National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for likelihood cone-national oceanic

  1. 1, 115, 2013 Likelihood of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    , ocean levels, precipitation, temperature, wind, landslides, bird and plant populations and a myriad about the likelihood of whether or10 not society is prepared to accommodate and respond to such trends impacts on the earth system are now so widespread that it is difficult to find a location

  2. Rising Above Chaotic Likelihoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hailiang Du; Leonard A. Smith

    2014-10-06

    Berliner (Likelihood and Bayesian prediction for chaotic systems, J. Am. Stat. Assoc. 1991) identified a number of difficulties in using the likelihood function within the Bayesian paradigm for state estimation and parameter estimation of chaotic systems. Even when the equations of the system are given, he demonstrated "chaotic likelihood functions" of initial conditions and parameter values in the 1-D Logistic Map. Chaotic likelihood functions, while ultimately smooth, have such complicated small scale structure as to cast doubt on the possibility of identifying high likelihood estimates in practice. In this paper, the challenge of chaotic likelihoods is overcome by embedding the observations in a higher dimensional sequence-space, which is shown to allow good state estimation with finite computational power. An Importance Sampling approach is introduced, where Pseudo-orbit Data Assimilation is employed in the sequence-space in order first to identify relevant pseudo-orbits and then relevant trajectories. Estimates are identified with likelihoods orders of magnitude higher than those previously identified in the examples given by Berliner. Importance Sampling uses the information from both system dynamics and observations. Using the relevant prior will, of course, eventually yield an accountable sample, but given the same computational resource this traditional approach would provide no high likelihood points at all. Berliner's central conclusion is supported. "chaotic likelihood functions" for parameter estimation still pose challenge; this fact is used to clarify why physical scientists tend to maintain a strong distinction between the initial condition uncertainty and parameter uncertainty.

  3. Map-likelihood phasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01

    A map-likelihood function is described that can yield phase probabilities with very low model bias. The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2F{sub o} ? F{sub c} or ?{sub A}-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density.

  4. Linear Models Joint Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    Hierarchy Will Penny Linear Models Joint Likelihood First Layer Activity Predictive Coding Update Update Connectivity References Hierarchy Will Penny 24th March 2011 #12;Hierarchy Will Penny Linear x1 = W2x2 + e2 #12;Hierarchy Will Penny Linear Models Joint Likelihood First Layer Activity

  5. Local Regression and Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Local Regression and Likelihood Clive Loader Springer #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Preface This book, and the associated software, have grown out of the author's work in the field of local regression over the past- ods and in particular regression, for example at the level of Draper and Smith (1981). The theoretical

  6. Maximum-likelihood

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By Sarah Schlieder *8MatthewMaximum-likelihood fitting

  7. Maximum-likelihood density modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Structural Biology Group, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2000-08-01

    A likelihood-based density modification approach is developed that can incorporate expected electron-density information from a wide variety of sources. A likelihood-based approach to density modification is developed that can be applied to a wide variety of cases where some information about the electron density at various points in the unit cell is available. The key to the approach consists of developing likelihood functions that represent the probability that a particular value of electron density is consistent with prior expectations for the electron density at that point in the unit cell. These likelihood functions are then combined with likelihood functions based on experimental observations and with others containing any prior knowledge about structure factors to form a combined likelihood function for each structure factor. A simple and general approach to maximizing the combined likelihood function is developed. It is found that this likelihood-based approach yields greater phase improvement in model and real test cases than either conventional solvent flattening and histogram matching or a recent reciprocal-space solvent-flattening procedure [Terwilliger (1999 ?), Acta Cryst. D55, 1863–1871].

  8. New likelihoods for shape analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fichet, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new kind of likelihood function based on the sequence of moments of the data distribution. Both binned and unbinned data samples are discussed, and the multivariate case is also derived. Building on this approach we lay out the formalism of shape analysis for signal searches. In addition to moment-based likelihoods, standard likelihoods and approximate statistical tests are provided. Enough material is included to make the paper self-contained from the perspective of shape analysis. We argue that the moment-based likelihoods can advantageously replace unbinned standard likelihoods for the search of non-local signals, by avoiding the step of fitting Monte-Carlo generated distributions. This benefit increases with the number of variables simultaneously analyzed. The moment-based signal search is exemplified and tested in various 1D toy models mimicking typical high-energy signal--background configurations. Moment-based techniques should be particularly appropriate for the searches for effective o...

  9. New likelihoods for shape analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylvain Fichet

    2015-03-06

    We introduce a new kind of likelihood function based on the sequence of moments of the data distribution. Both binned and unbinned data samples are discussed, and the multivariate case is also derived. Building on this approach we lay out the formalism of shape analysis for signal searches. In addition to moment-based likelihoods, standard likelihoods and approximate statistical tests are provided. Enough material is included to make the paper self-contained from the perspective of shape analysis. We argue that the moment-based likelihoods can advantageously replace unbinned standard likelihoods for the search of non-local signals, by avoiding the step of fitting Monte-Carlo generated distributions. This benefit increases with the number of variables simultaneously analyzed. The moment-based signal search is exemplified and tested in various 1D toy models mimicking typical high-energy signal--background configurations. Moment-based techniques should be particularly appropriate for the searches for effective operators at the LHC.

  10. Maximum-Likelihood Stereo Correspondence using Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, W. James

    Maximum-Likelihood Stereo Correspondence using Field Programmable Gate Arrays Siraj Sabihuddin & W. James MacLean Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario be performed using a maximum- likelihood formulation. One such formulation has been presented by Cox [1], who

  11. Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood Neural Networks Finn A ffi rup Nielsen Section for Digital Signal, linear output, Gaussian distribution ] \\Gamma 1;+1[ ffl Binary (binary classification), tanh on output, bino­ mial distribution. ] \\Gamma 1; +1[ ffl Classification, softmax function on outputs [Bridle, 1990

  12. Numerical likelihood analysis of cosmic ray anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Hojvat et al.

    2003-07-02

    A numerical likelihood approach to the determination of cosmic ray anisotropies is presented which offers many advantages over other approaches. It allows a wide range of statistically meaningful hypotheses to be compared even when full sky coverage is unavailable, can be readily extended in order to include measurement errors, and makes maximum unbiased use of all available information.

  13. Partitioned algorithms for maximum likelihood and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Partitioned algorithms for maximum likelihood and other nonlinear estimation Gordon K. Smyth There are a variety of methods in the literature which seek to make iterative estimation algorithms more manageable by breaking the iterations into a greater number of simpler or faster steps. Those algorithms which deal

  14. REVIEW ARTICLE Profile likelihood in systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    REVIEW ARTICLE Profile likelihood in systems biology Clemens Kreutz1,2 , Andreas Raue1,3 , Daniel for Advanced Studies (FRIAS), University of Freiburg, Germany 3 Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology of Freiburg, Germany 5 BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, University of Freiburg, Germany

  15. A quantum framework for likelihood ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachael L. Bond; Yang-Hui He; Thomas C. Ormerod

    2015-08-04

    The ability to calculate precise likelihood ratios is fundamental to many STEM areas, such as decision-making theory, biomedical science, and engineering. However, there is no assumption-free statistical methodology to achieve this. For instance, in the absence of data relating to covariate overlap, the widely used Bayes' theorem either defaults to the marginal probability driven "naive Bayes' classifier", or requires the use of compensatory expectation-maximization techniques. Equally, the use of alternative statistical approaches, such as multivariate logistic regression, may be confounded by other axiomatic conditions, e.g., low levels of co-linearity. This article takes an information-theoretic approach in developing a new statistical formula for the calculation of likelihood ratios based on the principles of quantum entanglement. In doing so, it is argued that this quantum approach demonstrates: that the likelihood ratio is a real quality of statistical systems; that the naive Bayes' classifier is a special case of a more general quantum mechanical expression; and that only a quantum mechanical approach can overcome the axiomatic limitations of classical statistics.

  16. Likelihood smoothing using gravitational wave surrogate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Robert H.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2014-12-16

    (x|?) is the probability that a partic- ular data stream x is observed, given the parameters ? of the signal present. Assuming stationary Gaussian noise, the likelihood is simply L(x|?) ? exp [? ?x? h(?) |x? h(?) ? / 2] , (8) 3up to some normalising factor. The actual... (??)ei?i(? ?) N ? j=1 Nje?(?j?? ? j) 2/2?2j . (21) The phase of the waveform may be approximated around the evaluation point using a Taylor series ?i(??) ? ?i(?) + (?? ? ?).??i. (22) This is a good approximation when (?? ? ?) is small, which is true if we choose ?...

