-flyash Stabilized Layers . CHAPTER V. CONCLUSIONS AND RECONNENDATIONS . . . , . . . REFERENCES APPENDIX A Typical layouts and sections of Test sites . . . . . 8 Fitted Dynaflect deflections results C Results...

  12. Commercial applications of nanostructures created with ordered porous alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Brendan Christopher, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the drive from microfabrication to nanofabrication, porous alumina templates may play a key role in technological evolution. Under the right processing conditions, ordered pores can grow in anodic aluminum oxide, which ...

  13. alumina nanoparticles composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Evaluation of Composite Alumina Nanoparticle and Nitrate Eutectic Materials for use in Concentrating Solar Power Plants Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary:...

  14. alumina inlay failure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on post-CMOS MEMS processes and the methods which were used to characterize the thin film porous alumina sensing layer. The average sensitivity is approx. 15 pFRH% which is...

  15. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Aluminum-Alumina Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudlur, Pradeep

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary goal of this study is to determine the effects of processing conditions, compositions and microstructural morphologies of the constituents on the physical and thermo-mechanical properties of alumina (Al_2O_3) reinforced aluminum (Al...

  16. Wetting and strength issues at Al/alpha-alumina interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wetting behavior and strength at aluminum/alumina interfaces has been an active subject of research. Al/alumina applications include ceramic-metal composites and several applications for electronic industries. In this paper the interface strength and microstructure of Al/alpha-alumina was investigated. We discovered that in a solid-state joining, the strength of the joint increases with increasing joining temperature. In a liquid-state joining, the strength of the joint gradually decreases due to the formation of unbonded areas. The strength, sigma sub b, is expressed by the following equation as a function of unbonded area, A: sigma sub b = 2.22 A + 143 (70 percent {le} A {le} 100 percent). The highest strength reached 400 MPa when the interface was formed at around the melting temperature of aluminum. An aluminum layer close to the interface became a single crystal when it was bonded to a sapphire. The following crystallographic orientation relationship is established: (1{bar 1}1){sub Al}//(001){sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}, (110){sub Al}//<100>{sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Amorphous alumina islands were formed at the interface. In the amorphous alumina, gamma-alumina nanocrystals grew from the sapphire, with the same orientation relationship to sapphire as above.

  17. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  18. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard (Allentown, PA); Golden, Timothy Christopher (Allentown, PA); Mayorga, Steven Gerard (Allentown, PA); Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard (Bethlehem, PA); Taylor, Fred William (Allentown, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  19. Validation of the new mixture design and testing protocol for lime stabilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Fateh Ul Anam Muhammad Shafee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    describes some pertinent findings of the study. In situ properties of lime stabilized subgrades are identified based on Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) deflection measurements, Ground Penetration Radar (GPR) profiles, and Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP...

  20. Sulfate Induced Heave: Addressing Ettringite Behavior in Lime Treated Soils and in Cementitious Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochyil Sasidharan Nair, Syam Kumar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    threshold level of soluble sulfates in soils that can trigger substantial ettringite growth. The third part of this dissertation identifies alternative, probable mechanisms of swelling when sulfate laden soils are stabilized with lime. The swelling distress...

  1. Validation of the new mixture design and testing protocol for lime stabilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Fateh Ul Anam Muhammad Shafee

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and testing protocol is presented for lime stabilized subgrades. Comparison of field test data and laboratory test data shows that laboratory design test properties were achieved in the field. These properties are used in a mechanistic analysis to assess...

  2. The effect of hydrated lime on Salmonella enteritidis survival in poultry litter and poult performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanush, Deborah Denise

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of Salmonella and/or Campylobacter in poultry litter may contribute to contaminated processed carcasses. Initially in our first study, we evaluated the effect of 5, 10, or 20% added lime on in vitro survival of Salmonella enteritidis...

  3. Legume establishment, nodulation, and forage production as influenced by N, P, K fertilizers and lime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martillo Chalen, Eduardo Enrique

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LEGUME ESTABLISHMEJ'JT, NODL'LATION, AND FORAGE PRODUCTION AS INFLUE. 'JCZD BY N, P, K FERTILIZERS AND LIME A thesis by EDUARDO ENRIQUZ MARTII, 0 CHA EIJ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for tne degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Agronomy LEGUME ESTABLISHMENT, NODULATION, AND FORAGE PRODUCTION AS INFLUENCED BY N, P, K FERTILIZERS AND LIME A thesis EDUARDO ENRIQUE MARTILLO CHALEN Approved as to style...

  4. Equations for predicting the layer stiffness moduli in pavement systems containing lime-flyash stabilized materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Shah Manzoor

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EOUATIONS FOR PREDICTING THE LAYER STIFFNESS ' MODULI IN PAVEMENT SYSTEMS CONTAINING LIME-FLYASH STABILIZED MATERIALS A Thesis by SHAH MANZOOR ALAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AN University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EI)UATIONS FOR PREDICTING THE LAYER STIFFNESS MDDULI IN PAVEMENT SYSTEMS CONTAINING LIME-FLYASH STABILIZED MATERIALS A Thesis by SHAH MANZOOR ALAM Approved...

  5. Liming effects on slash pine (Pinus elliottii Englm.) seedlings growing on acid soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzner, John Thomas

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . lg Comparison of treatment means on selected soils using Duncan's New Nultiple Range Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . , 20 pH and percent exchangeable Al neutralized with lime rates based on initial exchangeable Al content...* , 842* 95. 02* . 051 . 0060 . 0001 408. 0 . 0328 Error 33 . 072 . 053 . 155 . 004 . 147 . 018 . 0033 . 0002 336. 8 . 0151 *P~ 0. 05 Table 4. ? Comparison of treatment means on selected soils using Duncan's New Multiple Range Test. Lime rate, ! Exch...

  6. AEC Lowman Station - coal switching and magnesium-enhanced lime scrubbing to lower operating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inkenhaus, W.; Babu, M.; Smith, K. [Dravo Lime Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Loper, L. [Alabama Electric Coopreative, Leroy, AL (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AEC`s Lowman Station is located in Leroy, Alabama. There are three coal-fired boilers at this station. Unit 1 is capable of generating 85 MW without a flue gas desulfurization, FGD, system. Units 2 and 3, with a total of 516 MW output capacity, are equipped with FGD systems. The FGD plant was designed for wet limestone FGD with natural oxidation. Lowman Station burned low sulfur, 1.3 to 1.8% sulfur, coal. In January of 1996 AEC switched Units 2 and 3 from limestone to magnesium-enhanced lime FGD operation. It was determined that the plant could take advantage of the higher SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of the magnesium-enhanced lime system. Major benefits resulting from this conversion were AEC`s ability to switch to a lower cost high sulfur coal while meeting the stringent SO{sub 2} emission requirements. Power cost savings resulted from the lower liquid to gas ratio required by the magnesium-enhanced lime process. Three recirculation pumps per module were reduced to a single operating pump per module, lowering the scrubber pressure drop. Significant cost reduction in the operating costs of the ball mill was realized due to modifications made to slake lime instead of grinding limestone. Prior to switching, personnel from AEC and Dravo Lime Company ran a four week test on magnesium-enhanced lime to obtain scrubber performance data including SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies on the modules while burning a 1.8% sulfur coal. This paper discusses the plant modifications that were needed to make the switch, cost justifications due to coal switching, and AEC`s operating experiences to date. AEC and Dravo Lime Company working together as a team conducted detailed cost studies, followed by extensive field tests and implemented the plant modifications. This plant continues to operate burning higher sulfur coal with the magnesium-enhanced lime FGD system.

  7. An introduction to LIME 1.0 and its use in coupling codes for multiphysics simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcourt, Noel; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Hooper, Russell Warren

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIME is a small software package for creating multiphysics simulation codes. The name was formed as an acronym denoting 'Lightweight Integrating Multiphysics Environment for coupling codes.' LIME is intended to be especially useful when separate computer codes (which may be written in any standard computer language) already exist to solve different parts of a multiphysics problem. LIME provides the key high-level software (written in C++), a well defined approach (with example templates), and interface requirements to enable the assembly of multiple physics codes into a single coupled-multiphysics simulation code. In this report we introduce important software design characteristics of LIME, describe key components of a typical multiphysics application that might be created using LIME, and provide basic examples of its use - including the customized software that must be written by a user. We also describe the types of modifications that may be needed to individual physics codes in order for them to be incorporated into a LIME-based multiphysics application.

  8. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  9. Peltier heats in cryolite melts with alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flem, B.E.; Ratkje, S.K.; Sterten, A. [Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seebeck coefficient was measured for cells with electrolytes of molten mixtures of sodium fluoride and aluminum fluoride saturated with alumina. The electrodes were either a pair of oxygen electrodes or a pair of aluminum electrodes. For the molar ratio NaF/AlF{sub 3} equal to 1.8, 1.2 and 1.0, the authors obtained the Seebeck coefficients {minus}1.80 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 971 C, {minus}1.63 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 813.6 C and {minus}0.583 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 758 C, respectively, for the oxygen electrodes. For the aluminum electrodes, the authors obtained the Seebeck coefficient {minus}1.23 mV K{sup {minus}1} at 962 C, for the molar ratio NaF/AlF{sub 3} equal to 1.8. The results suggest that there is a substantial reversible heat consumption at the anode during aluminum electrolysis and a large reversible heat production at the cathode. The highest temperature in the Hall-Heroult cell is then closer to the cathode than the anode. The transported entropies of Al{sup 3+} and O{sup 2{minus}} were calculated to be 77 J mol{sup {minus}1} K{sup {minus}1} and 10 J mol{sup {minus}1} K{sup {minus}1}, respectively, when the molar ratio NaF/AlF{sub 3} was equal to 1.0.

  10. The wetting behavior of NiAl and NiPtAl on polycrystalline alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauffier, Antoine

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alumina by nickel-aluminum alloys with or without platinumcompositions of nickel-aluminum alloys (with or without

  11. The wetting behavior of NiAl and NiPtAl on polycrystalline alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauffier, Antoine

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments of alumina by nickel-aluminium alloys andnickel-aluminium-platinum alloys with the sessile drop

  12. Hydrogen removal from e-beam deposited alumina thin films by oxygen ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Arijeet, E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Mukharjee, C., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Rajiv, K., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Bose, Aniruddha, E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, S. D., E-mail: arijeet@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, S. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Joshi, S. C.; Deb, S. K. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India); Phase, D. M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore-452017 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen interstitials and oxygen vacancies defects create energy levels in the band gap of alumina. This limits the application of alumina as a high-k dielectric. A low thermal budget method for removal of hydrogen from alumina is discussed. It is shown that bombardment of alumina films with low energy oxygen ion beam during electron beam evaporation deposition decreases the hydrogen concentration in the film significantly.

  13. Alumina-forming Austenitic Alloys for Advanced Recuperators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials selection for thin-walled recuperators has been extensively investigated over the past decade. In the latest generation of recuperated turbine engines, type 347 stainless steel has been replaced by higher alloyed steels and Ni-base chromia-forming alloys. However, high (linear) rates of chromia evaporation in exhaust gas fundamentally limits the oxidation lifetime of these chromia-forming alloys. One solution is to use alumina-forming alloys that are more resistant to this environment. The lower scale growth kinetics and resistance to evaporation in the presence of water vapor suggests an order of magnitude increase in lifetime for alumina-forming alloys. A significant problem with this strategy was the large drop in creep strength with the addition of sufficient Al to form an external alumina scale. However, new Fe-base austenitic compositions have been developed with sufficient strength for this application above 700 C.

  14. Advanced mineral calciner for regeneration of lime. Final report, March 1995--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namazian, M.; Nickeson, R.; Lovas, B.; Miller, G.; Kelly, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are approximately 800 pulp, paper and paperboard mills in the United States. Pulp and paper is the ninth largest industry in US, uses 2.8 quads of energy per year and ranks third among all domestic US industries in the cost of energy consumed. A significant fraction of the energy consumed in pulp and paper plants is needed to recover chemicals that are used in breaking down the wood chips into pulp. In particular, 0.1 quads of energy per year are used to regenerate lime. Furthermore, pulp and paper plant operations generate 9,870 tons of NOx per year. Additionally over two million tons of spent lime are sent to landfills each year. In addition, growth in paper demand and changes in plant processes (e.g., bleaching), as a result of environmental pressures, will continue to drive the need for more lime regeneration capacity. Unless the increased capacity can be delivered productively and inexpensively, the growth in pulp and paper may occur in overseas markets. Furthermore, if new environmental constraints cannot be met at low cost, existing US pulp and paper production capacity may also move off-shore. The advanced mineral calciner (AMC) technology was developed to address this lime regeneration need. Prior to describing the technology, and the program of work that was used to test the concept, conventional lime regeneration systems and their limitations are described.

  15. High vacuum indirectly-heated rotary kiln for the removal and recovery of mercury from air pollution control scrubber waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawk, G.G.; Aulbaugh, R.A. [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)] [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SepraDyne corporation (Denton, TX, US) has conducted pilot-scale treatability studies of dewatered acid plant blowdown sludge generated by a copper smelter using its recently patented high temperature and high vacuum indirectly-heated rotary retort technology. This unique rotary kiln is capable of operating at internal temperatures up to 850 C with an internal pressure of 50 torr and eliminates the use of sweep gas to transport volatile substances out of the retort. By removing non-condensables such as oxygen and nitrogen at relatively low temperatures and coupling the process with a temperature ramp-up program and low temperature condensation, virtually all of the retort off-gases produced during processing can be condensed for recovery. The combination of rotation, heat and vacuum produce the ideal environment for the rapid volatilization of virtually all organic compounds, water and low-to-moderate boiling point metals such as arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

  16. Structure of ?-Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding Of Transition Alumina Phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovarik, Libor; Bowden, Mark E.; Genc, Arda; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition Al2O3 derived from thermal decomposition of AlOOH Boehmite have complex structures and to a large extent remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed atomic level analysis of ?Al2O3 for the first time using a combination of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy imaging, XRD refinement, and DFT calculations. We show that the structure of ?Al2O3 represents a complex structural intergrowth from several crystallographic variants. The two main crystallographic variants, which are identified as ?1-Al2O3 and ?2?Al2O3, are fully structurally described. In addition, we also derive the energy of formation for ?1 and ?2-Al2O3 and the other relevant transition Al2O3 phases, and show how energetic degeneracy leads to structural disorder and complex intergrowths among several transition Al2O3. The results of the work have important implications for understanding thermodynamic stability and transformation processes in transition alumina.

  17. EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY, AND FUSARIUM WILT IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 EFFECTS OF COMPOST AND LIME APPLICATION ON SOIL CHEMICAL PROPERTIES, SOIL MICROBIAL COMMUNITY compost as an antagonistic suppression approach to combat soil-borne disease effects on crop yields the effect of compost and lime on soil chemical properties, the soil microbial community (including Fusarium

  18. A theory manual for multi-physics code coupling in LIME.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcourt, Noel; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Hooper, Russell Warren

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment (LIME) is a software package for creating multi-physics simulation codes. Its primary application space is when computer codes are currently available to solve different parts of a multi-physics problem and now need to be coupled with other such codes. In this report we define a common domain language for discussing multi-physics coupling and describe the basic theory associated with multiphysics coupling algorithms that are to be supported in LIME. We provide an assessment of coupling techniques for both steady-state and time dependent coupled systems. Example couplings are also demonstrated.

  19. Evaluation of lime-fly ash stabilized bases and subgrades using static and dynamic deflection systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raba, Gary W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structural evaluations of the subgrade and its overlying pavement layers for test sites in Texas. Six evaluations of the lime-fly ash stabilization technique, based on dual parametric results, are given in this thesis. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes... FOR TEST SITE 5 H. DFFLECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR TEST SITE 8 VITA PAGE 141 141 154 160 160 172 181 181 195 202 213 213 213 215 220 227 231 238 245 252 259 268 275 LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 10. 12. 13. 14. Lime-Fly Ash...

  20. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Joseph Wade Button, B. S. , Texas ASM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Mr. Bob M. Gallaway and Dr. Dallas N. Little A field test was conducted to evaluate the use of hydrated lime as an antistrip additive in hot mix asphalt concrete.... Lime was added in the pugmill of the batch plant, on the cold feed belt, and through the fines feeder of the drum mix plant. The asphalt and aggregates used were characterized in the laboratory. Asphalt concrete mixture tests included laboratory...

  1. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K. [Thermophysical Measurements Laboratory, Cryogenic Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  2. alumina nuclear waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alumina nuclear waste First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Nuclear magnetic resonance-based...

  3. alumina cement concrete: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: O, MgO, transient metal oxides as in Y2O3, Sc2O3, Er2O3 (Ref 1), rare-earths such as CeO, Yb2O3Phase Formation and Transformation in AluminaYSZ...

  4. The effect of hydrated lime on Salmonella enteritidis survival in poultry litter and poult performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanush, Deborah Denise

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or negative samples. At 24 or 48 h, 10/10 (100%) of untreated (control) litter samples were positive for Salmonella. Addition of lime resulted in significantly reduced Salmonella recovery incidence at 24 h. These data suggest that the addition of hydrated...

  5. An investigation of the use of lime as a soil additive to modify the detrimental effects of frost action 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnest, Clyde Talley

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF LITERATURE Lime Stabilisation . B, Frost Action . C, Lime as a Frost Modifying Soil Additive IIX PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THIS WORK IV METHOD OF TESTING A. General B. Selection of Materials C, Preliminary Tests D. Sample Preparation . E. Test Procedure... with the addition of lime . Figure 5. General view of the equipment Figure 6. Samples with insulation ready for testing Figure 7 Base plate and water reservoir shaving heat ex- 55 change coil Figure 8. Bquipment used in the preparation of samples . Figure Q...

  6. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  7. Melt processing of Bi--2212 superconductors using alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting articles and a method of forming them, where the superconducting phase of an article is Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 CaCu.sub.2 O.sub.y (Bi-2212). Alumina is combined with Bi-2212 powder or Bi-2212 precursor powder and, in order to form an intimate mixture, the mixture is melted and rapidly cooled to form a glassy solid. The glassy solid is comminuted and the resulting powder is combined with a carrier. An alternative to melting is to form the mixture of nanophase alumina and material having a particle size of less than about 10 microns. The powder, with the carrier, is melt processed to form a superconducting article.

  8. Evaluation of sulfidic mine tailings solidified/stabilized with cement kiln dust and fly ash to control acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nehdi, M.; Tariq, A. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present research, industrial byproducts, namely, cement kiln dust (CKD) and Class C fly ash (FAC) have been used as candidate materials along with the partial addition of sulfate-resistant cement (SRC) in the Stabilization/solidification of polymetallic sulfidic mine tailings (MT). The effectiveness of S/S was assessed by comparing laboratory experimental values obtained from unconfined compressive strength, hydraulic conductivity and leaching propensity tests of S/S samples with regulatory standards for safe surface disposal of such wastes. Despite general regulatory compliance of compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity, some solidified/stabilized-cured matrices were found unable to provide the required immobilization of pollutants. Solidified/stabilized and 90-day cured mine tailings specimens made with composite binders containing (10% CKD + 10% FAC), (5% SRC + 15% FAC) and (5% SRC + 5% CKD + 10% FAC) significantly impaired the solubility of all contaminants investigated and proved successful in fixing metals within the matrix, in addition to achieving adequate unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity values, thus satisfying USEPA regulations. Laboratory investigations revealed that, for polymetallic mining waste, leachate concentrations are the most critical factor in assessing the effectiveness of S/S technology.

  9. Directional solidification of the alumina-zirconia ceramic eutectic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldt, C.

    1994-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is possible to produce alumina-zirconia ceramic samples through existing solidification techniques. The resulting microstructures typically consist of rods of zirconia in an alumina matrix, although a lamellar structure has been noted in some cases. In nearly all cases, colony growth was present which may possibly result from grain size, repeated nucleation events, and lamellar oscillations. In the same vein, it appears that the amount of impurities within the system might be the underlying cause for the colony growth. Colony growth was diminished through impurity control as the higher purity samples exhibited colony free behavior. In addition to colony formations, faceted alumina dendrites or nonfaceted zirconia dendrites may result in the ceramic if the sample is solidified out of the coupled zone. In all cases, for larger-sized Bridgman samples, a lower limit in the eutectic spacing was noted. The solidification model which includes the kinetic effect has been developed, although the effect appears to be negligible under present experimental conditions. A spacing limit might also occur due to the result of heat flow problems. Heat flow out of the ceramic is difficult to control, often causing radial and not axial growth. This behavior is exaggerated in the presence of impurities. Thus, higher purity powders should always be used. Higher purity samples, in addition to yielding a more microstructurally uniform ceramic, also showed increased directionality. In the future, the kinetic model needs to be examined in more detail, and further research needs to be accomplished in the area of molten ceramics. Once better system constants are in place, the kinetic model will give a better indication of the behavior in the alumina-zirconia system.

  10. Alumina-carbon compositions and slidegate plates made therefrom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, D.S.

    1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A refractory composition consisting essentially of, for each 100 wt.% thereof, about 40 to 80 wt.% of an alumina, about 5 to 30 wt.% of a zirconia containing grain, about 2 to 10 wt.% of a carbon, and about 1 to 12 wt.% of an oxidation and erosion resistance additive that is a mixture of silicon, aluminum and at least one of silicon carbide, ferrosilicon nitride, and a combination thereof is described.

  11. Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Pe-Der

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

  12. Alumina catalysts for reduction of NOx from methanol fueled diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Toshiro; Noda, Akira; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sato, Yoshio [Ministry of Transport of Japan, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOx selective reducing catalysts are expected to be used for lean-burn gasoline engines and diesel engines as an effective NOx reduction measure. The authors are interested in the combination of methanol, as a reducing agent, and alumina catalyst, and have considered the NOx reduction method using effectively much unburned methanol. In this report, in order to investigate the effect of NOx reduction by the alumina catalyst, the experiment was carried out by feeding the actual exhaust gas from the methanol engine into the alumina catalyst. As a result, it was confirmed that, without addition of any other reducing agents into the exhaust gas, the alumina catalyst has activity to reduce NOx.

  13. agglomerate-free alumina slurry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuwen 168 Chemical Preparation of the Binary Compounds in the CalciaAlumina System by Self-Propagating Combustion Synthesis Materials Science Websites Summary: Chemical...

  14. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  15. Zinc Fertilization Plus Liming to Reduce Cadmium Uptake by Romaine Lettuce on Cd-Mineralized Lockwood Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaney, Rufus L; Green, Carrie E.; Ajwa, Husein A; Smith, Richard F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cd accumulation by lettuce from biosolids amended soils withmine waste contaminated or biosolids-amended soils with Cd:of a highly Cd enriched biosolids also found that liming

  16. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime...

  17. A comparison of alumina, carbon, and carbon-covered alumina as supports for Ni-Mo-F additives: Carbon deposition and model compound reaction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boorman, P.M.; Chong, K.; Kydd, R.A.; Lewis, J.M. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride-promoted Ni-Mo catalysts supported on alumina, carbon, and carbon-coveres alumina have been investigated for their activity in cumene cracking, hydrocracking (reduced and sulfided forms), and thiophene HDS. The carbon-covered alumina was prepared by pyrolysis of cyclohexene over either {gamma}-alumina or boehmite and the carbon deposition followed adsorption isotherm-type behavior. The cumene reaction studies indicate that the resulting support system successfully merges the properties of carbon and alumina, possessing improved dehydrogenation-hydrogenation functionality due to carbon and acidic properties due to alumina, such as the generation of Broensted acidity upon fluoride impregnation. In the thiophene HDS reaction the catalyst activities followed the order Al{sub 2} > C-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} > C, suggesting that alumina, and not carbon, is the superior HDS support at atmospheric H{sub 2} pressure and at the metal loadings used in this study. Carbon deposition onto Ni-Mo-F/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts revealed that cyclohexene polymerization is promoted by the metal centers, resulting in multilayer islands on these sites, and not by the fluoride-associated Broensted acid sites. However, the Broensted acid sites do promote coke formation when the polymerization reaction is easier such as for {alpha}-methylstyrene.

  18. Liming effects on slash pine (Pinus elliottii Englm.) seedlings growing on acid soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzner, John Thomas

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth Liming CHAPTER III. NETHODS Experimental Design Soil Treatments Greenhouse Care Laboratory Analysis Statistical Analysis . CHAPTER IV. RESULTS . Soils Exchangeable Aluminum Extractable Aluminum Exchangeable Acidity pH Calcium Page 1... growth; and under very acid conditions, phosphorus may be tied up with soluble aluminum (Shoulders and McKee, 1973). Solubility of aluminum is strongly influenced by pH and may interfere with the uptake of phosphorus and subsequent growth of southern...

  19. The Relation of Lime and Phosphoric Acid to the Growth and Bone Development of White Rats.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blum, J. K. (Joseph Kelly)

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY, A & M COLLEGE. CAMPUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BULLETIN NO. 441 DECEMBER, 1931 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Relation of Lime and Phosphoric Acid to the Growth... and Bone Development of White Rats 2 ., .t .I* .-. /.' AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS--. .. T. 0. WALTON, President ..- STATION STAFF+ ADMINISTRATION: VETERINARY SCIENCE: A B. CONNER M S. Director *M. FRANCIS, D. V. M., Chief. R: E...

  20. The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ULTRA-HIGH LIME WITH ALUMINUM PROCESS FOR REMOVING CHLORIDE FROM RECIRCULATING COOLING WATER A Dissertation by AHMED IBRAHEEM ALI ABDEL-WAHAB Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...-WAHAB Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chair of Committee) Robin L. Autenrieth (Member...

