Sample records for likes sh coatings

  1. SH Coatings LP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SH Coatings, based in Dallas, Texas, employs Super Hydrophobic Coating (SHC) technology that protects power systems by preventing ice accumulation on power lines in ice storm threatened areas and contamination of power lines from salt on the coasts. In order to successfully utilize and commercialize the SHC technology for this application, tools to apply the coating onto new and existing lines must be developed. SH Coatings is developing these tools with the help of technology from Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  3. Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Corrosion Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advances in PSII Deposited Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings for Use as a Corrosion Barrier R. S to improve corrosion resistance, however, the necessary organometallics needed to implant these materials to produce an adherent, hard, wear and, corrosion-resistant coating plays a vital role. These applications

  4. `LOW TEMPERATURE FOMBLIN' COATED ACCORDION-LIKE UCN STORAGE SYSTEM FOR NEUTRON LIFETIME EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyerl, Albert

    Island, Kingston, RI, USA; 3 Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; 4 Institut Laue Temperature Fomblin', has been tested as a wall coating in an ultracold neutron (UCN) storage experiment using to n is made more reliable by the novel use of an accordion-like storage vessel. In this system

  5. Osteoblast proliferation on neat and apatite-like calcium phosphate-coated titanium foam scaffolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    Osteoblast proliferation on neat and apatite-like calcium phosphate-coated titanium foam scaffolds-bearing ability of lightweight titanium made it possible to be used as a biomaterial, especially in hip revision and fixation surgery. It was initially shown that sand-blasted or surface-roughened titanium implants had

  6. The Impact of Thermal Fatigue and Carbidisation on the W Coatings Deposited on CFC tiles for the ITER-like Wall Project at JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Thermal Fatigue and Carbidisation on the W Coatings Deposited on CFC tiles for the ITER-like Wall Project at JET

  7. NEUTRON LIFETIME EXPERIMENT BASED ON AN `ACCORDION-LIKE' UCN STORAGE VOLUME COATED WITH `LOW TEMPERATURE FOMBLIN'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyerl, Albert

    , Cambridge, MA, USA; 2 University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA; 3 Joint Institute for Nuclear Research-fluorinated polymer, `Low Temperature Fomblin', has been tested as a wall coating in an ultracold neutron (UCN of an accordion-like storage vessel. In this system, the surface area and its distribution over height remain

  8. SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is developing a low-cost, advanced lithium-ion battery that employs a novel silicon graphene composite material that will substantially improve battery cycle life. When combined...

  9. Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings as Encapsulants for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Panosyan, Zh.; Gippius, A. A.; Kontsevoy, J. A.; Touryan, K.; Voskanyan, S.; Yengibaryan, Y.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-quality single-layer and bilayer diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are fabricated by two technologies, namely, ion-assisted plasma-enhanced deposition (IAPED) and electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) deposition. Deposition on various substrates, such as sapphires and solar cells, has been performed at low substrate temperatures (50 {approx} 80 C). The two deposition technologies allow good control over the growth conditions to produce DLC films with desired optical properties, thickness, and energy bandgap. The bilayer-structured DLC can be fabricated by using IAPED for the bottom layer followed by ECR for the top layer, or just by IAPED for both layers with different compositions. The DLC films have shown good spatial uniformity, density, microhardness, and adhesion strength. They exhibit excellent stability against attack by strong acids, prolonged damp-heat exposure at 85 C and 85% relative humidity, mechanical scratch, ultrasonication, and irradiation by ultraviolet (UV), protons, and electrons. When deposited on crystalline Si and GaAs solar cells in single-layer and/or bilayer structure, the DLC films not only serve as antireflection coating and protective encapsulant, but also improve the cell efficiencies.

  10. PubMed search tips March 2013, Medical Library Nijmegen MeSH Search Medical Subject Headings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Suijlekom, Walter

    or in selected fields, like title, abstract, author. Untagged terms that are entered in the search box with a MeSH term in PubMed you have 2 options: 1. Type the MeSH term in the PubMed search box adding [MeSH] 2. Find a term in the MeSH Database, click on Add to Search Builder (right of the screen

  11. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Price, R. Eugene (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

  12. Workforce Statistics - NA SH | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Workforce Statistics - NA SH Workforce Statistics - NA SH NA SH FY14 Year End...

  13. Superhydrophobic Surface Coatings for Microfluidics and MEMs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branson, Eric D.; Singh, Seema [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA] [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Houston, Jack E.; van Swol, Frank B.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low solid interfacial energy and fractally rough surface topography confer to Lotus plants superhydrophobic (SH) properties like high contact angles, rolling and bouncing of liquid droplets, and self-cleaning of particle contaminants. This project exploits the porous fractal structure of a novel, synthetic SH surface for aerosol collection, its self-cleaning properties for particle concentration, and its slippery nature 3 to enhance the performance of fluidic and MEMS devices. We propose to understand fundamentally the conditions needed to cause liquid droplets to roll rather than flow/slide on a surface and how this %22rolling transition%22 influences the boundary condition describing fluid flow in a pipe or micro-channel. Rolling of droplets is important for aerosol collection strategies because it allows trapped particles to be concentrated and transported in liquid droplets with no need for a pre-defined/micromachined fluidic architecture. The fluid/solid boundary condition is important because it governs flow resistance and rheology and establishes the fluid velocity profile. Although many research groups are exploring SH surfaces, our team is the first to unambiguously determine their effects on fluid flow and rheology. SH surfaces could impact all future SNL designs of collectors, fluidic devices, MEMS, and NEMS. Interfaced with inertial focusing aerosol collectors, SH surfaces would allow size-specific particle populations to be collected, concentrated, and transported to a fluidic interface without loss. In microfluidic systems, we expect to reduce the energy/power required to pump fluids and actuate MEMS. Plug-like (rather than parabolic) velocity profiles can greatly improve resolution of chip-based separations and enable unprecedented control of concentration profiles and residence times in fluidic-based micro-reactors. Patterned SH/hydrophilic channels could induce mixing in microchannels and enable development of microflow control elements. Acknowledgements This work was funded by Sandia National Laboratory's Laboratory Directed Research & Development program (LDRD). Some coating processes were conducted in the cleanroom facility located at the University of New Mexico's Center for High Technology Materials (CHTM). SEM images were performed at UNM's Center for Micro-Engineering on equipment funded by a NSF New Mexico EPSCoR grant. 4

  14. Fabrication of highly transparent diamond-like carbon anti-reflecting coating for Si solar cell application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Amit, E-mail: erdd@iacs.res.in; Das, Debajyoti, E-mail: erdd@iacs.res.in [Nano-Science Group, Energy Research Unit, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata-700032 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    ARC grade highly transparent unhydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were produced, directly from a-C target, using RF magnetron sputtering deposition technique, for optoelectronic applications. Optical band gap, transmittance, reflectance, sp{sup 3} fraction, I{sub D}/I{sub G}, density, and refractive index of the films have been estimated with the help of optical tools like Uv-vis spectrophotometer, ellipsometer and micro-Raman. Optimum ARC-qualities have been identified in low-temperature grown DLC films at an Ar pressure of 4 mTorr in the reactor, accomplishing its key requirements for use in silicon solar cells.

  15. Material Stock Requests -SH Version Date: June 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Material Stock Requests - SH Version Date: June 2013 #12;Training Guide Material Stock Requests injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall be responsible to take all Stock Requests - SH Page iii Table of Contents Material Stock Requests - SH

  16. Probing the Magnetized Interstellar Medium Surrounding the Planetary Nebula Sh 2-216

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan Ransom; Bulent Uyaniker; Roland Kothes; Tom Landecker

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 1420 MHz polarization images of a 2.5 X 2.5 degree region around the planetary nebula (PN) Sh 2-216. The images are taken from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS). An arc of low polarized intensity appears prominently in the north-east portion of the visible disk of Sh 2-216, coincident with the optically identified interaction region between the PN and the interstellar medium (ISM). The arc contains structural variations down to the ~1 arcminute resolution limit in both polarized intensity and polarization angle. Several polarization-angle "knots" appear along the arc. By comparison of the polarization angles at the centers of the knots and the mean polarization angle outside Sh 2-216, we estimate the rotation measure (RM) through the knots to be -43 +/- 10 rad/m^2. Using this estimate for the RM and an estimate of the electron density in the shell of Sh 2-216, we derive a line-of-sight magnetic field in the interaction region of 5.0 +/- 2.0 microG. We believe it more likely the observed magnetic field is interstellar than stellar, though we cannot completely dismiss the latter possibility. We interpret our observations via a simple model which describes the ISM magnetic field around Sh 2-216, and comment on the potential use of old PNe as probes of the magnetized ISM.

  17. Deposition of mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide by dual-source metal plasma immersion. Topical report, October 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide have been produced by a Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (Mepiiid) technique based on two cathodic vacuum arc sources and concurrent pulse biasing of the substrate in an oxygen atmosphere. The deposition was carried out at oxygen partial pressures of between 0.66 and 3.33 Pa. The Al:Si ratio in the films varied from 1:1 to 8:1 and was controlled by varying the pulse duration of the separate plasma guns. High bias voltage was used early in the deposition process in order to produce atomic mixing at the film-substrate interface, while lower bias voltage was used later in the deposition; low ion energy allows control of the physical properties of the film as well as faster deposition rates. The as-deposited films were amorphous, and crystalline mullite was formed by subsequent annealing at 1,100 C for 2 hours in air. Strong adhesion between the mullite and the SiC was achieved, in some cases exceeding the 70 MPa instrumental limit of the pull-tester.

  18. Topic Models to Interpret MeSH MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, David

    ://ii.nlm.nih.gov/mti.shtml #12;MeSH heading Major MeSH heading Major qualifier MeSH-qualifier combination Humans Brain metabolism Brain (metabolism) Table 1. Most frequent MeSH headings, major MeSH headings, major qualifiers and MeTopic Models to Interpret MeSH ­ MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings David Newman12 , Sarvnaz Karimi

  19. Aluminide coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H [Kennewick, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  20. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES AND COMMUNICATIONS ON THE SH 130 PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    0-4661-P3 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES AND COMMUNICATIONS ON THE SH 130 PROJECT Authors: James T. O 130 organizational structures and communication flows. A set of guidelines pertaining to team: Organizational Structure, Communication Flows, Design-Build, Comprehensive Development Agreement No. of Pages

  1. SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT, Albert M. Day, Director #12;THE VENEZUKLAN SALT-FISH INDUSTRIES CONTE^fTS Part II Potential Productive and Craft 29 Development of Unused or Underutilized Species 29 Development of New Areas 35 Salt 35 Studies

  2. PubMed advanced exercise: MeSH Searching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    achilles tendon and click Search. With MeSH searches, you enter only one search term at a time and you don can remove the need to enter multiple alternative terms to describe the same concept. For the following exercise, please search PubMed using: a) search terms that feature within the following

  3. Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Coincident P and Sh...

  4. Protective Coatings for Turbomachinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCune, B.; Hilty, L.

    of these coatings has lead to the development of tailored coatings for different applications. In addition, coatings now offer multiple benefits. The most advanced compressor coatings restore surface finish, resist erosion, and provide protection from corrosion....

  5. Workforce Statistics - NA SH | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER643 DOEof|00 |SH |

  6. Activation of the S-H Group in Fe(µ2-SH)Fe Clusters: S-H Bond Strengths and Free Radical Reactivity of the Fe(µ2-SH)Fe Cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz, James A.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Bowden, Thomas A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Appel, Aaron M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Bitterwolf, Thomas E.; Dupuis, Michel

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute rate constants were determined for the abstraction of hydrogen atom from (OC)3Fe(?-SH)2Fe(CO)3 (Fe2S2H2) and (OC)3Fe(?-SCH3)(?-SH)Fe(CO)3 (Fe2S2MeH) by benzyl radical in benzene. From the temperature dependent rate data for Fe2S2H2, ?H‡ and ?S‡ were determined to be 2.03 ? 0.56 kcal/mol and 19.3 ? 1.7 cal/mol K, respectively, giving kabs = 1.2 ? 107 M 1 s 1 at 25?C. For Fe2S2MeH, ?H‡ and ?S‡ were determined to be 1.97 ? 0.46 kcal/mol and 18.1 ? 1.5 cal/mol K, respectively, giving kabs = 2.3 ? 107 M 1 s 1 at 25?C. Temperature dependent rate data are also reported for hydrogen atom abstraction by benzyl radical from thiophenol (?H‡ = 3.62 ? 0.43 kcal/mol, ?S‡ = 21.7 ? 1.3 cal/mol K) and H2S (?H‡ = 5.13 ? 0.99 kcal/mol, ?S‡ = 24.8 ? 3.2 cal/mol K), giving kabs at 25?C of 2.5 ? 105 and 4.2 ? 103 M 1 s 1, respectively. DFT calculations predict S-H bond strengths of 73.1 and 73.2 kcal/mol for Fe2S2H2 and Fe2S2MeH, respectively. Free energy and NMR chemical shift calculations confirm the NMR assignments and populations of Fe2S2H2 and Fe2S2MeH isomers. Derived radicals Fe2S2H• and Fe2S2Me• exhibit singly occupied HOMOs with unpaired spin density distributed between the two Fe atoms, a bridging sulfur, and d?-bonding between Fe centers. The S-H solution bond dissociation free energy (SBDFE) of Fe2S2MeH was found to be 69.4 ± 1.7 kcal/mol by determination of its pKa (16.0 ± 0.4) and the potential for the oxidation of the anion, Fe2S2Me- of 0.26 ± 0.05 V vs. ferrocene in acetonitrile (corrected for dimerization of Fe2S2Me•). This SBDFE for Fe2S2MeH corresponds to a gas phase bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of 74.2 kcal/mol, in satisfactory agreement with the DFT value of 73.2 kcal/mol. Replacement of the Fe-Fe bond in Fe2S2MeH with bridging ?-S (Fe2S3MeH) or ?-CO (Fe2S2(CO)MeH) groups leads to (DFT) BDEs of 72.8 and 66.2 kcal/mol, the latter indicating dramatic effects of choice of bridge structure on S-H bond strengths. These results provide a model for the reactivity of hydrosulfido sites of low-valent heterogeneous FeS catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  7. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas M. Lillo; Richard N. Wright; W. David Swank; D.C Haggard; Dennis C. Kunerth; Denis E. Clark

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HVOF coating have shown high resistance to corrosion in fossil energy applications and it is generally accepted that mechanical failure, e.g. cracking or spalling, ultimately will determine coating lifetime. The high velocity oxygen-fuel method (HVOF) of applying coatings is one of the most commercially viable and allows the control of various parameters including powder particle velocity and temperature which influence coating properties, such as residual stress, bond coat strength and microstructure. Methods of assessing the mechanical durability of coatings are being developed in order to explore the relationship between HVOF spraying parameters and the mechanical properties of the coating and coating bond strength. The room temperature mechanical strength, as well as the resistance of the coating to cracking/spalling during thermal transients, is of considerable importance. Eddy current, acoustic emission and thermal imaging methods are being developed to detect coating failure during thermal cycling tests and room temperature tensile tests. Preliminary results on coating failure of HVOF FeAl coatings on carbon steel, as detected by eddy current measurements during thermal cycling, are presented. The influence of HVOF coating parameters of iron aluminides - applied to more relevant structural steels, like 316 SS and Grade 91 steel, - on coating durability will be explored once reliable methods for identification of coating failure have been developed.

  8. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Thompson, Karen G. (Orlando, FL); Bryan, Coleman J. (Merritt Island, FL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  9. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  10. SH Wave Propagation in Semiconductor/Piezoelectric Structures Jianke Du, Xiaoying Jin, Ji Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    SH Wave Propagation in Semiconductor/Piezoelectric Structures Jianke Du, Xiaoying Jin, Ji Wang Acoustic wave propagating in a piezoelectric crystal is usually accompanied by an electric field. When of the initial stress on the propagation of SH surface wave has remarkable importance for design of devices

  11. Elements of Constr S&H Program UT-Battelle Contracts January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Elements of Constr S&H Program UT-Battelle Contracts January 2008 Page 1 of 2 constrR2_080123.pdf of job site medical attention · Medical evacuation from job site #12;Elements of Constr S&H Program UT-Battelle

  12. -tin ! Imma ! sh Phase Transitions of Germanium Xiao-Jia Chen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;-tin ! Imma ! sh Phase Transitions of Germanium Xiao-Jia Chen,1 Chao Zhang,2 Yue Meng,3 Rui March 2011) New paths were designed for the investigations of the #12;-tin ! Imma ! sh phase transitions in nanocrystalline Ge under conditions of hydrostatic stress. A second-order transition between the #12;-tin and Imma

  13. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  14. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors Re-direct Destination: An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective...

  15. amorphous diamond-like carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b, Materials Science Websites Summary: Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon...

  16. adherent diamond-like carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon coatings Angela M. Ladwig a,b, Materials Science Websites Summary: Atmospheric plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon...

  17. Flow coating apparatus and method of coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

  18. EERE Desal using Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coating's surface; preventing salt creep, and thus virtually eliminates salt induced corrosion on any surface coated. 2. These coatings consist primarily of diatomaceous earth as...

  19. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry N. (Tracy, CA); Patterson, Steven R. (Concord, NC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  20. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  1. Metallic coating of microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

  2. The EMBO Journal Vol.17 No.18 pp.52735285, 1998 Crystal structure of the amphiphysin-2 SH3 domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Phil

    at its C-terminus which have the potential to interact with various Src homology 3 (SH3) domains (Gout et

  3. al coated a2: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties of Ti-doped diamond-like carbon composite coatings Engineering Websites Summary: AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties...

  4. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  5. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  6. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  7. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  8. Superhard Coating Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Applications," International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings and Thin Films, San Diego, CA, April 23-27, 2007. - A. Erdemir, O. L. Eryilmaz., M. Urgen, K....

  9. Thermal barrier coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  10. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  11. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  12. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  13. High-resolution MAS NMR analysis of PI3-SH3 amyloid fibrils: Backbone conformation and implications for protofilament assembly and structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayro, Marvin J.

    The SH3 domain of the PI3 kinase (PI3-SH3 or PI3K-SH3) readily aggregates into fibrils in vitro and has served as an important model system in the investigation of the molecular properties and mechanism of formation of ...

  14. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  15. Aluminum phosphate coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sambasivan, Sankar (Chicago, IL); Steiner, Kimberly A. (Chicago, IL); Rangan, Krishnaswamy K. (Evanston, IL)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminophosphate compounds and compositions as can be used for substrate or composite films and coating to provide or enhance, without limitation, planarization, anti-biofouling and/or anti-microbial properties.

  16. Spin coating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  17. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of X-ray emitting young stars associated with the Sh 2-296 nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, B; Montmerle, T; Rojas, G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied a sample of stars associated with the Sh 2-296 nebula, part of the reflection nebulae complex in the region of Canis Major (CMa R1). Our sample corresponds to optical counterparts of X-ray sources detected from observations with the XMM-Newton satellite, which revealed dozens of possible low-mass young stars not yet known in this region. A sample of 58 young star candidates were selected based on optical spectral features, mainly H{\\alpha} and lithium lines, observed with multi-objects spectroscopy performed by the Gemini South telescope. Among the candidates, we find 41 confirmed T Tauri and 15 very likely young stars. Based on the H{\\alpha} emission, the T Tauri stars were distinguished between classical (17%) and weak-lined (83%), but no significant difference was found in the age and mass distribution of these two classes. The characterization of the sample was complemented by near- and mid-infrared data, providing an estimate of ages and masses from the comparison with pre-main-sequence evolut...

  19. Development of an Alginate-based Antimicrobial Edible Coating to Extend the Shelf-life of Fresh-cut Pineapple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mantilla, Natalia

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and beneficial components of fresh-cut pineapple is coating the fruit with an edible material, a coating. This coating acts as a barrier against moisture loss and gas exchanges and can be a carrier of other components like antimicrobials, which can help to extend...