  17. Recovering Velocity Distributions via Penalized Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1996-05-14

    Line-of-sight velocity distributions are crucial for unravelling the dynamics of hot stellar systems. We present a new formalism based on penalized likelihood for deriving such distributions from kinematical data, and evaluate the performance of two algorithms that extract N(V) from absorption-line spectra and from sets of individual velocities. Both algorithms are superior to existing ones in that the solutions are nearly unbiased even when the data are so poor that a great deal of smoothing is required. In addition, the discrete-velocity algorithm is able to remove a known distribution of measurement errors from the estimate of N(V). The formalism is used to recover the velocity distribution of stars in five fields near the center of the globular cluster Omega Centauri.

  18. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  19. Quantifying the Likelihood of Regional Climate Change: A Hybridized Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiang

    The growing need for risk-based assessments of impacts and adaptation to climate change calls for increased capability in climate projections: specifically, the quantification of the likelihood of regional outcomes and the ...

  20. Maximum likelihood analysis of low energy CDMS II germanium data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnese, R.

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is ...

  1. Submitted to the Bernoulli Empirical Likelihood Approach To Goodness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Anton

    and ANTON SCHICK2 1 Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis, Department of Mathematical constraints. Qin and Lawless (1994) linked 1 #12;2 H. Peng and A. Schick empirical likelihood with finitely

  2. Weak Identification in Maximum Likelihood: A Question of Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Isaiah

    In this paper we connect the discrepancy between two estimates of Fisher information, one based on the quadratic variation of the score and the other based on the negative Hessian of the log-likelihood, to weak identification. ...

  3. Maximum likelihood analysis of low energy CDMS II germanium data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    likelihood analysis of low energy CDMS II germanium data R.United States Department of Energy, by NSERC Canada, and byStates Department of Energy. [1] P. A. R. Ade et al. (Planck

  4. Multi-Dimensional mSUGRA Likelihood Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, B. C.; Lester, Christopher G.

    2006-01-01

    upon ?DMh2. Fig. 2a demonstrates (in cor- roboration with Refs. [43, 44]) that the strips are truly a result of picking a 2d hyper-surface in parameter space: if one performs a full multi-dimensional scan, there is a large region in the m0-M1/2 plane... Multi-Dimensional mSUGRA Likelihood Maps? B.C. Allanach DAMTP, CMS, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA, United Kingdom C.G. Lester Cavendish Laboratory. Madingley Road. Cambridge CB3 0HE, United Kingdom We calculate the likelihood map in the full 7...

  5. ON CONFIDENCE INTERVALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE USUAL AND ADJUSTED LIKELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    Institute of Management Post Box No 16757 Calcutta 700 027, India N. Reid Department of Statistics by like­ lihood ratio statistics arising from the usual profile likelihood and various adjustments thereof statistic; parameter orthogonality; point estimation. 1. Introduction In recent years, there has been

  6. Maximum likelihood estimation of the equity Efstathios Avdis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Michael J.

    premium is usually estimated by taking the sample mean of stock returns and subtracting a measure the expected return on the aggregate stock market less the government bill rate, is of central importance an alternative esti- mator, based on maximum likelihood, that takes into account informa- tion contained

  7. THE LIKELIHOOD OF STRATOPHENETIC-BASED HYPOTHESES OF GENEALOGICAL SUCCESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roopnarine, Peter D.

    THE LIKELIHOOD OF STRATOPHENETIC-BASED HYPOTHESES OF GENEALOGICAL SUCCESSION by PETER D. ROOPNARINE and palaeoenvironments / palaeo- ecology to hypotheses of microevolutionary genealogy, and in fact the hypothesizing of genealogies themselves, is often viewed as problematic to the traditional evolutionary and stratophenetic

  8. Estimating the likelihood of weather criteria exceedance during marine operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brabazon, P.G. [Four Elements Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Gudmestad, O.T. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway); Hopkins, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an approach to estimating the probability of marine operations being exposed to unsafe weather conditions. Marine operations, both inshore and offshore, are normally sensitive to environmental conditions. For the majority of operations threshold weather criteria will be predefined. An estimate of the likelihood of the operation experiencing bad weather, taking into account the uncertainties in weather forecasting, is of great value. The method is intended to be used as part of a risk assessment of marine operations, enabling the impact of design and scheduling decisions to be assessed in a structured and systematic way. The method has two components. Firstly, the time to complete an operation is defined in the form of a probability/time distribution. This is done by analyzing the duration of the tasks within the operation and identifying possible causes of delays. The likelihood and duration of each delay is estimated. Secondly, a probability/time curve is defined for the weather conditions exceeding the predefined threshold. The curve is determined by reference to the location of the marine operation, the time of year of the operation, the initial weather conditions and the accuracy of weather forecasting. Using the two probability/time curves, the likelihood of exposure is calculated.

  9. CCSI Technology Readiness Levels Likelihood Model (TRL-LM) User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2013-03-26

    This is the manual for the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) Technology Readiness Level Likelihood model based on PNNL velo.

  10. Applying Exclusion Likelihoods from LHC Searches to Extended Higgs Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Bechtle; Sven Heinemeyer; Oscar Stal; Tim Stefaniak; Georg Weiglein

    2015-07-24

    LHC searches for non-standard Higgs bosons decaying into tau lepton pairs constitute a sensitive experimental probe for physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM), such as Supersymmetry (SUSY). Recently, the limits obtained from these searches have been presented by the CMS collaboration in a nearly model-independent fashion - as a narrow resonance model - based on the full 8 TeV dataset. In addition to publishing a 95% C.L. exclusion limit, the full likelihood information for the narrow resonance model has been released. This provides valuable information that can be incorporated into global BSM fits. We present a simple algorithm that maps an arbitrary model with multiple neutral Higgs bosons onto the narrow resonance model and derives the corresponding value for the exclusion likelihood from the CMS search. This procedure has been implemented into the public computer code HiggsBounds (version 4.2.0 and higher). We validate our implementation by cross-checking against the official CMS exclusion contours in three Higgs benchmark scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), and find very good agreement. Going beyond validation, we discuss the combined constraints of the tau tau search and the rate measurements of the SM-like Higgs at 125 GeV in a recently proposed MSSM benchmark scenario, where the lightest Higgs boson obtains SM-like couplings independently of the decoupling of the heavier Higgs states. Technical details for how to access the likelihood information within HiggsBounds are given in the appendix. The program is available at http://higgsbounds.hepforge.org.

  11. Maximum likelihood method for cross-correlations with astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R, E-mail: rj486@nyu.edu, E-mail: gf25@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    We generalize the maximum likelihood-type method used to study cross-correlations between a catalog of candidate astrophysical sources and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), to allow for differing source luminosities. The new method is applicable to any sparse dataset such as UHE gamma rays or astrophysical neutrinos. Performance of the original and generalized techniques is evaluated in simulations of various scenarios. Applying the new technique to data, we find an excess correlation of about nine events between HiRes UHECRs and known BLLacs, with a 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} probability of such a correlation arising by chance.

  12. Generalized Maximum Likelihood Method for Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    2008-10-01

    The Maximum Likelihood Method is generalized to include effects important for UHECR applications. The new approach can incorporate source distance constraints implied by the observed CR energy and can allow for energy uncertainties, possible deflection in magnetic fields, multiple source types, and a spectrum of CR composition. It can be efficiently implemented and does not require the unphysical "isotropic" assumption for unidentified sources. The approach optimizes the utility of UHECR data to discriminate between source classes and can help constrain galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. Aspects of the method are directly applicable in other contexts, such as TeV gamma ray astrophysics.

  13. Maximum Likelihood Method for Cross Correlations with Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronnie Jansson; Glennys R. Farrar

    2008-06-18

    We generalize the Maximum Likelihood-type method used to study cross correlations between a catalog of candidate astrophysical sources and Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), to allow for differing source luminosities. The new method is applicable to any sparse data set such as UHE gamma rays or astrophysical neutrinos. Performance of the original and generalized techniques is evaluated in simulations of various scenarios. Applying the new technique to data, we find an excess correlation of about 9 events between HiRes UHECRs and known BLLacs, with a 6*10^-5 probability of such a correlation arising by chance.