  1. Viscosity of aqueous and cyanate ester suspensions containing alumina nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawler, Katherine

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosities of both aqueous and cyanate ester monomer (BECy) based suspensions of alumina nanoparticle were studied. The applications for these suspensions are different: aqueous suspensions of alumina nanoparticles are used in the production of technical ceramics made by slip casting or tape casting, and the BECy based suspensions are being developed for use in an injection-type composite repair resin. In the case of aqueous suspensions, it is advantageous to achieve a high solids content with low viscosity in order to produce a high quality product. The addition of a dispersant is useful so that higher solids content suspensions can be used with lower viscosities. For BECy suspensions, the addition of nanoparticles to the BECy resin is expected to enhance the mechanical properties of the cured composite. The addition of saccharides to aqueous suspensions leads to viscosity reduction. Through DSC measurements it was found that the saccharide molecules formed a solution with water and this resulted in lowering the melting temperature of the free water according to classic freezing point depression. Saccharides also lowered the melting temperature of the bound water, but this followed a different rule. The shear thinning and melting behaviors of the suspensions were used to develop a model based on fractal-type agglomeration. It is believed that the structure of the particle flocs in these suspensions changes with the addition of saccharides which leads to the resultant viscosity decrease. The viscosity of the BECy suspensions increased with solids content, and the viscosity increase was greater than predicted by the classical Einstein equation for dilute suspensions. Instead, the Mooney equation fits the viscosity behavior well from 0-20 vol% solids. The viscosity reduction achieved at high particle loadings by the addition of benzoic acid was also investigated by NMR. It appears that the benzoic acid interacts with the surface of the alumina particle which may be the cause of the viscosity reduction. The flow behavior of alumina particles in water and BECy is markedly different. Aqueous alumina suspensions are shear thinning at all alumina loadings and capable of 50 vol% loading before losing fluidity whereas BECy/alumina suspensions show Newtonian behavior up to 5 vol%, and above 5 vol% show shear thinning at all shear rates. Highly loaded suspensions (i.e. 20vol% alumina) exhibit shear thinning at low and moderate shear rates and shear thickening at higher shear rates. The maximum particle loading for a fluid suspension, in this case, appears to be about 20 vol%. The difference in the viscosity of these suspensions must be related to the solvent-particle interactions for each system. The reason is not exactly known, but there are some notable differences between BECy and water. Water molecules are {approx}0.28 nm in length and highly hydrogen bonded with a low viscosity (1 mPa's) whereas in the cyanate ester (BECy) system, the solvent molecule is about 1.2 nm, in the largest dimension, with surfaces of varied charge distribution throughout the molecule. The viscosity of the monomer is also reasonably low for organic polymer precursor, about 7 mPa's. Nanoparticles in water tend to agglomerate and form flocs which are broken with the shear force applied during viscosity measurement. The particle-particle interaction is very important in this system. In BECy, the particles appear to be well dispersed and not as interactive. The solvent-particle interaction appears to be most important. It is not known exactly how the alumina particles interact with the monomer, but NMR suggests hydrogen bonding. These hydrogen bonds between the particle and monomer could very well affect the viscosity. A conclusion that can be reached in this work is that the presence of hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alumina particles is significant and seems to affect the interactions between other particles and the solvent. Thus, the hydrogen bonding between particles, particle/additive and/or particle/solvent dictates the behavior of nanos

  2. Weak bonding of alumina coatings on Ni(1 1 1) Emily A.A. Jarvis, Asbjorn Christensen, Emily A. Carter *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    Weak bonding of alumina coatings on Ni(1 1 1) Emily A.A. Jarvis, Asbjorn Christensen, Emily A a marked decrease in the work of adhesion for thicker alumina coatings. This provides a new atomic

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based study of ordered layering on the surface of alumina nanoparticles in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    Layering of water molecules on the surface of alumina nanoparticles in an alumina/water nanofluid is studied using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The data suggest that a thin ordered layer ( ? 1.4?nm) of water molecules ...

  4. D2O Adsorption on an Ultrathin Alumina Film on NiAl(110). | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D2O Adsorption on an Ultrathin Alumina Film on NiAl(110). D2O Adsorption on an Ultrathin Alumina Film on NiAl(110). Abstract: The structure of an ordered, ultra-thin Al2O3 film...

  5. Silicon carbide whisker-zirconia reinforced mullite and alumina ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flexural strength and/or fracture toughness of SiC whisker-reinforced composites utilizing mullite or alumina as the matrix material for the composite are increased by the addition of zirconia in a monoclinic or tetragonal phase to the matrix. The zirconia addition also provides for a lower hot-pressing temperature and increases the flexural strength and/or fracture toughness of the SiC whisker-reinforced composites over SiC whisker-reinforced composites of the similar matrix materials reinforced with similar concentrations of SiC whiskers.

  6. Stresses in thermally grown alumina scales near edges and corners.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimsditch, M.

    1998-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the residual stress near edges and corners of thermally grown alumina scales. Micro-fluorescence measurements, performed on alloys with composition Fe-5Cr-28Al (at.%, bal. Fe) oxidized at 900 C, showed a large (>50%) reduction in hydrostatic stress in the vicinity of edges and corners. Surprisingly, stress relaxation persists out to distances ten times the scale thickness from the edge. Finite element analysis calculations confirm the experimental results and provide a considerably more detailed picture of the stress distribution and its components.

  7. Alumina and Aluminum (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro FleetAlternativeAlumina and Aluminum

  8. ITP Aluminum: Alumina Technology Roadmap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGENDDepartmentSeptember 2009 | DepartmentAlumina

  9. Final report on DSA methods for monitoring alumina in aluminum reduction cells with cermet anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sensors Development Program was conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Processes. The work was performed in conjunction with the Inert Electrodes Program at PNL. The objective of the Sensors Development Program in FY 1990 through FY 1992 was to determine whether methods based on digital signal analysis (DSA) could be used to measure alumina concentration in aluminum reduction cells. Specifically, this work was performed to determine whether useful correlations exist between alumina concentration and various DSA-derived quantification parameters, calculated for current and voltage signals from laboratory and field aluminum reduction cells. If appropriate correlations could be found, then the quantification parameters might be used to monitor and, consequently, help control the alumina concentration in commercial reduction cells. The control of alumina concentration is especially important for cermet anodes, which have exhibited instability and excessive wear at alumina concentrations removed from saturation.

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime Institute. 2001. Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide inIndustry, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resourcesof a Cement Kiln, Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme,

  11. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Foil for Advanced Recuperators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL; Matthews, Wendy [Capstone Turbines

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion- and creep-resistant austenitic stainless steel has been developed for advanced recuperator applications. By optimizing the Al and Cr contents, the alloy is fully austenitic for creep strength while allowing the formation of a chemically stable external alumina scale at temperatures up to 900 C. An alumina scale eliminates long-term problems with the formation of volatile Cr oxy-hydroxides in the presence of water vapor in exhaust gas. As a first step in producing foil for primary surface recuperators, three commercially cast heats have been rolled to 100 m thick foil in the laboratory to evaluate performance in creep and oxidation testing. Results from initial creep testing are presented at 675 C and 750 C, showing excellent creep strength compared with other candidate foil materials. Laboratory exposures in humid air at 650 800 C have shown acceptable oxidation resistance. A similar oxidation behavior was observed for sheet specimens of these alloys exposed in a modified 65 kW microturbine for 2871 h. One composition that showed superior creep and oxidation resistance has been selected for the preparation of a commercial batch of foil. DOI: 10.1115/1.4002827

  12. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Lynnwood, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

    2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode. Removing sulfur from the bath can also minimize cathode deposits. Aluminum formed on the cathode can be removed directly from the cathode.

  13. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Lynnwood, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

    2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  14. Removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions by La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasay, Syed Abdul; Tokunaga, Shuzo [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraka (Japan); Park, S.W. [Keimyung Univ., Daegu City (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New adsorbents, La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina, were prepared for the removal of hazardous anions from aqueous solutions. A commercially available alumina was impregnated with La(III) or Y(III) ions by the adsorption process. The change in the surface charge due to the impregnation was measured by acid/base titration. The adsorption rate and the capacity of the alumina for La(III) and Y(III) ions were determined. The adsorption characteristics of the La(III)- and Y(III)-impregnated alumina and the original alumina for fluoride, phosphate, arsenate and selenite ions were analyzed under various conditions. The pH effect, dose effect, and kinetics were studied. The removal selectivity by the impregnated alumina was in the order fluoride > phosphate > arsenate > selenite. The impregnated alumina has been successfully applied for the removal of hazardous anions from synthetic and high-tech industrial wastewaters.

  15. A study of the durability of lime as a stabilizing agent of clay soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Harvey Earl

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tested for their strength in a triaxLal testing 4ovioe, using lateral pressures of ths same order as those used bp the Texas Highwgr Seysrtsmnt (15), Thop mare tested for their Atterberg limits to asoertain if thep nero still ha- flienoad bp the lime... of thks factor Fox ths first ssi3. , tho yexeentagaxof kins used moxa too~ four& sirv eight, and ten, For the second soils the percentages vere tao, ~ and ton It uas shomn l8 the test of the first eamyle that the same information could be obtaLnek RF...

  16. The Relation of Lime and Phosphoric Acid to the Growth and Bone Development of White Rats. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blum, J. K. (Joseph Kelly)

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY, A & M COLLEGE. CAMPUS. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BULLETIN NO. 441 DECEMBER, 1931 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Relation of Lime and Phosphoric Acid to the Growth... SULLIVXN, 'As.hsfant Chief E. B. REYNOLDS, Ph. D., Chief S. D. PEARCE, Secretary R. E KARPER M S. Agronomist J. H. ROGERS Feed Inspector P. C: MANGE~SD~RF,'SC. D., Agrqnomist K. L. KIRKLAND, B. S., Feed Inspector I D T KILLOUGH M. S. Agronomzst S. D...

  17. Activated alumina adsorption of trace amounts of chromium and lead from wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Reid L

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacities for adsorption of a given compound, activated alumina would be the preferable adsorbent as it is cheaper and has greater density. Activated alumina with an average pore size of 4 to 5 16, 17 nm has larger pores than granular activated carbon... in which 95 percent of the pores are typically less than 2 nm. Larger pore size 19 could suggest that larger molecular weight organics and inorganic polymeric metal complexes could be more readily adsorbed by activated alumina than by granular activated...

  18. Plasma preparation of planar models of alumina catalysts: their characterization and impregnation chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halverson, Dennis Eric

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -3735 8 j'I 4 /IX Xl/ Ql/ (lh /IX I/ 37X-3710 basic /t'y~?/ /"y /'Ix Figure 3 - Infrared stretching frequencies for OH on alumina. These hydroxyl groups are the result of adsorbed water on the surface. They have been assigned to the IR stretching... on the surface of alumina prior to and during calcination are a mixture of oxides, hydroxyls, adsorbed water and coordinatively unsaturated aluminum ions. ~ *e The alumina surface goes through a stepwise dehydroxylation upon calcination, while the bulk...

  19. Effect of the isoelectric point on the adsorption of molybdates on fluoride-modified aluminas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulcahy, F.M.; Houalla, M.; Hercules, D.M.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isoelectric point (IEP) of ..gamma..-alumina was modified by the addition of various amounts of fluoride. The modified aluminas were used as supports for molybdenum catalysts prepared by equilibrium adsorption at pH = 6.5. Also, the adsorption of molybdate on supports containing various amounts of fluoride was studied as a function of pH. The amount of molybdenum adsorbed on the fluoride-modified aluminas was found to decrease the IEP of the carrier decreased. An electrostatic model is used to interpret the results. 9 references.

  20. Effects of the maximum soil aggregates size and cyclic wetting-drying on the stiffness of a lime-treated clayey soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects of the maximum soil aggregates size and cyclic wetting-drying on the stiffness of a lime-treated clayey soil Anh Minh TANG, BEng, PhD; Minh Ngoc VU, BEng; Yu-Jun CUI, BEng, PhD Ecole des Ponts Paris soils used for embankment. Several studies show that lime treatment significantly modifies the physical

  1. ICSE6 Paris -August 27-31, 2012 Herrier, Berger, Bonelli The Friant-Kern canal : a forgotten example of lime-treated structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : a forgotten example of lime-treated structure in hydraulic conditions Gontran HERRIER1 , Eric BERGER2 in the paper. The treated clay was replaced and compacted by a sheep- foot roller, to achieve a typical in the 70's . Despite the fact that the lime-treated soil has been in constant direct contact

  2. Physico-chemical modifications of the interactions between hemp fibres and a lime mineral matrix: impacts on mechanical properties of mortars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Physico-chemical modifications of the interactions between hemp fibres and a lime mineral matrix interactions between hemp fibres and a lime-based mineral matrix, the consequences of various chemical treatments onto hemp fibres characteristics were measured using scanning electron microscopy, thermal

  3. Separating hydrogen from coal gasification gases with alumina membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egan, B.Z. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Fain, D.E.; Roettger, G.E.; White, D.E. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas produced in coal gasification processes contains hydrogen, along with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, water, nitrogen, and other gases, depending on the particular gasification process. Development of membrane technology to separate the hydrogen from the raw gas at the high operating temperatures and pressures near exit gas conditions would improve the efficiency of the process. Tubular porous alumina membranes with mean pore radii ranging from about 9 to 22 {Angstrom} have been fabricated and characterized. Based on hydrostatic tests, the burst strength of the membranes ranged from 800 to 1600 psig, with a mean value of about 1300 psig. These membranes were evaluated for separating hydrogen and other gases. Tests of membrane permeabilities were made with helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. Measurements were made at room temperature in the pressure range of 15 to 589 psi. Selected membranes were tested further with mixed gases simulating a coal gasification product gas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

  5. LimeSurvey -Crdit mobilit pour le PATGS http://survey2.ulb.ac.be/limesurvey/admin/admin.php?action=showprintablesurvey&sid=35186[4/10/2013 14:30:04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerf, Nicolas

    TEMPLATE Département Enseignement #12;LimeSurvey - Crédit mobilité pour le PATGS http://survey2.ulb dépenses prévues Informations sur le séjour TEMPLATE #12;LimeSurvey - Crédit mobilité pour le PATGS http://survey réponse ici : TEMPLATE #12;LimeSurvey - Crédit mobilité pour le PATGS http://survey2.ulb

  6. Analysis of volatile contaminants in US Navy fleet soda lime. Technical report, August 1992-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, R.S.; Ruby, R.; Gummin, D.D.; Porter, W.R.; Caldwell, J.M.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination was suspected of U.S. Navy Fleet soda lime (High Performance Sodasorb(R)) when an ammonia-like odor was reported during its use in August 1992. This material contained indicator dye and was used for carbon dioxide absorption during diving. This incident had a major impact on the U.S Navy diving program when the Navy temporarily banned use of Sodasorb(R) and authorized Sofnolime(R) as an interim replacement. The Naval Medical Research Institute was immediately assigned to investigate. Testing involved sampling from the headspace (gas space) inside closed buckets and from an apparatus simulating conditions during operational diving. Volatile organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry; ammonia and amines were measured by infrared spectroscopy. Significant amounts of ammonia (up to 30 ppm), ethyl and diethyl amines (up to several ppm), and various aliphatic hydrocarbons (up to 60 ppm) were detected during testing of both Sodasorb(R) and Sofnolime(R). Contaminants were slowly removed by gas flow and did not return. The source(s) of the ammonia and amines are unknown, although they may result from the breakdown of the indicator dye. Hydrocarbon contamination appeared to result from the materials of which the bucket is constructed. Based on these findings, the U.S. Navy is expected to phase in non-indicating soda lime that will be required to meet defined contaminant limits.

  7. Kilns and Firing Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    actually employed for metallurgy (or less correctly glasssince slag is specific to metallurgy). In fact the substance

  8. The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qian

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were...

  9. Analysis of the Temporal Evolution of Thermal Conductivity in Alumina-Water Nanofluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortenberry, Stephen

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this effort, the temporal behavior of a manufactured alumina (Al2O3) – water nanofluid was evaluated. Measurements of nanofluid effective thermal conductivity were acquired over an extended time period. Analysis of acquired measurements...

  10. The Effect of Nanoparticle Concentration on Thermo-physical Properties of Alumina-nitrate Nanofluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Qian

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to determine how Al2O3 nanoparticle concentration affected the specific heat, heat of fusion, melting point, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Alumina-Nitrate nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles were...

  11. SO2-induced stability of Ag-alumina catalysts in the SCR of NO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peden.2009."SO2-induced stability of Ag-alumina catalysts in the SCR of NO with methane."Applied Catalysis. B, Environmental 88(1-2):98-105. Authors: X She M Flytzani-Stephanopoul...

  12. Effect of catalyst structure on oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane on alumina-supported vanadia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argyle, Morris D.; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    catalysts: (a) ethane ODH, (b) propane ODH (663 K, 14 kPa CDehydrogenation of Ethane and Propane on Alumina-Supporteddehydrogenation of ethane and propane. UV-visible and Raman

  13. Templated self-assembly of nanoporous alumina : pore formation and ordering mechanisms, methodologies, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Ramkumar, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), also known as porous alumina, is a self-ordered nanostructured material well-suited for use in electronic, magnetic, optical and biological applications due to its small pore size (4-200nm) ...

  14. Analysis of the Temporal Evolution of Thermal Conductivity in Alumina-Water Nanofluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortenberry, Stephen

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this effort, the temporal behavior of a manufactured alumina (Al2O3) – water nanofluid was evaluated. Measurements of nanofluid effective thermal conductivity were acquired over an extended time period. Analysis of acquired measurements...

  15. Evaluation of Composite Alumina Nanoparticle and Nitrate Eutectic Materials for use in Concentrating Solar Power Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Darren R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this research was to create and characterize high temperature alumina and nitrate salt eutectic nanofluids for use in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The nitrate eutectic was originally used in the TES system demonstrated as part...

  16. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on Alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Eric; DelaRiva, Andrew; Lin, Sen; Johnson, Ryan S.; Guo, Hua; Miller, Jeff; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Kiefer, Boris; Allard, Lawrence F.; Ribeiro, Fabio; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalysis by single isolated atoms of precious metals has attracted much recent interest since it promises the ultimate economy in atom efficiency. Previous reports have been confined to reducible oxide supports such as FeOx, TiO2 or CeO2. Here we show that isolated Pd atoms can be stabilized on industrially relevant gamma-alumina supports. At low Pd loadings (?0.5 wt%) these catalysts contain exclusively atomically dispersed Pd species. The addition of lanthanum-oxide to the alumina, long known for its ability to improve alumina stability, is found to also help in the stabilization of isolated Pd atoms. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM) confirms the presence of intermingled Pd and La on the gamma-alumina surface. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy, performed on Pd/La-alumina and Pd/gamma-alumina (0.5 wt% Pd) demonstrates the presence of catalytically active atomically dispersed ionic Pd in the Pd/La-doped gamma-alumina system. CO oxidation reactivity measurements show onset of catalytic activity at 40 ?C, indicating that the ionic Pd species are not poisoned by CO. The reaction order in CO and O2 is positive, suggesting a reaction mechanism that is different from that on metallic Pd. The catalyst activity is lost if the Pd species are reduced to their metallic form, but the activity can be regenerated by oxidation at 700 ?C in air. The high-temperature stability of these ionic Pd species on commercial alumina supports makes this catalyst system of potential interest for low-temperature exhaust treatment catalysts.

  17. Effects of composition on the mechanical response of alumina-filled epoxy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, Stephen Tedford

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of composition on the elastic responses of alumina particle-filled epoxy composites is examined using isotropic elastic response models relating the average stresses and strains in a discretely reinforced composite material consisting of perfectly bonded and uniformly distributed particles in a solid isotropic elastic matrix. Responses for small elastic deformations and large hydrostatic and plane-strain compressions are considered. The response model for small elastic deformations depends on known elastic properties of the matrix and particles, the volume fraction of the particles, and two additional material properties that reflect the composition and microstructure of the composite material. These two material properties, called strain concentration coefficients, are characterized for eleven alumina-filled epoxy composites. It is found that while the strain concentration coefficients depend strongly on the volume fraction of alumina particles, no significant dependence on particle morphology and size is observed for the compositions examined. Additionally, an analysis of the strain concentration coefficients reveals a remarkably simple dependency on the alumina volume fraction. Responses for large hydrostatic and plane-strain compressions are obtained by generalizing the equations developed for small deformation, and letting the alumina volume fraction in the composite increase with compression. The large compression plane-strain response model is shown to predict equilibrium Hugoniot states in alumina-filled epoxy compositions remarkably well.

  18. Soil Acidity and Liming L. A. Redmon, M. L. McFarland, V. A. Haby, and D. H. Bade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Acidity and Liming L. A. Redmon, M. L. McFarland, V. A. Haby, and D. H. Bade Department of Soil and Crop Sciences The Agriculture Program The Texas A&M University System SCS-2001-06 What Causes SoilAcidity? Various environmental, climatic, and cultural factors can af- fect formation of acid soils

  19. Biogeochemical redox cycling in hyper alkaline sediment-water systems. Ian Burke, Rob Mortimer and Doug Stewart (Civil Engineering)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    kiln contrusted at Harper Hill in Derbyshire by the Buxton Lime Company was biggest of its type and was in operation continuously, 24/7, from 1872 until it was closed in 1944. (The kiln was demolished in 1980 of the kiln, and groundwater in contact with this waste has become saturated in Ca-, Na-, and K- hydroxides

  20. Biogeochemical redox cycling in hyper alkaline sediment-water systems. Ian Burke, Rob Mortimer and Doug Stewart (Civil Engineering)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    kiln constructed at Harper Hill in Derbyshire by the Buxton Lime Company was biggest of its type and was in operation continuously, 24/7, from 1872 until it was closed in 1944. (The kiln was demolished in 1980 of the kiln, and groundwater in contact with this waste has become saturated in Ca-, Na-, and K- hydroxides

  1. Final report on the PNL program to develop an alumina sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Brenden, B.B.; Koski, O.H.; Williford, R.E.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alumina concentration sensor was required to ensure safe operating conditions for cermet inert anodes that were under development at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(a) for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. The Sensors Development Program at PNL was conducted in response to this need for an alumina sensor. In all, eight different approaches to developing an alumina sensor were evaluated as part of this program. Each approach sought to correlate alumina concentration either to some spectral, physical, or electrical property of the molten electrolytic, or alternatively, to some operational characteristic of the reduction cell such as the integrity of the cermet anodes or the electrical noise generated by them during cell operation. The studies on electrical noise were performed using a large number of digital signal analysis (DSA) methods. There were two primary requirements for success for an alumina sensor to be used in conjunction with cermet anodes: (1) adequate sensitivity to alumina concentration at concentrations close to saturation, and (2) ease of use in an industrial setting. After numerous laboratory experiments as well as field studies in some cases, it was concluded that none of the approaches sufficiently satisfied the two criteria to serve as the basis for an alumina sensor. If further work is to continue in this area, it is recommended that the research focus on altemative DSA approaches, primarily because DSA methods would be so easy to use in an industrial environment. Due to the lack of correlation using DSA in the present work, however, it is recommended that altemative strategies for data collection and analysis be used in any further development activities.

  2. Final report on the PNL program to develop an alumina sensor. Sensors Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Brenden, B.B.; Koski, O.H.; Williford, R.E.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alumina concentration sensor was required to ensure safe operating conditions for cermet inert anodes that were under development at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(a) for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. The Sensors Development Program at PNL was conducted in response to this need for an alumina sensor. In all, eight different approaches to developing an alumina sensor were evaluated as part of this program. Each approach sought to correlate alumina concentration either to some spectral, physical, or electrical property of the molten electrolytic, or alternatively, to some operational characteristic of the reduction cell such as the integrity of the cermet anodes or the electrical noise generated by them during cell operation. The studies on electrical noise were performed using a large number of digital signal analysis (DSA) methods. There were two primary requirements for success for an alumina sensor to be used in conjunction with cermet anodes: (1) adequate sensitivity to alumina concentration at concentrations close to saturation, and (2) ease of use in an industrial setting. After numerous laboratory experiments as well as field studies in some cases, it was concluded that none of the approaches sufficiently satisfied the two criteria to serve as the basis for an alumina sensor. If further work is to continue in this area, it is recommended that the research focus on altemative DSA approaches, primarily because DSA methods would be so easy to use in an industrial environment. Due to the lack of correlation using DSA in the present work, however, it is recommended that altemative strategies for data collection and analysis be used in any further development activities.

  3. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 878892 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stabilization Lime kiln dust Base course a b s t r a c t Fly ashes produced by power plants in the United StatesResources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 878­892 Contents lists available at Science with another recycled material, lime kiln dust (LKD). California bearing ratio (CBR) and resilient modulus

  4. ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS ONNANOPOROUS ALUMINA TEMPLATES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of the nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Both the 20 nm and 100 nm titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not exhibit statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. In addition, 20 nm pore size titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exposed to ultraviolet light demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for 'smart' drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  5. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ecosystem Function in Alluvial Tailings after Biosolids and Lime Addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Ecosystem Function in Alluvial Tailings after Biosolids and Lime Addition Sally Brown,* Mark Sprenger, this site requires an alternative assessment meth-Municipal biosolids and agricultural limestone were

  6. Investigation of the benefits of carbonate cementation due to addition of low percentage of hydrated lime in the base courses of pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhuiyan, Jasim Uddin

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas, limestone and caliche soil, were tested extensively to examine the effect of carbonate cementation due to the addition of small percentages of lime. Testing included mineralogical analysis of the two materials, strength analysis in terms of texas...

  7. The effect of competition by chloride and sulfate anions on the adsorption of arsenate ion onto activated alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janis, Patrick John

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for adsorption sites on the activated alumina. The results of this study showed that the presence of 15 meq/L chloride anion depresses the ability of the arsenate to be adsorbed by F-1 activated alumina initial liquid phase arsenate ion concentration of 5 mg...