  20. Development of an Alginate-based Antimicrobial Edible Coating to Extend the Shelf-life of Fresh-cut Pineapple 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mantilla, Natalia

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and beneficial components of fresh-cut pineapple is coating the fruit with an edible material, a coating. This coating acts as a barrier against moisture loss and gas exchanges and can be a carrier of other components like antimicrobials, which can help to extend...

  1. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  2. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  3. Metallic coatings: autocatalytic (electroless) nickel-phosphorus alloy coatings: specification and test methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic coatings: autocatalytic (electroless) nickel-phosphorus alloy coatings: specification and test methods

  4. Revêtements métalliques : Dépôts électrolytiques de nickel Metallic coatings : Electrodeposited coatings of nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revêtements métalliques : Dépôts électrolytiques de nickel Metallic coatings : Electrodeposited coatings of nickel

  5. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA); Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA); Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  6. Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

  7. Tribology and coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future use of fuel-efficient, low-emission, advanced transportation systems (for example, those using low-heat-rejection diesel engines or advanced gas turbines) presents new challenges to tribologists and materials scientists. High service temperatures, corrosive environments, and extreme contact pressures are among the concerns that make necessary new tribological designs, novel materials, and effective lubrication concepts. Argonne is working on methods to reduce friction, wear and corrosion, such as soft metal coatings on ceramics, layered compounds, diamond coatings, and hard surfaces.

  8. Fiber coating method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  9. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  10. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  11. Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a coating system meeting the requirements for photovoltaic module encapsulation.

  12. Kinetics of SH with NO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, O/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedl, R.R.; Brune, W.H.; Anderson, J.G.

    1985-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A low pressure (1-8 torr of He) discharge flow reactor with (a) LIF detection of SH using a high repetition rate (20 kHz) metal atom laser to circumvent severe predissociation of the A/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ state and (b) resonance fluorescence detection of OH has been used to examine the kinetics of the title reactions at 298 K: SH + NO/sub 2/ ..-->.. HSO + NO, SH + O/sub 3/ ..-->.. HSO + O/sub 2/; SH + O/sub 2/ ..-->.. SO + OH, SH + H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/S + HO/sub 2/; SH + H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ ..-->.. HSO + H/sub 2/O. Regeneration of SH in reaction 2 by HSO + O/sub 3/ is observed and is used to infer a rate constant for HSO + O/sub 3/ ..-->.. products. Absence of OH production in that reaction implies that the primary products are SH + 2O/sub 2/. Isotope experiments with H/sub 2/S replaced by D/sub 2/S substantiate that conclusion and yield a reaction rate constant for DSO + O/sub 3/ ..-->.. SD + 2O/sub 2/. Brief discussions of SH reactivity compared with OH and Br are offered, as well as a summary of the atmospheric chemistry of SH. 20 references, 7 figures.

  13. Graphene Coating Coupled Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

  14. Low friction and galling resistant coatings and processes for coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Roger N. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention describes coating processes and the resultant coated articles for use in high temperature sodium environments, such as those found in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and their associated systems. The substrate to which the coating is applied may be either an iron base or nickel base alloy. The coating itself is applied to the substrate by electro-spark deposition techniques which result in metallurgical bonding between the coating and the substrate. One coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and an aluminum electrode. Another coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and a nickel-base hardfacing alloy electrode.

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring on-line failure of turbine thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zombo, Paul J.; Lemieux, Dennis; Diatzikis, Evangelos

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of remotely monitoring the radiant energy (6) emitted from a turbine component such as a turbine blade (1) having a low-reflective surface coating (3) which may be undergoing potential degradation is used to determine whether erosion, spallation, delamination, or the like, of the coating (3) is occurring.

  16. Effect of coating on the hygric performance of a hemp concrete wall Yacine At Oumziane 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Effect of coating on the hygric performance of a hemp concrete wall Yacine Aït Ouméziane 1 , Sophie de Génie Mécanique, Rennes, France Keywords: building material, HAM modelling, hysteresis, hemp concrete, coating ABSTRACT Constructions built with environmentally friendly materials like hemp concrete

  17. Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

  18. Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhi Heng (San Ramon, CA); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

  19. Method for simultaneously coating a plurality of filaments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Paul A. (1004 Matia Ct. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Pochan, Paul D. (3308 Morris St. NE., #11, Albuquerque, NM 87111); Siegal, Michael P. (9900 Spain NE., Apt. W-2123, Albuquerque, NM 87111); Dominguez, Frank (11341 Academy Ridge Rd. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses for coating materials, and the products and compositions produced thereby. Substances, such as diamond or diamond-like carbon, are deposited onto materials, such as a filament or a plurality of filaments simultaneously, using one or more cylindrical, inductively coupled, resonator plasma reactors.

  20. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  1. Carbonaceous film coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris[1,3,2]diazaborine[1,2-a:1'2'-c:1"2"-e]borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

  2. Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

  3. Carbonaceous film coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, L.

    1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

  4. Grb2-SH3 ligand inhibits the growth of HER2+ cancer cells and has anti-tumor effects in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    formation in HER2 over-expressing SKBr3 cancer cells. Combined treatment of peptidimer-c with docetaxel1 Grb2-SH3 ligand inhibits the growth of HER2+ cancer cells and has anti-tumor effects in human further inhibited both colony formation and tumor cell survival compared to docetaxel treatment alone

  5. Can a more realistic model error structure improve the parameter estimation in modelling the dynamics of sh populations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong

    or applying an estimation method that is robust to the error structure assumption in modelling the dynamicsCan a more realistic model error structure improve the parameter estimation in modelling the dynamics of ®sh populations? Y. Chena,* , J.E. Paloheimob a Fisheries Conservation Chair Program, Fisheries

  6. Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozer, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R A T O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings NilgunUC-1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings NilgunPaper Sol-gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

  7. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 1080. AES Second Coatings for Solar Collectors Symp. , 11coating concept is to use heavy starting stock which might be suitable for direct fabrication of solar collectorsolar collector panels. Here the major consideration is whether the coating

  8. Tests Conducted with Strippable Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. E. Archibald; R. L. Demmer

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the testing and evaluation of several strippable coatings and their use in decontamination. Pentek 604, Bartlett (TLC), and ALARA 1146 were products examined for their overall effectiveness and ease of use. Conclusions were reached about the effective use of these coatings, and field test examples, with radioactive contamination are incorporated.

  9. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  10. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  11. Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozer, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, .O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

  12. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tong, William Man-Wai (Oakland, CA); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Mangat, Pawitter J. S. (Gilbert, AZ); Stivers, Alan R. (San Jose, CA); Kofron, Patrick G. (San Jose, CA); Thompson, Matthew A. (Austin, TX)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  13. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  14. Ceramic composite coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

  15. SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 ature, low-pressure technique was used to prepare a rough, highly porous organosilica aerogel-like film. UVozone treatments were used 15 to control the surface coverage of...

  16. An investigation of thin-film coating/substrate systems by nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Thostenson, E.T.; Chou, T.W. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Riester, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The indentation load-displacement behavior of three material systems tested with a Berkovich indenter has been examined. The materials studied were the substrate materials--silicon and polycarbonate, and the coating/substrate systems--diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on silicon, and DLC coating on polycarbonate. They represent three material systems, namely, bulk, soft-coating/hard-substrate, and hard-coating on soft-substrate. Delaminations in the soft-coating/hard-substrate (DLC/Si) system and cracking in the hard-coating/soft-substrate system (DLC/Polycarbonate) were observed. Parallel to the experimental work, an elastic analytical effort has been made to examine the influence of the film thickness and the properties of the coating/substrate systems. Comparisons between the experimental data and analytical solutions of the load-displacement curves during unloading show good agreement. The analytical solution also suggests that the Young`s modulus and hardness of the thin film can not be measured accurately using Sneddon`s solution for bulk materials when the thickness of the film is comparable to the loading contact radius of the indenter. The elastic stress field analysis provides a basis for understanding the experimentally observed delaminations and cracking of the coating/substrate systems.

  17. Architecture for coated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan; Stan, Liliana

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Articles are provided including a base substrate having a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material with a rock-salt-like structure layer thereon, and, a layer of epitaxial titanium nitride upon the layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure. Such articles can further include thin films of high temperature superconductive oxides such as YBCO upon the layer of epitaxial titanium nitride or upon a intermediate buffer layer upon the layer of epitaxial titanium nitride.

  18. Environmental Technology Verification Coatings and Coating Equipment Program (ETV CCEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 Quality Assurance for the ETV CCEP.....................................................................1.................................................................11 2.2.12 Determination of Total Volatile Content of the UV-Curable Coating.......14 2.3 Schedule.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE OBJECTIVES.......................................

  19. SULFUR CHEMISTRY IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: THE EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION OF H{sub 2} IN THE REACTION S{sup +}+H{sub 2} ?SH{sup +}+H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanchet, Alexandre; Herrero, Victor J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), C.S.I.C. Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Agúndez, Marcelino [University Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Aguado, Alfredo [Unidad Asociada UAM-CSIC. Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Roncero, Octavio [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C. Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific rate constants for the S{sup +}+H{sub 2} reaction are calculated using the ground quartet state potential energy surface and quasi-classical trajectories method. The calculations are performed for H{sub 2} in different vibrational states v = 0-4 and thermal conditions for rotational and translational energies. The calculations lead to slow rate constants for the H{sub 2} vibrational levels v = 0, 1, but a significant enhancement of reactivity is observed when v > 1. The inverse reaction is also studied and rate constants for v = 0 are presented. For comparison, we also recompile previous results of state-to-state rate constants of the C{sup +}+H{sub 2} for H{sub 2} in rovibrational state v, j = (0,0), (1,0), (1,1), and (2,0). The calculated rate coefficients are fitted using an improved form of the standard three-parameter Arrhenius-like equation, which is found to be very accurate in fitting rate constants over a wide range of temperatures (10-4000 K). We investigate the impact of the calculated rate coefficients on the formation of SH{sup +} in the photon-dominated region Orion Bar and find an abundance enhancement of nearly three orders of magnitude when the reaction of S{sup +} with vibrationally excited H{sub 2} is taken into account. The title reaction is thus one of the principal mechanisms in forming SH{sup +} in interstellar clouds.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Lei L [ORNL; Pan, Yun-Long [Smart Papers, Hamilton, OH 45013; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Peterson, Robert C. [Miami University, Oxford, OH

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  1. Prime coats materials and methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mantilla, Christian Augusto

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prime coat is the application of a suitable bituminous binder applied to a nonbituminous granular base as a preliminary treatment before the application of a bituminous surfacing. The purpose of this research is to establish practical applications...

  2. PHOTOCATALYSIS ON TITANIA-COATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    PHOTOCATALYSIS ON TITANIA-COATED ELECTRODELESS DISCHARGE LAMPS #12;#12;PHOTOCATALYSIS ON TITANIA/Vis-illuminated Titania 39 Chapter 5 Novel Microwave Photocatalytic Reactors 41 Chapter 6 Microwave Photocatalysis

  3. SH 3.2.39 1 Study of the Shadow of the Moon and Sun with VHE Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    SH 3.2.39 1 Study of the Shadow of the Moon and Sun with VHE Cosmic Rays M.O. Wascko 1 1 Department by primaries with energy below 1 TeV. The shadows of the sun and moon observed with cosmic rays can be used. This is expected to distort and displace the shadows of the sun and the moon. The moon shadow, offset from

  4. Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi comPuter Science (bSc) Computer Science C x x x humanitieS (ba) Aboriginal Studies (J) x x x African Studies (J) x x x American Studies (J) x x x Celtic Studies x x x Christianity and Culture x x x Christianity and Education x Cinema

  5. Method for producing fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hakovirta, Marko J.; Nastasi, Michael A.; Lee, Deok-Hyung; He, Xiao-Ming

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorinated, diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) films are produced by a pulsed, glow-discharge plasma immersion ion processing procedure. The pulsed, glow-discharge plasma was generated at a pressure of 1 Pa from an acetylene (C.sub.2 H.sub.2) and hexafluoroethane (C.sub.2 F.sub.6) gas mixture, and the fluorinated, diamond-like carbon films were deposited on silicon <100>substrates. The film hardness and wear resistance were found to be strongly dependent on the fluorine content incorporated into the coatings. The hardness of the F-DLC films was found to decrease considerably when the fluorine content in the coatings reached about 20%. The contact angle of water on the F-DLC coatings was found to increase with increasing film fluorine content and to saturate at a level characteristic of polytetrafluoroethylene.

  6. Findings in seal coat design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Palmer, Miguel Angel

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FINDINGS IN SEAL COAT DESIGN A Thesis by MIGUEL ANGEL GONZALEZ PALMER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject : Civil... Engineering FINDINGS IN SEAL COAT DESIGN A Thesis by MIGUEL ANGEL GONZALEZ PALMER Approved as to style and content by: Michael P. J. Olsen (Chairman of Committee) Dallas N. Little (Member) ne D. Tiner (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Departme...

  7. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  8. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  9. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  10. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  11. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  12. Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

  13. On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer coated sheet metal components find diverse applications in many industries. The manufacturing of the components generally involves forming of sheet metal into the desired shape and coating of the formed part with organic coating...

  14. J. Vaissire et al.: Final manuscript Vaissire, J., Honda, K., Amelot, A., Maeda, Sh., Crevier-Buchman, L., (in press), "Multisensor platform for speech physiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J. Vaissière et al.: Final manuscript 1 Vaissière, J., Honda, K., Amelot, A., Maeda, Sh., Crevier in a phonetics laboratory Jacqueline Vaissière (1) , Kiyoshi Honda (1) , Angélique Amelot (1) , Shinji Maeda (2

  15. Structural evolution of the P22-like phages: Comparison of Sf6 and P22 procapsid and virion architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Timothy S.

    Structural evolution of the P22-like phages: Comparison of Sf6 and P22 procapsid and virion Keywords: cryoEM Image reconstruction Bacteriophage Sf6 Virus assembly Procapsid Virion Coat proteins chaperones), these phages are classified into three groups (P22-like, Sf6-like, and CUS-3-like). We used cryo

  16. Sputtering process and apparatus for coating powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

  17. HVOF coatings of Diamalloy 2002 and Diamalloy 4010 onto steel: Tensile and bending response of coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Shehri, Y. A.; Hashmi, M. S. J. [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Eng., DCU, Dublin (Ireland); Yilbas, B. S. [Mech. Eng. Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    HVOF coating of Diamalloy 2002 powders and Diamalloy 4010 powders as well as two-layered coatings consisting of these powders is carried out. In the two-layered structure, Diamalloy 4010 is sprayed at the substrate surface while Diamalloy 2002 is sprayed on the top of Diamalloy 4010 coating. The mechanical properties of the coatings are examined through tensile and three-point bending tests. The coating microstructure and morphology are examined using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the coating produced is free from defects including voids and cracks. The failure mechanism of coating during tensile and three-point bending tests is mainly crack formation and propagation in the coating. The elastic modulus of coating produced from Diamalloy 2002 is higher than that of Diamalloy 4010 coating, which is due to the presence of 12% WC in the coating.

  18. Evaluation of End Mill Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

  19. Laser-based coatings removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D & D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building.

  20. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  1. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian (Newton, MA); Chen, Jinghua (Chestnut Hill, MA); Huang, Zhongping (Belmont, MA); Wang, Dezhi (Wellesley, MA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  2. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

  3. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  4. POLYIMIDE COATINGS FOR ELECTRONICS ridyid KMeinfelcl-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    / POLYIMIDE COATINGS FOR ELECTRONICS ridyid KMeinfelcl- .Room 6H-.424 ' ' ATT Bell Laboratgri^;5i existing patent. ·Dn Pnnt Tpa«4o Print«riin tift & #12;POLYIMIDE COATINGS FOR ELECTRONICS \\ PRODUCT

  5. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. of 1977 Flat Plate Solar Collector Conference- USDOE,"Second Coatings for Solar Collectors Symp. , 11 Winter Park,COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS Carl M. Lampert TWO-WEEK

  6. High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    powders for SSC layer paste 'Multi-scale' particles clearly show much better light absorption Multi-scale vs. Mono-scale Structures Coating Process Development Coating of SSC...

  7. YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) in 1986, both (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 (BSCCO or 2223 with a critical temperature, Tc of 110 K) and YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO or 123 with a Tc of 91 K) have emerged as the leading candidate materials for the first generation (1G) and second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor wires or tapes that will carry high critical current density in liquid nitrogen temperatures [1-7]. The crystal structures and detailed fundamental properties of BSCCO and YBCO superconductors have been reviewed by Matsumoto in a separate chapter in this book. The U.S. Department of Energy s target price for the conductor is close to the current copper wire cost of $10-50/kA-meter, i.e. a meter of copper type conductor carrying 1000 A current costs ~ $ 50 [8]. The long-term goal for the DOE, Office of Electricity, Advanced Conductors and Cables program is to achieve HTS wire in 1000 meters long with current carrying capacity of 1000 A/cm [8]. Robust, high-performance HTS wire will certainly revolutionize the electric power grid and various other electric power equipments as well. Sumitomo Electric Power (Japan) has been widely recognized as the world leader in manufacturing the first-generation HTS wires based on BSCCO materials using the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube (OPIT) over-pressure process [9]. Typically, 1G HTS wires carry critical currents, Ic, of over 200 Amperes (A) in piece lengths of one kilometer lengths at the standard 4 mm width and ~ 200 m thickness. However, due to the higher cost of 1G wire, mainly because of the cost of Ag alloy sheath, the researchers shifted their effort towards the development of YBCO (second generation 2G) tapes in the last fifteen years [1-7]. One of the main obstacles to the ability to carry high critical currents in YBCO films has been the phenomenon of weak links, i.e., grain boundaries formed by the misalignment of neighboring YBCO grains are known to form obstacles to current flow [10]. By carefully aligning the grains in YBCO films, low angle boundaries between superconducting YBCO grains allow more current to flow. In fact below a critical misalignment angle of 4 , the critical current density approaches that of YBCO films grown on single crystal substrates [10]. Typically, 2G HTS wires have three components, flexible metal substrate, buffer layers, and REBa2Cu3O7- (REBCO: RE = Rare Earth) superconductor layers [1-7]. Several methods were developed to obtain biaxially textured templates suitable for fabricating high-performance YBCO coated conductors. They are Ion-Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD), Rolling-Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) and Inclined-Substrate Deposition (ISD). Compared to 1G wire, for producing 2G wires using RABiTS or IBAD process, silver is replaced by a low cost nickel alloy, which allows for fabrication of less expensive HTS wires.

  8. Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers J Available online 30 March 2006 Abstract The mechanical and optical properties of dual-coated optical fibers of silica nanoparticles in the secondary coating is shown to enhance the resistance of optical fibers

  9. Friction- and wear-reducing coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dong (Farmington Hills, MI); Milner, Robert (Warren, MI); Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim (Troy, MI)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  11. CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS Prepared For: California Energy ANALYSIS REPORT (FAR) CORROSION RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS EISG AWARDEE Chemat://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Corrosion Resistant Coating for Carbonate Fuel Cell Components EISG Grant # 00-05 Awardee

  12. Terahertz antireflection coatings using metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhou, Jiangfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate terahertz metamaterial antireflection coatings (ARCs) that significantly reduce the reflection and enhance the transmission at an interface of dielectric media. They are able to operate over a wide range of incidence angles for both TM and TE polarizations. Experiments and finite-element simulations will be presented and discussed.

  13. Direct Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Schaaf; Michelle D. Shinn; E. Carpene; J. Kaspar

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct laser synthesis of functional coatings employs the irradiation of materials with short intensive laser pulses in a reactive atmosphere. The material is heated and plasma is ignited in the reactive atmosphere. This leads to an intensive interaction of the material with the reactive species and a coating is directly formed on the materials surface. By that functional coatings can be easily produced a fast way on steel, aluminium, and silicon by irradiation in nitrogen, methane, or even hydrogen. The influence of the processing parameters to the properties of the functional coatings will be presented for titanium nitride coating produced on titanium with the free electron laser.