  14. Better Nonlinear Models from Noisy Data: Attractors with Maximum Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

    1999-11-30

    A new approach to nonlinear modelling is presented which, by incorporating the global behaviour of the model, lifts shortcomings of both least squares and total least squares parameter estimates. Although ubiquitous in practice, a least squares approach is fundamentally flawed in that it assumes independent, normally distributed (IND) forecast errors: nonlinear models will not yield IND errors even if the noise is IND. A new cost function is obtained via the maximum likelihood principle; superior results are illustrated both for small data sets and infinitely long data streams.

  15. Analyticity, Convergence and Convergence Rate of Recursive Maximum Likelihood Estimation in Hidden Markov Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadi?, Vladislav B

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the asymptotic properties of the recursive maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models. The paper is focused on the asymptotic behavior of the log-likelihood function and on the point-convergence and convergence rate of the recursive maximum likelihood estimator. Using the principle of analytical continuation, the analyticity of the asymptotic log-likelihood function is shown for analytically parameterized hidden Markov models. Relying on this fact and some results from differential geometry (Lojasiewicz inequality), the almost sure point-convergence of the recursive maximum likelihood algorithm is demonstrated, and relatively tight bounds on the convergence rate are derived. As opposed to the existing result on the asymptotic behavior of maximum likelihood estimation in hidden Markov models, the results of this paper are obtained without assuming that the log-likelihood function has an isolated maximum at which the Hessian is strictly negative definite.

  16. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

    2006-09-26

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

  17. Maximum likelihood density modification by pattern recognition of structural motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-04-13

    An electron density for a crystallographic structure having protein regions and solvent regions is improved by maximizing the log likelihood of a set of structures factors {F.sub.h } using a local log-likelihood function: (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV)p.sub.SOLV (x)+p(.rho.(x).vertline.H)p.sub.H (x)], where p.sub.PROT (x) is the probability that x is in the protein region, p(.rho.(x).vertline.PROT) is the conditional probability for .rho.(x) given that x is in the protein region, and p.sub.SOLV (x) and p(.rho.(x).vertline.SOLV) are the corresponding quantities for the solvent region, p.sub.H (x) refers to the probability that there is a structural motif at a known location, with a known orientation, in the vicinity of the point x; and p(.rho.(x).vertline.H) is the probability distribution for electron density at this point given that the structural motif actually is present. One appropriate structural motif is a helical structure within the crystallographic structure.

  18. The Multi-Mission Maximum Likelihood framework (3ML)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vianello, Giacomo; Younk, Patrick; Tibaldo, Luigi; Burgess, James M; Ayala, Hugo; Harding, Patrick; Hui, Michelle; Omodei, Nicola; Zhou, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are now observed by many different instruments at different wavelengths, from radio to high-energy gamma-rays, with an unprecedented quality. Putting all these data together to form a coherent view, however, is a very difficult task. Each instrument has its own data format, software and analysis procedure, which are difficult to combine. It is for example very challenging to perform a broadband fit of the energy spectrum of the source. The Multi-Mission Maximum Likelihood framework (3ML) aims to solve this issue, providing a common framework which allows for a coherent modeling of sources using all the available data, independent of their origin. At the same time, thanks to its architecture based on plug-ins, 3ML uses the existing official software of each instrument for the corresponding data in a way which is transparent to the user. 3ML is based on the likelihood formalism, in which a model summarizing our knowledge about a particular region of the sky is convolved with the instrument...

  19. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

  20. Dark matter CMB constraints and likelihoods for poor particle physicists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, James M.; Scott, Pat, E-mail: jcline@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: patscott@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2013-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background provides constraints on the annihilation and decay of light dark matter at redshifts between 100 and 1000, the strength of which depends upon the fraction of energy ending up in the form of electrons and photons. The resulting constraints are usually presented for a limited selection of annihilation and decay channels. Here we provide constraints on the annihilation cross section and decay rate, at discrete values of the dark matter mass m{sub ?}, for all the annihilation and decay channels whose secondary spectra have been computed using PYTHIA in arXiv:1012.4515 (''PPPC 4 DM ID: a poor particle physicist cookbook for dark matter indirect detection''), namely e, ?, ?, V ? e, V ? ?, V ? ?, u, d s, c, b, t, ?, g, W, Z and h. By interpolating in mass, these can be used to find the CMB constraints and likelihood functions from WMAP7 and Planck for a wide range of dark matter models, including those with annihilation or decay into a linear combination of different channels.

  1. Power and Effective Study Size Based on Approximations to the Expected Likelihood Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Power and Effective Study Size Based on Approximations to the Expected Likelihood Ratio Test statistical power and precision of heritability estimates can be difficult particularly in complex pedigrees. Previous work focused on the power to detect heritability by using the expectation of the likelihood ratio

  2. Non-Coherent Amplify-and-Forward Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test Receiver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-Coherent Amplify-and-Forward Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test Receiver Michael R. Souryal for the relay channel and evaluates its diversity performance for Rayleigh fading channels. We use the generalized likelihood ratio test to obtain the decision rule in closed form, independent of the fading

  3. Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle filter implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recursive maximum likelihood estimation for structural health monitoring: Kalman and particle by a likelihood approach. In a first part the structural health monitoring problem is written in term of recursive al [6] in a more simple framework. Particle approximation for health monitoring was already proposed

  4. A generalized likelihood ratio technique for automated analysis of bobbin coil eddy current dataq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polikar, Robi

    is positioned in a defect-free region of the tube, the differential im- pedance of the two coils is zeroA generalized likelihood ratio technique for automated analysis of bobbin coil eddy current dataq M presents a generalized likelihood ratio technique for detection of defect locations from bobbin coil eddy

  5. Likelihood-based modification of experimental crystal structure electron density maps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, Thomas C. (Sante Fe, NM)

    2005-04-16

    A maximum-likelihood method for improves an electron density map of an experimental crystal structure. A likelihood of a set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is formed for the experimental crystal structure as (1) the likelihood of having obtained an observed set of structure factors {F.sub.h.sup.OBS } if structure factor set {F.sub.h } was correct, and (2) the likelihood that an electron density map resulting from {F.sub.h } is consistent with selected prior knowledge about the experimental crystal structure. The set of structure factors {F.sub.h } is then adjusted to maximize the likelihood of {F.sub.h } for the experimental crystal structure. An improved electron density map is constructed with the maximized structure factors.

  6. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  7. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  8. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  9. Maximum-likelihood density modification using pattern recognition of structural motifs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01

    A likelihood-based density-modification method is extended to include pattern recognition of structural motifs. The likelihood-based approach to density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] is extended to include the recognition of patterns of electron density. Once a region of electron density in a map is recognized as corresponding to a known structural element, the likelihood of the map is reformulated to include a term that reflects how closely the map agrees with the expected density for that structural element. This likelihood is combined with other aspects of the likelihood of the map, including the presence of a flat solvent region and the electron-density distribution in the protein region. This likelihood-based pattern-recognition approach was tested using the recognition of helical segments in a largely helical protein. The pattern-recognition method yields a substantial phase improvement over both conventional and likelihood-based solvent-flattening and histogram-matching methods. The method can potentially be used to recognize any common structural motif and incorporate prior knowledge about that motif into density modification.

  10. Failed Searches: How the choice set of job applicants affects an employer’s likelihood of making an offer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Ming D.

    2015-01-01

    s likelihood of making an offer Ming D. Leung Cite as: Minglikelihood of making an offer”. IRLE Working Paper No. 111-s likelihood of making an offer* Ming D. Leung Haas School

  11. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  12. Volley: Violation Likelihood Based State Monitoring for Datacenters Shicong Meng Arun K. Iyengar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    Volley: Violation Likelihood Based State Monitoring for Datacenters Shicong Meng Arun K. Iyengar--Distributed state monitoring plays a critical role in Cloud datacenter management. One fundamental problem distributed state monitoring in Cloud datacenters. Volley achieves both efficiency and accuracy

  13. A social demographic study of the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality resulting in death 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traut, Rachel Lynn

    2009-05-15

    This thesis explores occupational fatalities to American males for the years 1998 and 1999. The focus is on predicting the likelihood that the individual will sustain an occupational injury resulting in death based on an occupational status score...

  14. Maximum Likelihood Estimation for the Proportional Odds Model with Random Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Donglin

    Maximum Likelihood Estimation for the Proportional Odds Model with Random Effects DONGLIN ZENG, D. Y. LIN, and GUOSHENG YIN In this article, we study the semiparametric proportional odds model; Frailty model; Linear transformation model; Proportional hazards; Semiparametric efficiency; Survival data

  15. A Maximum Likelihood Method with Penalty to Estimate Link Travel Time Based on Trip Itinerary Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Chujun

    2014-12-15

    Travel time is an important network performance measure. It is a challenging subject due to the fluctuations in traffic characteristics, such as traffic flow. This study proposes a maximum likelihood method with penalty ...