  8. Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper/Niobium/Copper Interlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fracture and Fatigue Behavior at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures of Alumina Bonded with Copper/Niobium-phase bonded using copper/niobium/copper interlayers have been investigated at both room and elevated, with failure primarily at the alumina/niobium interfaces. At room temperature, cyclic fatigue-crack propagation

  9. Technical status report development of lime based in-duct scrubbing - A cost effective SO/sub 2/ control technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilling, N.Z.; Samuel, E.A.; Pennline, H.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lime Based In-Duct Scrubbing (LIBIDS) was one of the candidate technologies receiving contract awards for pilot demonstration by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Acid Rain Precurser program. The concept as developed by General Electric utilizes rotary atomization of lime slurry directly within flue gas carrying ductwork to remove SO/sub 2/. This promises to be a very low capital cost method of SO/sub 2/ control with capital plus levelized operating cost estimated to be $364/KW. Several significant technical milestones have been passed relative to proof of principle and ultimate commercialization. Based on positive results from a laboratory and supporting analytical work, a detailed engineering design has begun for a pilot plant.

  10. Final report on DSA methods for monitoring alumina in aluminum reduction cells with cermet anodes. Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sensors Development Program was conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Processes. The work was performed in conjunction with the Inert Electrodes Program at PNL. The objective of the Sensors Development Program in FY 1990 through FY 1992 was to determine whether methods based on digital signal analysis (DSA) could be used to measure alumina concentration in aluminum reduction cells. Specifically, this work was performed to determine whether useful correlations exist between alumina concentration and various DSA-derived quantification parameters, calculated for current and voltage signals from laboratory and field aluminum reduction cells. If appropriate correlations could be found, then the quantification parameters might be used to monitor and, consequently, help control the alumina concentration in commercial reduction cells. The control of alumina concentration is especially important for cermet anodes, which have exhibited instability and excessive wear at alumina concentrations removed from saturation.

  11. Alumina reinforced tetragonal zirconia (TZP) composites. Final technical report, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shetty, D.K.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report summarizes the significant research results obtained during the period July 1, 1993 through December 31, 1996 in the DOE-supported research project entitled, {open_quotes}Alumina Reinforced Tetragonal Zirconia (TZP) Composites{close_quotes}. The objective of the research was to develop high-strength and high-toughness ceramic composites by combining mechanisms of platelet, whisker or fiber reinforcement with transformation toughening. The approach used included reinforcement of Celia- or yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (Ce-TZP or Y-TZP) with particulates, platelets, or continuous filaments of alumina.

  12. Solid-state NMR studies of the adsorption of acetylene on platinum/alumina catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambregts, Marsha Jo Lupher

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLID-STATE NMR STUDIES OF THE ADSORPTION OF ACETYLENE ON PLATINUM/ALUMINA CATALYSTS A Thesis by MARSHA JO LUPHER LAMBREGTS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Chemistry SOLID-STATE NMR STUDIES OF THE ADSORPTION OF ACETYLENE ON PLATINUM/ALUMINA CATALYSTS A Thesis by MARSHA JO LUPHER LAMBREGTS Approved as to style and content by: ames F. Haw...

  13. Micro Catalytic Combustor with Pd/Nano-porous Alumina for High-Temperature Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    Micro Catalytic Combustor with Pd/Nano-porous Alumina for High-Temperature Application Takashi: A micro-scale catalytic combustor using high-precision ceramic tape-casting technology has been developed surface reaction of butane. In combustion experiments with a prototype combustor, the wall temperature

  14. Acidity and catalytic activity of zeolite catalysts bound with silica and alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xianchun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of applications as catalysts in the petroleum refining and chemical industry. Because of their poor self- binding property, they need to be bound with a binder (matrix) such as silica, alumina, clay, or their mixture to produce a desired physical shape...

  15. Creep behavior in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grain boundary sliding (often accompanied by cavitation) is a major contributor to compressive and tensile creep deformation in fine-grained aluminas, both with and without whisker-reinforcement. Studies indicate that the creep response of alumina composites reinforced with SiC whiskers can be tailored by controlling the composite microstructure and composition. The addition of SiC whiskers (< 30 vol%) significantly increases the creep resistance of fine-grained (1--2 {mu}m) alumina in air at temperatures of 1,200 and 1,300 C. However, at higher whisker contents (30 and 50 vol%), the creep resistance is degraded due to enhanced surface oxidation reactions accompanied by extensive creep cavitation. Densification aids (i.e., Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which facilitate silica glass formation and thus liquid phase densification of the composites, can also result in degradation of creep resistance. On the other hand, increasing the matrix grain size or decreasing the whisker aspect ratio (increased whisker number density) results in raising the creep resistance of the composites. These observations not only explain the variability in the creep response of various SiC whisker-reinforced alumina composites but also indicate factors that can be used to enhance the elevated temperature performance.

  16. Beryllium Adsorption at Transition Aluminas: Implications for Environmental Science and Oxidation of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that?gamma- and?eta- aluminas (transition Al2O3 polytypes with defect spinel structure) can effectively capture beryllium atoms. Although the bulk crystal structures of these two oxides are characterized only by slight differences in cation vacancy distributions, the interaction of Be with the two polytypes are different. For gamma- Al2O3, the Be adsorption energy is high (~ 5 eV per atom), and all Be atoms are captured and trapped at the surface - all attempts to move Be in the subsurface region result in its expulsion back to the surface. On the other hand, for ?eta- alumina Be atoms can be captured both at the surface and in octahedrally-coordinated subsurface cation vacancies. This result implies that both alumina oxides could be successfully used for Be capture out of wastewater streams related to industrial processes of aluminum and alumina production. Also, the surface adsorption mechanism of Be at?gamma- Al2O3 explains why very small additions of Be (of the order of several ppm) to Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Si casting and wrought alloys prevent run-away oxidation of these materials in molten state, as well as ingot cracking. We also discuss possibilities to use other additives (e.g., Ca and Sr) yielding the same protective effect for aluminum alloys but which are less toxic than beryllium.

  17. Alumina atomic layer deposition nanocoatings on primary diamond particles using a fluidized bed reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven M.

    /high-temperature (HP/HT) synthesis methods [4­7] led to the discovery of polycrystalline diamond grit and the manufacture of polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) materials [8]. PDC cutters are well known and widely usedAlumina atomic layer deposition nanocoatings on primary diamond particles using a fluidized bed

  18. Evaluation of Composite Alumina Nanoparticle and Nitrate Eutectic Materials for use in Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Darren R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Solar Two power tower and is currently employed as the TES material at Andasol 1 in Spain. Concentrations of alumina nanoparticles between 0.1% and 10% by weight were introduced into the base material in an effort to create nanofluids which would exhibit...

  19. Electrical conductivity and current-voltage characteristics of alumina with or without neutron and electron irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    irradiation. Radiation induced conductivity (RIC) was observed for all speci- mens under neutron and electron of the leading candidates for insula- tor and radiofrequency window/feedthrough applica- tions in magnetic fusion of alumina. Radiation induced conductivity (RIC) and radiation induced electrical de- gradation (RIED

  20. WRINKLING OF a-ALUMINA FILMS GROWN BY OXIDATIONII. OXIDE SEPARATION AND FAILURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, David R.

    of thermal cycling on these modes of separation and how they may lead to oxide spalling are discussed. # 1998WRINKLING OF a-ALUMINA FILMS GROWN BY OXIDATIONÐII. OXIDE SEPARATION AND FAILURE V. K. TOLPYGO oxidation and cooling to room temperature. One type is a form of buckling where the size of the detached

  1. Atomistic structure of sodium and calcium silicate intergranular films in alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garofalini, Stephen H.

    Atomistic structure of sodium and calcium silicate intergranular films in alumina David A. Litton March 1998; accepted 21 October 1998) Sodium silicate intergranular films (IGF) in contact. The results were compared to previous simulations of calcium silicate and sol-gel silica IGF's in contact

  2. Processing and Mechanical Properties of Ti2AlC Reinforced with Alumina Fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeon, Kwonguk

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , even at temperature as high as 1400 oC at which reaction between Ti2AlC and NextelTM 720 was observed. The double torsion (DT) tests were carried out at room temperature to measure the fracture toughness of the HIPed pure and 5vol% alumina fiber...

  3. STRESS-DENSITY VARIATIONS IN ALUMINA SEDIMENTS: EFFECTS OF POLYMER CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    rearrangement into densely packed structures. Polysiloxanes are excellent lubricants (e.g., silicon oil) due151 STRESS-DENSITY VARIATIONS IN ALUMINA SEDIMENTS: EFFECTS OF POLYMER CHEMISTRY C. H. SCHILLING) the magnitude of the effective stresses (i.e., stresses that are supported by the particulate network) and (ii

  4. Effect of core topology on projectile penetration in hybrid aluminum/alumina sandwich structuresq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    sandwich structures were fabricated by shrink-fitting precision-ground prisms of alumina (CoorsTek grade AD bending resistance of sandwich panels relative to monolithic plates of equivalent areal density [1 reductions in panel deflection relative to equivalent monolithic plates under high-intensity soil loading

  5. Differential Pair Distribution Function Study of the Structure of Arsenate Adsorbed on Nanocrystalline [gamma]-Alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Tang, Yuanzhi; Kubicki, James D.; Aryanpour, Masoud; Reeder, Richard J.; Parise, John B.; Phillips, Brian L. (SBU); (Penn)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural information is important for understanding surface adsorption mechanisms of contaminants on metal (hydr)oxides. In this work, a novel technique was employed to study the interfacial structure of arsenate oxyanions adsorbed on {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles, namely, differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering. The d-PDF is the difference of properly normalized PDFs obtained for samples with and without arsenate adsorbed, otherwise identically prepared. The real space pattern contains information on atomic pair correlations between adsorbed arsenate and the atoms on {gamma}-alumina surface (Al, O, etc.). PDF results on the arsenate adsorption sample on {gamma}-alumina prepared at 1 mM As concentration and pH 5 revealed two peaks at 1.66 {angstrom} and 3.09 {angstrom}, corresponding to As-O and As-Al atomic pair correlations. This observation is consistent with those measured by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, which suggests a first shell of As-O at 1.69 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 4 and a second shell of As-Al at 3.13 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom} with a coordination number of 2. These results are in agreement with a bidentate binuclear coordination environment to the octahedral Al of {gamma}-alumina as predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculation.

  6. Mullite/Alumina Mixtures for Use as Porous Matrices in Oxide Fiber Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    ceramic composites. Conditions for the deflection of a matrix crack at a fiber-matrix interface are used particle mixtures of mullite and alumina are assessed as candidate matrixes for use in porous matrix to identify the combinations of modulus and toughness of the fibers and the matrix for which damage

  7. Effect of testing conditions and doping on superplastic creep of alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    716 Effect of testing conditions and doping on superplastic creep of alumina P. Gruffel, P. Carry. pressive creep tests at 1450 °C [3]. It was un- ambiguously established that: - normal grain growth took superplastic deformation. Fig. 1. Strain rate variations during creep tests in compression C and tension

  8. Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cadden, Charles H. (Danville, CA); Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi (Lafayette, CA); Hosking, Floyd M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  9. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this six-month reporting period, we continued the work on the development and construction of the thermogravimetric chemical vapor deposition system that we intend to employ for studying the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of metal chlorides in H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Specifically, we worked on the development of the tubular flow reactor that will be used for producing aluminum chloride for delivery to the chemical vapor deposition system and of the vapor and gas supply system. Various problems arising from condensation of aluminum chlorides in some sections of the supply line were resolved, and we expect to perform experiments using mixtures containing AlCl{sub 3} in the next reporting period. Preliminary experiments on the deposition of SiO{sub 2} from mixtures of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) or tetrachlorosilane in H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were carried out, and the results showed that the deposition rates from MTS were much higher than those from SiCl{sub 4} and comparable to those reported in the literature for alumina deposition from AlC{sub 3}-H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixtures of similar composition. It was thus decided to employ MTS as silicon source in our codeposition experiments, and a comprehensive investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium in the Al/Si/Cl/C/O/H system for compositions corresponding to MTS-AlCl{sub 3}-H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} mixtures was conducted so as to identify the boundaries of the region of the space of operating parameters and conditions where preparation of functionally graded mullite/alumina coatings through CVD from metal chloride, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} is feasible. The results showed that deposition of silica, alumina, mullite, and other aluminosilicates is feasible in a broad range of operating conditions from the equilibrated gas phase, but temperatures above 1148 K have to employed to obtain deposits of alumina and mullite if the solid phases are also at equilibrium with each other.

  10. Lithium ion diffusion in Li ?-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque, E-mail: mtareque@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li ?-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10{sup ?11} m{sup 2}/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10{sup ?13} m{sup 2}/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the ?-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297–333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li ?-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li ?-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li ?–alumina system.

  11. Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

  12. A comparison of ZnO films deposited on indium tin oxide and soda lime glass under identical conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deka, Angshuman; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore - 560012 (India)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnO films have been grown via a vapour phase transport (VPT) on soda lime glass (SLG) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. ZnO film on ITO had traces of Zn and C which gives them a dark appearance while that appears yellowish-white on SLG. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm the traces of C in the form of C-O. The photoluminescence studies reveal a prominent green luminescence band for ZnO film on ITO.

  13. Chemically sensitive polymer-mediated nanoporous alumina SAW sensors for the detection of vapor-phase analytes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Gregory Paul

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the chemical sensitivity of nanoporous (NP) alumina-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices that have been surface-modified with polymeric mediating films. The research in this dissertation covers the refinement of the NP...

  14. Thermal cycling effect on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a carbonate eutectic with alumina nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Sandhya

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to measure the effect of thermal cycling on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a nanocomposite material consisting of a eutectic of lithium carbonate and potassium carbonate and 1% by mass alumina...

  15. Chemically sensitive polymer-mediated nanoporous alumina SAW sensors for the detection of vapor-phase analytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Gregory Paul

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the chemical sensitivity of nanoporous (NP) alumina-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices that have been surface-modified with polymeric mediating films. The research in this dissertation covers the refinement of the NP...

  16. Time-resolved measurement of photon emission during fast crack propagation in three-point bending fracture of silica glass and soda lime glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiota, Tadashi, E-mail: tshiota@ceram.titech.ac.jp; Sato, Yoshitaka; Yasuda, Kouichi [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S7-13 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)] [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-S7-13 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of photon emission (PE) and fast crack propagation upon bending fracture were conducted in silica glass and soda lime glass. Observation of fracture surfaces revealed that macroscopic crack propagation behavior was similar between the silica glass and soda lime glass when fracture loads for these specimens were comparable and cracks propagated without branching. However, a large difference in the PE characteristics was found between the two glasses. In silica glass, PE (645–655?nm) was observed during the entire crack propagation process, whereas intense PE (430–490?nm and 500–600?nm) was observed during the initial stages of propagation. In contrast, only weak PE was detected in soda lime glass. These results show that there is a large difference in the atomic processes involved in fast crack propagation between these glasses, and that PE can be used to study brittle fracture on the atomic scale.

  17. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Patna1k (1 ) partially support th1s explanation. They found that lime at ths rate of one percent of the weight of the so11 increased mineralisat1on of nitrogen, but most of the n1trogen in their tests accumulated as ammonia rather than nitrate under...RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of aluminium–alumina micro- and nano-composites by spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, K., E-mail: khushbudash@gmail.com; Chaira, D.; Ray, B.C.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The evolution of microstructure by varying the particle size of reinforcement in the matrix employing spark plasma sintering has been demonstrated here in Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. An emphasis has been laid on varying the reinforcement particle size and evaluating the microstructural morphologies and their implications on mechanical performance of the composites. Nanocomposites of 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7 volume % alumina (average size < 50 nm) reinforced in aluminium matrix were fabricated by powder metallurgy route using spark plasma sintering technique technique at a temperature of 773 K and pressure of 50 MPa. Another set of specimens having composition 1, 5, 20 vol.% of alumina (average size ? 10 ?m) had been fabricated to compare the physical as well as mechanical attributes of the microcomposite as well as the nanocomposites. These micro- and nano-composites have been characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy followed by density, microhardness and nanoindentation measurements. The alumina nanoparticles revealed an interface showing appreciable physical intimacy with the aluminium matrix compared to that of the alumina microparticles. The interfacial integrity in case of nanocomposites is better than in the microcomposite which has been studied using microscopic techniques. Spark plasma sintering imparts enhanced densification as well as matrix-reinforcement proximity which has been corroborated with the experimental results. - Highlights: • The Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} micro- and nano-composites fabricated by spark plasma sintering. • Better matrix-reinforcement integrity in nanocomposites than microcomposites. • Spark plasma sintering method results in higher density and hardness values. • High density and hardness values of nanocomposites than microcomposites. • High dislocation density in spark plasma sintered Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites. - Abstract: In the present study, an emphasis has been laid on evaluation of the microstructural morphologies and their implications on mechanical performance of the composites by varying the reinforcement particle size. Nanocomposites of 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 7 volume % alumina (average size < 50 nm) and microcomposites of 1, 5, 20 volume % of alumina (average size ? 10 ?m) reinforced in aluminium matrix were fabricated by spark plasma sintering technique at a temperature of 773 K and pressure of 50 MPa. These micro- and nano-composites have been characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy followed by density, microhardness and nanoindentation hardness measurements. The alumina nanoparticles revealed appreciable physical intimacy with the aluminium matrix than that of alumina microparticles. The highest nanohardness recorded 0.85 GPa and 99% densification for 7 and 1 vol.% Al–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nancomposites respectively. Spark plasma sintering imparts enhanced densification and matrix-reinforcement proximity which have been corroborated with the experimental results.

  19. Particle shape effects on thermo-physical properties of alumina nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timofeeva, E.; Routbort, J.; Singh, D. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivity and viscosity of various shapes of alumina nanoparticles in a fluid consisting of equal volumes of ethylene glycol and water were investigated. Experimental data were analyzed and accompanied by theoretical modeling. Enhancements in the effective thermal conductivities due to particle shape effects expected from Hamilton-Crosser equation are strongly diminished by interfacial effects proportional to the total surface area of nanoparticles. On the other hand, the presence of nanoparticles and small volume fractions of agglomerates with high aspect ratios strongly increases viscosity of suspensions due to structural constrains. Nanoparticle surface charge also plays an important role in viscosity. It is demonstrated that by adjusting pH of nanofluid, it is possible to reduce viscosity of alumina nanofluid without significantly affecting thermal conductivity. Efficiency of nanofluids (ratio of thermal conductivity and viscosity increase) for real-life cooling applications is evaluated in both the laminar and turbulent flow regimes using the experimental values of thermal conductivity and viscosity.

  20. Novel method for the prediction of an interface bonding species at alumina/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshitake, Michiko, E-mail: yoshitake.michiko@nims.go.jp; Yagyu, Shinjiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13, Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Chikyow, Toyohiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1, Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Interface bonding between alumina and various metals is discussed from the viewpoint of chemical thermodynamics. A method to predict the interface bonding species at an alumina/metal interface under equilibrium conditions is proposed by using the concept of chemical equilibrium for interface termination. The originality of this method is in the way a simple estimation of the interface binding energy, which is generally applicable to most metals, is developed. The effectiveness of this method is confirmed by careful examination of the experimental results. Comparison of the predicted and experimentally observed interface terminations reveals that the proposed method agrees well with the reported results. The method uses only basic quantities of pure elements and the formation enthalpy of oxides. Therefore, it can be applied to most metals in the periodic table and is useful for screening materials in the quest to develop interfaces with particular functions.

  1. Fischer-Tropsch activity for non-promoted cobalt-on-alumina catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Alan H. (Baden, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Gibsonia, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Gibsonia, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cobalt catalysts, and processes employing these inventive catalysts, for hydrocarbon synthesis. The inventive catalyst comprises cobalt on an alumina support and is not promoted with any noble or near noble metals. In one aspect of the invention, the alumina support preferably includes a dopant in an amount effective for increasing the activity of the inventive catalyst. The dopant is preferably a titanium dopant. In another aspect of the invention, the cobalt catalyst is preferably reduced in the presence of hydrogen at a water vapor partial pressure effective to increase the activity of the cobalt catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis. The water vapor partial pressure is preferably in the range of from 0 to about 0.1 atmospheres.

  2. A Fracture Mechanics Approach to Thermal Shock Investigation in Alumina-Based Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkov-Husovic, T.; Heinemann, R. Jancic; Mitrakovic, D. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Karnegijeva 4, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal shock behavior of large grain size, alumina-based refractories was investigated experimentally using a standard water quench test. A mathematical model was employed to simulate the thermal stability behavior. Behavior of the samples under repeated thermal shock was monitored using ultrasonic measurements of dynamic Young's modulus. Image analysis was used to observe the extent of surface degradation. Analysis of the obtained results for the behavior of large grain size samples under conditions of rapid temperature changes is given.

  3. Structural studies of alumina pillared hectorite using polyvinyl alcohol as a pillaring agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroenig, Andrea N

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the clay's hydrated cations to be replaced with almost any desired cation by using simple ion exchange methods, allows for the preparation of pillared interlayered clays (PILC's). Homoionic exchange derivatives are readily achievable with simple... the pillaring precursor into A1203 pillars. The resulting alumina pillared clay (Al-PILC) is a stable microporous material with high specific surface area, although this porosity is mainly influenced by the method of preparation. 90 Occelli and Pinnavaia...

  4. Industrial recovery capability. Final report. [Claus alumina catalyst for sulfur production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, D.W.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an evaluation of the vulnerability - to a nuclear strike, terrorist attack, or natural disaster - of our national capacity to produce chlorine, beryllium, and a particular specialty alumina catalyst required for the production of sulfur. All of these industries are of critical importance to the United States economy. Other industries that were examined and found not to be particularly vulnerable are medicinal drugs and silicon wafers for electronics. Thus, only the three more vulnerable industries are addressed in this report.

  5. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this reporting period, the construction and development of the chemical vapor deposition system was completed, and experiments were conducted on the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of AlCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3} in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. Work was mainly done on the investigation of the effects of the reaction temperature on the deposition kinetics. It was found that the temperature had a positive effect on the single oxides deposition rates and the codeposition rate. The apparent activation energy values extracted from the deposition rate vs. temperature curves in the high temperature region were similar for the three deposition processes, having a value around 20 kcal/mol. The codeposition rates were higher, by a more than a factor of 2 in some cases, than the sum of the deposition rates of the two oxides in the independent experiments at the same operating conditions, and this result led to the conclusion that there should exist additional surface reaction steps in the codeposition process, that lead to solid formation and involve both silicon-containing and aluminum-containing species. The elemental analysis (EDXA) of films deposited from MTS-AlCl{sub 3}-CO{sub 2}- H2 mixtures showed that silicon oxide was the main component, and comparison of the deposition rates of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} during codeposition with those seen in single species deposition experiments at the same conditions revealed that the codeposition process was characterized by a dramatic enhancement of the deposition of SiO{sub 2} and an equally dramatic reduction in the rate of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition. Since the enhanced codeposition rate was caused by increased silicon oxide deposition, it was concluded that the main deposition product of the additional surface reaction steps in codeposition must be silicon oxide. A comprehensive investigation of the effects of the other operating parameters on the kinetics of the codeposition process will be carried out in the next reporting period.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on the catalytic activity of activated alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, Gerald Leland

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to choose between the various theories presented concerning the actual phenomena respon sible for loss of Catalyst activity on firing. The activity loss mey be due to a growth in siss of particles having homogeneous eur? facese or a decrease...EFFECT OF lRAT 5KATJRNT ON 1HE CATALYTIC ACTIVITY OF ACTIVAmD ALUMINA A Thesis Gerald Leland Farrar January~ 1950 Approval as to style and content recosnendedi ~ ~ Head of tte tment of Chemical E ring EFFECT CF HEAT THEATMPNT QN...

  7. Final report on the application of chaos theory to an alumina sensor for aluminum reduction cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williford, R.E.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four chaos-related digital signal analysis (DSA) methods were applied to the analysis of voltage and current signals collected from aluminum electrolysis cells. Two separate data bases were analyzed: bench-scale laboratory experiments and a pilot-scale test. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using these types of data and analysis methods as the basis for a non-intrusive sensor to measure the alumina content in the electrolysis bath. This was the first time chaos theory approaches have been employed to analyze aluminum electrolysis cells.

  8. Vapor-phase synthesis of a solid precursor for {alpha}-alumina through a catalytic decomposition of aluminum triisopropoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Tu Quang [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kongju National University, 275 Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kongju National University, 275 Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyun Young, E-mail: kypark@kongju.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kongju National University, 275 Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Youl [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kongju National University, 275 Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kongju National University, 275 Budae-dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-717 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung Baek [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), 92 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new solid precursor for {alpha}-alumina was prepared at about 200 Degree-Sign C from aluminum tri-isopropoxide vapor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained precursor was calcined at 1200 Degree-Sign C to form {alpha}-alumina particles, 75 nm in surface area equivalent diameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The weight loss of the precursor upon calcination was 24%, lower than that of Al(OH){sub 3}, a conventional alumina precursor. -- Abstract: A new solid precursor, hydrous aluminum oxide, for {alpha}-alumina nanoparticles was prepared by thermal decomposition of aluminum triisopropoxide (ATI) vapor in a 500 mL batch reactor at 170-250 Degree-Sign C with HCl as catalyst. The conversion of ATI increased with increasing temperature and catalyst content; it was nearly complete at 250 Degree-Sign C with the catalyst at 10 mol% of the ATI. The obtained precursor particles were amorphous, spherical and loosely agglomerated. The primary particle size is in the range 50-150 nm. The ignition loss of the precursor was 24%, considerably lower than 35% of Al(OH){sub 3}, the popular precursor for alumina particles. Upon calcination of the precursor at 1200 Degree-Sign C in the air with a heating rate of 10 Degree-Sign C/min and a holding time of 2 h, the phase was completely transformed into {alpha}. The spherical particles composing the precursor turned worm-like by the calcination probably due to sintering between neighboring particles. The surface area equivalent diameter of the resulting {alpha}-alumina was 75 nm.