  14. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  15. Cleaning and Decontamination Using Strippable and Protective Coatings at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Tripp; K. Archibald; L. Lauerhass; M. Argyle; R. Demmer

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction (RLWR) group is conducting a testing and evaluation program on strippable and protective coatings. The purpose of the program is to determine how and where these coatings can be used to aid in the minimization of liquid waste generation. These coatings have become more important in daily operations because of the increased concern of secondary liquid waste generation at the INEEL. Several different strippable and protective coatings were investigated by the RLWR group, including Pentek 604, Bartlett (TLC), and ALARA 1146. During the tests quantitative data was determined, such as effectiveness at reducing contamination levels, or costs, as well as some qualitative data on issues like ease of application or removal. PENTEK 604 and Bartlett TLC are seen as superior products with slightly different uses.

  16. TiN coated aluminum electrodes for DC high voltage electron guns

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Taus, Rhys; Forman, Eric; Poelker, Matthew

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparing electrodes made of metals like stainless steel, for use inside DC high voltage electron guns, is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In this paper, the authors report the exceptional high voltage performance of aluminum electrodes coated with hard titanium nitride (TiN). The aluminum electrodes were comparatively easy to manufacture and required only hours of mechanical polishing using silicon carbide paper, prior to coating with TiN by a commercial vendor. The high voltage performance of three TiN-coated aluminum electrodes, before and after gas conditioning with helium, was compared to that of bare aluminum electrodes, and electrodes manufactured from titanium alloymore »(Ti-6Al-4V). Following gas conditioning, each TiN-coated aluminum electrode reached ?225?kV bias voltage while generating less than 100?pA of field emission (« less

  17. Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

  18. High efficiency turbine blade coatings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600 oC and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the production of layered periodic microstructures in the coating, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) modeling of particle transport in the PVD plume, functional graded layer development, the deposition of all layers to form a complete coating, and materials characterization including thermal testing. Ion beam-assisted deposition, beam sharing through advanced digital rastering, substrate pivoting, hearth calorimetry, infrared imaging, fiber optic-enabled optical emission spectroscopy and careful thermal management were used to achieve all the milestones outlined in the FY02 LDRD proposal.

  19. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most impressive finding was the impact of the clay on the elongation at break; a nearly 400% increase was observed for a clay concentration of 0.5 wt.%. These coatings also demonstrate a number of other property enhancements, which make them a good candidate for continued research. Another approach explored in this research was the use of structured and self-cleaning surfaces. If the amount of coating utilized can be significantly reduced, the environmental impact is diminished.

  20. A theoretical study on gas-phase coating of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, S.; Fotou, G.P.; Kodas, T.T. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, MN (United States)] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, MN (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ coating of aerosol particles by gas-phase and surface reaction in a flow reactor is modeled accounting for scavenging (capture of small particles by large particles) and simultaneous surface reaction along with the finite sintering rate of the scavenged particles. A log-normal size distribution is assumed for the host and coating particles to describe coagulation and a monodisperse size distribution is used for the coating particles to describe sintering. As an example, coating of titania particles with silica in a continuous flow hot-wall reactor was modeled. High temperatures, low reactant concentrations, and large host particle surface areas favored smoother coatings in the parameter range: temperature 1,700--1,800 K, host particle number concentration 1 {times} 10{sup 5}--1 {times} 10{sup 7} No./cm{sup 3}, average host particle size 1 {micro}m, inlet coating reactant concentration (SiCl{sub 4}) 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}--2 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} mol/cm{sup 3}, and various surface reaction rates. The fraction of silica deposited on the TiO{sub 2} particles decreased by more than seven times with a hundredfold increase in SiCl{sub 4} inlet concentration because of the resulted increase in the average SiO{sub 2} particle size under the assumed coating conditions. Increasing the TiO{sub 2} particle number concentration resulted in higher scavenging efficiency of SiO{sub 2}. In the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} system it is likely that surface reaction as well as scavenging play important roles in the coating process. The results agree qualitatively with experimental observations of TiO{sub 2} particles coated in situ with silica.

  1. Dye-coated europium monosulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, Srotoswini [Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States); Dollahon, Norman R. [Department of Biology, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Stoll, Sarah L., E-mail: sls55@georgetown.ed [Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University, Washington D.C. 20057 (United States)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticles of EuS were synthesized using europium dithiocarbamate complexes. The resulting nanoparticles were coated with the dye, 1-pyrene carboxylic acid and the resulting material was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the relative energy of the conduction band edge to the excited state energy of the dye. -- Graphical abstract: Dye sensitized magnetic semiconductor materials were prepared by synthesizing EuS nanoparticles using single source precursors and coating with the dye, 1-pyrene carboxylic acid. Display Omitted highlights: > Synthesized EuS nanoparticles, 11{+-}2.4 nm characterized using XRD, TEM, and UV-vis. spect. > Grafted a dye to the surface and characterized the product using XRD, FTIR, UV-vis., and TEM. > Studied the photophysical properties using fluorescence spectroscopy. > Determined the relative dye excited state to the conduction band of the semiconductor.

  2. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  3. High Critical Current Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

  4. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lionel Foret; Pierre Sens

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also triggered by factors such as the presence of cargo and variation of the membrane mechanical tension, allows for efficient regulation of vesicle secretion. We propose a model, supported by different experimental observations, in which vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy consuming desorption of coat proteins, until the presence of cargo or other factors triggers a dynamical switch into a vesicle producing state.

  5. Acceptance testing of the eddy current probes for measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thickness on K West Basin fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During a recent visual inspection campaign of fuel elements stored in the K West Basin, it was noted that fuel elements contained in sealed aluminum canisters had a heavy translucent type coating on their surfaces (Pitner 1997a). Subsequent sampling of this coating in a hot cell (Pitner 1997b) and analysis of the material identified it as aluminum hydroxide. Because of the relatively high water content of this material, safety related concerns are raised with respect to long term storage of this fuel in Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). A campaign in the basin is planned to demonstrate whether this coating can be removed by mechanical brushing (Bridges 1998). Part of this campaign involves before-and-after measurements of the coating thickness to determine the effectiveness of coating removal by the brushing machine. Measurements of the as-deposited coating thickness on multiple fuel elements are also expected to provide total coating inventory information needed for MCO safety evaluations. The measurement technique must be capable of measuring coating thicknesses on the order of several mils, with a measurement accuracy of 0.5 mil. Several different methods for quantitatively measuring these thin coatings were considered in selecting the most promising approach. Ultrasonic measurement was investigated, but it was determined that due to the thin coating depth and the high water content of the material, the signal would likely pass directly through to the cladding without ever sensing the coating surface. X-ray fluorescence was also identified as a candidate technique, but would not work because the high gamma background from the irradiated fuel would swamp out the low energy aluminum signal. Laser interferometry could possibly be applied, but considerable development would be required and it was considered to be high risk on a short term basis. The consensus reached was that standard eddy current techniques for coating thickness measurement had the best chance for success in this endeavor. If proper placement and alignment of the eddy current measurement probe on the coating could be achieved, the thickness of this non-conductive coating over the conductive fuel cladding (Zircaloy 2) should be measurable based on magnetic stand-off aspects. Eddy current devices are routinely used to measure paint coating thicknesses on metal surfaces in this regard. The purpose of this report is to document the development and acceptance testing of the eddy current system conducted to qualify its use for the measurement of aluminum hydroxide coating thicknesses on fuel stored in the K West Basin.

  6. Electrodeposited coatings for diamond turning applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, A.; Bramlett, R.D.; Day, R.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Evans, C.J.; Polvani, R.S. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodeposited coatings are attractive for precision machining operations because thick coatings can be economically applied, with good adhesion, to a variety of substrates. Approximately 20 pure metals and a large number of alloys can be deposited from aqueous solutions. Fused salt and organic solvent electrolytes can be used to lengthen the list of metals that can be electrodeposited. However, both the choice of the metallic coating and the control of the plating process are critical for success in precision finishing of electrodeposited coatings. Some preliminary results at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory suggest that electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloys are excellent coatings for single point diamond turning from the standpoint of material properties and low tool wear. Electrodeposited aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings also merit consideration for precision finishing where weight is an important factor. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Investigation of Genes Associated with the White Coat Color in Tigers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larkin, Emilee 1991-

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    of the white coat color and associated disorders so that breeding could be modified to avoid these detrimental phenotypes. We used information obtained from other species regarding the genes found to be involved to select two likely candidates for the white...

  8. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  9. A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakakibara, Y; Suzuki, T; Yamamoto, K; Chen, D; Koike, S; Tokoku, C; Uchiyama, T; Ohashi, M; Kuroda, K

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  10. A Study of Cooling Time Reduction of Interferometric Cryogenic Gravitational Wave Detectors Using a High-Emissivity Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Sakakibara; N. Kimura; T. Suzuki; K. Yamamoto; D. Chen; S. Koike; C. Tokoku; T. Uchiyama; M. Ohashi; K. Kuroda

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  11. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  12. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  13. Functioning mechanism of AlF3 coating on the Li- and Mn-rich cathode materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Xiao, Jie; Polzin, Bryant; Yan, Pengfei; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Li- and Mn-rich (LMR) material is a very promising cathode for lithium ion batteries because of their high theoretical energy density (~900 Wh kg-1) and low cost. However, their poor long-term cycling stability, voltage fade, and low rate capability are significant barriers hindered their practical applications. Surface coating, e.g. AlF3 coating, can significantly improve the capacity retention and enhance the rate capability. However, the fundamental mechanism of this improvement and the microstructural evolution related to the surface coating is still not well understood. Here, we report systematic studies of the microstructural changes of uncoated and AlF3-coated materials before and after cycling using aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results reveal that surface coating can reduce the oxidation of electrolyte at high voltage, thus suppressing the accumulation of SEI layer on electrode particle surface. Surface coating also enhances structural stability of the surface region (especially the electrochemically transformed spinel-like phase), and protects the electrode from severe etching/corrosion by the acidic species in the electrolyte, therefore limiting the degradation of the material. Moreover, surface coating can alleviate the undesirable voltage fade by minimize layered-spinel phase transformation in the bulk region of the materials. These fundamental findings may also be widely applied to explain the functioning mechanism of other surface coatings used in a broad range of electrode materials.

  14. Optical coatings for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Rainer, F.

    1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasers for fusion experiments use thin-film dielectric coatings for reflecting, antireflecting and polarizing surface elements. Coatings are most important to the Nd:glass laser application. The most important requirements of these coatings are accuracy of the average value of reflectance and transmission, uniformity of amplitude and phase front of the reflected or transmitted light, and laser damage threshold. Damage resistance strongly affects the laser's design and performance. The success of advanced lasers for future experiments and for reactor applications requires significant developments in damage resistant coatings for ultraviolet laser radiation.

  15. OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference Proceedings,Conference on Gas Turbine Materials in a Marine Environment,in developing new turbine materials, coatings and processes,

  16. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide (TCO)...

  17. Method of identifying defective particle coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Mark E. (San Diego, CA); Whiting, Carlton D. (San Diego, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying coated particles having defective coatings desig to retain therewithin a build-up of gaseous materials including: (a) Pulling a vacuum on the particles; (b) Backfilling the particles at atmospheric pressure with a liquid capable of wetting the exterior surface of the coated particles, said liquid being a compound which includes an element having an atomic number higher than the highest atomic number of any element in the composition which forms the exterior surface of the particle coating; (c) Drying the particles; and (d) Radiographing the particles. By television monitoring, examination of the radiographs is substantially enhanced.

  18. Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sheet form For corrosion resistance, apply a coating that is a composite of two materials: - Filler to provide electrical conductivity * Candidate Materials: graphite, carbon...

  19. Residual Stress Measurements in Thin Coatings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on steel Accomplishments Adhesion Energy Measurements Using Indentation (Kim et al., Thin Solid Films 441 (2003) 172-179) * Hard brittle coating on relatively ductile...

  20. Delbruck scattering at energies of 140450 MeV Sh. Zh. Akhmadaliev, G. Ya. Kezerashvili, S. G. Klimenko, V. M. Malyshev, A. L. Maslennikov, A. M. Milov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delbru¨ck scattering at energies of 140­450 MeV Sh. Zh. Akhmadaliev, G. Ya. Kezerashvili, S. G on a bismuth germanate (Bi4Ge3O12) target at photon energies 140­450 MeV and scattering angles 2.6­16.6 mrad

  1. Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference R. Pasupathy, S.-H. Kim, A. Tolk, R. Hill, and M. E. Kuhl, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference R. Pasupathy, S.-H. Kim, A. Tolk, R. Hill the clarity and readability of their papers in the Proceedings of the Winter Simulation Conference, this paper at the Winter Simulation Conference (WSC) as well as publication in the Proceedings of the Winter Simulation

  2. Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference R. Pasupathy, S.-H. Kim, A. Tolk, R. Hill, and M. E. Kuhl, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the 2013 Winter Simulation Conference R. Pasupathy, S.-H. Kim, A. Tolk, R. Hill, telecommunication, nuclear engineering, climatology, etc. Crude Monte Carlo simulations are no longer efficient manuscript, published in "2013 Winter Simulation Conference, WASHINGTON : United States (2013)" #12

  3. On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -off apparatus that measures the coating pull-off stress was used to indicate the coating adhesion strength. Several types of specimen were designed to obtain uniaxial tension, biaxial tension, and tension-compression deformation modes on pre-coated sheet...

  4. Triggered massive-star formation on the borders of Galactic HII regions. III. Star formation at the periphery of Sh2-219

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Deharveng; B. Lefloch; F. Massi; J. Brand; S. Kurtz; A. Zavagno; J. Caplan

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Massive-star formation triggered by the expansion of HII regions. Aims. To understand if sequential star formation is taking place at the periphery of the HII region Sh2-219. Methods. We present 12CO(2-1) line observations of this region, obtained at the IRAM 30-m telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain). Results. In the optical, Sh2-219 is spherically symmetric around its exciting star; furthermore it is surrounded along three quarters of its periphery by a ring of atomic hydrogen. This spherical symmetry breaks down at infrared and millimetre wavelengths. A molecular cloud of about 2000\\msol lies at the southwestern border of Sh2-219, in the HI gap. Two molecular condensations, elongated along the ionization front, probably result from the interaction between the expanding HII region and the molecular cloud. In this region of interaction there lies a cluster containing many highly reddened stars, as well as a massive star exciting an ultracompact HII region. More surprisingly, the brightest parts of the molecular cloud form a `chimney', perpendicular to the ionization front. This chimney is closed at its south-west extremity by H-alpha walls, thus forming a cavity. The whole structure is 7.5 pc long. A luminous H-alpha emission-line star, lying at one end of the chimney near the ionization front, may be responsible for this structure. Confrontation of the observations with models of HII region evolution shows that Sh2-219 is probably 10^5 yr old. The age and origin of the near-IR cluster observed on the border of Sh2-219 remain unknown.

  5. In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. (National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States)); Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

  6. In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. [National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States); Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

  7. Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating properties characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Bowman, C.; Gannon, Paul E.; VanVorous, D.; Voevodin, A. A.; Rutkowski, A.; Muratore, C.; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Gelles, David S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Trusov, B. G.

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Aircraft propulsion applications require low-friction and wear resistant surfaces that operate under high contact loads in severe environments. Recent research on supertough and low friction nanocomposite coatings produced with hybrid plasma deposition processes was demonstrated to have a high potential for such demanding applications. However, industrially scalable hybrid plasma technologies are needed for their commercial realization. The Large area Filtered Arc Deposition (LAFAD) process provides atomically smooth coatings at high deposition rates over large surface areas. The LAFAD technology allows functionally graded, multilayer, super-lattice and nanocomposite architectures of multi-elemental coatings via electro-magnetic mixing of two plasma flows composed of different metal ion vapors. Further advancement can be realized through a combinatorial process using a hybrid filtered arc-magnetron deposition system. In the present study, multilayer and nanostructured TiCrCN/TiCr +TiBC composite cermet coatings were deposited by the hybrid filtered arc-magnetron process. Filtered plasma streams from arc evaporated Ti and Cr targets, and two unbalanced magnetron sputtered B4C targets, were directed to the substrates in the presence of reactive gases. A multiphase nanocomposite coating architecture was designed to provide the optimal combination of corrosion and wear resistance of advanced steels (Pyrowear 675) used in aerospace bearing and gear applications. Coatings were characterized using SEM/EDS, XPS and RBS for morphology and chemistry, XRD and TEM for structural analyses, wafer curvature and nanoindentation for stress and mechanical properties, and Rockwell and scratch indentions for adhesion. Coating properties were evaluated for a variety of coating architectures. Thermodynamic modeling was used for estimation of phase composition of the top TiBC coating segment. Correlations between coating chemistry, structure and mechanical properties are discussed.

  8. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  9. Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Moisture Penetration Through Optical Fiber Coatings J. L. Armstrong, M. J. Matthewson and C. R for measuring the diffusion coefficients of water vapor through optical fiber polymer coatings has been. Kurkjian #12;732 International Wire & Cable Symposium Proceedings 1998 Moisture Penetration Through Optical

  10. Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is available in sheet form For corrosion resistance, apply a coating that is a composite of two materials: ­ Filler to provide electrical conductivity · Candidate Materials: graphite, carbon black, TiB2 and CaB6Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings Jennifer Mawdsley Argonne National Laboratory Fuel

  11. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  12. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  13. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  14. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel...

  15. Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and...

  16. High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers This presentation was...

  17. agent resistant coating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the polymer coating dramatically Matthewson, M. John 33 Protective Coatings for Turbomachinery Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: broad range of corrodents. 2) Resist...

  18. Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High-Performance Membranes Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...

  19. antireflection coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    choices in terms of reflective coatings for both the primary and the secondary mirror. In particular, multi-layer dielectric coatings, capable of filtering out the large...

  20. antireflective coating effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    choices in terms of reflective coatings for both the primary and the secondary mirror. In particular, multi-layer dielectric coatings, capable of filtering out the large...

  1. Amorphous layer coating induced brittle to ductile transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    layer coating induced brittle to ductile transition in single crystalline SiC nanowires: an atomistic simulation. Amorphous layer coating induced brittle to ductile transition in...

  2. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

  3. Characterization of Organic Coatings on Hygroscopic Salt Particles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Coatings on Hygroscopic Salt Particles and their Atmospheric Impacts. Characterization of Organic Coatings on Hygroscopic Salt Particles and their Atmospheric Impacts....

  4. Method for smoothing the surface of a protective coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sangeeta, D. (Cincinnati, OH); Johnson, Curtis Alan (Schenectady, NY); Nelson, Warren Arthur (Clifton Park, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for smoothing the surface of a ceramic-based protective coating which exhibits roughness is disclosed. The method includes the steps of applying a ceramic-based slurry or gel coating to the protective coating surface; heating the slurry/gel coating to remove volatile material; and then further heating the slurry/gel coating to cure the coating and bond it to the underlying protective coating. The slurry/gel coating is often based on yttria-stabilized zirconia, and precursors of an oxide matrix. Related articles of manufacture are also described.

  5. advanced antifouling coating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies for tank linings, new technologies for pipeline coatings and linings, marine corrosion, pipeline integrity, surface tolerant coatings, thermal insulation and...

  6. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein Digestion. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein...

  7. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell...