  16. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    sub- tropical North Pacific Ocean. Aquatic Microbial Ecologytropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and contributes sub-

  17. Ocean Energy Resource Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States.

  18. ENCYCLOPEDIA OCEAN SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENCYCLOPEDIA OF OCEAN SCIENCES Editor-in-Chief JOHN H. STEELE Editors STEVE A. THORPE KARL K in Marine Biology 26: 115-168. Rosland Rand Giske .I (1997) A dynamic model for tbe life history

  19. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  20. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  1. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  3. Maximum Likelihood method for ultrahigh energy cosmic ray cross correlations with astrophysical sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronnie Jansson; Glennys R. Farrar

    2007-08-20

    We extend the Maximum Likelihood method used by HiRes to study cross correlations between a catalog of candidate astrophysical sources and Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), to allow for differing source luminosities. Our approach permits individual sources to be ranked according to their likelihood of having emitted the correlated UHECRs. We test both old and new method by simulations for various scenarios. We conclude that there are 9 true correlation between HiRes UHECRs and known BLLacs, with a 6*10^-5 probability of such a correlation arising by chance.

  4. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  5. Steroid estrogens in ocean sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga, O.; Smythe, G.A.; Schäfer, Andrea; Feitz, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives results from a study measuring the abundance of steroid hormones in ocean sediments in the proximity of a deep ocean sewage outfall. The outfall is discharge point for an enhanced primary sewage treatment ...

  6. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the same conditions). 3) To demonstrate a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, naval architecture: Design/Fluid Mechanics Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior Focus: Naval Architecture and High Speed Small vessel under a variety of foil configurations, sea conditions, propulsion states and loads. 2) To perform

  7. Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

  8. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  9. Strategic Plan National Ocean Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan of the National Ocean Service 2005-2010 U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic Strategic Plan for 2005 to 2010. This Plan heralds a new era for the ocean and coasts as NOS responds these challenges. The NOS Strategic Plan is synchronous with the NOAA Strategic Plan -- one NOAA, one workforce

  10. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  11. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  12. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  13. Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering Bachelor of Science Degree Virginia Tech For more engineering is a diverse field. At Virginia Tech, the major focus areas are ocean energy systems and ocean in the aerospace and related industries and in the shipbuilding, naval engineering, and ship design fields. Some

  14. Fault Detection Likelihood of Test Sequence Length Fevzi Belli, Michael Linschulte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belli, Fevzi

    accepted hypothesis is that the longer the test sequences, the higher the chances to detect faults. However the length of test sequences. · For our experiments the length of sequences varied from 2 to 4, definingFault Detection Likelihood of Test Sequence Length Fevzi Belli, Michael Linschulte University

  15. A 2-step Empirical Likelihood approach for combining sample and population data in regression estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    with the dependent variables are known from the population level data, obtained as for example from census then be obtained by maximizing the likelihood function under the population level constraints. The method can covariates is modeled using a combination of sample data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID, Hill

  16. STATISTICS, HANDLE WITH CARE: DETECTING MULTIPLE MODEL COMPONENTS WITH THE LIKELIHOOD RATIO TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    STATISTICS, HANDLE WITH CARE: DETECTING MULTIPLE MODEL COMPONENTS WITH THE LIKELIHOOD RATIO TEST Rostislav Protassov and David A. van Dyk Department of Statistics, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street-distributions in many statistical tests common in astrophysics, thereby casting many marginal line or source detections

  17. DATABASE LIKELIHOOD RATIOS AND FAMILIAL DNA KLAAS SLOOTEN AND RONALD MEESTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meester, Ronald

    DATABASE LIKELIHOOD RATIOS AND FAMILIAL DNA SEARCHING KLAAS SLOOTEN AND RONALD MEESTER Abstract. Familial Searching is the process of searching in a DNA database for relatives of a given individual ratio, which is in this context called a Kinship Index. Suppose that the database contains, for a given

  18. Predictors of the likelihood of adoption among U.S. women by race and ethnicity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klucsarits, Christine Elizabeth

    2009-05-15

    This thesis utilizes a series of seven logistic regression models to examine the predictors of the likelihood of adoption among U.S. women based on the National Survey of Family Growth, Cycle 6. The individual characteristics that have been found...

  19. Mathematical Geology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1998 A Bootstrap Test Using Maximum Likelihood Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Snigdhansu

    Mathematical Geology, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1998 A Bootstrap Test Using Maximum Likelihood Ratio 24 January 1997; revised 10 May 1997. 2Geological Studies Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B-8121/98/0400-0275$15.00/1 © 1998 International Association for Mathematical Geology KEY WORDS: polar coordinates, joint frequency

  20. Investigating the Impact of Changes in Iteration-likelihoods on Design Process Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Daniel; Hamraz, Bahram; Sommer, Anita F.; Clarkson, P. John

    2015-01-01

    1 Investigating the Impact of Changes in Iteration-likelihoods on Design Process Performance Authors: Daniel Shapiro(1) (corresponding author, ds678@cam.ac.uk, +447922058809), Bahram Hamraz(2) (bh351@cam.ac.uk), Anita F. Sommer(1) (afs35@cam...

  1. Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Extensions on the Likelihood Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Topic 19 Extensions on the Likelihood Ratio Two-Sided Tests 1 / 12 #12;Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Outline Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Power Analysis 2 / 12 #12;Overview Normal Observations Two

  2. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  3. The relative efficiency of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium-likelihood and the conditional on parental genotype-likelihood methods for candidate-gene association studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, M.; Baur, M.P. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany); Wassmer, G. [GSF-Institute for Epidemiology, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1995-12-01

    Selecting a control group that is perfectly matched for ethnic ancestry with a group of affected individuals is a major problem in studying the association of a candidate gene with a disease. This problem can be avoided by a design that uses parental data in place of nonrelated controls. Schaid and Sommer presented two new methods for the statistical analysis using this approach: (1) a likelihood method (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium [HWE] method), which rests on the assumption that HWE holds, and (2) a conditional likelihood method (conditional on parental genotype [CPG] method) appropriate when HWE is absent. Schaid and Sommer claimed that the CPG method can be more efficient than the HWE method, even when equilibrium holds. It can be shown, however, that in the equilibrium situation the HWE method is always more efficient than the CPG method. For a dominant disease, the differences are slim. But for a recessive disease, the CPG method requires a much larger sample size to achieve a prescribed power than the HWE method. Additionally, we show how the relative risks for the various candidate-gene genotypes can be estimated without relying on iterative methods. For the CPG method, we present an asymptotic power approximation that is sufficiently precise for planning the sample size of an association study. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Planck 2015 results. XI. CMB power spectra, likelihoods, and robustness of parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Fergusson, J; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Gauthier, C; Gerbino, M; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hamann, J; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leonardi, R; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Lilley, M; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; López-Caniego, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Migliaccio, M; Millea, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Narimani, A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Serra, P; Spencer, L D; Spinelli, M; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Trombetti, T; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the Planck 2015 likelihoods, statistical descriptions of the 2-point correlation functions of CMB temperature and polarization. They use the hybrid approach employed previously: pixel-based at low multipoles, $\\ell$, and a Gaussian approximation to the distribution of cross-power spectra at higher $\\ell$. The main improvements are the use of more and better processed data and of Planck polarization data, and more detailed foreground and instrumental models. More than doubling the data allows further checks and enhanced immunity to systematics. Progress in foreground modelling enables a larger sky fraction, contributing to enhanced precision. Improvements in processing and instrumental models further reduce uncertainties. Extensive tests establish robustness and accuracy, from temperature, from polarization, and from their combination, and show that the {\\Lambda}CDM model continues to offer a very good fit. We further validate the likelihood against specific extensions to this baseline, suc...

  5. Recursive Pathways to Marginal Likelihood Estimation with Prior-Sensitivity Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Ewan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the utility to contemporary Bayesian studies of recursive, Gauss-Seidel-type pathways to marginal likelihood estimation characterized by reverse logistic regression and the density of states. Through a pair of illustrative, numerical examples (including mixture modeling of the well-known 'galaxy dataset') we highlight both the remarkable diversity of bridging schemes amenable to recursive normalization and the notable efficiency of the resulting pseudo-mixture densities for gauging prior-sensitivity in the model selection context. Our key theoretical contributions show the connection between the nested sampling identity and the density of states. Further, we introduce a novel heuristic ('thermodynamic integration via importance sampling') for qualifying the role of the bridging sequence in marginal likelihood estimation. An efficient pseudo-mixture density scheme for harnessing the information content of otherwise discarded draws in ellipse-based nested sampling is also introduced.