  9. [Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

  10. Alumina reinforced tetragonal zirconia (TZP) composites. [Annual report, February 16, 1994--February 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shetty, D.K.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective is to develop high-strength and high-toughness ceramic composites by combining mechanisms of platelet, whisker or fiber reinforcement with transformation toughening. The approach being used includes reinforcement of ceria or yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (CE-TZP or Y-T-ZP) with platelets, whiskers or continuous filaments of alumina. Critical stresses for extension of filament-bridged matrix cracks were measured as a function of crack length in a model composite system, SiC (filament)-reinforced epoxy-alumina (matrix). The crack-length dependence of the crack extension stress at short crack lengths followed the prediction of a fracture-mechanics analysis that employed a new force-displacement law for the crack-bridging filaments developed in this study. At large crack lengths, the measured matrix-cracking stress was close to the prediction of the steady-state theory of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans. Optical fluorescence was employed to measure stresses in crack-bridging sapphire filaments and assess interfacial properties in a model sapphire-epoxy composite. Composites of yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) matrix dispersed with either single crystal A1{sub 2}0{sub 3} platelets or particulars were fabricated by a hybrid suspension/powder processing route to densities greater than 99.0% of theoretical. Both transformation toughening and platelet reinforcement contribute to the high fracture toughness of the A1{sub 2}0{sub 3} (platelet)-Y-TZP composites.

  11. Sol-gel processed silica-alumina materials for diesel engine emission reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narula, C.K.; Rokosz, M.; Allard, L.F.; Kudla, R.J.; Chattha, M.S.

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The incorporation of >30% silica in alumina prior to platinum impregnation improves the NOx conversion efficiency in the 200--300 C range from 45 to 57% and reduces light-off temperature. Further increase in the amount of silica to 50% is detrimental to NOx conversion efficiency. The {sup 1}H and {sup 29}Si NMR of the materials suggest that this trend is probably related to the surface acidity. The analyses of these materials by X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy do not reveal significant differences. Additional NOx conversion in the 350--450 C range with a maximum of 30% at 400 C can be achieved if a rhodium-impregnated 30% silica-alumina, Rh-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is placed upstream of Pt-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It is important to note that mixing Pt-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with Rh-30% SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} does not enhance conversion efficiency or effective temperature range.

  12. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural... BEAUMONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By Nilliam B. Gay, III Chairman of Committee Head of the Department of Soil Sc Crop Sciences ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my appreciation to Dr. A. G. Caldwell for his 1nterest and guidance...

  13. Signicance of sample thickness and surface segregation on the electrical conductivity of Wesgo AL995 alumina under ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    are expected to be used in fusion reactors like international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER insulating material in fusion reactors [1] because of its high thermal conductivity [2], high resistance of alumina are to be used in fusion reactors, no studies have ever been done on the thickness dependence

  14. Two-dimensional finite element simulation of fracture and fatigue behaviours of alumina microstructures for hip prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    microstructures for hip prosthesis Kyungmok Kim¹, Bernard Forest¹, Jean Geringer¹* ¹Ecole Nationale Supérieure des and fatigue behaviours of pure alumina microstructures found at hip prosthesis. Finite element models are similar to those found at a slip zone between a femoral head and an acetabular cup of hip prosthesis

  15. Materials Science and Engineering A 493 (2008) 256260 In situ bend testing of niobium-reinforced alumina nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pathways [5]. If the frac- ture toughness can be improved, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) hold great the stress field around the crack tip. The addition of fibers to a brittle ceramic matrix can improve of carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline alumina (Al2O3) bene- fits the brittle ceramic's mechanical

  16. Effects of Adsorbed Pyridine Derivatives and Ultrathin Atomic-Layer-Deposited Alumina Coatings on the Conduction Band-Edge Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the identity of shuttle molecules. INTRODUCTION Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) constitute a promising (such as alumina) are known to boost open-circuit photovoltages substantially for dye-sensitized solar. The archetypal cell utilizes a Ru-based dye,7 typically N719 (i.e., ditetrabutyl-ammonium cis

  17. Characterization of microstructure and crack propagation in alumina using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, S.J.; Michael, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Readey, M.J. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States); Wright, S.I.; Field, D.P. [TSL, Inc., Provo, UT (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A more complete description requires the lattice orientations of a statistically significant number of grains, coupled with morphology such as grain size and shape; this can be obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), which uses crystallographic orientation data from Backscattered Electron Kikuchi patterns (BEKP) collected using a SEM. This report describes the OIM results for alumina; these include image quality maps, grain boundary maps, pole figures, and lattice misorientations depicted on MacKenzie plot and in Rodrigues space. High quality BEKP were obtained and the images and data readily reveal the grain morphology, texture, and grain boundary misorientations, including those for cracked boundaries. A larger number of grains should be measured to make statistical comparisons between materials with different processing histories.

  18. Synthesis and enhanced light absorption of alumina matrix nanocomposites containing multilayer oxide nanorods and silver nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Yong X., E-mail: yong.gan@utoledo.edu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Zeng, Xianwu; Su, Lusheng; Yang, Lu [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Gan, Bo J. [Ottawa Hills High School, 2532 Evergreen Road, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)] [Ottawa Hills High School, 2532 Evergreen Road, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Zhang, Lihua [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)] [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Multilayer oxide nanorods (nanocables) were obtained via chemical processing. {yields} Ag nanoparticles were deposited between the core and shell layers of the nanorods. {yields} The structure and composition of the nanorods were analyzed by SEM and TEM. {yields} CoO nanorods and Ag nanoparticles enhance light absorption of the nanocomposites. -- Abstract: In this paper, multilayer oxide nanorods were deposited in the nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) via solution infiltration followed by heat treatment. The nanorods have a core-shell structure. First, the shell (nanotube) with the thickness of about 40 nm was made of TiO{sub 2} through the hydrolysis of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}TiF{sub 6}. Second, silver nanoparticles with the diameter of about 3 nm were added into the TiO{sub 2} layer through thermal decomposition of AgNO{sub 3} at elevated temperatures. Then, cylindrical cores (nanorods) of CoO and ZnO with 200 nm diameter were prepared, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structure and composition of the nanorods. UV-vis light absorption measurements in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm were performed to study the effect of nanorod and nanoparticle addition on the light absorption property of the alumina nanocomposites. It is found that CoO nanorods increase the light absorption of the alumina matrix composite in the wavelength range from 500 nm to 800 nm, but the TiO{sub 2} shell does not increase the light absorption much. The ZnO nanorods do not change the light absorption either. However, the addition of silver nanoparticles significantly enhances light absorption of both AAO/TiO{sub 2}/Ag/CoO and AAO/TiO{sub 2}/Ag/ZnO nanocomposites. This increase in the visible light absorption reveals that there exists surface plasmon around the fine silver nanoparticles in the nanorods.

  19. Synthesis and Enhanced Light Absorption of Alumina Matrix Nanocomposites Containing Multilayer Oxide Nanorods and Silver Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Y.X.; Zhang, L.; Zeng, X.; Su, L.; Yang, L.; Gan, B.J.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, multilayer oxide nanorods were deposited in the nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) via solution infiltration followed by heat treatment. The nanorods have a core-shell structure. First, the shell (nanotube) with the thickness of about 40 nm was made of TiO{sub 2} through the hydrolysis of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}TiF{sub 6}. Second, silver nanoparticles with the diameter of about 3 nm were added into the TiO{sub 2} layer through thermal decomposition of AgNO{sub 3} at elevated temperatures. Then, cylindrical cores (nanorods) of CoO and ZnO with 200 nm diameter were prepared, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structure and composition of the nanorods. UV-vis light absorption measurements in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm were performed to study the effect of nanorod and nanoparticle addition on the light absorption property of the alumina nanocomposites. It is found that CoO nanorods increase the light absorption of the alumina matrix composite in the wavelength range from 500 nm to 800 nm, but the TiO{sub 2} shell does not increase the light absorption much. The ZnO nanorods do not change the light absorption either. However, the addition of silver nanoparticles significantly enhances light absorption of both AAO/TiO{sub 2}/Ag/CoO and AAO/TiO{sub 2}/Ag/ZnO nanocomposites. This increase in the visible light absorption reveals that there exists surface plasmon around the fine silver nanoparticles in the nanorods.

  20. Experimental study of alumina-water and zirconia-water nanofluids convective heat transfer and viscous pressure loss in Laminar regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rea, Ulzie L

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to evaluate experimentally the convective heat transfer and viscous pressure loss characteristics of alumina-water and zirconia-water nanofluids. Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of ...

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRITICAL HEAT FLUX WITH ALUMINA-WATER NANOFLUIDS IN DOWNWARD-FACING CHANNELS FOR IN-VESSEL RETENTION APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, R.J.

    The Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of water with dispersed alumina nanoparticles was measured for the geometry and flow conditions relevant to the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) situation which can occur during core melting sequences ...

  2. Effects of dispersion and support on adsorption, catalytic and electronic properties of cobalt/alumina Co hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the effects of surface structure, dispersion, and support on the adsorption, catalytic, and electronic properties of cobalt/alumina is described, the objectives of which were to determine (1) the effects of surface structure and metal dispersion on the adsorption and catalytic properties of cobalt and (2) the effects of direct electronic interactions between metal clusters and support, on the adsorption, catalytic and electronic properties of cobalt supported on alumina. Effects of surface structure and dispersion on the adsorption, activity/selectivity, and electronic properties of Co/W single crystal surfaces and alumina-supported cobalt were investigated in a surface investigation, lab reactor studies, TPD/TPSR studies, and a Moessbauer spectroscopy study. The structure, stability, surface electronic properties, and chemisorptive properties of vapor-deposited cobalt overlayers (0-4 ML) on W(110) and W(100) were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, work function changes, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of cobalt, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide. The CO chemisorptive properties of the two cobalt overlayers are quite different, CO adsorption being dissociative on the W(100) surface and nondissociative on the W(110) surface; comparison of the results with those for Ni/W(100) indicate that Co/W(100) dissociates CO as a result of electronic interaction with the tungsten substrate.

  3. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys in Microturbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, M.P.; Matthews, W.J. (Capstone Turbine Corp.)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Capstone Turbine Corporation (CTC) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for use of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels as a material of construction for microturbine recuperator components. ORNL delivered test coupons of three different AFA compositions to CTC. The coupons were exposed in steady-state elevated turbine exit temperature (TET) engine testing, with coupons removed for analysis after accumulating ~1,500, 3,000, 4,500, and 6,000 hours of operation. Companion test coupons were also exposed in oxidation testing at ORNL at 700-800°C in air with 10% H2O. Post test assessment of the coupons was performed at ORNL by light microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The higher Al and Nb containing AFA alloys exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation/corrosion, and thus show good promise for recuperator applications.

  4. Porous Alumina Silicate Matrix Gubka for Solidification of {sup 137}Cs Strip Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aloy, Albert; Strelnikov, Alexander; Essimantovskiy, Vyacheslav ['V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute', 2nd Murinskiy str., 28, Saint Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separated liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) fractions, in particular, about 100 liters of a {sup 137}Cs strip product with activity up to {approx} 100 Ci/l (3.7 TBq/l) have been produced during the development and testing of partitioning technology and temporarily stored at V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) (Saint-Petersburg, Russia). The bench-scale experimental unit designed for operation in the hot cell was developed for {sup 137}Cs strip product solidification using an alumina silicate porous inorganic material (PIM) called Gubka. Conditions of saturation, drying, and calcinations of the salts into Gubka pores were optimized, and the operations under a remote control regime were executed during tests using a simulated strip product doped with {sup 137}Cs. The volume reduction coefficients were equal by a factor of 3.2-3.9 and a {sup 137}Cs discharge into an off-gas system was not detected. {sup 137}Cs leach rates from Gubka blocks after calcination at 800 deg. C were 1.0-1.5.10{sup -3} g/m{sup 2}.per day. (authors)

  5. Method for fabricating cermets of alumina-chromium systems. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, C.S.

    1981-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cermet insulators resistant to thermal and mechanical shock are prepared from alumina-chromium systems in the following way: by providing an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ material of about 0.5 to 7.0 micron size with a solid-hydrocarbon overcoating by slurrying an effective amount of said solid hydrocarbon in a solvent mixture containing said Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and thereafter evaporating said solvent, contacting said coated Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with a solution of chromium precursor compound, heating the resulting mixture in a reducing environment to a temperature above the decomposition temperature of said chromium precursor compound but less than the melting temperature of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or chromium for sufficient duration to yield a particulate compound having chromium essentially dispersed throughout the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and then densifying said particulate to provide said cermet characterized by a theoretical density in excess of 96% and having 0.1 to 10.0 vol. % elemental chromium metal present therein as a dispersed phase at the boundaries of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ material. Cermet components prepared thereby are useful in high temperature equipment, advanced heat engines, and nuclear-related equipment applications where electrical or thermal insulators are required.

  6. The transported entropies of ions in solid state fluorides and beta-alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharivker, V.S.; Ratkje, S.K. [Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical relevance of reversible heat effects is discussed with reference to high temperature batteries and electrolysis systems. The transported entropies of Na{sup +} in solid state mixtures of NaF and Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6} are presented. The transported entropies are S{sup *cry}{sub Na{sup +}} = 140 {+-} 7 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1} for cryolite, S{sup *NaF}{sub Na{sup +}} = 81 {+-} 8 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1} for sodium fluoride and S{sup *{beta}}{sub Na{sup +}} = 60 {+-} 5 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1} for sodium {beta}{double_prime}-alumina at the temperature range 380--500 C. The value obtained for sodium in the solid cryolite is higher than transported entropy of Na{sup +} in other solid sodium conductors and makes the authors predict that the transported entropy for Na{sup +} in the molten electrolyte mixture for aluminum production is substantial, and that so are the reversible heat effects in the aluminum electrolysis cell.

  7. Biophysicochemical interaction of a clinical pulmonary surfactant with nano-alumina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mousseau; R. Le Borgne; E. Seyrek; J. -F. Berret

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the interaction of pulmonary surfactant composed of phospholipids and proteins with nanometric alumina (Al2O3) in the context of lung exposure and nanotoxicity. We study the bulk properties of phospholipid/nanoparticle dispersions and determine the nature of their interactions. The clinical surfactant Curosurf, both native and extruded, and a protein-free surfactant are investigated. The phase behavior of mixed surfactant/particle dispersions was determined by optical and electron microscopy, light scattering and zeta potential measurements. It exhibits broad similarities with that of strongly interacting nanosystems such as polymers, proteins or particles, and supports the hypothesis of electrostatic complexation. At a critical stoichiometry, micron sized aggregates arising from the association between oppositely charged vesicles and nanoparticles are formed. Contrary to the models of lipoprotein corona or of particle wrapping, our work shows that vesicles maintain their structural integrity and trap the particles at their surfaces. The agglomeration of particles in surfactant phase is a phenomenon of importance since it could change the interactions of the particles with lung cells.

  8. Effect of Alumina Source on the Rate of Melting Demonstrated with Nuclear Waste Glass Batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The melting behaviors of three glass batches formulated to vitrify high-level waste were compared. These batches, otherwise identical, differed in the alumina source: one was prepared with corundum (Al2O3), another with gibbsite [Al(OH)3], and the other with boehmite [AlO(OH)]. Batch samples, in the form of loose batches or pressed pellets, were heated at 5°C/min up to 1200°C. The expansion of pellets was monitored photographically. Quenched samples of batches, heated in crucibles, were thin-sectioned, investigated with optical microscopy, and analyzed with X-ray diffraction to quantify crystalline phases. Finally, batch-to-glass conversion was investigated with thermal analysis. Corundum was still present in one batch up to 900°C whereas gibbsite and boehmite dissolved below 500°C. In the batch with corundum, quartz, the source of silica, dissolved marginally earlier than in the batches with gibbsite and boehmite. Unlike the batch with corundum that exhibited considerable foaming, the batches with gibbsite and boehmite did not produce primary foam and made a more homogeneous glass. The occurrence of primary foam in the batch with corundum is a likely cause of a low rate of melting within the cold cap of a large-scale electric melter.

  9. Combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control using ferrous{center_dot}EDTA and a secondary additive in a lime-based aqueous scrubber system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Livengood, C.D.; Harkness, J.B.L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of NO{sub x} control into existing flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems addresses site-specific control requirements while minimizing retrofit difficulties. Argonne has studied the use of the metal-chelate additives, such as ferrous{center_dot}EDTA in various wet FGD chemistries, to promote combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} scrubbing. A major process problem is oxidation of the iron to the ferric species, leading to a significant decrease in NO{sub x}-removal capability. Argonne discovered a class of organic compounds that, when used with ferrous{center_dot}EDTA in a sodium carbonate chemistry, could maintain high levels of NO{sub x} removal. However, those antioxidant/reducing agents are not effective in a lime-based chemistry, and a broader investigation of antioxidants was initiated. This paper discusses results of that investigation, which found a practical antioxidant/reducing agent capable of maintaining NO{sub x} removals of about 50% (compared with about 15% without the agent) in a lime-based FGD chemistry with FE(II){center_dot}EDTA. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Combined SO sub 2 /NO sub x control using ferrouster dot EDTA and a secondary additive in a lime-based aqueous scrubber system. [Sodium ascorbate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Livengood, C.D.; Harkness, J.B.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of NO{sub x} control into existing flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems addresses site-specific control requirements while minimizing retrofit difficulties. Argonne has studied the use of the metal-chelate additives, such as ferrous{center dot}EDTA in various wet FGD chemistries, to promote combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} scrubbing. A major process problem is oxidation of the iron to the ferric species, leading to a significant decrease in NO{sub x}-removal capability. Argonne discovered a class of organic compounds that, when used with ferrous{center dot}EDTA in a sodium carbonate chemistry, could maintain high levels of NO{sub x} removal. However, those antioxidant/reducing agents are not effective in a lime-based chemistry, and a broader investigation of antioxidants was initiated. This paper discusses results of that investigation, which found a practical antioxidant/reducing agent capable of maintaining NO{sub x} removals of about 50% (compared with about 15% without the agent) in a lime-based FGD chemistry with FE(II){center dot}EDTA. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Liming Terminology and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Neutralizing power per weight of material relative to pure CaCO3 CaCO3 + 2H+ Ca2+ + CO2 + H2O Ca(OH)2 + 2H+ Ca2 Recommendation in IA 6 inch incorporation depth Buffer pH Target pH 6.5 Target pH 6.9 ----- CaCO3 to apply (lb

  12. Surface acidity and cumene conversion. II. A study of. gamma. -alumina containing fluoride, cobalt, and molybdenum additives: the effect of reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boorman, P.M.; Kydd, R.A.; Sarbak, Z.; Somogyvari, A.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of reduction of the cumene conversion activity of a series of fluoride-impregnated, alumina-supported cobalt-molybdenum catalysts has been investigated. Such catalysts exhibit two different types of Broensted acid sites, one associated with the molybdenum and the other with the fluorided alumina surface. Reduction with H/sub 2/ eliminates the former type of site, but does not affect the latter. Reduction does not affect the activity of the alumina catalyst which is impregnated only with fluoride, but conversions for the other catalysts are reduced by 2-10%. In hydrocracking experiments, the dramatic influence of fluoride impregnation on cumene conversion and the synergistic nature of the fluoride and cobalt/molybdenum are demonstrated.

  13. Preliminary study of niobium alloy contamination by transport through helium. [Nb-1Zr; Sm-Co; Hiperco 50 steel; alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheuermann, C.M.; Moore, T.J.; Wheeler, D.R.

    1987-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary tests were conducted to determine if interstitial element transport through a circulating helium working fluid was a potential problem in Brayton and Stirling space power systems. Test specimens exposed to a thermal gradient for up to 3000 h included Nb-1%Zr, a Sm-Co alloy, Hiperco 50 steel, and alumina to simulate various engine components of the Brayton and Stirling systems. Results indicate that helium transport of interstitial contaminants can be minimized over a 7-y life with monometallic Nb-1%Zr design. Exposure with other materials indicated a potential for interstitial contaminant transport.

  14. Final report on the application of chaos theory to an alumina sensor for aluminum reduction cells. Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williford, R.E.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four chaos-related digital signal analysis (DSA) methods were applied to the analysis of voltage and current signals collected from aluminum electrolysis cells. Two separate data bases were analyzed: bench-scale laboratory experiments and a pilot-scale test. The objective was to assess the feasibility of using these types of data and analysis methods as the basis for a non-intrusive sensor to measure the alumina content in the electrolysis bath. This was the first time chaos theory approaches have been employed to analyze aluminum electrolysis cells.

  15. Density dependence of the room temperature thermal conductivity of atomic layer deposition-grown amorphous alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, Caroline S.; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Parsons, Gregory N.; Losego, Mark D. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the thermal conductivity of atomic layer deposition-grown amorphous alumina thin films as a function of atomic density. Using time domain thermoreflectance, we measure the thermal conductivity of the thin alumina films at room temperature. The thermal conductivities vary ?35% for a nearly 15% change in atomic density and are substrate independent. No density dependence of the longitudinal sound speeds is observed with picosecond acoustics. The density dependence of the thermal conductivity agrees well with a minimum limit to thermal conductivity model that is modified with a differential effective-medium approximation.

  16. Fatigue properties of atomic-layer-deposited alumina ultra-barriers and their implications for the reliability of flexible organic electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumert, E. K.; Pierron, O. N. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The fatigue degradation properties of atomic-layer-deposited alumina, with thickness ranging from 4.2 to 50 nm, were investigated using a silicon micro-resonator on which the coatings were deposited and strained in a static or cyclic manner, with strain amplitudes up to 2.2%, in controlled environments. Based on the measured resonant frequency evolution, post-test scanning electron microscopy observations, and finite element models, it is shown that cracks in the alumina nucleate and propagate under cyclic loading, and that the crack growth rates scale with the strain energy release rates for crack channeling. The implications for the reliability of flexible electronics are discussed.

  17. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ethanol/gasoline blends over a silver/alumina catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL] [ORNL; Fisher, Galen [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean gasoline engines running on ethanol/gasoline blends and equipped with a silver/alumina catalyst for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ethanol provide a pathway to reduced petroleum consumption through both increased biofuel utilization and improved engine efficiency relative to the current stoichiometric gasoline engines that dominate the U.S. light duty vehicle fleet. A pre-commercial silver/alumina catalyst demonstrated high NOx conversions over a moderate temperature window with both neat ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends containing at least 50% ethanol. Selectivity to NH3 increases with HC dosing and ethanol content in gasoline blends, but appears to saturate at around 45%. NO2 and acetaldehyde behave like intermediates in the ethanol SCR of NO. NH3 SCR of NOx does not appear to play a major role in the ethanol SCR reaction mechanism. Ethanol is responsible for the low temperature SCR activity observed with the ethanol/gasoline blends. The gasoline HCs do not deactivate the catalyst ethanol SCR activity, but they also do not appear to be significantly activated by the presence of ethanol.

  18. The adhesion of electroless Ni(P) on alumina ceramic using a vacuum-deposited Ti-Pd activator layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severin, J.W.; Hokke, R.; Wel, H. van der; Johnson, M.T.; With, G. de (Philips Research Labs., Eindhoven (Netherlands))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adhesion of electrolessly deposited nickel on Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] ceramic substrates using sputtered and evaporated Ti-Pd activator films was studied. The adhesion was measured using the direct pull-off test and the 90[degree] peel test. The morphology and the chemical composition of the fracture surfaces of the samples with evaporated Ti-Pd activator film were studied with scanning electron microscopy/energy, dispersive x-ray, and static secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Failure did not occur along the metal-ceramic interface, but mainly in the alumina, and therefore the strength of the system is determined primarily by the substrate material. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to study the interface structure before failure. The oxidation state of Ti at the interface was measured with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This was carried out in the (sub)monolayer range by using a Ti wedge deposited on alumina with a maximum thickness of 0.35 nm. It is concluded that the strong adhesion at the metal-ceramic interface is caused by chemical bonding of the first Ti monolayer with substrate oxygen atoms.

  19. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul G.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and significant plastic deformation during compressi on . On the other hand, the micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited brittle f racture in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 3um Al 2 O 3 particles fractured into pieces without observable plastic deformation in compression. Particle deformation behaviors will be used to inform Al 2 O 3 coating deposition parameters and particle - particle bonding in the consolidated Al 2 O 3 coatings.

  20. Template Synthesis of Ordered Pt Nanorods in Porous Anodic Alumina Yar-Ming Wang, Hong-Hsiang Kuo, and Mark W. Verbrugge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Wei

    , Singapore 639798 High-purity aluminum was anodized to form an alumina coating layer (typically 10 to 30 µm composite layer could be used as an oxidizing catalyst for automotive applications. The morphologies (Fig. 1B) obtained after removing the front surface of the aluminum oxide have been observed using

  1. Two-dimensional finite element simulation of fracture and fatigue behaviours of alumina microstructures for hip prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kyungmok; Géringer, Jean; 10.1177/0954411911422843

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a two-dimensional (2D) finite element simulation for fracture and fatigue behaviours of pure alumina microstructures such as those found at hip prostheses. Finite element models are developed using actual Al2O3 microstructures and a bilinear cohesive zone law. Simulation conditions are similar to those found at a slip zone in a dry contact between a femoral head and an acetabular cup of hip prosthesis. Contact stresses are imposed to generate cracks in the models. Magnitudes of imposed stresses are higher than those found at the microscopic scale. Effects of microstructures and contact stresses are investigated in terms of crack formation. In addition, fatigue behaviour of the microstructure is determined by performing simulations under cyclic loading conditions. It is shown that crack density observed in a microstructure increases with increasing magnitude of applied contact stress. Moreover, crack density increases linearly with respect to the number of fatigue cycles within a given con...