  8. Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

  9. Electron-stimulated desorption from polished and vacuum fired 316LN stainless steel coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyshev, Oleg B., E-mail: oleg.malyshev@stfc.ac.uk; Valizadeh, Reza; Hogan, Benjamin T.; Hannah, Adrian N. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, WA4 4AD Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, two identical 316LN stainless steel tubular samples, which had previously been polished and vacuum-fired and then used for the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments, were coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V with different morphologies: columnar and dense. ESD measurement results after nonevaporable getter (NEG) activation to 150, 180, 250, and 350?°C indicated that the values for the ESD yields are significantly (2–20 times) lower than the data from our previous study with similar coatings on nonvacuum-fired samples. Based on these results, the lowest pressure and best long-term performance in particle accelerators will be achieved with a vacuum-fired vacuum chamber coated with dense Ti-Zr-Hf-V coating activated at 180?°C. This is likely due to the following facts: after NEG activation, the hydrogen concentration inside the NEG was lower than in the bulk stainless steel substrate; the NEG coating created a barrier for gas diffusion from the sample bulk to vacuum; the dense NEG coating performed better as a barrier than the columnar NEG coating.

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Partial radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH13 Shiprock, New Mexico, November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a detailed radiological assessment of the vicinity properties at Shiprock, a comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH13 was initiated on November 19, 1982. At that time, a single residential structure existed in the northwest corner of the property. The lands surrounding the structure were extensively cluttered with junk. The initial assessment activities were limited to measurements within the residential structure of the ambient external penetrating radiation level at a 1-meter height and analyses of indoor air samples for airborne radioactivity. The external penetrating radiation exposure rate (12.3 ..mu..R/h) was less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(2)). As determined by the air samples, the short-term radon daughter concentration within the structure (0.36 mWL) did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard. Further measurements required to completely determine the radiological status of this vicinity property, such as measurements of surface radiation both indoors and outdoors and collection and analyses of soil samples, were planned for the final phase of this assessment. However, that phase of the program was terminated before these measurements were accomplished. Thus, the extent of outdoor radiological contamination is presently unknown, and the evaluation of indoor contamination (if any) is incomplete.

  11. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  12. Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

  13. Void forming pyrolytic carbon coating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Cook, Jackie L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pyrolytic carbon coated nuclear fuel particle and method of making it. The fuel particle has a core composed of a refractory compound of an actinide metal. The pyrolytic carbon coating surrounds the core so as to provide a void volume therebetween. The coating has an initial density of no greater than 1.45 grams/cm.sup.3 and an anisotropy factor than 3.0 and a final density upon heat treatment above about 2000.degree. C. of greater than 1.7 grams/cm.sup.3 and an anisotropy factor greater than 5.

  14. Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

  15. Measure Guideline: Transitioning from Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco with EPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brozyna, K.; Davis, G.; Rapport, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Measure Guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The three-coat system uses a base layer, a fill layer, and a finish layer. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

  16. A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications coated with nanoparticles of multiple materials to realize the multicomponent coating. High resolution.1115/1.2787026 Keywords: carbon nanotubes, nanoparticles, electrostatic force directed assembly, coating, size selection

  17. Shape Memory Assisted Self-Healing Coating Xiaofan Luo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Shape Memory Assisted Self-Healing Coating Xiaofan Luo and Patrick T. Mather* Department and characterization of new shape memory assisted self- healing (SMASH) coatings. The coatings feature a phase in a shape memory epoxy matrix. Mechanical damage to the coating can be self-healed via heating, which

  18. Royal SwediSh academy of engineeRing ScienceS (iVa) a TRibuTe To The memoRy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Royal SwediSh academy of engineeRing ScienceS (iVa) a TRibuTe To The memoRy of SVanTe a; A TribuTe To The MeMory of PresenTed AT The 2008 AnnuAl MeeTing of The royAl swedish AcAdeMy; The Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA) is an independent, learned society that promotes

  19. Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  20. Permeation Barrier Coatings for the Helical Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.S.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A permeation barrier coating was specified for the Helical Heat Exchanger (HHE) to minimize contamination through emissions and/or permeation into the nitrogen system for ALARA reasons. Due to the geometry of the HHE, a special coating practice was needed since the conventional method of high temperature pack aluminization was intractable. A survey of many coating companies was undertaken; their coating capabilities and technologies were assessed and compared to WSRC needs. The processes and limitations to coating the HHE are described. Slurry coating appears to be the most technically sound approach for coating the HHE.

  1. Triggered massive-star formation on the borders of Galactic HII regions. IV- Star formation at the periphery of Sh2-212

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Deharveng; B. Lefloch; S. Kurtz; D. Nadeau; M. Pomarès; J. Caplan; A. Zavagno

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We wish to establish whether sequential star formation is taking place at the periphery of the Galactic HII region Sh2-212. Methods: We present CO millimetre observations of this region obtained at the IRAM 30-m telescope to investigate the distribution of associated molecular material. We also use deep JHK observations obtained at the CFHT to study the stellar content of the region, and radio observations obtained at the VLA to look for the presence of an ultra-compact (UC) HII region and for maser emission. Results: In the optical, Sh2-212 is spherically symmetric around its central exciting cluster. This HII region is located along a molecular filament. A thin, well-defined half ring of molecular material surrounds the brightest part of the HII region at the rear and is fragmented. The most massive fragment (~200 solar masses) contains a massive young stellar object displaying a near-IR excess; its spectral energy distribution indicates a high-mass (~14solar masses), high-temperature (~30000K), and high-luminosity (~17000 solar luminosities) source. This object ionizes a UC HII region. Conclusions: Sh2-212 is a good example of massive-star formation triggered via the collect and collapse process. The massive YSO observed at its periphery is a good candidate for a massive star formed in isolation.

  2. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, C.S.; Reed, S.T.

    1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An antireflection film made from reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  3. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An antireflection film made from a reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  4. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 1977 Flat Plate Solar Collector Conference- USDOE," Wash.Second Coatings for Solar Collectors Symp. , 11 Winter Park,assuming the finisher and the collector manufacturer are not

  5. Thin film-coated polymer webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wenz, Robert P. (Cottage Grove, MN); Weber, Michael F. (Shoreview, MN); Arudi, Ravindra L. (Woodbury, MN)

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

  6. UV Curable Coatings in Aluminum Can Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donhowe, E. T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based coatings. The Coors Brewing Company Can Manufacturing Plant has been utilizing this technology in full scale aluminum can production since 1975, and therefore has had the opportunity to evaluate practical operations of the UV technology...

  7. Performance of Polymer Coatings Under Forming Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purohit, Zalak

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepainted metal sheets being environment friendly and cost effective as compared to postpainted metal sheets, are widely used in construction, packaging, transportation and automotive industries. One of the key requirements for prepainted coatings...

  8. Nickel coated aluminum battery cell tabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bucchi, Robert S.; Casoli, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kathleen M.; Nicotina, Joseph

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery cell tab is described. The battery cell tab is anodized on one end and has a metal coating on the other end. Battery cells and methods of making battery cell tabs are also described.

  9. Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials - F13 Q1 Corrosion in Very High-Temperature Molten Salt for Next Generation CSP Systems Direct s-CO2...

  10. OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone1970, p. 545. R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

  11. Conformal chemically resistant coatings for microflow devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Zdeblick, Mark

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for coating the inside surfaces of silicon microflow devices, such as electrophoresis microchannels, with a low-stress, conformal (uniform) silicon nitride film which has the ability to uniformly coat deeply-recessed cavities with, for example, aspect ratios of up to 40:1 or higher. The silicon nitride coating allows extended exposure to caustic solutions. The coating enables a microflow device fabricated in silicon to be resistant to all classes of chemicals: acids, bases, and solvents. The process involves low-pressure (vacuum) chemical vapor deposition. The ultra-low-stress silicon nitride deposition process allows 1-2 .mu.m thick films without cracks, and so enables extended chemical protection of a silicon microflow device against caustics for up to 1 year. Tests have demonstrated the resistance of the films to caustic solutions at both ambient and elevated temperatures to 65.degree. C.

  12. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  13. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 1080. AES Second Coatings for Solar Collectors Symp. , 11solar collector panels. Here the major consideration is whether the coatingcoating concept is to use heavy starting stock which might be suitable for direct fabrication of solar collector

  14. OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,FT4, JT9D and other gas turbines, and their use continues toOVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone

  15. Downdrag on bitumen-coated piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, Randall Keith

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOWNDRAG ON BITUMEN-COATED PILES A Thesis by RANDALL KEITH BUSH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering DOWNDRAG ON BITUMEN-COATED PILES A Thesis by RANDALL KEITH BUSH Approved as to style and content by: Jean-Louis Briaud (Chair of Committee) Har M. Coyle (Member) Alan Letton (Member) James . P. Yao (Head of artment...

  16. Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof Coating Procedures and their Productivity Gains John Bonaby and Dr. Diane Schaub, University of Florida As building envelope improvements are realized in organizations as ways to insulate businesses from high energy costs, the relative... benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially...

  17. Thermal sensor with an improved coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

  18. Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially... available roof coatings, and productivity gains associated with these energy saving strategies. This type of situation is evidenced in the justification of energy rebates distributed by Florida Power & Light in exchange for the application of Energy Star...

  19. Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

  20. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  1. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH03, Shiprock, NM, July-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K F; Justus, A L; Sholeen, C M; Smith, W H; Wynveen, R A

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH03 was conducted on an intermittent basis from July 26 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, three structures were located on the property - a residential trailer, the main structure, and an old gas pump housing. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with arid vegetation or paved. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air, soil, and other material samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the trailer. However, the results of the radiological assessment did indicate the occurrence of elevated levels of gamma, surface alpha, and radon daughter radioactivity within the main structure. The short-term radon daughter measurements exceeded the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background. The assessment also indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 32,000 ft/sup 2/ of the grounds adjacent to and surrounding the main structure on the east, south, and west sides. The contamination appeared to be due to the presence of unprocessed uranium ore. Analysis of surface soil samples collected from the environs indicated radium concentrations in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination levels exceeded the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  2. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH12, Shiprock, NM, October-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH12 was conducted on an intermittent basis from October 27 to November 22, 1982. At the time of the survey, several exhibition halls and concession stands; an auction yard; a race track and rodeo arena with associated stands, shutes, and corrals; and a hogan were located on the property. The surrounding environs were either sparsely covered with arid vegetation or covered with gravel. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels, for both fixed and removable contamination, through direct instrument and smear (indoor only) surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analyses of air, soil, and other material samples. The radiological assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity within only one of the structures. Background levels of radioactivity were indicated within all other structures. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at the rodeo arena and nearby shutes and corrals, encompassing about 49,000 ft/sup 2/ of land. Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from this general area indicated 23 +- 2 pCi/g for radium, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface. Elevated levels of radioactivity were also found at the southern end of the west parking lot, encompassing about 7500 ft/sup 2/ of land, and at several areas in the southern section of the property, encompassing about 160,000 ft/sup 2/ of land. Radiochemical analyses of two of the soil samples collected from the southern section indicated radium concentrations of 43 +- 5 and 42 +- 5 pCi/g of soil, in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background as specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known.

  3. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH01, Shiprock, NM, August-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH01 was conducted on an intermittent basis from August 23 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, three structures were located on the property - two residential structures and a residential trailer. In addition to the three residences, the frame from a former truck scale was still on the property. The lands surrounding the structures and former truck scale were sparsely covered with vegetation. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels through direct instrument surveys and analysis of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the structures, although elevated levels of radioactivity due to proximity to or shine from contaminated soils were indicated within all. The short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background, as specified in the EPA Standard 40 CFR 192. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 32,000 ft/sup 2/ (2900 m/sup 2/) of land surrounding, and north of, the former truck scale. Analysis of a surface soil sample collected from the environs indicated a radium concentration considerably in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination level exceeded the limit specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  4. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

  5. Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

  6. Development of an Iron-Oxide Coated Ceramic Filter for Removal of As(III) and As(V) in Developing Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, Emily C.

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    -oxide-coated sand (IOCS). A 1.8-cm ID column was packed with 250-mL of IOCS-2. The influent flow rate was 125 mL/min, yielding an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 2 min. The media was regenerated using a solution near pH 2.0. The IOCS was effective... ……………………………………………..…..10 Figure 5: Predominance diagram for As(III) and As(V) as a function of pH ……………........19 Figure 6: Eh-pH diagram for As-O2-S-H2O system …………………………………………....20 Figure 7: Sorption of [A] arsenite and [B] arsenate (pH 7.5; arsenic...

  7. Tissue-like phantoms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA); De Grand, Alec M. (Boston, MA)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  8. METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Depositing Solar Collector Coatings". Proceedings of theSymposium on Coatings for Solar Collectors, . Louis,'MO,OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS Carl M. Lampert

  9. METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the AES Coatings for Solar Collectors Symposium. Atlanta.Sputtering for Depositing Solar Collector Coatings".Symposium on Coatings for Solar Collectors, . Louis,'MO,

  10. Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dash, Monika

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

  11. Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Low Friction, Nanocomposite AlMgB14-TiB2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Bruce A [Ames Laboratory; Harringa, J [Ames Laboratory; Anderegg, A [Ames Laboratory; Russell, A M [Iowa State University; Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Higdon, Clifton [Eaton Corporation; Elmoursi, Alaa A [Eaton Corporation

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in coating science and technology offer new opportunities to enhance the energy-efficiency and performance of industrial machinery such as hydraulic fluid pumps and motors. The lubricated friction and wear characteristics of two wear-resistant coatings, diamond-like carbon and a nanocomposite material based on AlMgB{sub 14}-50 vol.% TiB{sub 2}, were compared in pin-on-disk tribotests using Mobil DTE-24{trademark} oil as the lubricant. In each case, the pins were fixed 9.53 mm diameter spheres of AISI 52100 steel, the load was 10 N, and the speed 0.5 m/s in all tests. Average steady-state friction coefficient values of 0.10 and 0.08 were measured for the DLC and nanocomposite, respectively. The coatings and their 52100 steel counterfaces were analyzed after the tests by X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy for evidence of material transfer or tribo-chemical reactions. The low-friction behavior of the boride nanocomposite coating is due to the formation of lubricative boric acid, B(OH){sub 3}. In contrast, the low-friction behavior of the DLC coating is related to the relatively low dielectric constant of the oil-based lubricant, leading to desorption of surface hydrogen from the coating.

  12. Glass/ceramic coatings for implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomsia, Antoni P. (Pinole, CA); Saiz, Eduardo (Berkeley, CA); Gomez-Vega, Jose M. (Nagoya, JP); Marshall, Sally J. (Larkspur, CA); Marshall, Grayson W. (Larkspur, CA)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

  13. Figure correction of multilayer coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

  14. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  15. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  16. Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, lightweight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention.

  17. Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

  18. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  19. Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Partial radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH14 Shiprock, New Mexico, October-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a detailed radiological assessment of the vicinity properties at Shiprock, a comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH14 was initiated during October and November 1982. At the time of the survey, vicinity property SH14 consisted of about 20 acres of open lands to the northeast of, and directly across the San Juan River from, the upper tailings pile at Shiprock. The lands consisted of a sandy soil, sparsley covered with trees and other vegetation. The partial assessment activities included determination of surface radiation levels on about a 2-meter grid spacing through direct instrument surveys and analysis of a soil sample collected from the area. The partial radiological assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several general areas within the open lands. Radiochemical analyses of the soil sample collected from one of these areas indicated a radium concentration of 18 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192). Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Further measurements required to completely determine and accurately report the radiological status of this vicinity property, including additional direct instrument surveys, collection and analyses of soil samples, and the establishment of a 200-ft grid system, were planned for the final phase of this assessment. However, that phase of the program was cancelled before these measurements were accomplished. The total extent of the radiological contamination of vicinity property SH14 is presently unknown. Nonetheless, since the surface soil contamination levels exceeded the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  1. Production of porous coating on a prosthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preselected surface areas of a prosthesis are covered by a blend of matching primary metallic particles and expendable particles. The particles are compressed and heated to assure that deformation and metallurgical bonding occurs between them and between the primary particles and the surface boundaries of the prosthesis. Porosity is achieved by removal of the expendable material. The result is a coating including discrete bonded particles separated by a network of interconnected voids presenting a homogeneous porous coating about the substrate. It has strength suitable for bone implant usage without intermediate adhesives, and adequate porosity to promote subsequent bone ingrowth.

  2. Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

  3. Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zemanian, Thomas Samuel (Richland, WA); Fryxell, Glen (Kennwick, WA); Ustyugov, Oleksiy A. (Spokane, WA)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

  4. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  5. Special Coating Emission Control System At Goulds Pumps ITT Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caropolo, B.; Evans, T.

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required significant changes for users of industrial paints and coatings. New York State requires users of highly volatile coatings to meet additional regulations, and apply for special permits and variances...

  6. Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golen, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

  7. Special Coating Emission Control System At Goulds Pumps ITT Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caropolo, B.; Evans, T.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required significant changes for users of industrial paints and coatings. New York State requires users of highly volatile coatings to meet additional regulations, and apply for special permits and variances...

  8. The possibility of forming a sacrificial anode coating for Mg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mg is the most active engineering metal, and is often used as a sacrificial anode/coating to protect other engineering metals from corrosion attack. So far no sacrificial anode coating has been developed or considered for Mg. This study explores the possibility of forming a sacrificial coating for Mg. A lithiated carbon coating and a metaphosphated coating are applied on the Mg surface, respectively, and their open-circuit-potentials are measured in saturated Mg(OH)2 solution. They exhibit more negative potentials than bare Mg. SEM reveals that the metaphosphated coating offers more effective and uniform protection for Mg than the lithiated carbon coating. These preliminary results indicate that development of a sacrificial anode coating for Mg is indeed possible.

  9. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q1 High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q1...

  10. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2 High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2...

  11. Value pricing of surface coatings for mitigating heat exchanger fouling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, D.I.; Gomes da Cruz, L.; Ishiyama, E.M.; Boxler, C.; Augustin, W.; Scholl, S.

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    crystallisation fouling; (b) fluorocarbon-based coatings which offer antifouling performance but can reduce heat transfer, for crystallisation fouling; and (c) fluorocarbon-based coatings in a dairy pasteuriser application. A novel strategy, of replacing stainless...

  12. area supplemental coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    unknown authors 4 Continuous blade coating for multi-layer large-area organic light-emitting diode and solar cell Materials Science Websites Summary: Continuous blade coating for...

  13. The Addition of Graphene to Polymer Coatings for Improved Weathering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuraje, Nurxat

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene nanoflakes in different weight percentages were added to polyurethane top coatings, and the coatings were evaluated relative to exposure to two different experimental conditions: one a QUV accelerated weathering ...

  14. Systematic Evaluation of Jc Decrease in Thick Film Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Ignatiev; Dr. Amit Goyal

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Address both thickness dependence of Jc, in thick film YBCO coated conductors through an application of a suite of new measurement techniques to thick film wire samples produced by commercially viable coated conductor technologies.

  15. Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

  16. Apparatus for coating and impregnating filament with resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.

    1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for evenly coating and impregnating a filament with binder material. Dimension control and repeatability of the coating and impregnating characteristics are obtained with the apparatus.

  17. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  18. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles W. Brullot a coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized to chemical treatments and biocompatible [12]. An impression of an iron oxide nanoparticle coated with a PEG

  19. Lithographically directed deposition of silica nanoparticles using spin coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Lithographically directed deposition of silica nanoparticles using spin coating Deying Xia and S. R-assembly by spin coating to control particle placement. Three sizes of silica nanoparticles (mean diameters: 78, 50, and 15 nm) were employed for spin-coating processes. Single linear silica particle chain patterns

  20. A new method of coating oilfield core for laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.; Shadizadeh, R.S.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method has been developed for coating oilfield core for laboratory studies. It consists of applying a steel coating and aluminum wraps around the outer surface of a core. The strength of the coating, the short time needed to apply it, and its low cost are the major advantages of this new method.