  6. Global convergence of diluted iterations in maximum-likelihood quantum tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Gonçalves; M. A. Gomes-Ruggiero; C. Lavor

    2013-06-13

    In this paper we present an inexact stepsize selection for the Diluted R\\rho R algorithm, used to obtain the maximum likelihood estimate to the density matrix in quantum state tomography. We give a new interpretation for the diluted R\\rho R iterations that allows us to prove the global convergence under weaker assumptions. Thus, we propose a new algorithm which is globally convergent and suitable for practical implementation.

  7. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  8. A Profile Likelihood Analysis of the Constrained MSSM with Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashar Akrami; Pat Scott; Joakim Edsjö; Jan Conrad; Lars Bergström

    2010-03-23

    The Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) is one of the simplest and most widely-studied supersymmetric extensions to the standard model of particle physics. Nevertheless, current data do not sufficiently constrain the model parameters in a way completely independent of priors, statistical measures and scanning techniques. We present a new technique for scanning supersymmetric parameter spaces, optimised for frequentist profile likelihood analyses and based on Genetic Algorithms. We apply this technique to the CMSSM, taking into account existing collider and cosmological data in our global fit. We compare our method to the MultiNest algorithm, an efficient Bayesian technique, paying particular attention to the best-fit points and implications for particle masses at the LHC and dark matter searches. Our global best-fit point lies in the focus point region. We find many high-likelihood points in both the stau co-annihilation and focus point regions, including a previously neglected section of the co-annihilation region at large m_0. We show that there are many high-likelihood points in the CMSSM parameter space commonly missed by existing scanning techniques, especially at high masses. This has a significant influence on the derived confidence regions for parameters and observables, and can dramatically change the entire statistical inference of such scans.

  9. Reducing the likelihood of future human activities that could affect geologic high-level waste repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations provides a means of isolating the waste from people until the radioactivity has decayed to safe levels. However, isolating people from the wastes is a different problem, since we do not know what the future condition of society will be. The Human Interference Task Force was convened by the US Department of Energy to determine whether reasonable means exist (or could be developed) to reduce the likelihood of future human unintentionally intruding on radioactive waste isolation systems. The task force concluded that significant reductions in the likelihood of human interference could be achieved, for perhaps thousands of years into the future, if appropriate steps are taken to communicate the existence of the repository. Consequently, for two years the task force directed most of its study toward the area of long-term communication. Methods are discussed for achieving long-term communication by using permanent markers and widely disseminated records, with various steps taken to provide multiple levels of protection against loss, destruction, and major language/societal changes. Also developed is the concept of a universal symbol to denote Caution - Biohazardous Waste Buried Here. If used for the thousands of non-radioactive biohazardous waste sites in this country alone, a symbol could transcend generations and language changes, thereby vastly improving the likelihood of successful isolation of all buried biohazardous wastes.

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversionfor the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary

  11. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  12. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA Related Links AntarcticaNews fromOceanic

  13. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,OceanLtd

  14. Oceans and Ecosystems Research Changing levels of Oceanic Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmospheric, the remainder is taken up by land plants and oceans. · We study the uptake by the oceans both EPA qualified the increasing CO2 levels as a pollutant along with the other greenhouse gases Ch4, N2O & wind Algorithm development pCO2= f(SST, color) Co-located satellite data Regional satellite SST & color

  15. OCEAN PREDICTION WITH THE HYBRID COORDINATE OCEAN MODEL (HYCOM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . of South Florida, Fugro-GEOS, ROFFS, Orbimage, Shell, ExxonMobil #12;414 ERIC P. CHASSIGNET ET AL-resolving, real-time global and basin-scale ocean prediction system in the context of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE). Keywords: HYCOM, GODAE, LAS, data assimilation, metrics. 1. Introduction

  16. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  17. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  18. Oceans and Human Health (and climate change)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Oceans and Human Health (and climate change) Tracy K. Collier Science Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate, USC March 12, 2013 1 #12 use Climate change Closes the loop in understanding connections between ocean health and human health

  19. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  20. Marine Ecosystems Ocean Environment Research Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been studying how CO2 emissions affect the ocean system for more than three decades and conQnue to monitor ocean acidificaQon in all the world's oceans from

  1. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  2. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  3. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  4. Ocean Systems Lecture 16 & 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    to thrive in oceans and lakes they need sunlight and nutrients. But thermal stratification tends to separateOcean Systems Lecture 16 & 17 #12;Hydroclimate, heat budgets and stratification For plants the nature of stratification. Light, less dense, water floats on top of colder, less dense water. Plankton

  5. Likelihood-based gene annotations for gap filling and quality assessment in genome-scale metabolic models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedict, Matthew N.; Mundy, Michael B.; Henry, Christopher S.; Chia, Nicholas; Price, Nathan D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-16

    Genome-scale metabolic models provide a powerful means to harness information from genomes to deepen biological insights. With exponentially increasing sequencing capacity, there is an enormous need for automated reconstruction techniques that can provide more accurate models in a short time frame. Current methods for automated metabolic network reconstruction rely on gene and reaction annotations to build draft metabolic networks and algorithms to fill gaps in these networks. However, automated reconstruction is hampered by database inconsistencies, incorrect annotations, and gap filling largely without considering genomic information. Here we develop an approach for applying genomic information to predict alternative functions for genes and estimate their likelihoods from sequence homology. We show that computed likelihood values were significantly higher for annotations found in manually curated metabolic networks than those that were not. We then apply these alternative functional predictions to estimate reaction likelihoods, which are used in a new gap filling approach called likelihood-based gap filling to predict more genomically consistent solutions. To validate the likelihood-based gap filling approach, we applied it to models where essential pathways were removed, finding that likelihood-based gap filling identified more biologically relevant solutions than parsimony-based gap filling approaches. We also demonstrate that models gap filled using likelihood-based gap filling provide greater coverage and genomic consistency with metabolic gene functions compared to parsimony-based approaches. Interestingly, despite these findings, we found that likelihoods did not significantly affect consistency of gap filled models with Biolog and knockout lethality data. This indicates that the phenotype data alone cannot necessarily be used to discriminate between alternative solutions for gap filling and therefore, that the use of other information is necessary to obtain a more accurate network. All described workflows are implemented as part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) and are publicly available via API or command-line web interface.

  6. A new time-dependent likelihood technique for detection of gamma-ray bursts with IACT arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiner, Ori M

    2015-01-01

    In imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (IACT) arrays, the standard method of statistically inferring the existence of a source is based on the maximum likelihood method of Li&Ma (1983). We present a new statistical approach, also based on maximum likelihood theory, which takes into account a priori knowledge of the source light curve. This approach is especially useful for observations of rapidly decaying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We also discuss results established by using this technique to analyze VERITAS GRB observations.

  7. Likelihood-based gene annotations for gap filling and quality assessment in genome-scale metabolic models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Benedict, Matthew N.; Mundy, Michael B.; Henry, Christopher S.; Chia, Nicholas; Price, Nathan D.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-16

    Genome-scale metabolic models provide a powerful means to harness information from genomes to deepen biological insights. With exponentially increasing sequencing capacity, there is an enormous need for automated reconstruction techniques that can provide more accurate models in a short time frame. Current methods for automated metabolic network reconstruction rely on gene and reaction annotations to build draft metabolic networks and algorithms to fill gaps in these networks. However, automated reconstruction is hampered by database inconsistencies, incorrect annotations, and gap filling largely without considering genomic information. Here we develop an approach for applying genomic information to predict alternative functions for genesmore »and estimate their likelihoods from sequence homology. We show that computed likelihood values were significantly higher for annotations found in manually curated metabolic networks than those that were not. We then apply these alternative functional predictions to estimate reaction likelihoods, which are used in a new gap filling approach called likelihood-based gap filling to predict more genomically consistent solutions. To validate the likelihood-based gap filling approach, we applied it to models where essential pathways were removed, finding that likelihood-based gap filling identified more biologically relevant solutions than parsimony-based gap filling approaches. We also demonstrate that models gap filled using likelihood-based gap filling provide greater coverage and genomic consistency with metabolic gene functions compared to parsimony-based approaches. Interestingly, despite these findings, we found that likelihoods did not significantly affect consistency of gap filled models with Biolog and knockout lethality data. This indicates that the phenotype data alone cannot necessarily be used to discriminate between alternative solutions for gap filling and therefore, that the use of other information is necessary to obtain a more accurate network. All described workflows are implemented as part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) and are publicly available via API or command-line web interface.« less