  2. Effect of palladium dispersion on the capture of toxic components from fuel gas by palladium-alumina sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Rupp, E.C.; Stanko, D.C.; Howard, B.; Pennline, H.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersion and location of Pd in alumina-supported sorbents prepared by different methods was found to influence the performance of the sorbents in the removal of mercury, arsine, and hydrogen selenide from a simulated fuel gas. When Pd is well dispersed in the pores of the support, contact interaction with the support is maximized, Pd is less susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. and the sorbent has better long-term activity for adsorption of arsine and hydrogen selenide. but poorer adsorption capacity for Hg. As the contact interaction between Pd and the support is lessened the Pd becomes more susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. resulting in higher capacity for Hg, but poorer long-term performance for adsorption of arsenic and selenium.

  3. [sup 27]Al NMR, GT-IR and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD characterization of fluorided alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCanio, E.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States) Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Bruno, J.W. (Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Nero, V.P.; Edwards, J.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New environmental legislation in the United States requiring reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels is making its necessary to develop better, alternative acid catalysts for alkylation and isomerization reactions, and for hydrotreating catalysts for sulfur and nitrogen removal from refinery streams. A series of F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples (wt % F = 0 to 20) has been studied using a combination of solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR, FT-IR, and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD techniques. Solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR is particularly sensitive to amorphous phases or small crystallites present on the catalyst surface, many of which cannot be detected by XRD. [sup 27]Al NMR shows the presence of three types of AlF[sub 3](H[sub 2]O)[sub n] species (with n varying between 0 and 3) on fluorided alumina. FT-IR studies of ethanol adsorption show that fluoride blocks the sites required for dissociative chemisorption of ethanol. A similar analysis of adsorbed pyridine shows an increase in the number of Broensted acid sites with the addition of up to 10 wt % fluoride. However, increasing the fluoride loading to 20 wt % decreases the number of Broensted acid sites. The TPD of ethanol-[sup 18]O from F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples shows that at low levels fluoride serves to block Lewis acid sites, but at higher levels its predominant role is to increase the Broensted acidity of the alumina surface. The pyridine adsorption and TPD experiments show that fluoride strengthens the remaining Lewis acid sites. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Generation of alkali-free and high-proton concentration layer in a soda lime glass using non-contact corona discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Nishii, Junji [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan)] [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan); Funatsu, Shiro [Production Technology Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1-1 Suehiro-cyo, Tsurumiku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan)] [Production Technology Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1-1 Suehiro-cyo, Tsurumiku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio [Research Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1150 Hazawa-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8755 (Japan)] [Research Center, Asahi Glass Co., Ltd., 1150 Hazawa-cho, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8755 (Japan); Harada, Kenji [Department of Computer Science, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)] [Department of Computer Science, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation mechanisms of alkali-free and high-proton concentration surfaces were investigated for a soda lime glass using a corona discharge treatment under an atmospheric pressure. Protons produced by high DC voltage around an anode needle electrode were incorporated into a sodium ion site in the anode side glass. The sodium ion was swept away to the cathode side as a charge carrier. Then it was discharged. The precipitated sodium was transformed to a Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} powder when the surface contacted with air. The sodium ion in the glass surface layer of the anode side was replaced completely by protons. The concentration of OH groups in the layer was balanced with the amount of excluded sodium ions. The substitution reaction of sodium ions with protons tends to be saturated according to a square root function of time. The alkali depletion layer formation rate was affected by the large difference in mobility between sodium ions and protons in the glass.

  5. Effects of dispersion and support on adsorption, catalytic and electronic properties of cobalt/alumina Co hydrogenation catalysts. Final progress report, August 1, 1987--July 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the effects of surface structure, dispersion, and support on the adsorption, catalytic, and electronic properties of cobalt/alumina is described, the objectives of which were to determine (1) the effects of surface structure and metal dispersion on the adsorption and catalytic properties of cobalt and (2) the effects of direct electronic interactions between metal clusters and support, on the adsorption, catalytic and electronic properties of cobalt supported on alumina. Effects of surface structure and dispersion on the adsorption, activity/selectivity, and electronic properties of Co/W single crystal surfaces and alumina-supported cobalt were investigated in a surface investigation, lab reactor studies, TPD/TPSR studies, and a Moessbauer spectroscopy study. The structure, stability, surface electronic properties, and chemisorptive properties of vapor-deposited cobalt overlayers (0-4 ML) on W(110) and W(100) were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, work function changes, and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of cobalt, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide. The CO chemisorptive properties of the two cobalt overlayers are quite different, CO adsorption being dissociative on the W(100) surface and nondissociative on the W(110) surface; comparison of the results with those for Ni/W(100) indicate that Co/W(100) dissociates CO as a result of electronic interaction with the tungsten substrate.

  6. Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped lead bismuth alumina borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goud, K. Krishna Murthy, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Reddy, M. Chandra Shekhar, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Rao, B. Appa, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead bismuth alumina borate glasses codoped with Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} were prepared by melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been studied. Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to to the f ? f transitions for evaluating ?{sub 2}, ?{sub 4} and ?{sub 6} parameters. Radiative properties like branching ratio ?{sub r} and the radiative life time ?{sub R} have been determined on the basis of Judd-Ofelt theory. Upconversion emissions have been observed under 980nm laser excitation at room temperature. Green and red up-conversion emissions are centered at 530, 550 and 656 nm corresponding to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+} respectively. The results obtained are discussed quantitatively based on the energy transfer between Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}.

  7. Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

  8. Stabilization of hexagonal close-packed metallic nickel for alumina-supported systems prepared from Ni(II) glycinate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Vicente [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface (UMR 7609 CNRS), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Marceau, Eric [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface (UMR 7609 CNRS), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: eric.marceau@upmc.fr; Beaunier, Patricia [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface (UMR 7609 CNRS), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Che, Michel [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface (UMR 7609 CNRS), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Institut Universitaire de France (France); Train, Cyrille [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique et Materiaux Moleculaires (UMR 7071 CNRS), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The decomposition in flowing argon of the neutral complex [Ni{sup II}(glycinate){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] leads to a mixture of face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metallic nickel. The latter is the main phase when the Ni(II) complex is supported on alumina. Unlike most hexagonal Ni phases described earlier, and similar to hexagonal Ni{sub 3}C, the unit cell parameters (a=0.2493 and c=0.4084nm) lead to Ni-Ni distances equal to those encountered in fcc Ni. TEM shows that the nanoparticles are protected by graphite layers, whose elimination by heating in hydrogen results in transformation to the fcc phase and crystal growth. Magnetic measurements provide evidence of the coexistence of superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic nanoparticles. This result is in line with the broad size distribution observed by TEM and is interpreted on the basis of the metallic character of hcp Ni particles.

  9. X-ray Absorption Measurements on Nickel Cathode of Sodium-beta Alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-CI Chemical Associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 °C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

  10. Effects of Lime and Carbonate of Lime on Acid Phosphate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1917-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .50 .58 .05 -05 .36 .34 .56 .41 .45 day. 12.96 12 86 12:40 7.55 1.14 14 .14 .I5 .21 .32 1.17 4.08 2.80 1.40 .58 .05 .05 .30 .46 .56 1.34 .98 .81 days. 12.98 13 00 12:23 7.58 1.06 .OO days. --- 1.3.10 13 08 12... .03 .03 .41 .GO.. 1.84 1.13 1.06 16 14 .15 .17 .23 .28 .4P, 2.26 3.90 2.65 1.28 .53 .03 .03 .23 .34 .41 1.39 1.03 .76 .20 .25 .32 323 3.95 2.55 1.10 .53 .05 .05 .25 .34 -40 1.61 .93 .76 As was to be expected...

  11. Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1990 summary report. [SiC, SiN, whisker-reinforced SiN, ZrO-toughened aluminas, zirconias, joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data generated within the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) represent a valuable resource for both research and industry. The CTP database was created to provide easy access to this information in electronic and hardcopy forms by using a computerized database and by issuing periodic hardcopy reports on the database contents. This report is the sixth in a series of semiannual database summaries and covers recent additions to the database, including joined brazed specimen test data. It covers 1 SiC, 34 SiN, 10 whisker-reinforced SiN, 2 zirconia-toughened aluminas, 8 zirconias, and 34 joints.

  12. SOIL INFORMATION Last Lime Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    production. Send samples, forms, and payment to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Industrial Lawns - Bermudagrass Routine (soil pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and estimated CEC) $10, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATE SOIL TEST DESIRED AND FEES SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION Your

  13. Lime Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,LakefrontLighthouse Solar Westchester

  14. Matrix-grain-bridging contributions to the toughness of SiC composites with alumina-coated SiC platelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, J.J.; He, Y.; MoberlyChan, W.J.; De Jonghe, L.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide composites were fabricated through the incorporation of alumina-coated SiC platelets into a SiC matrix. Mechanical properties were evaluated in direct comparison with a commercial Hexoloy SiC. The fracture toughness of the composite, with a fine grained {beta}-SiC matrix, was twice that of the commercial material. The alumina-coating on the platelets provided a weak interface to promote crack deflection and platelet bridging, as well as easing densification of the composites. On the other hand, a three-fold increase in fracture toughness (9.1 MPa {radical}m) of an in situ toughened monolithic SiC was achieved by processing at higher temperatures, promoting the {beta}-to-{alpha} phase transformation and forming a microstructure containing high-aspect-ration plate-shaped grains. Efforts were made to combine the effects of coated-platelets reinforcement and in situ toughening in the matrix. Moderate high toughness (8 MPa {radical}m) was achieved by coupled toughening. The contribution of matrix-grain-bridging, however, was limited by the processing temperature at which the oxide coating was stable.

  15. Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

  16. Thermochimie solaire hautes tempratures, rsultats exprimentaux. Quelques perspectives d'application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of energy and the industrial production of lime or portland cement, using fluidized bed reactor or rotary kiln. This type of chemical reactor has been studied with small solar furnaces (power : ~ 2 k vertical (puissance utile Pu = 1,4 kW), le lit fluidisé (Fig. 1) est constitué, pour l'essentiel. d'un tube

  17. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 58 (2012) 817 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2011 Keywords: Fly ash Stabilization Heavy metals Leaching Coal combustion byproducts Highways a b (HCFA). HCFA can be activated with lime kiln dust (LKD) and used as a base layer for newly paved roads. 1. Introduction According to American Coal Ash Association (ACAA), 45% of the electricity consumed

  18. Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, ?-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koretsky, Carla [Western Michigan University] [Western Michigan University

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), ?-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2?nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of hexavalent chromium, especially at low pH. Unexpectedly, experiments with the clay minerals kaolinite and montmorillonite suggest that hexavalent chromium may interact with these solids over much longer periods of time than expected. Furthermore, hexavalent chromium may irreversibly bind to these solids, perhaps because of oxidation-reduction reactions occurring on the surfaces of the clay minerals. More work should be done to investigate and quantify these chemical reactions. Experiments conducted with mixtures of goethite, hydrous manganese oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, ?-alumina, montmorillonite and kaolinite demonstrate that it is possible to correctly predict hexavalent chromium binding in the presence of multiple minerals using thermodynamic models derived for the simpler systems. Further, these models suggest that of the six solid considered in this study, goethite is typically the solid to which most of the hexavalent chromium will bind. Experiments completed with organic-rich and organic-poor natural sediments demonstrate that in organic-rich substrates, organic matter is likely to control uptake of the hexavalent chromium. The models derived and tested in this study for hexavalent chromium binding to ?-alumina, hydrous manganese oxide, goethite, hydrous ferric oxide and clay minerals can be used to better predict changes in hexavalent chromium bioavailability and mobility in contaminated sediments and soils.

  19. Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

  20. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective alumina coating on electrical stability in dual environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alkali-containing silicate glass was recently proposed as a potential sealant for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The glass contains appreciable amount of alkalis and retains its glassy microstructure at elevated temperatures over time. It is more compliant as compared to conventional glass-ceramics sealants and could potentially heal cracks during thermal cycling. In previous papers the thermal cycle stability, thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte and YSZ-coated ferritic stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we report the electrical stability of the compliant glass with aluminized AISI441 interconnect material under DC load in dual environment at 700-800oC. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two aluminized AISI441 metal coupons as well as plain AISI441 substrates. The results showed good electrical stability with the aluminized AISI441 substrate, while unstable behavior was observed for un-coated substrates. In addition, interfacial microstructure was examined with scanning electron microscopy and correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the alumina coating demonstrated good chemical stability with the alkali-containing silicate sealing glass under DC loading.

  1. Kinetics of the reaction of iron blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents with SO{sub 2} at low temperatures: effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.F.; Shih, S.M. [Industrial Technological Research Institute, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the presence of CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and NOx in the flue gas on the kinetics of the sulfation of blast furnace slag/hydrated lime sorbents at low temperatures were studied using a differential fixed-bed reactor. When O{sub 2} and NOx were not present simultaneously, the reaction kinetics was about the same as that under the gas mixtures containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and N{sub 2} only, being affected mainly by the relative humidity. The sulfation of sorbents can be described by the surface coverage model and the model equations derived for the latter case. When both O{sub 2} and NOx, were present, the sulfation of sorbents was greatly enhanced, forming a great amount of sulfate in addition to sulfite. The surface coverage model is still valid in this case, but the model equations obtained show a more marked effect of relative humidity and negligible effects of SO{sub 2} concentration and temperature on the reaction. The effect of sorbent composition on the reaction kinetics was entirely represented by the effects of the initial specific surface area (S{sub g0}) and the Ca molar content (M{sup -1}) of sorbent. The initial conversion rate of sorbent increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}, and the ultimate conversion increased linearly with increasing S{sub g0}M{sup -1}. The model equations obtained in this work are applicable to describe the kinetics of the sulfation of the sorbents in the low-temperature dry and semidry fine gas desulfurization processes either with an upstream NOx, removal unit or without.111

  2. Analysis of Energy Savings by Painting a Rotary Kiln Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Wang, T.; Tonti, R. T.; Edwards, L.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the paint because good insulation will increase the metal shell temperature. Too much temperature increase could result in structural problems induced by differential thermal expansion between the shell metal and the refractory bricks. A detailed heat...

  3. ancient ceramic kilns: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  4. Selective Catalytic Reduction of Oxides of Nitrogen with Ethanol/Gasoline Blends over a Silver/Alumina Catalyst on Lean Gasoline Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is a very effective reductant of nitrogen oxides (NOX) over silver/alumina (Ag/Al2O3) catalysts in lean exhaust environment. With the widespread availability of ethanol/gasoline-blended fuel in the USA, lean gasoline engines equipped with an Ag/Al2O3 catalyst have the potential to deliver higher fuel economy than stoichiometric gasoline engines and to increase biofuel utilization while meeting exhaust emissions regulations. In this work a pre-commercial 2 wt% Ag/Al2O3 catalyst was evaluated on a 2.0-liter BMW lean burn gasoline direct injection engine for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOX with ethanol/gasoline blends. The ethanol/gasoline blends were delivered via in-pipe injection upstream of the Ag/Al2O3 catalyst with the engine operating under lean conditions. A number of engine conditions were chosen to provide a range of temperatures and space velocities for the catalyst performance evaluations. High NOX conversions were achieved with ethanol/gasoline blends containing at least 50% ethanol; however, higher C1/N ratio was needed to achieve greater than 90% NOX conversion, which also resulted in significant HC slip. Temperature and HC dosing were important in controlling selectivity to NH3 and N2O. At high temperatures, NH3 and N2O yields increased with increased HC dosing. At low temperatures, NH3 yield was very low, however, N2O levels became significant. The ability to generate NH3 under lean conditions has potential for application of a dual SCR approach (HC SCR + NH3 SCR) to reduce fuel consumption needed for NOX reduction and/or increased NOX conversion, which is discussed in this work.

  5. Using the new lime recommendations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    of reagent grade CaCO3 added to each soil (3x) 2. Soil and CaCO3 were thoroughly mixed 3. Water added 4. Soil

  6. Lime and Phosphoric Acid Requirements for Chicks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, R. M. (Ross Madison)

    1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Magee, M. S., Farm Management Jeanne F. DeMottier, Asst. Chemist Rural Home Research : R. L. Schwartz, B. S., Asst. Chemist Jesse Wh'itacre, Ph. D., Chief C. M. Pounders. B. S., Asst. Chemist Mary Anna Grimes, M. S.. Textiles Horticulture : Elizabeth...

  7. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  8. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetin, Bora [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Aydilek, Ahmet H., E-mail: aydilek@umd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Li, Lin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 17068 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the evaluation of leaching potential of fly ash-lime mixed soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This objective is met with experimental and numerical analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn leaching decreases with increase in fly ash content while Ba, B, Cu increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu while Zn increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical analysis predicted lower field metal concentrations. - Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of unpaved road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater impacts of barium, boron, copper, and zinc leaching. This objective was met by a combination of batch water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted on soil alone, fly ash alone, and URM-fly ash-lime kiln dust mixtures. The results indicated that an increase in fly ash and lime content has significant effects on leaching behavior of heavy metals from URM-fly ash mixture. An increase in fly ash content and a decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu whereas Zn leaching was primarily affected by the fly ash content. Numerically predicted field metal concentrations were significantly lower than the peak metal concentrations obtained in laboratory column leach tests, and field concentrations decreased with time and distance due to dispersion in soil vadose zone.

  10. Quantifying the Co-benefits of Energy-Efficiency Programs: A Case Study of the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ingredient in cement: vertical shaft kilns and rotary kilns.cement was produced by plants using outdated vertical shaft kilns (Vertical shaft kilns (Mt) Rotary (NSP + other) kilns (Mt) Clinker production (Mt) Clinker-cement

  11. NUCLEAR POWERED CO2 CAPTURE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere was recently proposed. This process uses a closed cycle of sodium and calcium hydroxide, carbonate, and oxide transformations to capture dilute CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and to generate a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} that is amenable to sequestration or subsequent chemical transformations. In one of the process steps, a fossil-fueled lime kiln is needed, which reduces the net CO{sub 2} capture of the process. It is proposed to replace the fossil-fueled lime kiln with a modified kiln heated by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. This will have the effect of eliminating the use of fossil fuels for the process and increasing the net CO{sub 2} capture. Although the process is suitable to support sequestration, the use of a nuclear power source for the process provides additional capabilities, and the captured CO{sub 2} may be combined with nuclear-produced hydrogen to produce liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or other technologies. Conceivably, such plants would be carbon-neutral, and could be placed virtually anywhere without being tied to fossil fuel sources or geological sequestration sites.

  12. Performance evaluation of ALCAN-AASF50-ferric coated activated alumina and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic removal in the presence of competitive ions in an active well :Kirtland field trial - initial studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neidel, Linnah L.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Khandaker, Nadim Reza

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a field trial program carried out at Well No.15 located at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico, to evaluate the performance of two relatively new arsenic removal media, ALCAN-AASF50 (ferric coated activated alumina) and granular ferric hydroxide (US Filter-GFH). The field trial program showed that both media were able to remove arsenate and meet the new total arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) in drinking water of 10 {micro}g/L. The arsenate removal capacity was defined at a breakthrough effluent concentration of 5 {micro}g/L arsenic (50% of the arsenic MCL of 10 {micro}g/L). At an influent pH of 8.1 {+-} 0.4, the arsenate removal capacity of AASF50 was 33.5 mg As(V)/L of dry media (29.9 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). At an influent pH of 7.2 {+-} 0.3, the arsenate removal capacity of GFH was 155 mg As(V)/L of wet media (286 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). Silicate, fluoride, and bicarbonate ions are removed by ALCAN AASF50. Chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions were not removed by AASF50. The GFH media also removed silicate and bicarbonate ions; however, it did not remove fluoride, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions. Differences in the media performance partly reflect the variations in the feed-water pH between the 2 tests. Both the exhausted AASF50 and GFH media passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test with respect to arsenic and therefore could be disposed as nonhazardous waste.

  13. Improved Materials for Use as Components in Kraft Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, J.R.

    2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to evaluate current and improved materials and materials processing conditions for use as components in kraft black liquor recovery boilers and other unit processes. The main areas addressed were: (1) Improved Black Liquor Nozzles, (2) Weld Overlay of Composite Floor Tubes, and (3) Materials for Lime Kilns. Iron aluminide was evaluated as an alternate material for the nozzles used to inject an aqueous solution known as black liquor into recovery boilers as well for the uncooled lining in the ports used for the nozzles. Although iron aluminide is known to have much better sulfidation resistance in gases than low alloy and stainless steels, it did not perform adequately in the environment where it came into contact with molten carbonate, sulfide and sulfate salts. Weld overlaying carbon steel tubes with a layer of stainless weld metal was a proposed method of extending the life of recovery boiler floor tubes that have experienced considerable fireside corrosion. After exposure under service conditions, sections of weld overlaid floor tubes were removed from a boiler floor and examined metallographically. Examination results indicated satisfactory performance of the tubes. Refractory-lined lime kilns are a critical component of the recovery process in kraft pulp mills, and the integrity of the lining is essential to the successful operation of the kiln. A modeling study was performed to determine the cause of, and possible solutions for, the repeated loss of the refractory lining from the cooled end of a particular kiln. The evaluation showed that the temperature, the brick shape and the coefficient of friction between the bricks were the most important parameters influencing the behavior of the refractory lining.

  14. Improved Materials for Use as Components in Kraft Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, J.R.

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to evaluate current and improved materials and materials processing conditions for use as components in kraft black liquor recovery boilers and other unit processes. The main areas addressed were: (1) Improved Black Liquor Nozzles, (2) Weld Overlay of Composite Floor Tubes, and (3) Materials for Lime Kilns. Iron aluminide was evaluated as an alternate material for the nozzles used to inject an aqueous solution known as black liquor into recovery boilers as well for the uncooled lining in the ports used for the nozzles. Although iron aluminide is known to have much better sulfidation resistance in gases than low alloy and stainless steels, it did not perform adequately in the environment where it came into contact with molten carbonate, sulfide and sulfate salts. Weld overlaying carbon steel tubes with a layer of stainless weld metal was a proposed method of extending the life of recovery boiler floor tubes that have experienced considerable fireside corrosion. After exposure under service conditions, sections of weld overlaid floor tubes were removed from a boiler floor and examined metallographically. Examination results indicated satisfactory performance of the tubes. Refractory-lined lime kilns are a critical component of the recovery process in kraft pulp mills, and the integrity of the lining is essential to the successful operation of the kiln. A modeling study was performed to determine the cause of, and possible solutions for, the repeated loss of the refractory lining from the cooled end of a particular kiln. The evaluation showed that the temperature, the brick shape and the coefficient of friction between the bricks were the most important parameters influencing the behavior of the refractory lining.

  15. Proceedings of the DOE/Industry Sensor Working Group meeting, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper report contains topics presented at a sensor workshop group meeting. The topics describe measuring instruments of use in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include: measurement of solids fraction; process instrumentation research for the pulp paper industry; real-time non-contact optical surface motion monitor; on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties; hierarchical intelligent control of industrial processes -- an in-parallel lime kiln application; proposal for research on lignin concentration measurement in pulping liquors; and advanced polymeric sensor materials for industrial drying.

  16. Muffle furnace evaluation of FGD sludge-coal-clay mixtures as potential synthetic aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettit, Jesse William

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or returned to the adjacent surface coal mines for disposal. Alternatives to these two methods of disposal are being studied (3, 6, 11). The feasibility of using this material as a raw material in the manufacture of synthetic aggregates has recently been... suitability of synthetic aggregates made from lignite fly ash using a rotary kiln. Lignite or subbituminous coals such as those used are typical of the high-lime or "western" coals that are mined in the western half of the United States. Because of the high...

  17. Reuse of Drill Cutting Ash as a Stabilizing Agent for Niger Delta Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alayaki, F. M.; Al-Tabbaa, A.; Ayotamuno, M. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Onne Oil and Gas Free Zone, Rivers State, Nigeria. B. Niger Delta Soils The peculiar geology of Niger Delta and the derived soils have striking peculiarity that is different from other common laterite soils. Previous studies revealed that the in... to that in use at the North Sea. The binders were Portland cement, hydrated lime, pulverized fuel ash, blast furnace slag, MgO cements, zeolites, silica fume, and cement kiln dust. The study showed that the binders could effectively immobilized the toxic...

  18. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the small cement plants, earthen vertical kiln (and hollowcement plant in North China utilizing vertical shaft kilnsCement Industry Technical Conference: 75- Replacing Vertical Shaft Kilns

  19. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with theobsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with theobsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with the

  20. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 165 conventional vertical cement kilns were mechanized,Small cement plants use vertical kilns and generally haveof cement kilns The mechanization of conventional vertical

  1. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  2. IMPROVED CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ALUMINA REFRACTORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John P. Hurley; Patty L. Kleven

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial objective of this project was to do a literature search to define the problems of refractory selection in the metals and glass industries. The problems fall into three categories: Economic--What do the major problems cost the industries financially? Operational--How do the major problems affect production efficiency and impact the environment? and Scientific--What are the chemical and physical mechanisms that cause the problems to occur? This report presents a summary of these problems. It was used to determine the areas in which the EERC can provide the most assistance through bench-scale and laboratory testing. The final objective of this project was to design and build a bench-scale high-temperature controlled atmosphere dynamic corrosion application furnace (CADCAF). The furnace will be used to evaluate refractory test samples in the presence of flowing corrodents for extended periods, to temperatures of 1600 C under controlled atmospheres. Corrodents will include molten slag, steel, and glass. This test should prove useful for the glass and steel industries when faced with the decision of choosing the best refractory for flowing corrodent conditions.