  1. Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

  2. Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a, , Carlos G. Levi b is enhanced by incorporation of through-thickness pores within the coating. However, molten calcium­magnesium­alumino­silicate in dissolution of the coat- ing in the silicate melt, precipitation of new phases, and the elimination

  3. CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENTMACROCELL TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENT­MACROCELL TESTS by Khaled Z. Kahhaleh, Enrique corrosion experimental program was conducted to study the performance of bent epoxy- coated bars. The damage. The coated bars were embedded in concrete prisms and linked electrically to uncoated bars to set up macro-corrosion

  4. High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Woo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

  5. Coated powder for electrolyte matrix for carbonate fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iacovangelo, Charles D. (Schenectady, NY); Browall, Kenneth W. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of electrolyte carbonate-coated ceramic particle which does not differ significantly in size from that of the ceramic particle and wherein no significant portion of the ceramic particle is exposed is fabricated into a porous tape comprised of said coated-ceramic particles bonded together by the coating for use in a molten carbonate fuel cell.

  6. High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severs, Kevin

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

  7. Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

  8. Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  9. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  10. Biosolvents for Coatings, Resins and Biobased Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, Rathin [Vertec BioSolvents, Inc.] [Vertec BioSolvents, Inc.

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With close collaboration with several industrial coatings manufacturers several solvent blends were developed tested and optimized. These were then piloted in the commercial company’s reactors and systems. Three were successfully tested in commercial applications and two of these - Methotate replacement and a specialty ketone replacement were sold in commercial quantities in 2009. Further sales are anticipated in 2010 and the following years.

  11. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  12. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  13. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

  14. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  15. Urethane coatings rehabilitate large crude oil pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kresic, W. [Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc. (IPL) provides a vital transportation link for moving liquid petroleum resources from oil-producing areas of western Canada to refining centers and markets in eastern canada and the midwestern US. Together with Lakehead Pipe Line Co., Inc., the pipeline system consists of about 7,600 miles of pipe. Approximately 1.6 million bpd of crude oil and liquid hydrocarbons are transported by the system. Along with high-resolution inspection data, an in-house engineering critical assessment process based on Battelle`s NG-18 surface flaw equation was developed to identify corrosion anomalies needing structural reinforcement sleeve repairs. A majority of ht non-critical anomalies remained unearthed and were exposed to possible future growth which could become critical. Several rehabilitation methods were considered including on-going sleeve repair, selective pipe replacement, and coating reconditioning. Economics and logistics of sleeving programs and selective pipe replacement were well known at IPL. However, aspects of replacing a coating system over a relatively long length of pipe were not completely known. Preliminary cost estimates favored replacement of the coating over a massive sleeving program or pipe replacement. To gain further insight, IPL began a two-year pilot program to research long length coating replacement feasibility. Two sections of Line 3 ultimately were rehabilitated in this manner. This paper reviews the project.

  16. Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

  17. Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ve brought you the stories of several women in the energy and science industries -- past, present and future. This week we spoke with Shirley Coates Brostmeyer, co-founder, CEO and owner of Florida Turbine Technologies, to find out what it takes to run a large engineering company.

  18. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  19. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

  20. Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their allows. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided.

  1. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  2. Natural and synthetic rubber coatings for steel: Properties and compositions. (Latest citations from World Surface Coatings abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of compositions containing natural and synthetic rubbers to steel. Polyurethane elastomers, chlorinated rubber coatings, and rubber containing acrylic adhesives are among the coatings discussed. Studies of the degradation of rubber coatings applied to steel are included. Bonding properties, adhesion strength, weathering, and anticorrosive properties are discussed. Additional information on anticorrosive coatings may be found in other bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 180 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Natural and synthetic rubber coatings for steel: Properties and compositions. (Latest citations from World Surface Coatings Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of compositions containing natural and synthetic rubbers to steel. Polyurethane elastomers, chlorinated rubber coatings, and rubber containing acrylic adhesives are among the coatings discussed. Studies of the degradation of rubber coatings applied to steel are included. Bonding properties, adhesion strength, weathering, and anticorrosive properties are discussed. Additional information on anticorrosive coatings may be found in other bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 147 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

  5. Paying for Likes? Understanding Facebook Like Fraud Using Honeypots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cristofaro, Emiliano; Jourjon, Guillaume; Kaafar, Mohamed Ali; Shafiq, M Zubair

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facebook pages offer an easy way to reach out to a very large audience as they can easily be promoted using Facebook's advertising platform. Recently, the number of likes of a Facebook page has become a measure of its popularity and profitability, and an underground market of services boosting page likes, aka like farms, has emerged. Some reports have suggested that like farms use a network of profiles that also like other pages to elude fraud protection algorithms, however, to the best of our knowledge, there has been no systematic analysis of Facebook pages' promotion methods. This paper presents a comparative measurement study of page likes garnered via Facebook ads and by a few like farms. We deploy a set of honeypot pages, promote them using both methods, and analyze garnered likes based on likers' demographic, temporal, and social characteristics. We highlight a few interesting findings, including that some farms seem to be operated by bots and do not really try to hide the nature of their operations, w...

  6. ALARA{trademark} 1146 strippable coating. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of strippable coatings is an innovative technology for decontamination, which effectively reduces hazard residuals at low cost. The process applies a plastic membrane or polymer on the contaminated surface. The strippable coating is allowed to cure for up to 24 hours, after which it can be easily peeled or stripped off the surface. The coating traps the contaminants in the polymer matrix. Strippable coatings are non-toxic and do not contain volatile compounds or heavy metals. Since the coating constitutes a solid waste, disposal is easier than treating contaminated liquid wastes.

  7. Selective emission multilayer coatings for a molybdenum thermophotovoltaic radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cockeram, Brian Vern

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayer coating designs have been developed to provide selective emission for a molybdenum thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator surface. These coatings increase the surface emissivity of a molybdenum TPV radiator substrate in the wavelength range that matches the bandgap of the TPV cells to increase the power density of the TPV system. Radiator emission at wavelengths greater than the bandgap energy of the TPV cells is greatly reduced through the use of these coatings, which significantly increases the efficiency of the TPV system. The use of this coating greatly improves the performance of a TPV system, and the coating can be tailored to match the bandgap of any practical TPV system.

  8. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5070 (United States); Kulkarni, Anand [Siemens Energy, Orlando, Florida 32826-2399 (United States)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  9. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas M. Lillo

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

  10. Magmatic "Quantum-Like" Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elemer E Rosinger

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computation has suggested, among others, the consideration of "non-quantum" systems which in certain respects may behave "quantum-like". Here, what algebraically appears to be the most general possible known setup, namely, of {\\it magmas} is used in order to construct "quantum-like" systems. The resulting magmatic composition of systems has as a well known particular case the tensor products.

  11. Job Title: Chemist (Entry Level) Job Description: Work to help improve existing coatings and develop new coating products, and test coating properties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Job Title: Chemist (Entry Level) Job Description: Work to help improve existing coatings communication skills are required. Background in formulation preferred. 1. Chemist Job Description A

  12. Method of applying a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating on a metal substrate, and related articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Borom, Marcus Preston (Tucson, AZ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for applying at least one bond coating on a surface of a metal-based substrate is described. A foil of the bond coating material is first attached to the substrate surface and then fused thereto, e.g., by brazing. The foil is often initially prepared by thermally spraying the bond coating material onto a removable support sheet, and then detaching the support sheet. Optionally, the foil may also include a thermal barrier coating applied over the bond coating. The substrate can be a turbine engine component.

  13. Balloon Coating with Rapamycin Using an On-site Coating Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmehl, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.schmehl@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Ruhr, Juergen von der [Institute of Anatomy, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Dobratz, Markus; Kehlbach, Rainer [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Braun, Isabelle [Translumina GmbH (Germany); Greiner, Tim-Oliver [Clinic of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, Claus D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany); Behnisch, Boris [Translumina GmbH (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. The efficacy of drug-eluting balloons has been demonstrated in clinical trials. The drug predominantly used is paclitaxel because of its lipophilic properties and the rapid onset of action. The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an alternative balloon coating with rapamycin that can be applied on site.MethodsThe balloon coating (3.0/18 and 3.0/12 mm, Cathy No. 4, Translumina GmbH) with rapamycin was conducted with a coating machine (Translumina GmbH). Concentrations were 2, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2, 3, and 4 %. Measurements regarding the amount of substance released to the vessel wall were carried out on explanted porcine coronaries by means of ultraviolet and visible-light spectroscopy. Inflation time varied between 30 and 120 s. The biological effect of the coating was evaluated in a porcine peripheral overstretch and stent implantation model. Results. The amount of rapamycin on the balloon surface ranged from 558 {+-} 108 {mu}g for the 2 % solution to 1,441 {+-} 228 {mu}g in the 4 % solution. An amount of 95 {+-} 63-193 {+-} 113 {mu}g was released into the vessel wall. The quantitative measurements of the angiographic examinations 4 weeks after treatment revealed a reduction of diameter stenosis from 20.6 {+-} 17.4 % in the control group to 11.6 {+-} 5.5 % in the drug-eluting balloon group. Conclusion. A balloon coating with rapamycin omitting an excipient is possible with a dose-adjustable coating machine. However, the biological effects are moderate, which make further optimization of the coating process and evaluation of appropriate excipients necessary.

  14. Sol-gel coatings for optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avellaneda, C.O.; Macedo, M.A.; Florentino, A.O.; Aegerter, M.A. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} prepared by a sol-gel process in form of coatings and aerogels are new materials which present interesting properties: (a) The coatings present electrochromic properties and exhibit a blue coloration under Li{sup +} insertion with 100% reversible variation of the optical transmission in the visible and near infrared range between 80% and 200% and have a high chemical stability (tested up to 2,000 cycles). (b) They are semiconductor and present a photoelectric effect when illuminating in the UV region ({lambda} < 360 nm). These films are therefore very promising to be used in electrochromic devices, as electrodes for photoelectrochemical purpose and the development of nanocrystalline solar cell. (c) When prepared in aerogel form, the high BET surface area of the powders is a promising asset to use these new materials for catalytic purposes for air pollution control.

  15. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T (Clinton, TN) [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  16. Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

  17. Coating considerations for mirrors of CPV devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmauder, Torsten; Sauer, Peter; Ickes, Gerd [Leybold Optics GmbH, Siemensstr. 88, D-63755 Alzenau (Germany)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the different optical concepts for concentrator devices is to place a focussing primary mirror behind a transparent front plate. In addition (also in case of Fresnel-diffractive main optics), further 'secondary' reflectors may be used further along the beam path. Such mirrors are usually implemented as coating stacks of a highly reflective metal - usually silver - and protective layers. The protective layers are preferably designed as reflection enhancing interference stack. The design of such protective layer stacks yields two difficulties, which are addressed in this paper: (a) vacuum coating of three-dimensional parts will result in a thickness distribution and the optical design of the stack should thus be tolerant to layer thickness variations, and (b) different places of the mirror will have different angle-of-incidence of the sunlight under operating conditions. As result, the layer stack has a different design at different places of the mirror.

  18. High temperature low friction surface coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Bharat (Watervliet, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

  19. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrnes, Larry Edward (Rochester Hills, MI); Kramer, Martin Stephen (Clarkston, MI); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  20. Anti-stiction coating for microelectromechanical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hankins, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Mayer, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for depositing an anti-stiction coating on a MEMS device comprises reacting the vapor of an amino-functionalized silane precursor with a silicon surface of the MEMS device in a vacuum chamber. The method can further comprise cleaning the silicon surface of the MEMS device to form a clean hydroxylated silicon surface prior to reacting the precursor vapor with the silicon surface. The amino-functionalized silane precursor comprises at least one silicon atom, at least one reactive amino (or imine) pendant, and at least one hydrophobic pendant. The amino-functionalized silane precursor is highly reactive with the silicon surface, thereby eliminating the need for a post-process anneal step and enabling the reaction to occur at low pressure. Such vapor-phase deposition of the amino-functionalized silane coating provides a uniform surface morphology and strong adhesion to the silicon surface.

  1. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  2. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation. 17 figs.

  3. Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided. 13 figs.

  4. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

  5. De tabellen zijn: likes(drinker, beer)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorova, Natalia

    De tabellen zijn: likes(drinker, beer) visits(drinker, bar) serves(bar, beer) De enige te maken die iemand lust die die bar bezoekt) bar(serves) - bar(serves - bar,beer(visits 1 likes))) 8. Geef(serves - bar,beer(visits 1 not likes)) not likes drinker(likes)× (beer(serves) beer(likes)) - likes Of: bar

  6. Method of coating the interior surface of hollow objects with a diffusion coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knowles, Shawn D.; Senor, David J.; Forbes, Steven V.; Johnson, Roger N.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a diffusion coating on the interior of surface of a hollow object wherein a filament, extending through a hollow object and adjacent to the interior surface of the object, is provided, with a coating material, in a vacuum. An electrical current is then applied to the filament to resistively heat the filament to a temperature sufficient to transfer the coating material from the filament to the interior surface of the object. The filament is electrically isolated from the object while the filament is being resistively heated. Preferably, the filament is provided as a tungsten filament or molybdenum filament. Preferably, the coating materials are selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hg, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni P, Pb, Pd, Pr, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Te, Tl, Y, Yb, Zn, and combinations thereof. The invention additionally allows for the formation of nitrides, hydrides, or carbides of all the possible coating materials, where such compounds exist, by providing a partial pressure of nitrogen, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or combination thereof, within the vacuum.

  7. Thick beryllium coatings by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H; Nikroo, A; Youngblood, K; Moreno, K; Wu, D; Fuller, T; Alford, C; Hayes, J; Detor, A; Wong, M; Hamza, A; van Buuren, T; Chason, E

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick (>150 {micro}m) beryllium coatings are studied as an ablator material of interest for fusion fuel capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). As an added complication, the coatings are deposited on mm-scale spherical substrates, as opposed to flats. DC magnetron sputtering is used because of the relative controllability of the processing temperature and energy of the deposits. We used ultra small angle x-ray spectroscopy (USAXS) to characterize the void fraction and distribution along the spherical surface. We investigated the void structure using a combination focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results show a few volume percent of voids and a typical void diameter of less than two hundred nanometers. Understanding how the stresses in the deposited material develop with thickness is important so that we can minimize film cracking and delamination. To that end, an in-situ multiple optical beam stress sensor (MOSS) was used to measure the stress behavior of thick Beryllium coatings on flat substrates as the material was being deposited. We will show how the film stress saturates with thickness and changes with pressure.

  8. Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al2O3-0-3 wt % La2O3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al2O3-3-40% TiO2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al2O3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

  9. ALARA{trademark} 1146 strippable coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Strippable or temporary coatings are innovative technologies for decontamination that effectively reduce loose contamination at low cost. These coatings have become a viable option during the deactivation and decommissioning of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. The ALARA{trademark} 1146 strippable coating was demonstrated as part of the Savannah River Site LSDDP and successfully removed transferable (surface) contamination from multiple surfaces (metal and concrete) with an average decontamination factor for alpha contamination of 6.68 and an average percentage of alpha contamination removed of 85.0%. Beta contamination removed was an average DF of 5.55 and an average percentage removed of 82.0%. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users. This Innovative Technology offers a 35% cost savings over the Baseline Technology.

  10. Interfacial Coatings for Inorganic Composite Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Stewart, M. W.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S. [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO, 80026 (United States)

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic (ceramic) insulation materials are known to have good radiation resistance and desirable electrical and mechanical properties at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. In addition, ceramic materials can withstand the high-temperature reaction cycle used with Nb3Sn superconductor materials, allowing the insulation to be co-processed with the superconductor in a wind-and-react fabrication process. A critical aspect in the manufacture of ceramic-based insulation systems is the deposition of suitable fiber-coating materials that prevent chemical reaction of the fiber and matrix materials, and thus provide a compliant interface between the fiber and matrix, which minimizes the impact of brittle failure of the ceramic matrix. Ceramic insulation produced with CTD-FI-202 fiber interfaces have been found to exhibit very high shear and compressive strengths. However, this material is costly to produce. Thus, the goal of the present work is to evaluate alternative, lower-cost materials and processes. A variety of oxide and polyimide coatings were evaluated, and one commercially available polyimide coating has been shown to provide some improvement as compared to uncoated and de-sized S2 glass.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF STRIPPABLE COATINGS FOR DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strippable coatings are polymer mixtures, such as water-based organic polymers, that are applied to a surface by paintbrush, roller, or spray applicator. As the polymer reacts, it attracts, absorbs, and chemically binds the contaminants; then, during the curing process, it mechanically locks the contaminants into the polymer matrix. Incorporating fiber reinforcement (such as a cotton scrim) into the coating may enhance the strength of these coatings. Once the coating dries, it can be stripped manually from the surface, In the case of auto-release coatings, the mixture cracks, flakes, and is collected by vacuuming. The surface properties of these coatings may be modified by applying a thin top coat (e.g., polyvinyl alcohol), which may provide a smoother, less permeable surface that would become less severely contaminated. In such a duplex, the thicker basis layer provides the required mechanical properties (e.g., strength and abrasion resistance), while the top layer provides protection from contamination. Once the strippable coating is removed, the loose surface contamination is removed with the coating, producing a dry, hard, non-airborne waste product. The use of strippable coatings during D&D operations has proved a viable option. These coatings can be used in the following three functions: As a protective coating, when applied to an uncontaminated surface in an area where contamination is present, so that on its removal the surface remains uncontaminated; As a decontamination agent, when applied to a contaminated surface, so that on its removal a significant decontamination of loose particulate activity is achieved; and As a fixative or tie-down coating, when applied to a contaminated surface, so that any loose contamination is tied down, thus preventing the spread of contamination during subsequent handling.

  12. Crystal-Like geometric modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landreneau, Eric Benjamin

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    faces, symmetry, and fractal geometry. The techniques have also been implemented in software, as a proof of concept. They are used in an interactive geometric modeling system, in which users can use these techniques to create crystal-like shapes...

  13. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT patterning and alignment, advances in commercial and research materials and field effect schemes. In addition, Eikos continued to develop improved efficiency coating materials and transfer methods suitable for batch and continuous roll-to-roll fabrication requirements. Finally, Eikos collaborated with NREL and the PV-community at large in fabricating and characterizing Invisicon���® enabled solar cells.

  14. Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

  15. Mechanical Loss in Tantala/Silica Dielectric Mirror Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Penn; Peter H. Sneddon; Helena Armandula; Joseph C. Betzwieser; Gianpietro Cagnoli; Jordan Camp; D. R. M. Crooks; Martin M. Fejer; Andri M. Gretarsson; Gregory M. Harry; Jim Hough; Scott E. Kittelberger; Michael J. Mortonson; Roger Route; Sheila Rowan; Christophoros C. Vassiliou

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors use test masses with mirror coatings formed from multiple layers of dielectric materials, most commonly alternating layers of SiO2 (silica) and Ta2O5 (tantala). However, mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings may limit the design sensitivity for advanced detectors. We have investigated sources of mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings, including loss associated with the coating-substrate interface, with the coating-layer interfaces, and with the bulk material. Our results indicate that the loss is associated with the bulk coating materials and that the loss of Ta2O5 is substantially larger than that of SiO2.

  16. Composite neutron absorbing coatings for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Richard N.; Swank, W. David; Mizia, Ronald E.

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal neutron absorbing composite coating materials and methods of applying such coating materials to spent nuclear fuel storage systems are provided. A composite neutron absorbing coating applied to a substrate surface includes a neutron absorbing layer overlying at least a portion of the substrate surface, and a corrosion resistant top coat layer overlying at least a portion of the neutron absorbing layer. An optional bond coat layer can be formed on the substrate surface prior to forming the neutron absorbing layer. The neutron absorbing layer can include a neutron absorbing material, such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium phosphate, dispersed in a metal alloy matrix. The coating layers may be formed by a plasma spray process or a high velocity oxygen fuel process.

  17. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  18. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  19. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  20. The role of electroplated coatings in metal joining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroplated and electroless coatings often play an important role in soldering, brazing, and welding operations. Thin deposits applied to critical surfaces before the joining operations can provide the difference between success and failure. Diffusion welding applications sometimes require coatings to help promote joining. For some applications, electroplating by itself can be used to join metals that cannot be welded or brazed because of metallurgical incompatibility. The use of electroplated coatings for these various joining applications is reviewed here.