  8. Free kick instead of cross-validation in maximum-likelihood refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pražnikar, Jure [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Primorska, (Slovenia); Turk, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.turk@ijs.si [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, (Slovenia)

    2014-12-01

    The maximum-likelihood free-kick target, which calculates model error estimates from the work set and a randomly displaced model, proved superior in the accuracy and consistency of refinement of crystal structures compared with the maximum-likelihood cross-validation target, which calculates error estimates from the test set and the unperturbed model. The refinement of a molecular model is a computational procedure by which the atomic model is fitted to the diffraction data. The commonly used target in the refinement of macromolecular structures is the maximum-likelihood (ML) function, which relies on the assessment of model errors. The current ML functions rely on cross-validation. They utilize phase-error estimates that are calculated from a small fraction of diffraction data, called the test set, that are not used to fit the model. An approach has been developed that uses the work set to calculate the phase-error estimates in the ML refinement from simulating the model errors via the random displacement of atomic coordinates. It is called ML free-kick refinement as it uses the ML formulation of the target function and is based on the idea of freeing the model from the model bias imposed by the chemical energy restraints used in refinement. This approach for the calculation of error estimates is superior to the cross-validation approach: it reduces the phase error and increases the accuracy of molecular models, is more robust, provides clearer maps and may use a smaller portion of data for the test set for the calculation of R{sub free} or may leave it out completely.

  9. Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch PreSS KiT/JUNe 2008 #12;#12;Media Contacts Steve .............................................................................................................................. 7 Why Study Ocean Surface Topography

  10. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

  11. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  12. Ocean Power (4 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    our existing non-renewable resources. Ocean power is divided into three categories: wave energy, tidal energy, and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) Systems. It is...

  13. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  14. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  15. 8D Likelihood Effective Higgs Couplings Extraction Framework in the Golden Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yi [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Di Marco, Emanuele [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lykken, Joe [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Spiropulu, Maria [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Vega-Morales, Roberto [Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, (France); Xie, Si [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we build a comprehensive analysis framework to perform direct extraction of all possible effective Higgs couplings to neutral electroweak gauge bosons in the decay to electrons and muons, the so called `golden channel'. Our framework is based on a maximum likelihood method constructed from analytic expressions of the fully differential cross sections for $h \\rightarrow 4\\ell$ and for the dominant irreducible $q\\bar{q} \\rightarrow 4\\ell$ background, where $4\\ell = 2e2\\mu, 4e, 4\\mu$. Detector effects are included by an explicit convolution of these analytic expressions with the appropriate transfer function over all center of mass variables. Using the full set of decay observables, we construct an unbinned 8-dimensional detector-level likelihood function which is continuous in the effective couplings and includes systematic uncertainties. We consider all possible $ZZ$, $Z\\gamma$ and $\\gamma\\gamma$ couplings, allowing for general CP odd/even admixtures and any possible phases. We describe how the convolution is performed and demonstrate the validity and power of the framework with a number of supporting checks and example fits. The framework can be used to perform a variety of multi-parameter extractions, including their correlations, to determine the Higgs couplings to neutral electroweak gauge bosons using data obtained at the LHC and other future colliders.

  16. A likelihood method to cross-calibrate air-shower detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. P. Dembinski; B. Kégl; I. C. Mari?; M. Roth; D. Veberi?

    2015-03-31

    We present a detailed statistical treatment of the energy calibration of hybrid air-shower detectors, which combine a surface detector array and a fluorescence detector, to obtain an unbiased estimate of the calibration curve. The special features of calibration data from air showers prevent unbiased results, if a standard least-squares fit is applied to the problem. We develop a general maximum-likelihood approach, based on the detailed statistical model, to solve the problem. Our approach was developed for the Pierre Auger Observatory, but the applied principles are general and can be transferred to other air-shower experiments, even to the cross-calibration of other observables. Since our general likelihood function is expensive to compute, we derive two approximations with significantly smaller computational cost. In the recent years both have been used to calibrate data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We demonstrate that these approximations introduce negligible bias when they are applied to simulated toy experiments, which mimic realistic experimental conditions.

  17. 8D likelihood effective Higgs couplings extraction framework in h ? 4?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Lykken, Joe; Spiropulu, Maria; Vega-Morales, Roberto; Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay Cedex; Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL; Xie, Si

    2015-01-23

    We present an overview of a comprehensive analysis framework aimed at performing direct extraction of all possible effective Higgs couplings to neutral electroweak gauge bosons in the decay to electrons and muons, the so called ‘golden channel’. Our framework is based primarily on a maximum likelihood method constructed from analytic expressions of the fully differential cross sections for h ? 4l and for the dominant irreducible $ q\\overline{q} $ ? 4l background, where 4l = 2e2?, 4e, 4?. Detector effects are included by an explicit convolution of these analytic expressions with the appropriate transfer function over all center of massmore »variables. Utilizing the full set of observables, we construct an unbinned detector-level likelihood which is continuous in the effective couplings. We consider possible ZZ, Z?, and ?? couplings simultaneously, allowing for general CP odd/even admixtures. A broad overview is given of how the convolution is performed and we discuss the principles and theoretical basis of the framework. This framework can be used in a variety of ways to study Higgs couplings in the golden channel using data obtained at the LHC and other future colliders.« less

  18. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  19. The Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    and ocean instrumentation. Application Available online at www.linkoe.org or write to/email: Forms and DrThe Link Foundation Ocean Engineering and Instrumentation Ph.D. Fellowship Program Objectives: To foster ocean engineering and ocean instrumentation research; to enhance both the theoretical

  20. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    primary productiv- ity, especially in the oligotrophic regions of the ocean. In addition to the energy

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  3. INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  6. WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2013 Product Documentation Ocean Climate Laboratory NODC / NESDIS / NOAA Silver: World Ocean Atlas 2013 Product Documentation. T. Boyer, Ed.; A. Mishonov, Technical Ed.; 14 pp such as mixed layer depth. Upon publishing Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean in 1982, he distributed

  7. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  8. Newsletter of Coastal Ocean Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Workshop Executive Summary Draft OCEAN.US Airlie House Workshop Update Evolution of the Cross and the following working groups: 1.Trace elements in ecological and biogeochemical processes 2.Physical forcing

  9. Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamborg, Carl

    The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

  10. Ocean Renewable Energy Conference X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10th annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference provides attendees a forum to share new ideas and concepts, opportunity to learn from leading-edge practitioners and policy-makers, information...

  11. MPAS-Ocean Development Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Ringler, Todd D.; Petersen, Mark R.; Jones, Philip W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.

    2012-06-13

    The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

  12. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  13. Ocean Sci., 5, 313327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    . The role of the penetration length scale of short- wave radiation into the surface ocean and its impactOcean Sci., 5, 313­327, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/313/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Regional impacts of ocean color

  14. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal; Siegel et al., 1995] have demonstrated that the penetration of EVIS in the upper layer of the ocean plays

  15. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore »using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  16. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  17. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  18. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  19. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  1. 3816 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 61, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2013 Likelihood-Based Modulation Classification for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Il-Min

    , IEEE Abstract--Likelihood-based algorithms for the classification of linear digital modulations-Based Modulation Classification for Multiple-Antenna Receiver Ali Ramezani-Kebrya, Student Member, IEEE, Il-Min Kim are systematically investigated for a multiple receive antennas configuration. Existing modulation classification (MC

  2. IEICE TRANS. FUNDAMENTALS, VOL.E85 {A, NO.12 DECEMBER 2002 Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Seungjin

    IEICE TRANS. FUNDAMENTALS, VOL.E85 {A, NO.12 DECEMBER 2002 1 PAPER Approximate Maximum Likelihood (t)] T is generated by x(t) = As(t) + v(t); (1) where A 2 IR m#2;n (m #21; n) is called the mixing ma of Education of Korea for its #12;nancial support toward the Electrical and Computer Engineering Division

  3. Land-ocean contrasts under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Observations and climate models show a pronounced land-ocean contrast in the responses of surface temperature and the hydrological cycle to global warming: Land temperatures increase more than ocean temperatures, low-level ...