  3. Alumina-forming Austenitic Alloys Licensed | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    powder metal stainless steels and specialty alloys including high temperature (iron-nickel-cobalt base), stainless, superior corrosion resistant, controlled expansion alloys,...

  4. Study of Alumina in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chung

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    matrix structure can be seen in Figure 3 , Figure 4, Figure 5 , and Figure 6 . 6 Figure 3 Contour Phase Fraction of FCC for SS-316 with Variable Temperature and Chromium Content Cr (wt%) T e m p e r a t u r e ( K ) 0 5 10 15 20 600 800 1000... 1200 1400 1 0.95 0.9 0.85 0.8 0.75 0.7 0.65 0.6 0.55 0.5 0.45 0.4 0.35 0.3 0.25 0.2 0.15 0.1 0.05 0 7 Figure 4 Contour Phase Fraction of FCC for SS-316 with Variable Temperature and Nickel Content Ni (wt%) T e m p e r a t u r e ( K ) 0 5 10...

  5. Design of fuel efficient brick kiln for ceramic water filter firing in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adjorlolo, Eric (Eric James Kofi)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic water filters are currently produced in Ghana in order to provide a household solution to contaminated water. These filters, locally branded with the name Kosim filter by originating from Potters for Peace-Nicaragua, ...

  6. Indirect-Fired Kiln Conserves Scrap Aluminum and Cuts Costs | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJune 25, 2012 EMSummary

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Work Plans

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    implementation actions to reduce greenhouse gas emission intensity from fuel combustion per ton of product by 8% between 2002 and 2012. NLA members, with the assistance of...

  8. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime - Energy Management

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    upgrades, and savings and effectiveness of energy efficiency measures. Processing Heating Assessment and Survey Tool Qualification (PHAST) PHAST assists users to survey...

  9. Original article Effects of liming and gypsum regimes on chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    chemistry. The natural soil was reconstituted in columns equipped with zero tension lysimeters. CaCO3, CaCO3 traitements sous forme CaCO3, CaCO3 + MgO et CaSO4, 2H2O sont appoités aux doses équivalentes en CaO de 0, 0

  10. agricultural liming techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 11 Air Temperature and Solar Radiation 31 Agricultural Environmental Geosciences Websites Summary: Agricultural...

  11. Enhancement of phosphogypsum with high lime fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Chuck Alan

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the effects of source size and background soil radiation were included. The quantity of radon released fzom the pile depended on the following (26): 1. The specific activity of Ra-226 in the phosphogypsum 2. The eminating power of the radon (the amount... of radon released per unit generated). 3. The atmospheric pressure 4 ~ The di f fus ion coef f ic ient, which includes the effects of 23 moisture, for the radon in the phosphogypsum. For example, high moisture content or water standing on the pile...

  12. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock...

  13. Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of widespread availability, low cost, sustainability, and potential supply far greater than that of food crops, lignocellulosic biomass is one of the most promising feedstocks for producing biofuels through fermentation processes. Among...

  14. Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

  15. Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

  16. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Se Hoon

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, are environmentally friendly because they emit less pollution without contributing net carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Among lignocellulosic biomass, corn stover is a very useful feedstock...

  17. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Lime: Resources and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resources & Links Software Tools DOE BestPractices Software Tools DOE BestPractices offers a range of software tools and databases that help manufacturers assess their plant's...

  18. Enhancement of phosphogypsum with high lime fly ash 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Chuck Alan

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation. Detailed Investigation. 51 58 IV CONCLUSIONS V RECOMMENDATIONS 114 REFERENCES 115 APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C Historical Summary of the Wet Process Phosphoric Acid Industry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hemihydrate and Hemihydrate-Dihydrate... generally exist in three different forms. 1. dihydrous (CaSO& 2H20) 2 . hemihydrous (CaSOd 1/2 H20) 3. anhydrous (CaSO ) It is these crystals, called phosphogypsum, that are filtered from the acid solution and piped to stockpiles in slurry form...

  19. Lime Energy formerly Electric City Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLighting Control Design Jump to:PhotonicsLihirLilyNewEnergy

  20. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    87 kWh/t cement for vertical shaft kiln (VSK) production (cement is produced by either a rotary kiln or a verticalChinese Cement Kilns. Rotary Kiln Production Vertical Shaft

  1. Effects of lime rate, lime ECCE, and B rate on rose clover and coastal bermudagrass dry matter yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villavicencio Batres, Rodolfo

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and is frequently observed in Al-treated plants (Alam and Adams, 1979). Plant P concentration was greater in the roots but lower in tops of AI-treated plants (0. 2 and 0. 6 mM of AI2(SO4)3) than the control. The roots of Al-treated plants were thick and brown...

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for Cement Making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern Vertical Shaft Kiln Technology” World Cement 1 26cement has ordered a vertical roller mill for the new kiln

  3. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  4. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  5. Method for scavenging mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  6. Effect of thermal residual stresses on the strength for both alumina/Ni/alumina and alumina/Ni/nickel alloy bimaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and improved over the past 60 years, among which solid-state diffusion bonding [2­7] and reactive metal brazing to ceramic materials. For a solid-state diffusion bonding, for which the wettability does not intervene or evaporation condensation mass transport pro- cesses. Therefore, the diffusion bonding process is made easier

  7. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    http://www.wbcsd.ch/web/projects/cement/pop-report.pdfShui Ni 1 and Shui Ni 2 cement plants in Shangdong ProvinceReferences Ash Grove Cement, n.d. , “Cement Manufacturing

  8. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air used for coal combustion and generation of heat withineven the 0.19% CO generation in coal combustion in a highfor power generation) Possible reduction in coal use Coal

  9. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer in boiler Boiler efficiency Heat used in boiler *hr. Assuming boiler heat recovery efficiency of 90%, totalEfficiency Improvement An analysis of the performance of the heat recovery components (boilers,

  10. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system that uses steam and turbine generators to produce upcombustion (CO gas) ? Steam turbine condenser cooling waterwater to cooling towers Steam Turbine Generator Waste Heat

  11. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water to cooling towers Steam Turbine Generator Waste Heatcombustion (CO gas) ? Steam turbine condenser cooling watersystem that uses steam and turbine generators to produce up

  12. Improvement of kiln design and combustion/carbonization timing to produce charcoal from agricultural waste in Developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Jason A. (Jason Alexander)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current economic conditions in third world countries like Haiti are so poor that the majority of the population has no access to energy sources that people in the first world take for granted. In Haiti the last two percent ...

  13. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Loss Loss as % of heat input Temperature Level Volumekg-cl kcal/kg-cl % of heat input in the system Hot clinker19.6%) of the total heat input or coal used in the system.

  14. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conversion: 1 kwh = 10,500 Btu for power production Averageelectricity and at 10,500 Btu/kwh or 2,646 kcal/kHz energyHCs Unit Nm3/hr Nm3/hr cfh Btu/scf MM Btu/hr GJ/hr Btu/scf

  15. Ten case history studies of energy efficiency improvements in pulp and paper mills. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ten technologies chosen for case history development are: sonic sootblowing in boilers, boiler operation on oil-water emulsified fuel, energy efficient motors, computerized control of excess air for boilers, boiler control and load allocation, driving of waste-activated sludge by multiple effect evaporation, pre-drying of hog fuel, lime kiln computerization, heat wheel for process heat recovery, and organic Rankine bottoming cycle for thermomechanical pulping heat recovery. For each case study, there is given: the company name, employee contact, plant summary, a description of the energy consuming process and of the energy-saving action, an assessment of energy savings, and the decision process leading to the adoption of the measure. A data summary for discounted cash flow analysis is tabulated for each case. (LEW)

  16. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eliminated all vertical shaft kilns in cement production.cement industry is steadily transitioning from using less-efficient vertical-shaft- kilnvertical shaft kilns to rotary kilns and endogenous process improvements, the final intensity of cement

  17. alumina ceramic foam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been obtained using hydroxyl fatty acids tubes. The stabilization results from the adsorption of monomers at the air-water interface preventing coalescence and coarsening...

  18. Sources of sintering inhibition in tape-cost aluminas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geho, M.; Palmour, H. III [Kanebo Ltd, Osaka (Japan)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-purity, lightly MgO-doped Al2O3 tapes were tape cast from slurries. Dilatometric data obtained in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the cast plane under constant-rate-of-heating conditions were utilized to evaluate all aspects of densification behavior during sintering. 38 refs.

  19. INITIATION OF DEGRADATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINE SODIUM-BETA ALUMINA ELECTROLYTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, L.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Energy, under Contract W-7405-Eng-48. References R. D.Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-48 mum # ms MWHfflI , s w a

  20. Decomposition of Perfluorocompounds on Alumina-Based Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanno, Shuichi; Tamata, Shin; Kurokawa, Hideaki

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The control of the atmospheric release of PFCs (perfluorocompounds) is an important environmental problem worldwide. PFCs are powerful greenhouse gases used by the semiconductor and liquid crystal industries as etching and cleaning agents. We developed a catalyst that decomposes PFCs with only water. Al2O3 was selected from the survey of some single metal-oxide catalysts. Addition of another metal-oxide improved the decomposition ratio and durability. The Al2O3-based catalyst decomposed CF4, C2F6, C3F8, C4F8, NF3 and SF6 by more than 99% at 750 degrees Celsius. Furthermore, our catalyst retained a high decomposition ratio as demonstrated by a continuous run for about 4000 hours at 700-750 degrees Celsius. The influence of chlorine as an impurity with regard to the SF6 decomposition ratio on the catalyst was examined. SF6 was decomposed at more than 99% during 8 hours in the presence of 400 ppm chlorine. Chlorine concentration in the outlet gas was less than TLV. No chlorine compounds were found by X-ray diffraction analysis of the used catalyst. That is, the hydrogenation of chlorine did not inhibit the surface catalytic reaction for PFC. Also, CF4 was decomposed at the condition of 1.4% of high concentration. The conversion remained higher than 99% throughout during a durability test. Furthermore, we investigated a large-scale decomposition system in the paper.

  1. anodic alumina mask: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and analyzed on the visible range of UV Spectrophotometer at 700 m. The equilibrium isotherm data are obtained at pH of 4.5 and 6. A peak adsorption capacity of 12-14 mg...

  2. Improved Alumina Loading in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.; Vienna, J.D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Peeler, D.K.; Fox, K.M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Aloy, A.; Trofimenko, A.V. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gerdes, K.D. [EM-21, Office of Waste Processing, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent tank retrieval, blending, and treatment strategies at both the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford have identified increased amounts of high-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} waste streams that are scheduled to be processed through their respective high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities. It is well known that the addition of small amounts of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses generally enhances the durability of the waste glasses. However, at higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4}) formation can result in a severe deterioration of the chemical durability of the slowly cooled glass near the center of the canister. Additionally, higher concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} generally increase the liquidus temperature of the melt and decrease the processing rate. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) are jointly performing laboratory and scaled-melter tests, through US Department of Energy, EM-21 Office of Waste Processing program, to develop glass formulations with increased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. These glasses are formulated for specific DOE waste compositions at Hanford and Savannah River Site. The objectives are to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints such as viscosity, liquidus temperature, and glass durability. This paper summarizes the results of recent tests of simulated Hanford HLW glasses containing up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in glass. In summary: Glasses with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading ranging from 25 to 27 wt% were formulated and tested at a crucible scale. Successful glass formulations with up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} that do not precipitate nepheline during CCC treatment and had spinel crystals 1 vol% or less after 24 hr heat treatment at 950 deg. C were obtained. The selected glass, HAL-17 with 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, had viscosity and electrical conductivity within the boundaries for adequate processing in the Joule heated melters operated at 1150 deg. C. This HAL-17 glass was successfully processed using small-scale (SMK) and larger scale (EP-5) melters. There was no indication of spinel settling during processing. The product glass samples from these melter tests contained 1 to 4 vol% spinel crystals that are likely formed during cooling. The PCT tests on the product glasses are underway. The present study demonstrated that it is possible to formulate the glasses with up to 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} that satisfy the property requirements and is processable with Joule-heated melters operated at 1150 deg. C. The 'nepheline discriminator' for HAL-17 glass is 0.45, which supports that claim that the current rule ('nepheline discriminator' < 0.62) is too restrictive. Considering that the cost of HLW treatment is highly dependent on loading of waste in glass, this result provides a potential for significant cost saving for Hanford. The maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading that can be achieved will also depend on concentrations of other components in wastes. For example, the loading of waste used in this study was also limited by the spinel crystallization after 950 deg. C 24 hr heat treatment, which suggests that the concentrations of spinel-forming components such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, ZnO, and MnO would be critical in addition to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading achievable. The observed glass production rate per unit melter surface area of 0.75 MT/(d.m{sup 2}) for SMK test is comparable to the design capacity of WTP HLW melters at 0.8 MT/(d.m{sup 2}). However, the test with EP-5 melter achieved 0.38 MT/(d.m{sup 2}), which is roughly a half of the WTP design capacity. This result may imply that the glass with 26 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} may not achieve the WTP design production rate. However, this hypothesis is not conclusive because of unknown effects of melter size and operation

  3. alumina column purification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purification Columns. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??High-purity distillation columns are highly nonlinear systems. Nonlinear Model Predictive Control of these...

  4. SLOW DEGRADATION AND ELECTRON INJECTION IN SODIUM-B ALUMINAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer of 703 XBB 804 4126 Degradation of sulfur side ofsilver staining. The degradation layer becomes more uniformMaterials Science SLOW DEGRADATION AND ELECTRON INJECTION IN

  5. INITIATION OF DEGRADATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINE SODIUM-BETA ALUMINA ELECTROLYTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, L.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boundaries. XBB 804 4130 2B Degradation initiation at 300 C,the Proceedings INITIATION OF DEGRADATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINEs w a m INITIATION OF DEGRADATION IN POLYCRYSTALLINE SODIUM-

  6. OH CONCENTRATION PROFILES OVER ALUMINA, QUARTZ, AND PLATINUM SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for micro- thrusters. Even a 2% conversion of that heat energy to usable energy (giving 0.8 to 1 MJ=kg) will exceed the best battery energy densities cur- rently achieved, and conversion efficiencies greater than of the factors affecting OH recombination rate are provided as a function of material and temperature

  7. ORNL's Alumina-forming Austenitic Alloys Licensed to Carpenter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    powder metal stainless steels and specialty alloys including high temperature (iron-nickel-cobalt base), stainless, superior corrosion resistant, controlled expansion alloys,...

  8. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Aluminum-Alumina Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudlur, Pradeep

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    with temperatures. Secondly, the goal of this study is to determine the effect of microstructures on the effective thermo-mechanical properties of the manufactured Al-Al_2O_3 composites using finite element (FE) method. Software OOF was used to convert the SEM...

  9. alumina matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  10. CO2-selective, Hybrid Membranes by Silation of Alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid membranes are feasible candidates for the separation of CO2 from gas produced in coal-based power generation since they have the potential to combine the high selectivity of polymer membranes and the high permeability of inorganic membranes. An interesting method for producing hybrid membranes is the silation of an inorganic membrane. In this method, trichloro- or alkoxy-silanes interact with hydroxyl groups on the surface of ?-AlO3 or TiO2, binding organic groups to that surface. By varying the length of these organic groups on the organosilane, it should be possible to tailor the effective pore size of the membrane. Similarly, the addition of “CO2-phillic” groups to the silating agent allows for the careful control of surface affinity and the enhancement of surface diffusion mechanisms. This method of producing hybrid membranes selective to CO2 was first attempted by Hyun [1] who silated TiO2 with phenyltriethoxysilane. Later, Way [2] silated ?-AlO3 with octadecyltrichlorosilane. Both researchers were successful in producing membranes with improved selectivity toward CO2, but permeability was not maintained at a commercially applicable level. XPS data indicated that the silating agent did not penetrate into the membrane pores and separation actually occurred in a thin “polymer-like” surface layer. The present study attempts to overcome the mass transfer problems associated with this technique by producing the desired monolayer coverage of silane, and thus develop a highly-permeable CO2-selective hybrid membrane.

  11. SLOW DEGRADATION AND ELECTRON INJECTION IN SODIUM-B ALUMINAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Mitoff of the General Electric Research and Developmentobtained from the General Electric Research and Development

  12. Microfluidic Investigation of Tracer Dye Diffusion in Alumina Nanofluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Serdar 1979-

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    on enhanced mass diffusion and the possibility of tailoring mass transport by direct manipulation of molecular diffusion. Therefore, a microfluidic approach capable of directly probing tracer diffusion between nanoparticle-laden fluid streams was developed...

  13. alumina fibrous insulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  14. Behavior of alumina particles in atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle size, velocity and temperature was mapped over the flow field of a 31.5 kW plasma torch. The effects of varying the powder loading were studied. The powder feed rate was varied between .45 and 2.05 kg/hr independent of the carrier gas flow rate. The particle flow field was non-symmetric due to the method of particle injection. The data indicate that powder feed rate does not significantly affect either the temperature or velocity of the particles, for typical plasma spray conditions, and that the assumption of a dilute particle flow field is valid. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Tunability of Propane Conversion over Alumina Supported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this material for syngas products when prepared by procedures similar to those for Pt. Overall, the tunability of the anode for the production of syngas, which can subse- quently be electrochemically oxidized [7

  16. alumina thin films: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    films Engineering Websites Summary: of domain switching and controllability, preventing thin-film and polycrystalline ferroelectrics from the switching mechanisms of...

  17. Microfluidic Investigation of Tracer Dye Diffusion in Alumina Nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Serdar 1979-

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    to prepare new refrigerant formulations containing dispersed nanomaterials, including graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and metal oxide and nitride. The influence of key parameters such as particle type, size and volume fraction on the suspension...

  18. ORNL's Alumina-forming Austenitic Alloys Licensed to Carpenter Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627Homeland SecurityJonathanmaterial |andin theFred

  19. MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1| Department

  20. Optimized Alumina Coagulants for Water Purification - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find MoreRod

  1. A study of a lime-free calcium arsenate and lime-free calcium arsenate mixed with organic insecticides for cotton insect control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussel, John Severin

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the cotton aphid. 30 o ?s e* mi SS3 t=>o O fi w ow o Ix) s SM faO MOH Xoli W CtJofa ow w ? !=> o ei M 3...

  2. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asia Pacific Partnership Cement Task Force (APP). 2010.07(3) Utilizing Biosolids in Cement Kilns. (November). Asia-Utilising Biosolids in Cement Kilns. Final Report. Available

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the small cement plants, earthen vertical kiln (and hollowcement plant in North China utilizing vertical shaft kilnscement has ordered a vertical roller mill for the new kiln

  4. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    07-07(3) Utilizing Biosolids in Cement Kilns. (November).APP). 2011. Utilising Biosolids in Cement Kilns. FinalFederation. No date. Biosolids in cement production.

  5. Method for the recovery of fluorides from spent aluminum potlining and the production of an environmentally safe waste residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snodgrass, J.B.; Cambridge, E.L.

    1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for recovery of fluoride values from spent potlining and fluoride containing insulating materials associated with the potlining is disclosed. Spent potlining and the insulating matericals are reduced to a fine particle size and incinerated. The ash residue is leached with a dilute caustic and the leachate is treated with a calcium compound to precipitate calcium fluoride. The calcium fluoride is dried to a moisture content of less than 0.1 percent and is treated with about 93 to 99 percent concentration of sulfuric acid to produce hydrogen fluoride gas and a metal sulfate. The hydrogen fluoride gas is fed into an alumina dry scrubber to produce alumina with absorbed fluorides to be used as feed material to reduction cells used in the manufacture of aluminum by electrolytic reduction. The metal sulfate residue is treated with lime and constitutes an environmentally safe product which can be disposed of as landfill material.

  6. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prepared mixtures, field mixtures obtained at the plant and pavement cores. Laboratory tests included Hveem and Marshall stability, resilient modulus and indirect tension. Mixture conditioning to evaluate resistance to moisture damage included vacuum... Mixed and Compacted Specimens Tensile Strength Ratio for Laboratory Mixed and Compacted Specimens 14 Marshall Stability Before and After 7-days Soaking in Water for Lab Mixed and Compacted Specimens 36 FIGURE Page 15 16 Hveem Stability Before...

  7. GROWTH OF THE BERGMAN KERNEL ON PLANAR REGIONS John E. McCarthy and Liming Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, John E.

    accumulating at* * some point). In [McCY] the authors found geometric conditions for kk~k to remain bou

  8. Lessons Learned Following the Successful Decommissioning of a Reaction Vessel Containing Lime Sludge and Technetium-99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, P. M.; Watson, D. D.; Hylko, J. M.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents how WESKEM, LLC utilized available source term information, integrated safety management, and associated project controls to safely decommission a reaction vessel and repackage sludge containing various Resource Conservation and Recovery Act constituents and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The decommissioning activities were segmented into five separate stages, allowing the project team to control work related decisions based on their knowledge, experience, expertise, and field observations. The information and experience gained from each previous stage and rehearsals contributed to modifying subsequent entries, further emphasizing the importance of developing hold points and incorporating lessons learned. The hold points and lessons learned, such as performing detailed personal protective equipment (PPE) inspections during sizing and repackaging operations, and using foam-type piping insulation to prevent workers from cutting or puncturing their PPE on sharp edge s or small shards generated during sizing operations, minimized direct contact with the Tc-99. To prevent the spread of contamination, the decommissioning activities were performed inside a containment enclosure connected to negative air machines. After performing over 235 individual entries totaling over 285 project hours, only one first aid was recorded during this five-stage project.

  9. inp_30cm_60x60_1_200Hz_lime_shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... ros(2)= solid grains density (shale)(kg/m^3) used 1.81465889E+10 km(2)= Bulk modulus dry matrix (Pa) used 1.33564722E+10 mum(2)= shear modulus dry

  10. A study of the durability of lime as a stabilizing agent of clay soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Harvey Earl

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOIL CONSTANTS OF NATURAL SOIL UNIFIEn SXSTEN SF N. C. LoL PaI Palm CLASSIFICATION SPe QRAVa 7 ~the 5 Fears 4 Fears KLig $45 Slog 70og 18~5 55. 9 ELIAS lge 4 58, 4 R, 67 1S, S CH R, gg RR 8 CH R, 68 Rl+5 4 Frs. 7 m, 49. 1 18 R 50, 8 tR 5...+an e Consdttee esd of Depart n Angu*, 1958 Acknowledgnent is due to Rr, Spencer Ji Buchanan, Professor of Civg. Engineering for his guidance, sorel support and assistance in obtaining needed-materialsI to lh'. Charles J. Ifeese, Associate Professor...

  11. First New World Documentation of an Old World Citrus Pest, the Lime Swallowtail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian D.

    (Lepidoptera:Papilionidae), in the Dominican Republic (Hispaniola) Kelvin A. Guerrero, Denia Veloz, Sarah Lyn, is documented from eastern Dominican Republic on the Ca- ribbean island of Hispaniola. Resumen. Se registra la especiePapilio derrzoleus, una reconocido plaga de 10s citricos en el Mundo Viejo, 1 para la Hispaniola

  12. Sulfate Fining Chemistry in Oxidized and Reduced Soda-Lime-Silica Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Various reducing agents were used and their additions were varied to (1) increase glass quality through eliminating defects from silica scum, (2) decrease SOx emissions through changing the kind and quantity of reducing agents, and (3) improve production efficiency through increased flexibility of glass redox control during continuous processing. The work included measuring silica sand dissolution and sulfate decomposition in melts from glass batches. Glass batches were heated at a temperature-increase rate deemed similar to that experienced in the melting furnace. The sulfate decomposition kinetics was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis. Sulfur concentrations in glasses quenched at different temperatures were determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The distribution of residual sand (that which was not dissolved during the initial batch reactions) in the glass was obtained as a function of temperature with optical microscopy in thin-sections of melts. The fraction of undissolved sand was measured with X-ray diffraction. The results of the present study helped Visteon Inc. reduce the energy consumption and establish the batch containing 0.118 mass% of graphite as the best candidate for Visteon glass production. The improved glass batch has a lower potential for silica scum formation and for brown fault occurrence in the final glass product. It was established that bubbles trapped in the melt even at 1450 C have a high probability to be refined when reaching the hot zone in the glass furnace. Furthermore, silica sand does not accumulate at the glass surface and dissolves faster in the batch with graphite than in the batch with carbocite.

  13. Volatile fatty acid fermentation of lime-treated biomass by rumen microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapier, Charles Robert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concentration was studied. A counter-current fermentation system was also simulated to determine if it provided advantages over a conventional batch fermentor. All of the substrates studied produced similar amounts of VFA's. Approximately 7- I 0 g/L of acetic... sugars. This is accomplished by hydrolytic enzymes. However, cellulose possesses a recalcitrant crystalline structure and is insoluble in aqueous solutions, making it highly resistant to enzymatic degradation. Compounding this problem is lignin, which...