  1. Low gloss UV-cured coatings for aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Mark; Muschar, Harry

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of applying a low gloss coating to a substrate such as the exterior surface of an aircraft is disclosed. The coating composition comprising a polyene, a polythiol, a flatting agent and a coloring pigment is applied to the substrate and given a first dosage of UV radiation followed by a second dosage in which the second dosage is greater than the first resulting in an ultralow gloss coating.

  2. aluminum coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Philadelphia 2011-01-01 24 QUASI-STATIC AND DYNAMIC TORSION TESTING OF CERAMIC MICRO AND NANO-STRUCTURED COATINGS USING SPECKLE PHOTOGRAPHY Engineering Websites Summary:...

  3. PROTECTIVE SURFACE COATINGS ON SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS W. L. Hansen,COATINGS ON SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS* W. L.the use of germanium nuclear radiation detec­ tors, a new

  4. Preparation of Polymer-Coated Functionalized Ferrimagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Shi

    A simple chemical method to synthesize PMAA coated maghemite nanoparticles is described. Monomer methacrylic acid molecules were absorbed onto the synthesized ferrimagnetic nanoparticles followed by polymerization. The ...

  5. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Min [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Shen, Zhigang, E-mail: shenzhg@buaa.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Xiaohu [Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liang, Shuaishuai [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Lei [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

  6. Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Jose Nainaparampil

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL'Â?s feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

  7. Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Report: Development of Advanced Window Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, Ladena A.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced fenestration technologies for light and thermal management in building applications are of great recent research interest for improvements in energy efficiency. Of these technologies, there is specific interest in advanced window coating technologies that have tailored control over the visible and infrared (IR) scattering into a room for both static and dynamic applications. Recently, PNNL has investigated novel subwavelength nanostructured coatings for both daylighting, and IR thermal management applications. Such coatings rese still in the early stages and additional research is needed in terms of scalable manufacturing. This project investigates aspects of a potential new methodology for low-cost scalable manufacture of said subwavelength coatings.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electrode Coating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electrode Coating Defect Analysis and Processing NDE for High-Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  9. Optimal design of antireflection coatings with different metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments on several types of coatings, using the average and maximal values of the ... solar energy, and many other fields of applied optics. ... cell panels.

  10. aluminium based coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XI, Universit de 5 Machining of nickel based superalloys using coated PCBN tooling. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Following a comprehensive literature...

  11. antireflection coatings based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gupta, S Dutta 2013-01-01 26 Machining of nickel based superalloys using coated PCBN tooling. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Following a comprehensive literature...

  12. Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High-Performance Membranes Membrane Technology Provides Energy-Efficient Method to Concentrate...

  13. Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B4C targets, were directed to the substrates in the presence of reactive gases. A multiphase nanocomposite coating architecture was designed to provide the optimal combination...

  14. Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

  15. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  16. advanced coated particle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Janus particles,4 non-spherical shaped acorn'' particles5,6 and unsymmetrical 3D macromoleculesFabrication of asymmetrically coated colloid particles by microcontact...

  17. Final Project Report G-Plus Windshield Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matson, Dean W.; Koram, Kwaku

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of Sungate windshield material provided by PPG were analyzed to ascertain failure mechanisms observed at the interface between a copper busbar and the electrically conductive coating in use. Samples of “failed” windshield material were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, as well as surface analysis methods. These were compared to corresponding samples of “good” coatings. The primary failure mechanism of the coated windshield appears to be related to electrical discharges that originate where air-filled gaps are present between the copper busbar and the conductive coating. Gaps are produced by irregularities or wrinkles in the copper busbar that may result from the installation process.

  18. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  19. Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

  20. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

  1. anticorrosion coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PERFORMANCE TESTS Alex A. Volinsky Email: volinsky ABSTRACT Protective coating corrosion failure is a complicated process that involves various phenomena long time without...

  2. anticorrosive crc coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PERFORMANCE TESTS Alex A. Volinsky Email: volinsky ABSTRACT Protective coating corrosion failure is a complicated process that involves various phenomena long time without...

  3. Corrosion protection mechanism of polyaniline blended organic coating on steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaram, R.; Muthukrishnan, S.; Venkatachari, G. [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikkudi (India)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epoxy-coal tar coatings are widely used to protect steel structures exposed to marine atmosphere due to their good barrier property. However, the presence of micropores and microcracks formed during the coating formation leads to failure of the coating due to permeation of corrosive ions. In recent years, it has been established that the coatings containing polyaniline (PANI) is able to protect pinholes and defects due to its passivating ability. Hence, a study has been made on the effect of polyaniline content (1 and 3%) in epoxy-coal tar coating on the corrosion protection of steel in 3% NaCl solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. Both phosphate- and chloride-doped polyanilines were prepared by a chemical oxidative polymerization method. From EIS studies, it has been found that the resistance value of the coatings containing 1 and 3% phosphate-doped polyaniline and 3% chloride-doped polyaniline pigmented coatings are similar to 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} even after 90 days exposure to NaCl solution, which are two orders high in comparison to that of conventional coal tar epoxy coatings. Besides, the conducting state of polyaniline has been found to be decreased after exposure to NaCl solution due to redox property of PANI. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have shown that polyaniline forms a complex layer with iron beneath the coating along with iron oxide.

  4. Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers Sandia National Laboratories logo Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive...

  5. Passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coating on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenja, S.; Pan, J.; Wallinder, I.O.; Leygraf, C.; Kulu, P.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The passivation and anodic oxidation of duplex TiN coatings deposited by arc ion plating onto prenitrided AISI 304 stainless steel have been studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky measurements in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0.05 M HCl. The chemical composition of the oxidized surface film atop TiN was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Up to 1.2 V/SHE the TiN coating exhibits passive behavior, which is attributed to the formation of a TiO{sub 2}-like film of nanometer thickness which grows linearly with anodic potential at a rate of 2.4 nm/V. Above 1.2 V/SHE enhanced anodic oxidation of TiN is observed at a rate of 17.7 nm/V, and the overall corrosion performance is governed both by the oxidized TiN coating and by a metallic Ti interlayer atop the nitrided stainless steel substrate. At all potentials the TiO{sub 2} film is characterized by relatively high donor densities and is, furthermore, terminated by a hydroxylated surface.

  6. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating techniques, balanced with overall materials performance. State-of-the-art design and simulation capabilities were used to guide materials and process refinement. Caterpillar was the lead of the multi-partner collaborative project. Specific tasks were performed by the partners base on their unique capabilities. The project team was selected to include leaders in the field of material development, processing, modeling, and material characterization. Specifically, industrial members include the suppliers Deloro Stellite and Powder Alloy Corporation., who provided the experimental alloys and who aided in the development of the costs for the alloys, the Missouri University of Science and Technology and Iowa State University, who provided help in the alloy development and material characterization, QuesTek Innovations, a small company specializing the microstructural modeling of materials, and the DOE laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory (Albany), who provided unique coating process capability and wear characterization testing. The technologies developed in this program are expected to yield energy savings of about 50% over existing technologies, or 110 trillion BTUs per year by 2020 when fully implemented. Primary applications by Caterpillar are to replace the surface of machine components which are currently carburized and heat treated with new cladding materials with double the wear life. The new cladding technologies will consume less energy than carburizing. Thus, nearly 50% energy savings can be expected as a result from elimination of the heat treat process and the reduce wear of the materials. Additionally, when technologies from this project are applied on titanium or other non-ferrous substrates to make lighter weight, more wear resistant, and more efficient structures, significant fuel savings can be realized. With the anticipated drastic reduction in cost for refining titanium-containing ores, the usage of titanium alloys in earthmoving and related machinery is expected to increase multiple folds in the next d

  7. Platinum-Coated Nickel Nanowires as Oxygen-Reducing Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alia, Shaun M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Larsen, Brian A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Pylypenko, Svitlana [ORNL; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Diercks, David R [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Neyerlin, Kenneth C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Kocha, Shyam S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Pivovar, Bryan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Platinum (Pt)-coated nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) are synthesized by the partial spontaneous galvanic displacement of NiNWs, with a diameter of 150 250 nm and a length of 100 200 m. PtNiNWs are electrochemically characterized for oxygen reduction (ORR) in rotating disk electrode half-cells with an acidic electrolyte and compared to carbon-supported Pt (Pt/HSC) and a polycrystalline Pt electrode. Like other extended surface catalysts, the nanowire morphology yields significant gains in ORR specific activity compared to Pt/HSC. Unlike other extended surface approaches, the resultant materials have yielded exceptionally high surface areas, greater than 90 m2 gPt 1. These studies have found that reducing the level of Pt displacement increases Pt surface area and ORR mass activity. PtNiNWs produce a peak mass activity of 917 mA mgPt 1, 3.0 times greater than Pt/HSC and 2.1 times greater than the U.S. Department of Energy target for proton-exchange membrane fuel cell activity.

  8. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

  9. Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing:DOECoach ComplianceCoated Particle Fuel

  10. Coated Conductors Cylinder Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCityCoated Conductors Cylinder Ltd Jump to: navigation,

  11. Cerium Oxide Coating for Oxidation Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCerium Oxide Coating for Oxidation

  12. Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

  13. Self Healing Coatings | Polymer Coatings | Automotive Paints | Hea... http://living.oneindia.in/automobiles/auto-news/2008/polymer-coati... 1 of 2 2/6/09 10:29 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Self Healing Coatings | Polymer Coatings | Automotive Paints | Hea... http Ring #12;Self Healing Coatings | Polymer Coatings | Automotive Paints | Hea... http.gtglass.com Automotive Paints Guaranteed Color Match. Brush or Spray. In Stock Now. Order Today! www.Automotive

  14. Controlled, Rapid Deposition of Structured Coatings from Micro-and Nanoparticle Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Controlled, Rapid Deposition of Structured Coatings from Micro- and Nanoparticle Suspensions Brian Thin nanoparticle coatings can also impart decorative functions to surfaces, modify their wetting of micro- and nanoparticle coatings require the development of rapid, inexpensive, and easily controlled

  15. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

  16. Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface...

  17. Silver/polystyrene-coated hollow glass waveguides for the transmission of terahertz radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    earlier work in- volved the deposition of Ag or Cu coatings inside polycarbonate tubing to form THz-coated hol- low polycarbonate waveguide. To reduce the loss, it is necessary to deposit a dielectric coating

  18. METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Depositing Solar Collector Coatings i i • Proceedings ofSymposium on Coatings for Solar Collectors, St. Louis, MO,OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS Carl M. Lampert

  19. METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the AES Coatings for Solar Collectors Symposium. Atlanta.Symposium on Coatings for Solar Collectors, St. Louis, MO,OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS Carl M. Lampert

  20. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  1. Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (20) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating (20) consists essentially of a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula consisting essentially of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements selected from La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof; where B is selected from the group of elements selected from Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof; n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

  2. Full Scale Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride (BF3)-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated non-scintillating plastic fibers. Reported here are the results of tests of the full-scale 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT) and Saint Gobain, and is a follow-up report to an earlier one on a smaller prototype system.

  3. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  4. Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

  5. Edible Coating Development for Fresh-cut Cantaloupe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinon Gaspar, Mauricio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    healthy diet. One of the latest alternatives to reduce the decay of quality brought by minimal processing of fruits is the development of edible coatings. Acting as a barrier to moisture and gases, the coatings are expected to extend the shelf...

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Polyelectrolyte-Coated Gold Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Christopher

    Preparation and Characterization of Polyelectrolyte-Coated Gold Nanoparticles Annie Dorris, Simona, Canada H3A 2K6 ReceiVed September 28, 2007. In Final Form: NoVember 15, 2007 Gold nanoparticles of 5 nm diameter, stabilized by 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP), were coated with poly- (sodium 4-styrene

  7. Nanoparticle-Coated Chemiresistors with CMOS Baseline Tracking and Cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Nanoparticle-Coated Chemiresistors with CMOS Baseline Tracking and Cancellation D. Rairigh, G Abstract-- Chemiresistors (CR) with thiolate-monolayer- protected gold nanoparticle (MPN) interfacial for multi-VOC monitoring. This paper presents a new baseline cancellation and tracking system for MPN-coated

  8. Compositional Variations in Vapor Deposited Samarium Zirconate Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    section of the engine (the combustor and high pressure turbine). The blades at the inlet of the high temperatures instead have relied on the development of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. The thermal coat applied to the superalloy surface, (ii) a thermally grown oxide layer (TGO) that forms on the bond

  9. ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS By JORGE ANTONIO JEREZ transport experiments; Dr. Barbara Williams and Jason Shira from University of Idaho for providing access-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS Abstract by Jorge Antonio Jerez Briones, Ph.D. Washington

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF MAGNETRON SPUTTERED COATINGS BY PULSED EDDY CURRENT TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    CHARACTERIZATION OF MAGNETRON SPUTTERED COATINGS BY PULSED EDDY CURRENT TECHNIQUES Chris Mulligan1, Troy, NY 12180 ABSTRACT. A method that uses induced pulsed eddy currents for characterization of thick the correlation between coating properties, such as density and purity, and eddy current measured resistivity

  11. Edible Coating Development for Fresh-cut Cantaloupe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinon Gaspar, Mauricio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    healthy diet. One of the latest alternatives to reduce the decay of quality brought by minimal processing of fruits is the development of edible coatings. Acting as a barrier to moisture and gases, the coatings are expected to extend the shelf...

  12. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  13. Nondestructive optical characterization of chemical conversion coatings on aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schram, T.; De Laet, J.; Terryn, H. [Vrije Univ. Brussel, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Metallurgy, Electrochemistry, and Materials Science

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium phosphate conversion coatings on aluminum have been characterized with nondestructive optical techniques. Complementary vibrational spectroscopy techniques, i.e., Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy, prove the presence of chromium phosphate as principal component in the coating. Additionally, aluminum oxide and indications for the presence of chromium oxide and aluminum fluoride are found. Reflection/absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) allows analysis of coatings as thin as 40 nm, while confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy is limited to thicknesses above about 150 nm. Compared to RAIRS spectra, the interpretation of Raman spectra is easier due to the morphological characteristics of the conversion coatings, e.g., the coating thickness, using a simulation and regression procedure based on a two-layer optical model. The optical constants of the upper layer, which in a first approximation can be attributed to the chromium phosphate part of the conversion coating, can explain the greenish appearance of the thickest conversion coatings. A linear relationship exists between the coating thickness and the conversion time. An analogous linear relation exists between the conversion time and the peak areas of most of the absorption peaks in the RAIRS spectra.

  14. Visual and energy performance of switchable windows with antireflection coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonsson, Andreas; Roos, Arne [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this project was to investigate how the visual appearance and energy performance of switchable or smart windows can be improved by using antireflective coatings. For this study clear float glass, low-e glass and electrochromic glass were treated with antireflection (AR) coatings. Such a coating considerably increases the transmittance of solar radiation in general and the visible transmittance in particular. For switchable glazing based on absorptive electrochromic layers in their dark state it is necessary to use a low-emissivity coating on the inner pane of a double glazed window in order to reject the absorbed heat. In principle all surfaces can be coated with AR coatings, and it was shown that a thin AR coating on the low-e surface neither influences the thermal emissivity nor the U-value of the glazing. The study showed that the use of AR coatings in switchable glazing significantly increases the light transmittance in the transparent state. It is believed that this is important for a high level of user acceptance of such windows. (author)

  15. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  16. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  17. SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Beecherl; Bob A. Hardage

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical geologic condition in a more optimal way than do the other modes. A conclusion of the study is that 9-C seismic data contain more rock and fluid information and more sequence and facies information than do 3-C seismic data; 9-C data should therefore be acquired in multicomponent seismic programs whenever possible.

  18. METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sputtering for Depositing Solar Collector Coatings".AES Coatings for Solar Collectors Symposium. Atlanta. Ga.Surfaces on Flat Plate Solar Collectors". Proceedings of 2nd

  19. METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces on Flat Plate Solar Collectors". Proceedings of 2ndfor Depositing Solar Collector Coatings i i • Proceedings ofAES Coatings for Solar Collectors Symposium. Atlanta. Ga.

  20. Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krim, Jacqueline

    Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding degradation of the contact interface of a fluorocarbon monolayer-coated polycrystalline silicon microdevice

  1. antireflection coated s-fap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    choices in terms of reflective coatings for both the primary and the secondary mirror. In particular, multi-layer dielectric coatings, capable of filtering out the large...

  2. ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Fairbanks, "Advanced Gas Turbine Coatings for MinimallyResistance Coatings for Gas Turbine Airfoils, 11 Finaltion of Super alloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J, Metals,

  3. METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sputtering for Depositing Solar Collector Coatings".of the AES Coatings for Solar Collectors Symposium. Atlanta.Neutral Surfaces in Solar Collectors." Proceedings of ISES

  4. amorphous-metal thermal-spray coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal and Ceramic Coatings University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: corrosion- resistance deck coatings for some naval vessels. The hardness values for type 316L...

  5. Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Jian, E-mail: jxjawj@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Li, Xingwen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

  6. Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

  7. New capabilities and applications for electrophoretically deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, D.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our primary purpose in this test is to provide a brief general description of a few applications of various electrophoretic systems which have been investigated and have found use in various coating applications at Sandia National Laboratories. Both organic and inorganic suspensions in aqueous and non-aqueous media have been considered in these studies. Applications include high voltage insulating dielectrics, thermally conductive/electrically insulating films, adherent lubricating films, uniform photoresist films, glass coatings, and fissile uranium oxide/carbon composite films for studies of nuclear powered lasers. More recently, we have become interested in the beneficial environmental aspects of being able to provide protective polymer coatings which reduce or minimize the use of organic solvents required by traditional spray coat processes. Important practical factors which relate to film uniformity, adhesion, and composition are related to unique coating or plating capabilities and applications. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. UV-Shifted Durable Silver Coating for Astronomical Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, N.L.; Wolfe, J.

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver has the highest reflectance of all of the metals, but it tarnishes in the presence of sulfides, chlorides, and oxides in the atmosphere. Also, the silver reflectance is very low at wavelengths below 400 nm making aluminum more desirable mirror coating for the UV region. They have found a way to prevent silver tarnishing by sandwiching the silver layer between two thin layers of NiCrN{sub x}, and to extend the metal's high reflectance down to 200 nm by depositing the (thin) Ag layer on top of Al. Thus, the uv is transmitted through the thin Ag layer below 400 nm wavelength, and is reflected from the Al layer underneath. This UV-shifted durable coating provides a valuable alternative to the aluminum coating for telescope mirror coatings where high throughput and durability are important considerations. The throughput for a telescope with, say, six reflections from silver coatings is (0.97){sup 6} = 83% compared to (0.92){sup 6} = 60% for aluminum coatings, or 28% less. The use of silver coatings allows more photons to be collected by primary mirror. Aluminum also has a reflectance dip at 850 nm caused by inter-band transitions which is eliminated by placing the thin Ag layer on top. This paper describes a non-tarnishing silver coating having high reflectance down into the UV region. The average specular reflectance is 70%-97% in the near-UV, 95%-99% in the visible region, and {ge} 99% in the infrared region covering the total wavelength range 200 nm to 10,000 nm. Figure 1 compares the reflectance of the UVHR-LLNL silver coating to bare silver and aluminum over-coated with magnesium fluoride over the wavelength range 300 nm to 2000 nm.

  9. Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic fatigue characteristics of silica fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic, the State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA c Laboratory of Optical Fiber Technology, UMCS, Lublin, 20031, Poland, ABSTRACT Specialty optical fibers operating in harsh aerospace environments

  10. Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition to the Bond Coat Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Emily A.

    Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition engine turbine blades can shield the temperature to which the underlying superalloy is exposed modifications that should inhibit the failure of these jet engine turbine thermal barrier coatings. Research

  11. Correlation between AlPO4 nanoparticle coating thickness on LiCoO2 cathode and thermal stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jaephil

    Correlation between AlPO4 nanoparticle coating thickness on LiCoO2 cathode and thermal stability cathode. They coated the cathode with AlPO4 nanoparticles prepared from water [13]. The AlPO4 coating solÁ/gel coating method, this nanoparticle coating led to the easy control of the coating thickness

  12. PDGF-mediated protection of SH-SY5Y cells against Tat toxin involves regulation of extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Xuhui [Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 5000 Wahl Hall East, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tongji Hospital and Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yao Honghong; Peng Fuwang; Callen, Shannon [Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 5000 Wahl Hall East, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Buch, Shilpa [Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 5000 Wahl Hall East, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)], E-mail: sbuch@kumc.edu

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protein Tat has been implicated in mediating neuronal apoptosis, one of the hallmark features of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Mitigation of the toxic effects of Tat could thus be a potential mechanism for reducing HIV toxicity in the brain. In this study we demonstrated that Tat-induced neurotoxicity was abolished by NMDA antagonist-MK801, suggesting the role of glutamate in this process. Furthermore, we also found that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF exerted protection against Tat toxicity by decreasing extracellular glutamate levels. We also demonstrated that extracellular calcium chelator EGTA was able to abolish PDGF-mediated neuroprotection, thereby underscoring the role of calcium signaling in PDGF-mediated neuroprotection. We also showed that Erk signaling pathway was critical for PDGF-mediated protection of cells. Additionally, blocking calcium entry with EGTA resulted in suppression of PDGF-induced Erk activation. These findings thus underscore the role of PDGF-mediated calcium signaling and Erk phosphorylation in the protection of cells against HIV Tat toxicity.

  13. High temperature coatings for gas turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

  14. Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

  15. Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

  16. Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

  17. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  18. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  19. Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

  20. Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost, Kristy [Drexel University; Perez, Carlos O [ORNL; Mcdonough, John [Drexel University; Presser, Volker [ORNL; Heon, Min [Drexel University; Dion, Genevieve [Drexel University; Gogotsi, Yury [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a flexible and lightweight fabric supercapacitor electrode as a possible energy source in smart garments. We examined the electrochemical behavior of porous carbon materials impregnated into woven cotton and polyester fabrics using a traditional printmaking technique (screen printing). The porous structure of such fabrics makes them attractive for supercapacitor applications that need porous films for ion transfer between electrodes. We used cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study the capacitive behaviour of carbon materials using nontoxic aqueous electrolytes including sodium sulfate and lithium sulfate. Electrodes coated with activated carbon (YP17) and tested at 0.25 A$g1 achieved a high gravimetric and areal capacitance, an average of 85 F$g1 on cotton lawn and polyester microfiber, both corresponding to 0.43 F$cm2.

  1. Assessment of strippable coatings for decontamination and decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strippable or temporary coatings were developed to assist in the decontamination of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor. These coatings have become a viable option during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. A variety of strippable coatings are available to D and D professionals. However, these products exhibit a wide range of performance criteria and uses. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) was commissioned to perform a 2-year investigation into strippable coatings. This investigation was divided into four parts: (1) identification of commercially available strippable coating products; (2) survey of D and D professionals to determine current uses of these coatings and performance criteria; (3) design and implementation of a non-radiological testing program to evaluate the physical properties of these coatings; and (4) design and implementation of a radiological testing program to determine decontamination factors and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Activities during fiscal year 1997 are described.

  2. Strippable coating used for the TMI-2 reactor building decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.W.; Dougherty, D.R.; Barletta, R.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strippable coating material used in the TMI-2 reactor building decontamination has been tested for Sr, Cs, and Co leachability, for radiation stability, thermal stability, and for resistance to biodegradation. It was also immersion tested in water, a water solution saturated with toluene and xylene, toluene, xylene, and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) cocktail. Leach testing resulted in all of the Cs and Co activity and most of the Sr activity being released from the coating in just a few days. Immersion resulted in swelling of the coating in all of the liquids tested. Gamma irradiation and heating of the coating did not produce any apparent physical changes in the coating to 1 x 10/sup 8/ rad and 100/sup 0/C; however, gas generation of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/ was observed in both cases. Biodegradation of the coating occurred readily in soils as indicated by monitoring CO/sub 2/ produced from microbial respiration. These test results indicate that strippable coating radwaste would have to be stabilized to meet the requirements for Class B waste outlined in 10 CFR Part 61 and the NRC Draft Technical Position on Waste Form.

  3. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  4. DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopala N. Krishnan; Ripudaman Malhotra; Esperanza Alvarez; Kai-Hung Lau; Angel Sanjurjo

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat-exchangers, particle filters, turbines, and other components in integrated coal gasification combined cycle system must withstand the highly sulfiding conditions of the high temperature coal gas over an extended period of time. The performance of components degrades significantly with time unless expensive high alloy materials are used. Deposition of a suitable coating on a low cost alloy may improve is resistance to such sulfidation attack and decrease capital and operating costs. The alloys used in the gasifier service include austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, nickel-chromium-iron alloys, and expensive nickel-cobalt alloys. During this reporting period we coated coupons of selected alloy steels with diffusion coatings of Cr and Al, as well as with titanium and tantalum nitrides. The coated samples were analyzed for their surface composition. In several instances, the samples were also cut to determine the depth profile of the coating. Several of the early runs did not yield uniform or deep enough coatings and hence a significant portion of the effort in this period was devoted fixing the problems with our fluidized bed reactor. Before the end of the quarter we had prepared a number of samples, many of them in duplicates, and sent one set to Wabash River Energy Laboratory for them to install in their gasifier. The gasifier was undergoing a scheduled maintenance and thus presented an opportunity to place some of our coupons in the stream of an operating gasifier. The samples submitted included coated and uncoated pairs of different alloys.

  5. CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

  6. Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

  7. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  8. Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Energy Efficient Heat Engines Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherine Faber

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This program aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of the microstructural, mechanical, and chemical properties of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based coatings for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (AS800) substrates and optimize such coatings for environmental barriers. The program consisted of three tasks: processing of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings, phase and microstructural development, and life-limiting phenomena. Northwestern University formed a cross-functional team with Lehigh University, Honeywell Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The major accomplishments are: (1) Conditions for the plasma spray of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and its alloys were optimized to provide maximum density and thickness. (2) Adherent small particle plasma spray coatings of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be routinely prepared. (3) Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} can be stabilized against its disruptive phase transformation to 1400 C by the addition of one or more oxides of Al, La, and/or Nb. (4) Residual stresses in the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coatings were measured using X-rays and changed with thermal exposure. (5) Properly doped coatings are more resistant against thermal cycling than undoped coatings, and can be cycled many thousand times without spallation. (6) Water vapor testing in the ORNL Keiser Rig of adherent coatings showed that undoped Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is not an effective barrier at preventing chemical changes to the AS800. (7) Limited water vapor testing of doped and adherent coatings, which had successfully survived many thermal cycles, showed that in the water vapor environment, de-cohesion may occur.

  9. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

  10. Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

  11. Development of a Nanotracer Method to Characterize Nanoparticle Coatings Jeffrey A. Geuther, Michael Z. Podowski*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Development of a Nanotracer Method to Characterize Nanoparticle Coatings Jeffrey A. Geuther with the count rate from the coated slides, we were able to determine the mass of nanoparticles in the coating nanoparticle mass by 100 cm2 , the approximate coated area used for detection.) This lower limit of surface

  12. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600877 Nanoparticle Coating for Advanced Optical, Mechanical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven M.

    DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200600877 Nanoparticle Coating for Advanced Optical, Mechanical and Rheological such particles are coated with ultrathin inor- ganic films. The system composed by titania nanoparticles coat- ed are not affected. Nanoparticle coating could also be used to improve the mi- crostructure and mechanical properties

  13. Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Graphene coating makes carbon nanotube aerogels superelastic and resistant to fatigue Kyu Hun Kim one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. The graphene-coated aerogel exhibits no change , but collapse under stress15 . We fabricated graphene-coated single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels by coating

  14. Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

  15. TiN-Coating Effects on Stainless Steel Tribological Behavior Under Dry and Lubricated Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    properties of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride coating on 316L steel, sliding against Si3N4 ceramic ball microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. TiN coatings and 316L stainless steel had better tribological, titanium nitride coating 1. Introduction Titanium nitride (TiN) coatings deposited by physical vapor

  16. Preparation of high-strength nanometer scale twinned coating and foil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xinghang (Los Alamos, NM); Misra, Amit (Los Alamos, NM); Nastasi, Michael A. (Santa Fe, NM); Hoagland, Richard G. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Very high strength single phase stainless steel coating has been prepared by magnetron sputtering onto a substrate. The coating has a unique microstructure of nanometer spaced twins that are parallel to each other and to the substrate surface. For cases where the coating and substrate do not bind strongly, the coating can be peeled off to provide foil.

  17. Preparation of high temperature superconducting coated wires by dipping and post annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provenzano, V.; Singh, A.K.; Imam, M.A.; Tritt, T.M.

    1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for coating a film on a wire substrate, it comprises: melting a superconducting metal oxide mixture in a crucible to form a melt; coating the substrate with a diffusion barrier; dipping the coated wire substrate into the melt; cooling the coated wire substrate at a rate sufficiently slow to avoid thermal shock and hot cracking; and post-annealing the cooled, coated wire substrate to relieve thermal stresses in the coating, whereupon the superconducting metal-oxide mixture forms a perovskite coating upon the wire substrate.

  18. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH04, Shiprock, New Mexico, September-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological assessment conducted at the Shiprock vicinity property SH04 by the ANL Radiological Survey Group indicated background levels of radioactivity within the residential structure. Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(1)). The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. Twelve discrete hot spots or localized areas were found in the backyard, most associated with small slabs of decorative flagstone. Radiochemical analyses of the stone sample collected from one of the localized areas indicated the presence of natural uranium ore. Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from one other of the localized areas indicated a radium concentration of 33 +- 3 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in Section 192.12(a)(1) of the EPA Standard. From the analyses of the samples and the history of the site, the contaminating material in the general area at the backyard and alleyway, in the area in the frontyard, and at several of the discrete locations in the backyard appears to be residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 in the form of radium-enhanced material (i.e., tailings) and natural uranium ore. Since the surface soil contamination levels exceed the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered. 10 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH05, Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological assessment conducted at the Shiprock vicinity property SH05 by the ANL Radiological Survey Group indicated background levels of radioactivity within the residential structure. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(2)). Short-term radon daughter measurements within the residence did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard (Section 192.12(b)(1)). The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. One discrete hot spot or localized area was found in the frontyard, near the front porch of the residence. Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected there indicated a radium concentration of 352 +- 35 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in Section 192.12(a)(1) of the EPA Standard. From soil sample analyses and the history of the site, the contaminating material appears to be residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 in the form of radium-enhanced material (i.e., tailings) and natural uranium ore. Since the surface soil contamination levels exceed the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered. 10 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Uranium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH02 Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive survey of the vicinity property designated as SH02 was conducted on an intermittent basis from August 3 to November 11, 1982. At the time of the survey, seven structures were located on the property - two residential trailers, one institutional building, two institutional trailers, a storage building, and a pump house. The lands surrounding the structures were either sparsely covered with vegetation or gravelled. The assessment activities included determination of indoor and outdoor surface radiation levels through direct instrument surveys; measurement of ambient external penetrating radiation levels at 1-meter heights; and analysis of air and soil samples. No evidence of radioactive contamination was found inside the structures; background levels of radioactivity were indicated within all seven. The short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the limit of 0.02 Working Level for average annual concentration including background, as specified in the EPA Standard 40 CFR 192. The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at one general area in the outdoor environs, encompassing about 1400 ft/sup 2/ (130 m/sup 2/) of land along the property's northern boundary. Analysis of a surface soil sample collected from this area indicated a radium concentration considerably in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background specified in the EPA Standard. Subsurface soil sampling was not conducted, and thus the vertical extent of the radiological contamination is not known. Since the surface soil contamination level exceeded the limit specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered.

  1. Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

  2. Hydrophobic Polycationic Coatings Disinfect Poliovirus and Rotavirus Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Alyssa Maxine

    Coating surfaces with N-alkylated polyethylenimines (PEIs), namely branched N,N-hexyl,methyl-PEI via covalent attachment to glass or linear N,N-dodecyl,methyl-PEI by physical deposition (“painting”) onto polyethylene, ...

  3. Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Benjamin James Poyner

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have ...

  4. MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (MOF); the structure was determined at Beamline 11.3.1. Coating a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with this compound readily generates white light with high luminous...

  5. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Stinton, D.P.; Bleier, A.; Besmann, T.M.; Lara-Curzio, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rebillat, F. [LCTS, Pessac (France)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing an oxidation-resistant interfacial coating for continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) continues to be a major challenge. CFCCs` mechanical behavior are influenced by the interfacial bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite element modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  6. Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hirschfeld, D.A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

  7. Impact of graphene coating on the atom-plate interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the recently proposed quantum electrodynamical formalism, we calculate the Casimir-Polder free energies and forces between the ground state atoms of Rb, Na, Cs and He${}^{\\ast}$ and the plates made of Au, Si, sapphire and fused silica coated with a graphene sheet. It is shown that the graphene coating has no effect on the Casimir-Polder interaction for metallic plates, but influences significantly for plates made of dielectric materials. The influence of graphene coating increases with decreasing static dielectric permittivity of the plate material and the characteristic frequency of an atomic dynamic polarizability. Simple analytic expressions for the classical limit of the Casimir-Polder free energy and force between an atom and a graphene-coated plate are obtained. From the comparison with the results of numerical computations, the application region of these expressions is determined.

  8. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  9. A method of fabricating coated splices for oilfield applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killian, Lauren A. (Lauren Ashley), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is needed to make a critical splice for a downhole tool in the petroleum industry. The goal is to connect two wires, cover the connection with a protective coating, and then assess the integrity of the finished ...

  10. adhesive protein coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Mussel-Inspired Adhesives and Coatings Materials Science Websites Summary: to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation...

  11. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

  12. Strategies for incorporating functional block copolymers into polyelectrolyte multilayer coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Wui Siew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the creation of thin film responsive hydrogel coatings via Layer-by Layer assembly (LbL) of temperature (T) responsive block copolymer - polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). First, the LbL conditions ...

  13. Project Profile: Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polymeric Mirrors 3M logo 3M, under the CSP R&D FOA, is developing optical coatings for solar mirrors that are durable, easily maintained, and more cost-effective. Approach Diagram...

  14. amorphous carbon coatings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G; Hopf, C; Schwarz-Selinger, T; Jacob, W 2013-01-01 54 J Mater Sci (2006) 41:72327239 7232 Squeeze Infiltration Processing of Nickel Coated Carbon Fiber Reinforced...

  15. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    task (e.g., sputtered multilayer, sel 0.916). Milestone (Task 1.3) Sandia: Complete SAND report documenting the system-level metric for candidate selective surface coating and...

  16. Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

  17. A novel approach to antireflection coating using planar metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhou, Jiangfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel antireflection coating using planar metamaterials. It dramatically reduces the reflectance and enhances the transmittance over a wide range of incidence angles for both polarizations near the designed wavelength.

  18. Global optimization of silicon photovoltaic cell front coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghebrebrhan, Michael

    The front-coating (FC) of a solar cell controls its efficiency, determining admission of light into the absorbing material and potentially trapping light to enhance thin absorbers. Single-layer FC designs are well known, ...

  19. Theoretical analysis and experiments on antireflection coatings for laser diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Kai Jian

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEIEORETICAL 'NAI. YSIS AND EXPERIMENTS ON ANTIBEFLECTION COATINGS FOR LASER DIODES A Thesis by KAI 3IAN CHIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement, for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 19SI Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THEORETICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTS ON ANTIREFLECTION COATINGS FOR. LASER DIODES A Thesis KAI JIAN CHIN Approved as to style and content by: Henry . Taylor (Chairman of Committee...

  20. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  1. Theoretical analysis and experiments on antireflection coatings for laser diodes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Kai Jian

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEIEORETICAL 'NAI. YSIS AND EXPERIMENTS ON ANTIBEFLECTION COATINGS FOR LASER DIODES A Thesis by KAI 3IAN CHIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement, for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 19SI Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THEORETICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTS ON ANTIREFLECTION COATINGS FOR. LASER DIODES A Thesis KAI JIAN CHIN Approved as to style and content by: Henry . Taylor (Chairman of Committee...

  2. Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

  3. Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

  4. Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA)

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

  5. POLYETHERSULFONE COATING FOR MITIGATING CORROSION OF STEEL IN GEOTHERMAL ENVIRONMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA, T.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emphasis was directed toward evaluating the usefulness of a polyethersulfone (PES)-dissolved N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent precursor as a low-temperature film-forming anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel in simulated geothermal environments at brine temperatures up to 300 C. A {approx} 75 {micro}m thick PES coating performed well in protecting the steel against corrosion in brine at 200 C. However, at {>=} 250 C, the PES underwent severe hydrothermal oxidation that caused the cleavage of sulfone- and ether-linkages, and the opening of phenyl rings. These, in turn, led to sulfone {yields} benzosulfonic acid and ether {yields} benzophenol-type oxidation derivative transformations, and the formation of carbonyl-attached open rings, thereby resulting in the incorporation of the functional groups, hydroxyl and carbonyl, into the coating. The presence of these functional groups raised concerns about the diminutions in water-shedding and water-repellent properties that are important properties of the anti-corrosion coatings; such changes were reflected in an enhancement of the magnitude of susceptibility of the coatings surfaces to moisture. Consequently, the disintegration of the PES structure by hydrothermal oxidation was detrimental to the maximum efficacy of the coating in protecting the steel against corrosion, allowing the corrosive electrolytes to infiltrate easily through it.

  6. Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

  7. Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flynn, Paul L. (5139 Fox Park Dr., Fairview, PA 16415); Giammarise, Anthony W. (527 Lincoln Ave., Erie, PA 16505)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

  8. Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1991-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

  9. Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA); Giammarise, Anthony W. (Erie, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

  10. Coating system to permit direct brazing of ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cadden, Charles H. (Danville, CA); Hosking, F. Michael (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a ceramic component that enables direct brazing using a non-active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a ceramic component to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by using this brazing method. The ceramic can be high purity alumina. The method comprises applying a first coating of a silicon-bearing oxide material (e.g. silicon dioxide or mullite (3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.2SiO.sub.2) to the ceramic. Next, a thin coating of active metal (e.g. Ti or V) is applied. Finally, a thicker coating of a non-active metal (e.g. Au or Cu) is applied. The coatings can be applied by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Alternatively, the active and non-active metals can be co-deposited (e.g. by sputtering a target made of mullite). After all of the coatings have been applied, the ceramic can be fired at a high temperature in a non-oxidizing environment to promote diffusion, and to enhance bonding of the coatings to the substrate. After firing, the metallized ceramic component can be brazed to other components using a conventional non-active braze alloy. Alternatively, the firing and brazing steps can be combined into a single step. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

  11. DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

  12. Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

  13. Preparation of carbon coated MoS2 flower-like nanostructure with self-assembled nanosheets as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    -performance lithium-ion battery anodes Shan Hu,ab Wen Chen,*a Jing Zhou,a Fei Yin,c Evan Uchaker,b Qifeng Zhangb candidate as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries. 1. Introduction Battery energy storage addressing the environmental concerns. Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with high energy density, high voltage

  14. Natural and synthetic rubber coatings for steel: Properties and compositions. (Latest citations from World Surface Coatings abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and fabrication of natural and synthetic rubbers for use in coatings on steel. Coating materials include polyurethane elastomers, chlorinated rubber, and rubber-containing acrylic adhesives. References to bonding properties, mechanical strength, steel-wire reinforced rubbers, anticorrosion, and weather-resistance are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Structural evolution of the P22-like phages: Comparison of Sf6 and P22 procapsid and virion architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parent, Kristin N. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Gilcrease, Eddie B. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)] [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Casjens, Sherwood R., E-mail: sherwood.casjens@path.utah.edu [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Baker, Timothy S., E-mail: tsb@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); University of California, San Diego, Division of Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Coat proteins of tailed, dsDNA phages and in herpesviruses include a conserved core similar to the bacteriophage HK97 subunit. This core is often embellished with other domains such as the telokin Ig-like domain of phage P22. Eighty-six P22-like phages and prophages with sequenced genomes share a similar set of virion assembly genes and, based on comparisons of twelve viral assembly proteins (structural and assembly/packaging chaperones), these phages are classified into three groups (P22-like, Sf6-like, and CUS-3-like). We used cryo-electron microscopy and 3D image reconstruction to determine the structures of Sf6 procapsids and virions ({approx} 7 A resolution), and the structure of the entire, asymmetric Sf6 virion (16-A resolution). The Sf6 coat protein is similar to that of P22 yet it has differences in the telokin domain and in its overall quaternary organization. Thermal stability and agarose gel experiments show that Sf6 virions are slightly less stable than those of P22. Finally, bacterial host outer membrane proteins A and C were identified in lipid vesicles that co-purify with Sf6 particles, but are not components of the capsid.