  4. PHYSICS OF OCEAN CIRCULATION Instructor: S. Riser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    Topography Tides Wind Geothermal heating Surface flows elsewhere #12;How deep is the ocean? The average ocean circulation #12;UNITS Horizontal distance: km (= 105 cm) Vertical distance: m Velocity: cm/sec Density: g/cm3

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 164 PRELIMINARY REPORT GAS HYDRATE SAMPLING ON THE BLAKE RIDGE of Tokyo (Japan) National Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program (Belgium, Denmark, Finland

  6. Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Fanny

    2009-01-01

    Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

  7. Oceanography | Vol.24, No.3114 OCEAN WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    out ows via these pathways return freshwaters to the North Atlantic that were evaporated from tropical oceans, transported by the atmosphere, and delivered to the Arctic Ocean via precipi- tation, terrestrial

  8. Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons PI: Meghan Cronin Co Lab Review 2 hClimate Sta-ons are moored buoys #12;Ocean Climate Sta1ons 2014 PMEL Lab Review 5 Contribu-ng to NOAA's Goals

  9. Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Education: Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    ! ! ! ! ! Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Education: Aquarium Express Outreach Who: Students by The Price Philanthropies Ocean Science Fund and participate in our Aquarium Express Outreach Programs! What education, Price Philanthropies, led by Robert and Allison Price, joined supporters of Birch Aquarium

  10. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California, State and Federal Agencies and their expectations in respect to potential wave power deployments Jim a huge amount of wave measurement data from various data sources Asfaw Beyene of the Department

  11. Building unbiased estimators from non-Gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Sehgal, Neelima; McDonald, Patrick; Slosar, Anže E-mail: pvmcdonald@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong's estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g|=0.2.

  12. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; Slosar, Anze; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the work of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.

  13. Building unbiased estimators from non-gaussian likelihoods with application to shear estimation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Madhavacheril, Mathew S.; McDonald, Patrick; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze

    2015-01-15

    We develop a general framework for generating estimators of a given quantity which are unbiased to a given order in the difference between the true value of the underlying quantity and the fiducial position in theory space around which we expand the likelihood. We apply this formalism to rederive the optimal quadratic estimator and show how the replacement of the second derivative matrix with the Fisher matrix is a generic way of creating an unbiased estimator (assuming choice of the fiducial model is independent of data). Next we apply the approach to estimation of shear lensing, closely following the workmore »of Bernstein and Armstrong (2014). Our first order estimator reduces to their estimator in the limit of zero shear, but it also naturally allows for the case of non-constant shear and the easy calculation of correlation functions or power spectra using standard methods. Both our first-order estimator and Bernstein and Armstrong’s estimator exhibit a bias which is quadratic in true shear. Our third-order estimator is, at least in the realm of the toy problem of Bernstein and Armstrong, unbiased to 0.1% in relative shear errors ?g/g for shears up to |g| = 0.2.« less

  14. Deep Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Indian Ocean and Its Relation to Indian Ocean Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Meridional Overturning Circulation in the Indian Ocean and Its Relation to Indian Ocean Dipole of the Ocean (GECCO) syn- thesis data to analyze and examine the relationship of the Indian Ocean deep within the zonal band of 108 on both sides of the equator. Therefore, there exists a surface to deep

  15. AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

  16. A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    of the oceanic31 carbon pool. It influences light penetration with consequences for primary productivity1 A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2 S. Dwivedi1 , T. W. N. Haine2 and C. E. Del Castillo3 3 1 Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, University

  17. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  18. Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Ocean Surface Currents From Geostationary Satellite SST -We are implementing and evaluating a feature tracking approach to estimate ocean surface currents. - This approach allows us to estimate://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/ Ocean surface currents (vectors) derived from SST (background) modeled fields along the west coast of U

  19. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  20. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

  2. SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  7. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

  14. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    2006-01-01

    . Three quarter of our planet's surface is covered by water where a richer biodiversity than life on land exists--more major taxonomic groupings of animals can be found in the oceans than on land. The oceans food, energy, and mineral resources, oceans also play a critical role in regulating Earth's weather

  15. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    productive oceanic eastern boundary current, providing anCurrent System and the Kuroshio Extension uses OFES products for their oceanic

  16. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  17. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds CO2 and N2 are degassed · S and Cl are from Earth's data · 1 km thick ocean, variable basalt layer and phyllosilicates · S is in sulfate and sulfide minerals Why? · ~ neutral pH, no trapping of atmospheric CO2

  18. Maximum Likelihood Signal Extraction Method Applied to 3.4 years of CoGeNT Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Aalseth; P. S. Barbeau; J. Diaz Leon; J. E. Fast; T. W. Hossbach; A. Knecht; M. S. Kos; M. G. Marino; H. S. Miley; M. L. Miller; J. L. Orrell

    2015-02-05

    CoGeNT has taken data for over 3 years, with 1136 live days of data accumulated as of April 23, 2013. We report on the results of a maximum likelihood analysis to extract any possible dark matter signal present in the collected data. The maximum likelihood signal extraction uses 2-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs) to characterize the anticipated variations in dark matter interaction rates for given observable nuclear recoil energies during differing periods of the Earth's annual orbit around the Sun. Cosmogenic and primordial radioactivity backgrounds are characterized by their energy signatures and in some cases decay half-lives. A third parameterizing variable -- pulse rise-time -- is added to the likelihood analysis to characterize slow rising pulses described in prior analyses. The contribution to each event category is analyzed for various dark matter signal hypotheses including a dark matter standard halo model and a case with free oscillation parameters (i.e., amplitude, period, and phase). The best-fit dark matter signal is in close proximity to previously reported results. We find that the significance of the extracted dark matter signal remains well below evidentiary at 1.7 $\\sigma$.

  19. The ocean’s role in the transient response of climate to abrupt greenhouse gas forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffery R.

    We study the role of the ocean in setting the patterns and timescale of the transient response of the climate to anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing. A novel framework is set out which involves integration of an ocean-only ...

  20. Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean about 100 m). Because of correlations between errors, the export production becomes significant when cycling; 4863 Oceanography: Biological and Chemical: Sedimentation; KEYWORDS: export production, nutrient

  1. On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Joseph L

    2009-01-01

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

  2. Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Forest

    2011-04-26

    Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  3. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll...

  4. Observations: Oceanic Climate Change and Sea Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Changes ............. 402 5.4 Ocean Biogeochemical Changes ................... 403 5.4.1 Introduction ......................................................... 403 5.4.2 Carbon................................................................. 403 5.4.3 Oxygen

  5. Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information AreaCounty LandfillLtd JumpOcean

  6. ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimate inMakingMovingOcean

  7. Ocean Sci., 6, 775787, 2010 www.ocean-sci.net/6/775/2010/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Pacific Ocean F. M. Bingham1, G. R. Foltz2, and M. J. McPhaden3 1Center for Marine Science, Univ. of North salinity (SLS) is examined in the Pacific Ocean between 40 S and 60 N using a variety of data sourcesOcean Sci., 6, 775­787, 2010 www.ocean-sci.net/6/775/2010/ doi:10.5194/os-6-775-2010 © Author

  8. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  9. Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

  10. 2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

  11. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  12. Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

  13. TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

  14. DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Amit

    DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL developed to automatically detect, locate and track mesoscale eddies spatially and temporally. Using an invaluable tool to assess mesoscale oceanic features. Key Words ­ Scientific Visualization, Eddy Detection

  15. Global self-weighted and local quasi-maximum exponential likelihood estimators for ARMA--GARCH/IGARCH models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ke; 10.1214/11-AOS895

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the asymptotic theory of the quasi-maximum exponential likelihood estimators (QMELE) for ARMA--GARCH models. Under only a fractional moment condition, the strong consistency and the asymptotic normality of the global self-weighted QMELE are obtained. Based on this self-weighted QMELE, the local QMELE is showed to be asymptotically normal for the ARMA model with GARCH (finite variance) and IGARCH errors. A formal comparison of two estimators is given for some cases. A simulation study is carried out to assess the performance of these estimators, and a real example on the world crude oil price is given.

  16. Physics Problems for the Future of Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    --graphics, movies! #12;Recent Worries of Ocean Modeling Mesoscale eddies and boundary currents-- resolving;Recent Worries of Ocean Modeling Mesoscale eddies and boundary currents-- resolving the deformation) #12;Recent Worries of Ocean Modeling Mesoscale eddies and boundary currents-- resolving

  17. Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

  18. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large will unavoidably affect pelagic fish... ­ Noise and water pollution ­ FAD effects ­ Entrainment and Impingement

  19. ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    to Program Outcomes Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 4: OceanORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation Offshore Engineering Required Course. Design of Ocean Structures. Design process, project planning, materials selection, 6. economic analysis

  20. ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORE 630 Structural Analysis in Ocean Engineering Designation Offshore Engineering Required Course Catalog Description Structural and finite element analyses, and design of ocean structures to withstand analysis, finite element analysis, and their application in ocean structure design. Topics Covered 1

  1. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat...