  14. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD systems. Volume 3. Plant profiles. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant profiles are given for the following plants: Tombigbee 2, 3; Apache 2, 3; Cholla 1, 2; Four Corners 1, 2, 3; Laramie River 1; Green 1, 2; Duck Creek 1; Craig 1, 2; Conesville 5, 6; Coal Creek 1, 2; Elrama 1, 2, 3, 4; and Phillips 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. (DLC)

  15. Spring 2010 Anders Plejdrup Houmller, CEO, BlueLime Consulting, Karetmagervej 21 A, DK-7000 Fredericia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    covers Denmark, Finland, Sweden and Norway. Nord Pool Spot is an exchange primarily servicing the players with the electricity exchange. In this article, the term "the Nordic area" denotes Denmark, Finland, Sweden & Norway, Sweden & Norway. Brokers Producers End users Traders Fig. 1 The commercial players and the exchange

  16. LiME : A Linux based MPLS Emulator Abhijit Gadgil and Abhay Karandikar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karandikar, Abhay

    (API) for plugging in actual implementation thereby enabling a network device (called Device Under TestME to inject MPLS traÃ?c into the external world. Rest of the paper is organized as follows. Section 2 discusses

  17. Evaluation of lime-fly ash stabilized bases and subgrades using static and dynamic deflection systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raba, Gary W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 000 E /E(=l I O. I E( = 2, 000, 000 5 6 7 8 8 IO II (2 (3 I4 H, inches Figure 9. Surface Curvature Index - Thickness re(ation for various pavement systems [after Maj(dzadeh (23)]. 0. 7 0, 6 0. 5 0. 4 0. 3 0. 2 X u" II4 'X & lo' 'X H...=9 E~= 20, 000 psi Hfa H=4 H=5 6 7 H = IO a H = II X H-l4 O. l X 0. 0 O. l I. O IO EI /E2 Ratio 100 500 Figure 10. Surface Curvature Index - Modu1ar Ratio Relationship for various pavement systems [after Majidzadeh (23)]. 36 200...

  18. Sugarcane juice extraction and preservation, and long-term lime pretreatment of bagasse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granda Cotlear, Cesar Benigno

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    extraction. The performance of a pilot-scale screw-press conveyor was tested for dewatering capabilities and power consumption. The unoptimized equipment decreased megasse moisture from 96 to 89%. Simulation of the process suggested that eight stages...

  19. Volatile fatty acid fermentation of lime-treated bagasse by rumen microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chang-Ming

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    untreated bagasse . . . . . . . . Iso-Butyric acid concentrations from untreated bagasse . . . Iso-Valeric acid concentrations from untreated bagasse Total acid concentrations from Ca(OH)2-treated bagasse . . Acetic acid concentrations from Ca(OH)2...(OH)q-treated bagasse . . . . . . . Iso-Butyric acid concentrations from Ca(OH/-treated bagasse . . Iso-Valeric acid concentrations from Ca(OH)q-treated bagasse . . Total acid yields from untreated bagasse . 53 54 55 56 57 59 30 31 32 Acetic acid yields...

  20. RETENTION OF Cd, Cu, Pb AND Zn BY WOOD ASH, LIME AND FUME DUST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    to immobilize metals from wastewater and soils (Viraraghavan and Rao, 1991). Various methods to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils and wastes exist, including thermal, biological, and physical/chemical treatments. However, most current treatment technologies are either too costly or only partially effective

  1. The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and XRD analysis of precipitated solids indicated that this deviation was due to the formation of other solid phases such as tricalcium hydroxyaluminate and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate. Effect of pH on chloride removal was characterized. Optimum pH...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp - CT 0-01Naturita36 SupplyCanaan Site

  3. Alex Benson Cement Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    of generating electricity by coal. o From Kiln Combustion CO2 ­ 2nd largest CO2 emitter behind electricity cement company 156,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year o "Cemex to pay $2M for pollution controls to produce Kiln Mix -> sent to kilns along with coal ( heating is facilitated by the coal ). Kiln Mix

  4. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plants imported advanced technologies such as high-efficiency kilns in addition to renovating existing

  5. What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fridley, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vertical kiln technology are considered. In particular, these trends towards greater efficiency in cement

  6. EA-0405: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Innovative Sulfur Dioxide Scrubbing System for Coal Burning Cement Kilns, Passamaquoddy Tribe Thomaston, Maine

  7. Modeling the Atmospheric Transport and Deposition of PCDD/F to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be municipal waste incineration, iron sintering, medical waste incineration, and cement kilns burning hazardous

  8. WWWWWoods ofoods ofoods ofoods ofoods of LouisianaLouisianaLouisianaLouisianaLouisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimmy Marionneaux, Jimmy Marionneaux Lumber Co, Livonia, LA David Williams, Kustom Kilns, Maringouin, LA

  9. Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. “syngas”) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950°C), but was limited to pressures below about 5 bar. It is desirable however to operate BLG at 20-30 bar for efficiency reasons related to either firing the syngas in a turbine, or catalytically forming liquid fuels. This work focused on achieving high direct causticizing yields at 20 bars pressure. The titanate direct causticizing reactions are inhibited by CO2. Previous work has shown that the partial pressure of CO2 should be kept below about 0.5 bar in order for the process to work. This translates to a total reactor pressure limit of about 5 bar for airblown BLG, and only 2 bar for O2-blown BLG. In this work a process was developed in which the CO2 partial pressure could be manipulated to a level under 0.5 bar with the total system pressure at 10 bar during O2-blown BLG. This fell short of our 20 bar goal but still represents a substantial increase in the pressure limit. A material and energy balance was performed, as well as first-pass economics based on capital and utilities costs. Compared to a reference case of using BLG with a conventional lime cycle [Larson, 2003], the IRR and NVP were estimated for further replacing the lime kiln with direct causticizing. The economics are strongly dependent on the price of lime kiln fuel. At $6/mmBTU the lime cycle is the clear choice. At $8/mmBTU the NPV is $10M with IRR of 17%. At $12/mmBTU the NPV is $45M with IRR of 36%. To further increase the total allowable pressure, the CO2 could be further decreased by further decreasing the temperature. Testing should be done at 750C. Also a small pilot should be built.

  10. HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT D-GLU (DIRECTED-GREEN LIQ-UOR UTILIZATION) PULPING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, Lucian A

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of the project was to retrofit the front end (pulp house) of a commercial kraft pulping mill to accommodate a mill green liquor (GL) impregna-tion/soak/exposure and accrue downstream physical and chemical benefits while prin-cipally reducing the energy footprint of the mill. A major player in the mill contrib-uting to excessive energy costs is the lime kiln. The project was intended to offload the energy (oil or natural gas) demands of the kiln by by-passing the causticization/slaking site in the recovery area and directly using green liquor as a pulping medium for wood. Scope: The project was run in two distinct, yet mutually compatible, phases: Phase 1 was the pre-commercial or laboratory phase in which NC State University and the Insti-tute of Paper Science and Technology (at the Georgia Institute of Technology) ran the pulping and associated experiments, while Phase 2 was the mill scale trial. The first tri-al was run at the now defunct Evergreen Pulp Mill in Samoa, CA and lead to a partial retrofit of the mill that was not completed because it went bankrupt and the work was no longer the low-hanging fruit on the tree for the new management. The second trial was run at the MeadWestvaco Pulp Mill in Evedale, TX which for all intents and pur-poses was a success. They were able to fully retrofit the mill, ran the trial, studied the pulp properties, and gave us conclusions.

  11. Oil shale retort apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeves, Adam A. (Grand Junction, CO); Mast, Earl L. (Norman, OK); Greaves, Melvin J. (Littleton, CO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A retorting apparatus including a vertical kiln and a plurality of tubes for delivering rock to the top of the kiln and removal of processed rock from the bottom of the kiln so that the rock descends through the kiln as a moving bed. Distributors are provided for delivering gas to the kiln to effect heating of the rock and to disturb the rock particles during their descent. The distributors are constructed and disposed to deliver gas uniformly to the kiln and to withstand and overcome adverse conditions resulting from heat and from the descending rock. The rock delivery tubes are geometrically sized, spaced and positioned so as to deliver the shale uniformly into the kiln and form symmetrically disposed generally vertical paths, or "rock chimneys", through the descending shale which offer least resistance to upward flow of gas. When retorting oil shale, a delineated collection chamber near the top of the kiln collects gas and entrained oil mist rising through the kiln.

  12. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the kiln with alternative fuels, such as agricultural waste,non-agricultural waste like sewage sludge and saw dust,cement kilns from agricultural waste, or a certain percent

  13. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obsolete vertical shaft kiln (VSK) cement plants, with thecement industry is steadily transitioning from using less-efficient vertical-shaft-kilnvertical kiln technology are considered. In particular, these trends towards greater efficiency in cement

  14. The Use of Lime in Fish Ponds1 Andy M. Lazur, Charles E. Cichra and Craig Watson2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    small fish are being reared. Calcite and dolomite increase the total hardness, total alkalinity, and p desirable for most freshwater fish. Water in ponds reflects the quality of the soils in which they are located. In acid soils, ponds typically have low total alkalinity, total hardness, and pH. Total hardness

  15. An investigation of the use of lime as a soil additive to modify the detrimental effects of frost action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnest, Clyde Talley

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Destructive freeaing is associated with the formation of segregated ice (clear ice lenses or inclusions separating homogeneous soil). 2. The total frost heave approximately equals the total thick- nesses of the ioe lenses. 3. The total frost.... frost heaving ia due tc the growth of ice crystals into ice lenses perhaps owes its origin to Tabor's study of the work of Lavelle, Beckner, and Day on crystal growth. He states' "Frost (1) heaving is due to the growth of ice crystals and not to a...

  16. A study of the effects of repeated loadings and free water on the stability of a lime stabilized clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantos, Carl Thomas

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Stress Repetition V. RESEARCH PROCEDURE A. Oeneral . B. Sail Seleotion C. Soil Preparation and Prelind. nary Tests D. Triaxial Test Specimen Preparation Ei Triaxial Compression Testing VI. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION A. Preliminary Tests . B... be accomplished in the aotual pavement design. This cannot be fully appreciated, however, until the design procedures incorporate a realistic evaluation of subgrade stability based on repeated stress tests. C RAPTER II PURPOSE OF RESEARCH The purpose...

  17. Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falls, Matthew David

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    highly controversial food vs. fuel debate. Because of its high abundance and relatively low cost, lignocellulosic biomass is a promising alternative feedstock for biofuel production; however, structural features of lignocellulose limit accessibility...

  18. Growth of Devitrite, Na2Ca3Si6O16, in Soda-Lime-Silica Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Kevin M.; Thompson, Robert P.

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    be assumed that the refractive index is 1.52, following Hrma et al.,5 and it occurs as small spherulites with characteristic internal twinning arising from the ? ? ? cristobalite phase transition which occurs on cooling down to room temperature from a... as crystals ??6 ?? described by Hrma et al. as columnar and bladed.5 Also, unlike devitrite, it has a variable sign of elongation because the ? direction is parallel to the elongation.12 Both Morey and Bowen4 and Peck13 surmised that devitrite...

  19. Zinc Fertilization Plus Liming to Reduce Cadmium Uptake by Romaine Lettuce on Cd-Mineralized Lockwood Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaney, Rufus L; Green, Carrie E.; Ajwa, Husein A; Smith, Richard F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by emissions from zinc smelters. Trace Subst. Environ.1999) who studied Zn-smelter or mine waste contaminated orgrowing Romaine lettuce on Zn-smelter contaminated soils in

  20. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  1. Speciation and Mobility of Arsenic in Agricultural Lime Gerald T. Schmidt, Ka Hei Lui, and Michael Kersten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1161Goethite29-713 Ferrihydrite29-712browndendritescrapedoff residueoffirstextractionstep #12;S5 Supplemental reference samples. 7110 7130 7150 Energy [eV] µnorm. brown dendrite in situ goethite 2l ferrihydrite 6l ferrihydrite 7110 7130 7150 Energy [eV] dµ/dE brown dendrite in situ goethite 2l ferrihydrite 6l ferrihydrite

  2. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past decade increasing concern over the potential environmental impact associated with the emissions of both gaseous and particulate pollutants has resulted in the promulgation of strict regulatory standards governing such emissions...

  3. Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falls, Matthew David

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    enhanced the 72-h glucan digestibility of several promising biomass feedstocks: bagasse (74.0), corn stover (92.0), poplar wood (94.0), sorghum (71.8), and switchgrass (89.0). Highly digestible lignocellulose can also be used as ruminant animal feed. Shock...

  4. Review of Aegean Prehistory VII: Neopalatial, Final Palatial, and Postpalatial Crete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehak, Paul; Younger, John G.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The thermoluminescence dates for the MM IB kiln 3 at Phaistos (late 19th century) and for the LM I kiln at Ayia Triada (ca. 1600) seem appropriate; Y. Liritzis and R. Thomas, "Palaeointensity and Thermoluminescence Measurements on Cretan Kilns from 1300-2000 BC," Na... in the number of potter's kilns discovered" increases the possibil- ity of constructing archaeomagnetic and palaeoin- tensity sequences, helping to refine thermolumines- cence dates and to establish the contemporaneity of separated archaeological...

  5. Integrated methods for production of clean char and its combustion properties. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBarr, J.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States); Gullett, B.K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle, NC (United States); Benson, S.A.; Toman, D.L. [Univ. of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this two-year program is to produce low sulfur char using an integrated process scheme which combines physical coal cleaning, mild gasification and char desulfurization. The goal of the project is to produce chars with 50% or more lower sulfur emissions than that of the parent coal, and at minimum meet 1995 emission standards of 2.5 lbs S0{sub 2}/MMBtu. This project is a cooperative effort between the ISGS, UNDEERC and the US EPA and is cost-shared with the US EPA and the US DOE through UNDEERC. Mild gasification and char desulfurization studies are conducted with six coals selected from the Illinois Basin Coal (IBC) Sample Program in a batch fluidized-bed reactor at the ISGS. Pound quantities of chars for combustion testing are prepared in a continuous rotary kiln reactor under optimized conditions of mild gasification and char desulfurization. Burning characteristics and ash deposition behaviors of desulfurized chars are determined at the US EPA in a 14 kill pilot-scale combustor and at UNDEERC in a drop tube furnace (DTF). In some tests, methane is examined as an auxiliary fuel, and high-surface-area hydrated lime developed at ISGS is used to further reduce S0{sub 2} emissions. Complete analyses of the fuels are obtained to aid char desulfurization studies and help explain combustion and S0{sub 2} emission characteristics of the char.

  6. A thermionic energy converter with a molybdenum-alumina cermet emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubbels, G.H.M.; Wolff, L.R.; Metselaar, R. (Centre for Technical Ceramics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands (NL))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study is made of the properties of cermets as electrode materials for thermionic energy converters. For thermodynamic reasons it is expected that all cermets composed of pure Mo and refractory oxides have the same bare work function. From data on the work function of Mo in an oxygen atmosphere this bare work function is estimated to be {Phi}=4.9 eV (at {ital T}=1400 {degree}C). Experimentally, the bare work function of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Mo cermets was found to be {Phi}=4.5 eV, independent of the relative amounts of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Mo. The cesiated work function of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Mo cermets was found to be 0.15 eV lower than the cesiated work function of pure Mo. The bare work function of Mo{sub 3}Al was found to be {Phi}=4.0 eV. The cesiated work function of Mo{sub 3}Al at collector temperature conditions was 0.3 eV lower than the cesiated work function of pure Mo. The electrical power density of a diode with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Mo cermet emitter was 0.4 W/cm{sup 2} at 1300 {degree}C. The barrier index at this temperature was 2.36 V. The high barrier index is attributed to a high plasma voltage drop {ital V}{sub {ital d}}=0.91 V.

  7. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental 37 (2002) 1725 Selective CO oxidation over Pt/alumina catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulari, Erdogan

    ­4]. Pure hydrogen is the ideal fuel for the PEM fuel cell. Currently, there is no available technology for safely storing enough hydrogen to give a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle acceptable range. On de- mand or less, necessary for opera- tion of the fuel cell, with minimal loss of hydrogen. Of these three methods

  8. Plused EPR study of orthophosphoric and boric acid modified {gamma}-alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samoilova, R.I.; Dikanov, S.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); [Inst. of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Fionov, A.V.; Lunina, E.V. [Moscow State Univ (Russian Federation)] [Moscow State Univ (Russian Federation); Tyryshkin, A.M. [Inst. of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [Inst. of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bowman, M.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    CW EPR, pulsed ENDOR, and one- and two-dimensional ESEEM techniques have been applied to study the influence of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} acid modification of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the strong electron acceptor sites of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using adsorbed anthraquinone and {omicron}-chloranil as probe molecules. After the adsorption, electron transfer produces free radicals at active sites on the activated {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The observed spectra are the superposition of spectra from radicals simply adsorbed on the surface and from three different paramagnetic complexes of anthraquinone with coordinatively unsaturated aluminum. The isotropic hyperfine coupling of aluminum nuclei in these complexes is 2.5, 21, and 28 MHz. Treatment of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} decreases the relative amounts of adsorbed radical and the complex with 2.5 MHz hyperfine coupling. The H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} treatment, in contrast, gives only the complex with the 21 MHz hyperfine coupling, and its resolved EPR spectrum indicates two equivalent aluminums in this active site. The ESEEM spectra show only weak dipole-dipole interaction with {sup 31}P and {sup 11}B nuclei located around the paramagnetic complex. These results suggest that acid modification alters the catalytic properties by changing the number and type of catalytic sites on the surface without introducing new species. 31 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Hybrid Filtration Membranes incorporating Nanoporous Silica within a Nanoscale Alumina Fibre Scaffold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Veronica Mei Tiing; Clyne, Trevor William

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterisation Experimental permeation studies were conducted with the set-up shown schematically in Fig.1. The membranes were supported in a polycarbonate filter holder, using previously-developed procedures [8]. A cross-flow condition was generated with a... increased. This is difficult to avoid, since, in the absence of a conductive coating, the fibres have a strong tendency to become charged in the SEM. In order to study individual fibres in detail, transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies were...

  10. Particle-size effect on the compressibility of nanocrystalline alumina D. Penwell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruger, Michael - Department of Physics, University of Missouri

    . Benedetti,2 R. Jeanloz,3 and M. B. Kruger1 1 Department of Physics, University of Missouri, Kansas City INTRODUCTION The study of nanocrystalline materials with dimensions less than 100 nm is an active area- crystal transition pressures is explained in terms of surface- energy differences between the phases

  11. Structure of and ion segregation to an alumina grain boundary: Implications for growth and creep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    Ivan Milas, Berit Hinnemann,a) and Emily A. Carterb) Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering- enced by the underlying alloy. A typical TBC consists of three layers: (i) a NiAl-based bond coat alloy grown oxide (TGO) in between, the purpose of which is to protect the super- alloy from oxidative

  12. alumina-coated magnetite nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Websites Summary: He, Xi Zhang, Hongbo Gu, Haoran Chen, Qiang Wang, Luyi Sun, Suying Wei,* Zhanhu Guo Polystyrene (PS. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the...

  13. alumina-forming austenitic stainless: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of stainless steel container materials is a potential problem for long-term radioactive waste storage-to-failure of relevant stainless steels in the annealed...

  14. Stability and biocompatability of porous silicon and porous alumina for cell and biomolecular sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Sara D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Nanotechnology III, Canberra, ACT, Australia, 2007;SPIE: Canberra, ACT, Australia, 2007; pp 679909-12. Suh, K.

  15. alumina-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DFIG-based wind turbines. The proposed method uses the first Intrinsic Mode Terms--Wind turbine, Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), fault detection, bearings, signal...

  16. TEST PROGRAM FOR ALUMINA REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL; GEINESSE D

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This test program sets a multi-phased development path to support the development of the Lithium Hydrotalcite process, in order to raise its Technology Readiness Level from 3 to 6, based on tasks ranging from laboratory scale scientific research to integrated pilot facilities.

  17. Wagerup Refinery Unit Three September 2005 Alcoa World Alumina Australia Page i TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...................................................................................................... 1

  18. Adhesion of Copper and Alumina from First Principles Xiao-Gang Wang and John R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    barrier systems in gas turbines for aircraft engines and power generation, and coatings that inhibit

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - alumina-supported ceria ii Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13... to the preparation of a ceria-coated silica aerogel. A second opportunity for aerogels relates to the ... Source: Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science, C1 Chemistry Program...

  20. Microstructure and properties of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O with nanometer-scale alumina additions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goretta, K. C.

    1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles {approx}30 nm is size were added to Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} in a 1:4 molar ratio. For comparison, 0.3 and {approx}3 pm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were added to separate batches. All materials were partial-melt processed. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reacted during melting to primarily form stable compounds of approximate composition (Sr,Ca){sub 2}AlO{sub 4}. All additions caused slight decreases in the T{sub c} and melting point of the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}. The submicrometer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions induced large expansions in magnetic-hysteresis width at 6 K. Electron microscopy examinations strongly suggested that the hysteresis expansion was related to alloying of the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} matrix rather than to pinning by volume defects.

  1. alumina-supported fe-c nanoparticles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    followed the mixed triangular formations or the mixed patterns. They were found to be hollow nanocapsules with a size ranging from 152 nm (methacrylate copolymer) to 321 nm...

  2. NEW INSIGHT IN THE PREPARATION OF ALUMINA SUPPORTED HYDROTREATMENT OXIDIC PRECURSORS: A MOLECULAR APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    many important industries such as oil refining, petrochemicals, fine chemicals, power generation protection. The most industrially used catalyst is the CoMo/Al2O3, the active phase of which consists of well is the most industrially used one, the volume of solution corresponds to the pore volume of the support

  3. Effect of catalyst structure on oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane on alumina-supported vanadia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argyle, Morris D.; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The catalytic properties of Al2O3-supported vanadia with a wide range of VOx surface density (1.4-34.2 V/nm2) and structure were examined for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane. UV-visible and Raman spectra showed that vanadia is dispersed predominantly as isolated monovanadate species below {approx}2.3 V/nm2. As surface densities increase, two-dimensional polyvanadates appear (2.3-7.0 V/nm2) along with increasing amounts of V2O5 crystallites at surface densities above 7.0 V/nm2. The rate constant for oxidative dehydrogenation (k1) and its ratio with alkane and alkene combustion (k2/k1 and k3/k1, respectively) were compared for both alkane reactants as a function of vanadia surface density. Propene formation rates (per V-atom) are {approx}8 times higher than ethene formation rates at a given reaction temperature, but the apparent ODH activation energies (E1) are similar for the two reactants and relatively insensitive to vanadia surface density. Ethene and propene formation rates (per V-atom) are strongly influenced by vanadia surface density and reach a maximum value at intermediate surface densities ({approx}8 V/nm2). The ratio of k2/k1 depends weakly on reaction temperature, indicating that activation energies for alkane combustion and ODH reactions are similar. The ratio of k2/k1 is independent of surface density for ethane, but increase slightly with vanadia surface density for propane, suggesting that isolated structures prevalent at low surface densities are slightly more selective for alkane dehydrogenation reactions. The ratio of k3/k1 decreases markedly with increasing reaction temperature for both ethane and propane ODH. Thus, the apparent activation energy for alkene combustion (E3) is much lower than that for alkane dehydrogenation (E1) and the difference between these two activation energies decreases with increasing surface density. The lower alkene selectivities observed at high vanadia surface densities are attributed to an increase in alkene adsorption enthalpies with increasing vanadia surface density. The highest yield of alkene is obtained for catalysts containing predominantly isolated monovanadate species and operated at high temperatures that avoid homogeneous reactions (< {approx} 800 K).

  4. Development and Characterization of Novel Alumina Based Ceramic Matrix Composites for Energy Efficient Sliding Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluri, Rajeshwari S. Lakshmi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    for bearings. Bearings with low friction surface coatings have been used which improved the performance and increased the life cycle of turbines. Similar rolling element bearings are used in rocket engines, micro gas turbine engines, aircraft engines, turbo...

  5. Effects of Slurry Chemistry on the Rate of Agglomeration of Alumina Nanoparticles for Chemical Mechanical Planarization /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brahma, Neil Anjan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8.2, respectively. Solid lines are power law fit and dottedcopper at pH 8.0. Solid lines are power law fit and dotted8.2 respectively. Solid lines are power law fit and dotted

  6. alumina-titania high emittance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and analysis of lateral SiC N-emitter SiGe P-base Schottky metal-collector (NPM) HBT on SOI Engineering Websites Summary: on SOI M. Jagadesh Kumar *, C. Linga Reddy...

  7. Effects of specimen thickness and impurity on the conductivity of alumina under electron irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    windows in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), where the electrical conductivity believed to be critical issues for the application of a-Al2O3 to insulators in fusion reac- tors. The RIC

  8. Thermochemical Optimization of Float Glass Composition: Low-Alumina Glass Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, Donald E.; Yeager, John D.; Lam, Oanh P.

    2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquidus temperature (TL) was measured for a float-glass-type composition region with 72.7 to 74.0 mass% SiO2, 0.1 to 0.54 mass% Al2O3, 8.0 to 9.0 mass% CaO, 3.0 to 4.0 mass% MgO, and 13.1 to 14.2 mass% Na2O. Crystalline phases were identified at 900?C as cristobalite, wollastonite and devitrite. The primary phases were tridymite and wollastonite. Partial specific TLs were obtained from the data and compared with the literature.

  9. Chemical bath method to grow precipitated nanorods of iridium oxide on alumina membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    for water splitting or methanol oxidation in fuel cells [11, 12]. The recent success in fabricating one considerable attention because of its stable elec- trical transport properties [3]. Endowed with lower

  10. Strengthening and toughening of carbon nanotube reinforced alumina nanocomposite fabricated by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon nanotube; Ceramic matrix composite; Molecular level mixing; Spark: one is the weak bonding between CNTs and ceramic matrix and the other is the inhomogeneous distribution of CNTs within the ceramic matrix. Recently, CNTs have been homoge- neously dispersed within

  11. 1/2 CREEP FRACTURE IN CERAMIC POLYCRYSTALS I. CREEP CAVITATION EFFECTS IN POLYCRYSTALLINE ALUMINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, J.R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    non-linearity of creep in the test is found to be minimal.creep deformation under various conditions of stress and temperature. RESULTS AND OBSERVAT Deformation tests

  12. SubstrateSubstrate Commercially available high density -alumina plate (14x14 mm2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    followed by oxidation in a well-defined pO2 regime near the M-MOx proximity line by a suitable buffer gas Model. Fig. 4. Thermodynamic criteria for several M/MOx coexistence and practical pO2 regimes for phase

  13. Ferromagnetic nanocylinders electrodeposited into nanoporous alumina template: A magnetometry and Brillouin light scattering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherif, S. M.; Roussigne, Y.; Stashkevich, A. A. [LSPM-CNRS, Universite Paris13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Darques, M. [Institut Neel-CNRS, (CNRS/UJF), 25 Rue des Martyrs BP 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bouziane, K. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36 Al-Khodh 123, Sultanate of Oman (Oman); Piraux, L. [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The static magnetization experimental behavior of cobalt (Co), Permalloy (Py), and nickel (Ni) nanocylinders is obtained from vibrating sample magnetometry while the dynamic behavior for the Co and Py ones is analyzed by means of Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. Assuming the presence at remanence of two populations of cylinders with up and down magnetizations and including the dipolar coupling between the cylinders, a single analytical model based on a mean-field approach allowed us to satisfactorily analyze both series of experimental results. The model requires three physical parameters, allowing us to derive the in-plane saturation field, the eigenfrequency in the absence of applied field, and the eigenfrequency at the in-plane saturation field; these parameters enable us to adjust the whole variation of the eigenfrequency versus the applied field. Moreover, the effect of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy on the softening of the frequency in the nonsaturated state is clearly evidenced: it is more pronounced when the magnetocrystalline anisotropy is not vanishing and adds to the shape anisotropy (Co c-axis parallel to the cylinder axis); the softening being weak in the other cases (Co c-axis perpendicular to the cylinder axis or Permalloy).