  16. Urandium mill tailings remedial action program. Radiological survey of Shiprock vicinity property SH06, Shiprock, New Mexico, August-November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological assessment conducted at the Shiprock vicinity property SH06 by the ANL Radiological Survey Group indicated background levels of radioactivity within the residential structure. Radiation exposure rates were less than the 20 ..mu..R/h above background limit specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(2)). Short-term radon daughter measurements did not exceed the 0.02 WL (or 20 mWL) limit for average annual concentration including background as specified in the EPA Standard (40 CFR 192.12(b)(1)). The assessment indicated elevated levels of radioactivity at several areas in the outside environs. General areas of elevated radioactivity were found over almost the entire frontyard, encompassing about 1300 ft/sup 2/ (120 m/sup 2/), and at the west side of the residence, encompassing about 460 ft/sup 2/ (43 m/sup 2/). Radiochemical analysis of the soil sample collected from the frontyard near the residence indicated a radium concentration of 24 +- 2 pCi/g, which is in excess of the limit of 5 pCi/g above background, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, as specified in Section 192.12(a)(1) of the EPA Standard. Elevated levels were also found at a 37-ft/sup 2/ (3.4-m/sup 2/) strip of land along the east property line, and in the backyard, at a small shack encompassing about 21 ft/sup 2/ (2.0 m/sup 2/) of land. From soil sample analyses and the history of the site, the contaminating material appears to be residual radioactive material under the provisions of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 in the form of radium-enhanced material (i.e., tailings). Since the surface soil contamination levels exceed the limits specified in the EPA Standard, remedial action for this vicinity site should be considered. 9 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  17. Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

  18. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles A. Baldwin; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 degrees C. Release of 85Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 x 10-2 for silver, 1.4 x 10-3 for europium, and 1.1 x 10-5 for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 degrees C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated AGR-1 compacts. X-ray imaging of selected particles was performed to examine the internal microstructure. This examination revealed variable irradiation performance of the coating layers, but sufficient statistical sampling is not yet available to identify any possible correlation to variation in individual particle fission product retention.

  19. Plastic Deformation in an Amorphous Ni-P Coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yongfeng; Liu, Wenning; Sun, Xin; Xue, W. Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Zuo, Liang; Liaw, Peter K.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental and numerical investigation of the hardness and associated plastic deformation in as-deposited and as-annealed nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coatings was conducted. In addition to the indentation-deformation behavior, the deformation morphology underneath the indenter was examined. The yield strength extracted from the indentation data is as high as 5.6 GPa, indicating pressure-sensitive plasticity. Results show that the as-deposited Ni-P coating was deformed appreciably through the shear-band mechanism with semi-circular and radial shear-band morphologies. From the incremental loading-unloading cyclic experiments, the phenomena on hardening and recovery, which have scarcely been recognized in amorphous materials at room temperature, were observed in the amorphous coating using instrumented nanoindentation. A numerical simulation of the interfacial indentation test between the Ni-P coating and the substrate reveals the pile-up and shear bands of the Ni-P coating that were observed during the indentation tests.

  20. Antireflective graded index silica coating, method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yoldas, Bulent E. (Churchill, PA); Partlow, Deborah P. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antireflective silica coating for vitreous material is substantially non-reflecting over a wide band of radiations. This is achieved by providing the coating with a graded degree of porosity which grades the index of refraction between that of air and the vitreous material of the substrate. To prepare the coating, there is first prepared a silicon-alkoxide-based coating solution of particular polymer structure produced by a controlled proportion of water to alkoxide and a controlled concentration of alkoxide to solution, along with a small amount of catalyst. The primary solvent is alcohol and the solution is polymerized and hydrolized under controlled conditions prior to use. The prepared solution is applied as a film to the vitreous substrate and rapidly dried. It is thereafter heated under controlled conditions to volatilize the hydroxyl radicals and organics therefrom and then to produce a suitable pore morphology in the residual porous silica layer. The silica layer is then etched in order to enlarge the pores in a graded fashion, with the largest of the pores remaining being sufficiently small that radiations to be passed through the substrate are not significantly scattered. For use with quartz substrates, extremely durable coatings which display only 0.1% reflectivity have been prepared.

  1. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de, E-mail: nico.derooij@epfl.ch [Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Laboratory (SAMLAB), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G., E-mail: gaetano.mileti@unine.ch [Laboratoire Temps-Fréquence (LTF), Institut de Physique, Université de Neuchâtel, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140?°C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  2. Temporary coatings for protection of microelectronic devices during packaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Conley, William R.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of protecting a microelectronic device during device packaging, including the steps of applying a water-insoluble, temporary protective coating to a sensitive area on the device; performing at least one packaging step; and then substantially removing the protective coating, preferably by dry plasma etching. The sensitive area can include a released MEMS element. The microelectronic device can be disposed on a wafer. The protective coating can be a vacuum vapor-deposited parylene polymer, silicon nitride, metal (e.g. aluminum or tungsten), a vapor deposited organic material, cynoacrylate, a carbon film, a self-assembled monolayered material, perfluoropolyether, hexamethyldisilazane, or perfluorodecanoic carboxylic acid, silicon dioxide, silicate glass, or combinations thereof. The present invention also relates to a method of packaging a microelectronic device, including: providing a microelectronic device having a sensitive area; applying a water-insoluble, protective coating to the sensitive area; providing a package; attaching the device to the package; electrically interconnecting the device to the package; and substantially removing the protective coating from the sensitive area.

  3. Metallic coatings for enhancement of thermal contact conductance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, M.A.; Fletcher, L.S. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability of standard electronic modules may be improved by decreasing overall module temperature. This may be accomplished by enhancing the thermal contact conductance at the interface between the module frame guide rib and the card rail to which the module is clamped. Some metallic coatings, when applied to the card rail, would deform under load, increasing the contact area and associated conductance. This investigation evaluates the enhancements in thermal conductance afforded by vapor deposited silver and gold coatings. Experimental thermal conductance measurements were made for anodized aluminum 6101-T6 and electroless nickel-plated copper C11000-H03 card materials to the aluminum A356-T61 rail material. Conductance values for the electroless nickel-plated copper junction ranged from 600 to 2800 W/m(exp 2)K and those for the anodized aluminum junction ranged from 25 to 91 W/m(exp 2)K for contact pressures of 0.172-0.862 MPa and mean junction temperatures of 20-100 C. Experimental thermal conductance values of vapor deposited silver- and gold-coated aluminum A356-T61 rail surfaces indicate thermal enhancements of 1.25-2.19 for the electroless nickel-plated copper junctions and 1.79-3.41 for the anodized aluminum junctions. The silver and gold coatings provide significant thermal enhancement; however, these coating-substrate combinations are susceptible to galvanic corrosion under some conditions. 25 refs.

  4. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K. [eds.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  5. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hyde, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  6. Splice Resistance Measurements in 2G YBCO Coated Conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, Christopher M [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating the electrical splice resistance of second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductor. The purpose of the experimental investigation is to study the splice resistance of 2G YBCO coated conductor as a function of: a) operating temperature, b) magnetic field strength (B-field), and c) magnetic field orientation ( ). Understanding the splice resistance with its corresponding variation as a function of surface preparation and operating conditions is essential to the practical implementation of electric utility devices; e.g., motors, generators, transformers, cables, and fault-current limiters, etc. Preliminary test results indicate that the 2G YBCO splice resistance shows a weak temperature dependence and a significantly stronger dependence upon magnetic field strength and magnetic field orientation. Surface preparation conditions are also briefly discussed. Index Terms coated conductor, splice, critical current, YBCO

  7. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

  8. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Gandy; R. Viswanathan; S. Cheruvu; K. Krzywosz

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, four principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 is aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations.

  9. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; D. Gandy; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

  10. PATCHY SILICA-COATED SILVER NANOWIRES AS SERS SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murph, S.; Murphy, C.

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a class of core-shell nanomaterials that can be used as efficient surface-enhancement Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The core consists of silver nanowires, prepared through a chemical reduction process, that are used to capture 4- mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA), a model analyte. The shell was prepared through a modified Stöber method and consists of patchy or full silica coats. The formation of silica coats was monitored via transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and phase-analysis light scattering for measuring effective surface charge. Surprisingly, the patchy silica coated silver nanowires are better SERS substrate than silver nanowires; nanomolar concentration of 4-MBA can be detected. In addition, “nano-matryoshka” configurations were used to quantitate/explore the effect of the electromagnetic field at the tips of the nanowire (“hot spots”) in the Raman scattering experiment.

  11. Coatings for the protection of turbine blades from erosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.N.; Quets, J.M.; Tucker, R.C. Jr. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many types of turbines, including aircraft gas turbines, steam turbines, and power recovery turbines, suffer from solid particle erosion caused by a variety of materials ingested into the machines. Utilization of various laboratory erosion tests tailored to the specific application by using various erodents, temperatures, velocities, and angles of impact, have been shown to be effective in the development and selection of coatings for the erosion protection of turbine blades and other components. Detonation gun coatings have demonstrated their efficacy in providing substantial protection in many situations. It has now been shown that several tungsten carbide and chromium carbide Super D-Gun{trademark} coatings not only have better erosion resistance than their D-Gun analogs, but cause little or no degradation of the fatigue properties of the blade alloys. Nonetheless, caution should be employed in the application of any laboratory data to a specific situation and additional testing done as warranted by the turbine designer.

  12. TRISO-Coated Fuel Durability Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimanis, Ivar; Gorman, Brian; Butt, Darryl

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PIs propose to examine TRISO-coated particles (SiC and ZrC coatings) in an integrated two-part study. In the first part, experiments will be performed to assess the reaction kinetics of the carbides under CO-CO2 environments at temperatures up to 1800 degree C. Kinetic model will be applied to describe the degradation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy will be employed to establish the chemical and microstructure evolution under the imposed environmental conditions. The second part of the proposed work focuses on establishing the role of the high temperature, environmental exposure described above on the mechanical behavior of TRISO-coated particles. Electron microscopy and other advanced techniques will be subsequently performed to evaluate failure mechanisms. The work is expected to reveal relationships between corrosion reactions, starting material characteristics (polytype of SiC, impurity concentration, flaw distribution), flaw healing behavior, and crack growth.

  13. Lithium Surface Coatings for Improved Plasma Performance in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugel, H W; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaye, S; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and frequent benefits from lithium coatings applied to plasma facing components. Lithium pellet injection on NSTX introduced lithium pellets with masses 1 to 5 mg via He discharges. Lithium coatings have also been applied with an oven that directed a collimated stream of lithium vapor toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Lithium depositions from a few mg to 1 g have been applied between discharges. Benefits from the lithium coating were sometimes, but not always seen. These improvements sometimes included decreases plasma density, inductive flux consumption, and ELM frequency, and increases in electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement and periods of MHD quiescence. In addition, reductions in lower divertor D, C, and O luminosity were measured.

  14. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  15. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  16. Water-thinnable polymers for durable coatings for different materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.jankowski@ichp.pl; Kijowska, Dorota, E-mail: piotr.jankowski@ichp.pl [Industrial Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polyesters, Epoxides and Polyurethanes, 8 Rydygiera Str., 01-793 Warszawa (Poland)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The methods of obtaining water-thinnable polymers - water-thinnable unsaturated polyester resins (WTUPR) - by polycondensation were elaborate and optimized. As hydrophilic monomers different types of sulfonate monomers were used. The monomers, with sulfonate groups and other reactive groups, were obtained by sulfonation of organic compounds with satisfactory yield. All products were analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. WTUPR were used as polymeric binders for coatings applications. Coatings with relatively high pendulum hardness, good properties and durability, useful for practical applications, were obtained. Typical existing equipment for the production of unsaturated polyester resins can be applied for the industrial preparation of WTUPR.

  17. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  18. Durable silver thin film coating for diffraction gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Jesse D. (Discovery Bay, CA); Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA); Komashko, Aleksey M. (San Diego, CA)

    2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A durable silver film thin film coated non-planar optical element has been developed to replace Gold as a material for fabricating such devices. Such a coating and resultant optical element has an increased efficiency and is resistant to tarnishing, can be easily stripped and re-deposited without modifying underlying grating structure, improves the throughput and power loading of short pulse compressor designs for ultra-fast laser systems, and can be utilized in variety of optical and spectrophotometric systems, particularly high-end spectrometers that require maximized efficiency.

  19. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1984-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate prior to metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  20. Electroless nickel: an important coating for diamond turning applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.

    1980-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Diamond turning is the use of a single-point diamond tool on a precision lathe under very precisely controlled machine and environmental conditions to fabricate finished components. With a machine presently available at LLNL a part accuracy between 0.05 and 1.0 ..mu..m (2 and 40 millionths of an inch) is obtainable. Coatings offer significant advantages for diamond turning applications inasmuch as they can be applied to lightweight substrates such as aluminum or beryllium. One of the most used coatings for diamond turning applications is electroless nickel. Purpose of this paper is to document case histories of such applications and suggest areas for future work.

  1. Deuterated polyethylene coatings for ultra-cold neutron applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altarev, I; Fierlinger, P; Geltenbort, P; Gutsmiedl, E; Kuchler, F; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Marino, M G; Niessen, B; Petzoldt, G; Ruhstorfer, D; Seeman, K M; Soltwedel, O; Stuiber, St; Taubenheim, B; Windmayer, D; Zechlau, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the fabrication and use of deuterated polyethylene (dPE) as a coating material for ultra-cold neutron (UCN) storage and transport. The Fermi potential has been determined to be 214 neV and the wall loss coefficient $\\eta$ is 2$\\cdot$10$^4$ per wall collision. The coating technique allows for a wide range of applications and new possibilities in this field of physics. In particular, flexible and quasi-massless UCN guides with slit-less shutters and slit-less UCN storage volumes become possible. These properties enable the use in next-generation measurements of the electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  2. Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

  3. Variation in Morphology, Hygroscopicity, and Optical Properties of Soot Particles Coated by Dicarboxylic Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Huaxin

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    particles upon coating with succinic and glutaric acids. The effective densities, fractal dimensions and dynamic shape factors of fresh and coated soot aerosol particles have been determined. Significant size-dependent increases of soot particle mobility...

  4. Low emissivity high-temperature tantalum thin film coatings for silicon devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinnerbauer, Veronika

    The authors study the use of thin ( ? 230?nm) tantalum (Ta) layers on silicon (Si) as a low emissivity (high reflectivity) coating for high-temperature Si devices. Such coatings are critical to reduce parasitic radiation ...

  5. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion...

  6. Development of Corrosion Inhibiting E-Coat System for Body-in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corrosion Inhibiting E-Coat System for Body-in-White Assemblies Development of Corrosion Inhibiting E-Coat System for Body-in-White Assemblies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  7. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J. (Christiansburg, VA); Hirschfeld, Deidre A. (Elliston, VA); Li, Tingkai (Blacksburg, VA)

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  8. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries....

  9. De tabellen zijn: likes(drinker, beer)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorova, Natalia

    De tabellen zijn: likes(drinker, beer) visits(drinker, bar) serves(bar, beer) De enige te maken dat ze lusten. {t | x visits(t[drinker] = x[drinker] y serves(x[bar] = y[bar] z likes(y[beer] = z[beer(x[bar] = y[bar] z likes : y[beer] = z[beer] z[drinker] = x[drinker] ))} drinker(visits 1 serves 1 not

  10. Method for synthesis of high T[sub c] superconducting materials by oxidation and press coating of metallic precursor alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, W.; Vander Sande, J.B.

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductor oxide composite is prepared using a press coating technique. The coated layers on various substrates exhibit good adhesion, textured microstructure, and improved J[sub c].

  11. T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Director. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  12. Wear-Resistant NanoCompositeStainless Steel Coatings and Bits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resistant nanocompositestainless steel coatings and bulk components for geothermal drilling applications. highpeternanocompositebits.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  13. Thermo-optic noise in coated mirrors for high-precision optical measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Evans; S. Ballmer; M. Fejer; P. Fritschel; G. Harry; G. Ogin

    2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal fluctuations in the coatings used to make high-reflectors are becoming significant noise sources in precision optical measurements and are particularly relevant to advanced gravitational wave detectors. There are two recognized sources of coating thermal noise, mechanical loss and thermal dissipation. Thermal dissipation causes thermal fluctuations in the coating which produce noise via the thermo-elastic and thermo-refractive mechanisms. We treat these mechanisms coherently, give a correction for finite coating thickness, and evaluate the implications for Advanced LIGO.

  14. T-651: Blue Coat ProxySG Discloses Potentially Sensitive Information in Core Files

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat ProxySG. A local user can obtain potentially sensitive information

  15. The evaluation of the corrosion resistance of metallic substrates protected by a hydrophobic coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Daniel G

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?2. . . . . 4 EIS Results for Conformal Coated 1100 Aluminum Sample ?1. 98 5 EIS Results for Conformal Coated 1100 Aluminum Sample ?2 99 6 EIS Results for Conformal Coated 1100 Aluminum Sample ?3. 7 EIS Results for Acrylic Coated 1100 Aluminum.... 101 00 Copper. 32 34 36 V EXPERIMENTAL OVERVIEW. 38 VI EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS AND PROCEDURE Experimental Apparatus. Experimental Procedure. Specimen Preparation. 45 47 VII EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS EIS Results. SEM Results. 51 VIII DISCUSSION...

  16. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  17. Study of DNA coated nanoparticles as possible programmable self-assembly building blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Högberg, Björn

    Author's personal copy Study of DNA coated nanoparticles as possible programmable self Available online 3 April 2006 Abstract Nanoparticles coated with single stranded DNA have been shown (or algorithmic) self-assembly to build nanoparticle structures. However, we argue that a DNA coated

  18. Increase in thermal stability induced by organic coatings on nanoparticles L. H. Liang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Increase in thermal stability induced by organic coatings on nanoparticles L. H. Liang,1 C. M. Shen of the nanoparticles, due to the interface interaction with organic coatings, is provided by determining the atomic of the contribution of or- ganic coatings to the enhancement of thermal stability of the nanoparticles is helpful

  19. Effect of surfactant concentration on the size of coated ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prozorov, Ruslan

    Effect of surfactant concentration on the size of coated ferromagnetic nanoparticles T. Prozorova,1 nanoparticles is controlled by the surfactant concentration in the coating solution. Magnetization as a function; accepted 4 September 1998 Abstract We demonstrate that the average size of the coated ferromagnetic Fe2O3

  20. Controlled release nanoparticle-embedded coatings reduce the tissue reaction to neuroprostheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Controlled release nanoparticle-embedded coatings reduce the tissue reaction to neuroprostheses online 4 May 2010 Keywords: Microfabrication Nanoparticles Neuroprosthesis Controlled release coatings in the brain. The coatings consist of poly(propylene sulfide) drug-eluting nanoparticles embedded in a poly