  14. Evaluation of Cadmium-Free Thick Film Materials on Alumina Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. H. Perdieu

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new cadmium-free material system was successfully evaluated for the fabrication of thick film hybrid microcircuits at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T). The characterization involved screen printing, drying and firing two groups of resistor networks which were made using the current material system and the cadmium-free material system. Electrical, environmental and adhesion tests were performed on both groups to determine the more suitable material system. Additionally, untrimmed test coupons were evaluated to further characterize the new materials. The cadmiumfree material system did as well or better than the current material system. Therefore, the new cadmium-free material system was approved for use on production thick film product.

  15. Preparation of ceramic matrix and alumina fiber composites for use as solid electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudney, N.J.

    1987-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making solid electrolytes using a fibrous stabilizing dispersed second phase for enhanced conductivity of the electrolyte after deformation and annealing. 1 tab.

  16. Refractory Materials based on Magnesia-Alumina Spinel for Improved Performance in Coal Gasification Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a larger project to develop novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels, a team composed of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., and academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed new refractory materials and coating systems specifically for application in coal gasification environments. Materials were developed under this U.S. DOE funded project to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Work was conducted to develop and deploy these new materials and to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the serviced environment. Additionally, a light-weight back-up refractory system was developed to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the efforts involved in the development of these materials, along with the laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials leading to relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

  17. alumina-zirconia ceramic eutectic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  18. alumina-matrix ceramics research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  19. alumina-zirconium ceramics induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j and the magnetic field H in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 x ceramics. We provided in high-Tc superconduct- ing granular ceramics remain an intriguing subject of inten- sive investigations...

  20. Alumina Nanoparticle Pre-coated Tubing Ehancing Subcooled Flow Boiling Cricital Heat Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H.

    Nanofluids are engineered colloidal dispersions of nano-sized particle in common base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve critical heat flux (CHF) up to 200% for pool boiling and ...

  1. Method And Reactor For Production Of Aluminum By Carbothermic Reduction Of Alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aune, Jan Arthur (Ytre Enebakk, NO); Johansen, Kai (Kristiansand, NO)

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A hollow partition wall is employed to feed carbon material to an underflow of a carbothermic reduction furnace used to make aluminum. The partition wall divides a low temperature reaction zone where aluminum oxide is reacted with carbon to form aluminum carbide and a high temperature reaction zone where the aluminum carbide and remaining aluminum oxide are reacted to form aluminum and carbon monoxide.

  2. adhesive bonding high-alumina: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    various conditions, including the type of surface preparation, pH of the environmental media, (more) Xu, Dingying 2004-01-01 2 Bond Characteristics and Qualifications of...

  3. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Alumina and Aluminum (NAICS 3313), January 2014 (MECS 2010)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomyDr.EnergyManufacturingAll Manufacturing

  4. Development of a Calicum-Based Sorbent for Hot Gas Cleanup.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheelock, T.W.; Constant, K.; Doraiswamy, L.K.; Akiti, T.; Zhu, J.; Amanda, A.; Roe, R.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Further review of the technical literature has provided additional information which will support the development of a superior calcium-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in IGCC systems. Two general methods of sorbent preparation are being investigated. One method involves impregnating a porous refractory substrate with calcium while another method involves pelletizing lime or other calcium containing materials with a suitable binder. Several potential substrates, which are made of alumina and are commercially available, have been characterized by various methods. The surface area and apparent density of the materials have been measured, and it has been shown that some of the high surface area materials (i.e., 200-400 m{sub 2}/g) undergo a large decrease in surface area when heated to higher temperatures. Some of the lower surface area materials (i.e., 1-30 m{sub 2}/g) have been successfully impregnated with calcium by soaking them in a calcium nitrate solution and then heat treating them to decompose the nitrate. Potentially useful sorbents have also been prepared by pelletizing type I Portland cement and mixtures of cement and lime.

  5. Solid State Electrochemical Sensors for Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Detection in Lean Exhaust Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheaume, Jonathan Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allen, “ Pulse CO Laser Drilling of Green Alumina Ceramic”,Susan D. Allen, “Pulse CO Laser Drilling of Green Alumina

  6. Material and Energy Flows in the Materials Production, Assembly, and End-of-Life Stages of the Automotive Lithium-Ion Battery Life Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gaines, Linda [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Barnes, Matthew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sullivan, John L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains material and energy flows for lithium-ion batteries with an active cathode material of lithium manganese oxide (LiMn?O?). These data are incorporated into Argonne National Laboratory’s Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, replacing previous data for lithium-ion batteries that are based on a nickel/cobalt/manganese (Ni/Co/Mn) cathode chemistry. To identify and determine the mass of lithium-ion battery components, we modeled batteries with LiMn?O? as the cathode material using Argonne’s Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model for hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and electric vehicles. As input for GREET, we developed new or updated data for the cathode material and the following materials that are included in its supply chain: soda ash, lime, petroleum-derived ethanol, lithium brine, and lithium carbonate. Also as input to GREET, we calculated new emission factors for equipment (kilns, dryers, and calciners) that were not previously included in the model and developed new material and energy flows for the battery electrolyte, binder, and binder solvent. Finally, we revised the data included in GREET for graphite (the anode active material), battery electronics, and battery assembly. For the first time, we incorporated energy and material flows for battery recycling into GREET, considering four battery recycling processes: pyrometallurgical, hydrometallurgical, intermediate physical, and direct physical. Opportunities for future research include considering alternative battery chemistries and battery packaging. As battery assembly and recycling technologies develop, staying up to date with them will be critical to understanding the energy, materials, and emissions burdens associated with batteries.

  7. Target Strength of Southern Resident Killer Whales (Orcinus orca): Measurement and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Moore, Brian

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A major criterion for tidal power licensing in Washington’s Puget Sound is the management of the risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades. An active monitoring system is being proposed for killer whale detection, tracking, and alerting that links to and triggers temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision. Target strength (TS) modeling of the killer whale is critical to the design and application of any active monitoring system. A 1996 study performed a high-resolution measurement of acoustic reflectivity as a function of frequency of a female bottlenose dolphin (2.2 m length) at broadside aspect and TS as a function of incident angle at 67 kHz frequency. Assuming that killer whales share similar morphology structure with the bottlenose dolphin, we extrapolated the TS of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at 67 kHz frequency with -8 dB at broadside aspect and -28 dB at tail side. The backscattering data from three Southern Resident killer whales were analyzed to obtain the TS measurement. These data were collected at Lime Kiln State Park using a split-beam system deployed from a boat. The TS of the killer whale at higher frequency (200 kHz) was estimated based on a three-layer model for plane wave reflection from the lung of the whale. The TS data of killer whales were in good agreement with our model. In this paper, we also discuss and explain possible causes for measurement estimation error.

  8. Material and energy flows in the materials production, assembly, and end-of-life stages of the automotive lithium-ion battery life cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J.B.; Gaines, L.; Barnes, M.; Wang, M.; Sullivan, J. (Energy Systems)

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains material and energy flows for lithium-ion batteries with an active cathode material of lithium manganese oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}). These data are incorporated into Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, replacing previous data for lithium-ion batteries that are based on a nickel/cobalt/manganese (Ni/Co/Mn) cathode chemistry. To identify and determine the mass of lithium-ion battery components, we modeled batteries with LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the cathode material using Argonne's Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model for hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and electric vehicles. As input for GREET, we developed new or updated data for the cathode material and the following materials that are included in its supply chain: soda ash, lime, petroleum-derived ethanol, lithium brine, and lithium carbonate. Also as input to GREET, we calculated new emission factors for equipment (kilns, dryers, and calciners) that were not previously included in the model and developed new material and energy flows for the battery electrolyte, binder, and binder solvent. Finally, we revised the data included in GREET for graphite (the anode active material), battery electronics, and battery assembly. For the first time, we incorporated energy and material flows for battery recycling into GREET, considering four battery recycling processes: pyrometallurgical, hydrometallurgical, intermediate physical, and direct physical. Opportunities for future research include considering alternative battery chemistries and battery packaging. As battery assembly and recycling technologies develop, staying up to date with them will be critical to understanding the energy, materials, and emissions burdens associated with batteries.

  9. Integrated methods for production of clean char and its combustion properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBarr, J.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this two-year program is to produce clean char using an integrated process scheme which combines physical coal cleaning, mild gasification and char oxydesulfurization. Low sulfur chars which could be used in utility boilers to meet 1995 emission standards of 2.5 lbs DO{sub 2}/MMBtu are produced from Illinois coals having emissions of >5 lbs SO{sub 2}/MMBtu. Mild gasification and low temperature oxidation studies for sulfur removal are conducted with selected coals from the Illinois Basin Coal (IBC) Sample Program in a batch fixed-bed reactor at the ISGS. Pound quantities of chars for combustion testing are prepared in a continuous rotary kiln reactor under optimized conditions of mild gasification and oxydesulfurization. Burning characteristics and ash deposition behaviors of desulfurized chars are determined to ensure that a useable fuel is produced. These tests are done at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) in a drop tube furnace (DTF), and at the US EPA in a 14 kW pilot-scale combustor. In some tests, methane is examined as an auxiliary fuel, and high-surface-area hydrated lime developed at ISGS is used to further reduce SO{sub 2} emissions. Complete analyses of the fuels are obtained to aid char desulfurization studies and help explain combustion and SO{sub 2} emission characteristics of the char. This project is a cooperative effort between the ISGS, UNDEERC and the US EPA and is cost-shared with US EPA and the US DOE through UNDEERC.

  10. Integrated methods for production of clean char and its combustion properties. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBarr, J.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this two-year program is to produce clean char using an integrated process scheme which combines physical coal cleaning, mild gasification and char oxydesulfurization. Low sulfur chars which could be used in utility boilers to meet 1995 emission standards of 2.5 lbs DO{sub 2}/MMBtu are produced from Illinois coals having emissions of >5 lbs SO{sub 2}/MMBtu. Mild gasification and low temperature oxidation studies for sulfur removal are conducted with selected coals from the Illinois Basin Coal (IBC) Sample Program in a batch fixed-bed reactor at the ISGS. Pound quantities of chars for combustion testing are prepared in a continuous rotary kiln reactor under optimized conditions of mild gasification and oxydesulfurization. Burning characteristics and ash deposition behaviors of desulfurized chars are determined to ensure that a useable fuel is produced. These tests are done at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) in a drop tube furnace (DTF), and at the US EPA in a 14 kW pilot-scale combustor. In some tests, methane is examined as an auxiliary fuel, and high-surface-area hydrated lime developed at ISGS is used to further reduce SO{sub 2} emissions. Complete analyses of the fuels are obtained to aid char desulfurization studies and help explain combustion and SO{sub 2} emission characteristics of the char. This project is a cooperative effort between the ISGS, UNDEERC and the US EPA and is cost-shared with US EPA and the US DOE through UNDEERC.

  11. Infrared optical properties of ?-alumina with the approach to melting: ?-like tetrahedral structure and small polaron conduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, J. F., E-mail: brun@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, UPR 3079 CEMHTI, Orléans 45071 (France); UFR Collégium Sciences et Techniques, Université d'Orléans, Orléans 45067 (France); Campo, L. del; De Sousa Meneses, D. [CNRS, UPR 3079 CEMHTI, Orléans 45071 (France); Polytech'Orléans, Université d'Orléans, 45072 Orléans (France); Echegut, P. [CNRS, UPR 3079 CEMHTI, Orléans 45071 (France)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The normal spectral emittance of ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal has been measured from room temperature up to the liquid state and from 20?cm{sup ?1} up to 10 000?cm{sup ?1}, in two polarization configurations. The spectra were fitted with a semi-quantum dielectric function model. AlO{sub 4} structure units are revealed within the phonon spectral range more than a hundred degrees below the melting point when heating from the solid state. In parallel, the anomalous increase of emittance observed within the transparency spectral range with the approach to melting appears strongly correlated. Implications on the electronic structure are discussed: the existence of small polaron conduction is suggested which has never been mentioned before.

  12. Alumina-Forming Austenitics: A New Approach to Thermal and Degradation Resistant Stainless Steels for Industrial Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A Helmick; John H Magee; Michael P Brady

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of developmental AFA alloys was selected for study based on: 25 Ni wt.% (alloys A-F), 20 wt% Ni (alloys G-H), and 12 Ni wt.% (alloys I-L). An emphasis in this work was placed on the lower alloy content direction for AFA alloys to reduce alloy raw material cost, rather than more highly alloyed and costly AFA alloys for higher temperature performance. Alloys A-D explored the effects of Al (3-4 wt.%) and C (0.05-0.2 wt.%) in the Fe-25Ni-14Cr-2Mn-2Mo-1W-1Nb wt.% base range; alloys E and F explored the effects of removing costly Mo and W additions in a Fe-25Ni-14Cr-4Al-2.5Nb-2Mn-0.2C base, alloys G and H examined Nb (1-2.5wt.%) and removal of Mo, W in a Fe-20Ni-14Cr-3Al-2Mn-0.2 C wt.% base; and alloys I-L examined effects of C (0.1-0.2 wt.%) and Mn (5-10 wt.%) on a low cost Fe-14Cr-12Ni-3Cu-2.5Al wt.% base (no Mo, W additions). Creep testing resulted in elemental trends that included the beneficial effect of higher carbon and lower niobium in 20-25%Ni AFA alloys and, the beneficial of lower Mn in 12%Ni AFA alloys. Corrosion tests in steam and sulfidation-oxidation environments showed, in general, these alloys were capable of a ten-fold improvement in performance when compared to conventional austenitic stainless steels. Also, corrosion test results in metal-dusting environments were promising and, warrant further investigation.

  13. Structures and charging of alpha-alumina (0001)/water interfaces studies by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air interface with SSP, PPP, SPS polarization combinations.interfaces with SSP, PPP, SPS polarization combinations atrespectively), SPS and PPP, from the - Al 2 O 3 (0001)/air

  14. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES OF ENHANCED WASTE LOADING AND IMPROVED MELT RATE FOR HIGH ALUMINA CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; James Marra, J

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to determine the impacts of glass compositions with high aluminum concentrations on melter performance, crystallization and chemical durability for Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford waste streams. Glass compositions for Hanford targeted both high aluminum concentrations in waste sludge and a high waste loading in the glass. Compositions for SRS targeted Sludge Batch 5, the next sludge batch to be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which also has a relatively high aluminum concentration. Three frits were selected for combination with the SRS waste to evaluate their impact on melt rate. The glasses were melted in two small-scale test melters at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute. The results showed varying degrees of spinel formation in each of the glasses. Some improvements in melt rate were made by tailoring the frit composition for the SRS feeds. All of the Hanford and SRS compositions had acceptable chemical durability.

  15. Applied Catalysis A: General 232 (2002) 203217 Single step solgel made gold on alumina catalyst for selective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulari, Erdogan

    Seker, Erdogan Gulari Chemical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; Hydrogen tetranitratoaurate; Hydrogen tetrachloroaurate 1. Introduction Since Held et al. [1] and Iwamato operated gasoline engine vehicles. For example, Misono et al. [3] reported that the activity of cerium

  16. Thermal cycling effect on the nanoparticle distribution and specific heat of a carbonate eutectic with alumina nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankar, Sandhya

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    in a separate cold tank, and then is circulated through the collector field, where it is heated again. Figure 3: Schematic of an active direct storage system (Solar Tres Power Plant) (3) The SEGS I plant included a direct two-tank storage system... Thomas Lalk Committee Member Michael Schuller Head of Department, Dennis O?Neal May 2011 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Thermal Cycling Effects on the Nanoparticle Distribution...

  17. Formation of Crystalline Zn-Al Layered Double Hydroxide Precipitates on Alumina: The Role of Mineral Dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    the sequestration of toxic metals such as nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and cobalt (Co) as layered double hydroxide (LDH, which is an important mechanism for toxic metal sequestration in natural environments, carbonate, or silicate.8-10 Even though it is clear that Me-Al LDHs can form in certain environments

  18. Aluminium doped ceria–zirconia supported palladium-alumina catalyst with high oxygen storage capacity and CO oxidation activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu, E-mail: shuyin@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Guo, Chongshen; Wu, Xiaoyong; Kimura, Takeshi; Sato, Tsugio

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} possessed high OSC and CO oxidation activity at low temperature. - Highlights: • A new OSC material of Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is prepared via a mechanochemical method. • Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed high OSC even after calcination at 1000 °C for 20 h. • Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited the highest CO oxidation activity at low temperature correlates with enhanced OSC. - Abstract: The Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by a mechanochemical route and calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h in air atmosphere to evaluate the thermal stability. The prepared Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was characterized for the oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and CO oxidation activity in automotive catalysis. For the characterization, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique were employed. The OSC values of all samples were measured at 600 °C using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 41 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 583 ?mol-O g{sup ?1} and good OSC performance stability. The same synthesis route was employed for the preparation of the CeO{sub 2}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ce{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 0.5}O{sub 2}/Pd-?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for comparison.

  19. Hydrogen and the Structure of the Transition Aluminas Karl Sohlberg,*, Stephen J. Pennycook,, and Sokrates T. Pantelides,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , with different greek- letter phases corresponding to different distributions of the Aluminum (Al) ions on the two,2 (petroleum refining), and as a support for automotive3,4 and industrial catalysts.5,6 In particular, catalytic reduction of automotive pollutants such as nitric oxide (NOx), as well as oxidation of carbon

  20. MULTI-LAYER COATING OF ULTRATHIN POLYMER FILMS ON NANO-PARTICLES OF ALUMINA BY A PLASMA TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalal, Vikram

    (HRTEM) experiments showed that an extremely thin film of the pyrrole layer (10-20 Å) was uni- formly as a second layer onto the surface of pyrrole. Subsequently, a third layer of pyrrole was coated on the top coating of nanoparticles is an important area in nanomaterials synthesis. Because of their special

  1. TEMPERATURE-PROGRAMMED DESORPTION AND REACTION OF CO AND H2 ON ALUMINA-SUPPORTED RUTHENIUM CATALYST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Gordon Gongngai

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. Anderson, "The Fischer-Tropsch Related Synthesis",carbide theory of Fischer and Tropsch postulated that thereactions are still (Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) from CO and

  2. Densification and thermal gradient evolution of alumina during microwave sintering at 2.45 GHz Daniel ymelkaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is doped by magnesia. This system also allows monitoring of temperature distribution on the surface sample to the conversion of electromagnetic (EM) field energy into heat (rapid heating rates). Reduced sintering.e. by the response of a material to an external electromagnetic field. In the case of dielectric materials

  3. Surface characterizatin of palladium-alumina sorbents for high-temperature capture of mercury and arsenic from fuel gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Stanko, D.; Hamilton, H.; Rowsell, L.; Poulston, S.; Smith, A.; Chu, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal gasification with subsequent cleanup of the resulting fuel gas is a way to reduce the impact of mercury and arsenic in the environment during power generation and on downstream catalytic processes in chemical production, The interactions of mercury and arsenic with PdlAl2D3 model thin film sorbents and PdlAh03 powders have been studied to determine the relative affinities of palladium for mercury and arsenic, and how they are affected by temperature and the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the fuel gas. The implications of the results on strategies for capturing the toxic metals using a sorbent bed are discussed.

  4. Integration of Self-Assembled Porous Alumina and Distributed Bragg Reflector for Light Trapping in Si Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Xing

    Light trapping is an important issue for thin film silicon photovoltaic cells due to the limited absorption coefficient for near infrared light. In this letter, we present a photonic structure that combines porous anodic ...

  5. Measurement and Model Correlation of Specific Heat Capacity of Water-Based Nanofluids With Silica, Alumina and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Hanley, Harry

    Nanofluids are being considered for heat transfer applications. However, their thermo-physical properties are poorly known. Here we focus on nanofluid specific heat capacity. Currently, there exist two models to predict a ...

  6. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.T, 2001: Prospects for biogas harvesting at Sungunn WongseRenewables Biomass, Biogas, PV, Wind turbines, Hydropowermill, fluidized bed kiln Biogas, Biomass Cullet preheating

  7. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Price 2008). In addition, this scenario assumes that the share of biomassand Price 2008). Substitution of fossil fuels in cement kilns with low-sulfur biomass

  8. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic Output in Chinese Cement Kilns,” Proceedings of thereduction of China’s cement industry. Energy Policy 45 (751. Kong, Xiangzhong (China Cement Association, CCA), 2009.

  9. anhui province china: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guizhu 7 Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China University of California...

  10. air circulation wall: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manuscript A wall heat transfer correlation for the baffled-rotary kilns with secondary air Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: Accepted...

  11. Sources and transport of delta 14C in CO2 within the Mexico City Basin and vicinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kilns; medical waste incineration; and emissions from theand haz- ardous waste incineration. Mexico has two hazardousrecycling strategy. This incineration has been led by the

  12. BAE ET AL. VOL. 5 ' NO. 6 ' 49744980 ' 2011 www.acsnano.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liming Dai,^ and Jong-Beom Baek,* Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy and Institute of Advanced

  13. Maintaining the Fertility of Rice Soils : A Chemical Study. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................................................. Lime 25 ................................................................................. Potash 27 .................................................................. Phosphoric acid 27... ............................................................................. Nitrogen 28 Humus ................................................................................ 28 ................................................................................ Acidity 29 ........................................ Test...

  14. Transport in Cement:Transport in Cement: Relating Permeability and PoreRelating Permeability and Pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Transport in Cement:Transport in Cement: Relating Permeability and PoreRelating Permeability, 2004 #12;OutlineOutline Cement Manufacturing and StructureCement Manufacturing and Structure ofofCalcinated in rotaryin rotary kiln at 1500 C for 30kiln at 1500 C for 30-- 40 minutes40 minutes Produces Cement

  15. European Market Study for BioOil (Pyrolysis Oil)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilns 6.2. Sawmill Dry Kilns 6.3. District Heating 6.4. Power Plants- Co-firing and Alternative Fuels 6-distance transportation advantages over raw biomass and wood pellets is BioOil from fast pyrolysis, or Pyrolysis Oil and district heating applications, and in the long-term as a clean burning fuel to replace diesel in industrial

  16. Carbon Offsetting: An Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions or to Avoid Reducing Emissions? An Investigation and Analysis of Offsetting Design and Practice in India and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haya, Barbara

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cement factories are small inefficient vertical shaft kilnvertical shaft kilns (VSKs). Only the US’s 73 and India’s cementcement plants creates incentives to carry out the phase out of the factories that use small inefficient vertical shaft kilns.

  17. Multi-barrier borehole canister designs for a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, D.E.; Skaggs, R.L.; Mohansingh, S.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial dimensions are presented for proposed multi-barrier spent fuel borehole canisters using coated shells combined with sacrificial anodes and alkaline, oxide barriers to adjust potential and pH of the exterior shell into thermodynamically passive or immune regions of the Pourbaix diagram. Configuration of the 3 PWR canister is similar to the 1983 Site Characterization Project (SCP) borehole design. Canister dimensions were determined by using material performance data to calculate wall thickness, criticality, and sacrificial anode life. For the 3-PWR canister. Incoloy 825 is the preferred exterior canister shell material; copper-nickel alloy CDA 715 is the preferred interior canister shell material. High-lime concrete or alumina is preferred for the alkaline filler. Magnesium alloy is the preferred sacrificial anode material. Coating the canister exterior would be necessary to reduce corrosion current density to the point where a 10,000 year design life is possible. A 1 PWR canister has lower mass, thinner walls and lower criticality than the 3 PWR design. Equilibrium calculations for the historical average composition of J-13 water using the aquatic chemical speciation program WQ4F show positive saturation indices for several minerals, indicating potential for deposition on the canister exterior over long time periods. Uniform deposition could reduce corrosion rate by hindering transport of corrosion products from the canister surface. If deposition is non-uniform, local corrosion could increase through development of differential oxygen concentration cells.

  18. MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diluting and using emulsions Dormant spraying Dry lime-sulphur Dusting D N Oils Dormant oils European red Insects on plums Introduction ..- [ron-sulphate-lime mixture I .ead arsenate Leaf-curl I ,eaf hoppers Leaf

  19. DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrathall, James Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technology is assumed. Wet scrubber or combination flue-gasFlue Gas Scrubbing Costs Scrubber Lime- Limestone Reduction-Same as lime-limestone scrubber cost. Cap. Cost*4 Since 6236

  20. REACTIONS OF SULFITE AND NITRITE IONS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO X in lime/limestone FGD scrubbers without requiring majorIntroduction Lime/limestone scrubbers represent the currentbe identified so that a scrubber with better performance and