  2. Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas Smith

    2013-01-01

    2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

  3. Assessing uncertainty in models of the ocean carbon cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I explore the effect of parameter uncertainty in ocean biogeochemical models on the calculation of carbon uptake by the ocean. The ocean currently absorbs around a quarter of the annual anthropogenic CO2 ...

  4. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  5. Remote Sensing the Ocean Sarah Gille

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    ×1021 J in 50 years = 50 TW) roughly quadru- ple current energy usage by people (13 TW). #12;Global ocean- ple current energy usage by people (13 TW). · Energy added to top 700 m of ocean equivalent to about 2 Radiation http://www.uwsp.edu/geo/faculty/ritter/geog101/textbook/energy/global patterns of heat transfer

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS, this source should be appropriately acknowledged. Ocean Drilling Program Scientific Prospectus No. 102 Publications homepage on the World Wide Web at: http://www-odp.tamu.edu/publications This publication

  7. Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy the deployment of CO2 storage technologies used in the marine environment. This paper will address some of the legal issues involved in ocean storage of carbon dioxide from a US perspective. The following paragraphs

  8. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

  10. LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  15. Oceans and Climate Change Peter Rhines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , animals, atmosphere and ocean ... totally isolated except for an energy source: the sun #12;The value of the Atlantic circulation (kinetic energy density) from altimetry satellites #12;Oceans and the Global) Daphnia (water flea) Duckweed (floating water lens) #12;#12;#12;microcosm: a sealed flask with plants

  16. Vertical mixing and the ocean circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Changing sources of mixing Hurricanes Tidal dissipation 2 #12;Zonal Mean Ocean Temperature 3 #12;Sandström's Theorem A circulation cannot be driven unless heat is input at a lower depth than it is lost in the ocean? Wind-driven stirring Tidal generation of internal waves Biota Hurricanes Nasa 6 #12;Sources

  17. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01

    forecast models requires a thorough understanding of the upper ocean thermodynamic response to wind andforecasts of hurricane intensity A Supplementary Formulae A.l W i n d Stress Windforecast models. This thesis investigates several aspects of the ocean's response to strong wind

  18. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  19. What is the Ocean Like off Oregon?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    meters. The sampling grid was reminiscent of the more ambitious CalCOFI survey grid off California, begunWhat is the Ocean Like off Oregon? Exploring, Monitoring, and Understanding the Northern California g o 76 Introduction The dynamic, ever-changing ocean off Oregon is home to a rich, productive

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 122 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Suzanne O Connell Staff Scientist, Leg 122 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Francais de Recherche pour 1'Exploitation de la Mer (France) Ocean, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jay Miller Staff Scientist, Leg 158 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A/Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any

  2. A predictive ocean oil spill model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D.; Papodopoulos, P.; Schaudt, K.; Szabo, D.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

  3. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  4. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United...

  5. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of...

  6. Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

    2007-01-01

    during production from the Class 3 oceanic hydrate depositProduction From Oceanic Class 3 Hydrate Accumulations GeorgeAccumulations Houston, Texas, Class 3 May 2007. presented,

  7. Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources Memorandum of Understanding On...

  8. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  9. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and...

  10. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of...

  11. Application of asymptotic expansions for maximum likelihood estimators errors to gravitational waves from binary mergers: The single interferometer case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanolin, M.; Vitale, S.; Makris, N.

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we apply to gravitational waves (GW) from the inspiral phase of binary systems a recently derived frequentist methodology to calculate analytically the error for a maximum likelihood estimate of physical parameters. We use expansions of the covariance and the bias of a maximum likelihood estimate in terms of inverse powers of the signal-to-noise ration (SNR)s where the square root of the first order in the covariance expansion is the Cramer Rao lower bound (CRLB). We evaluate the expansions, for the first time, for GW signals in noises of GW interferometers. The examples are limited to a single, optimally oriented, interferometer. We also compare the error estimates using the first two orders of the expansions with existing numerical Monte Carlo simulations. The first two orders of the covariance allow us to get error predictions closer to what is observed in numerical simulations than the CRLB. The methodology also predicts a necessary SNR to approximate the error with the CRLB and provides new insight on the relationship between waveform properties, SNR, dimension of the parameter space and estimation errors. For example the timing match filtering can achieve the CRLB only if the SNR is larger than the Kurtosis of the gravitational wave spectrum and the necessary SNR is much larger if other physical parameters are also unknown.

  12. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glein, Christopher; Waite, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to obtain a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model indicates that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ~11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by clays and carbonates on the ocean floor. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecule...

  13. Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Measuring the Kuroshio Current with ocean acoustic tomography Naokazu Taniguchia) Graduate School 29 April 2013) Ocean current profiling using ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was conducted proportional to temperature) and current in the ocean (Munk et al., 1995). Other than coastal sea studies (e

  14. Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone Soup Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in the Ocean Drilling Program Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 13 Compiled by Elizabeth A. Heise Ocean Drilling Program Texas A orpersonalresearchpurposes; however,republicationof any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling

  15. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  16. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  17. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  18. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  19. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION FISCAL YEAR 2008 ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM UNITED STATES IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION CONSORTIUM FOR OCEAN LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION CONTRACT OCE-0352500 1 OCTOBER 2007­30 SEPTEMBER 2008 #12;INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ii

  20. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  1. The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    between the solid Earth, oceans and biosphere, both full penetration across the Moho and shallow targeted1 The Ocean Lithosphere: A Fundamental Component of the Earth System Damon Teagle1 , Natsue Abe2 formation at mid-ocean ridges, to its recycling in subduction zones, the oceanic lithosphere serves

  2. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean WEALTH FROM OCEANS FLAGSHIP Jock of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY3 | Thunnus tonggol Thunnus obesus Thunnus albacares Thunnus of the Southwest Pacific Ocean| JWY4 | Species SCA DR SIA SFA Thunnus alalunga + + + 0 Thunnus albacares + + + 0

  3. Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean C. L. Sabine,1 R. A. Feely,2 R. M. Key,3 J] This work presents an estimate of anthropogenic CO2 in the Pacific Ocean based on measurements from the WOCE tracers; 9355 Information Related to Geographic Region: Pacific Ocean; KEYWORDS: Pacific Ocean

  4. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint....................................................................................................................26 Organizational Chart Organizational Chart

  5. Basin Resonances in the Equatorial Indian Ocean WEIQING HAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Basin Resonances in the Equatorial Indian Ocean WEIQING HAN Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic, LOCEAN, Paris, France BENE´ T DUNCAN Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University in the equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) interact to form basin resonances at the semiannual (180 day) and 90-day periods

  6. Antarctic ice sheet fertilises the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Death, R.

    Southern Ocean (SO) marine primary productivity (PP) is strongly influenced by the availability of iron in surface waters, which is thought to exert a significant control upon atmospheric CO2 concentrations on glacial/interglacial ...

  7. Climate Prediction: The Limits of Ocean Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter H.

    We identify three major areas of ignorance which limit predictability in current ocean GCMs. One is the very crude representation of subgrid-scale mixing processes. These processes are parameterized with coefficients whose ...

  8. Ocean fertilization : ecological cure or calamity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogilvie, Megan Jacqueline, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    The late John Martin demonstrated the paramount importance of iron for microscopic plant growth in large areas of the world's oceans. Iron, he hypothesized, was the nutrient that limited green life in seawater. Over twenty ...

  9. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

  10. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

  11. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  12. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 198 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (successors to the Planning Committee) and the Pollution Prevention and Safety Panel. Technical Editor: Karen thermal maximum, the mid-Maastrichtian deep-water event, and the early Aptian Oceanic Anoxic Event

  14. Ocean Fertilization: Science, Policy, and Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Aaron L.

    Over the past 20 years there has been growing interest in the concept of fertilizing the ocean with iron to abate global warming. This interest was catalyzed by basic scientific experiments showing that iron limits primary ...

  15. Oceans Community Letter April 6, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Understanding upper-ocean dynamics, chemistry, and biology is critical to understanding the Earth system over 28 million U.S. jobs; U.S. consumers spend over $55 billion annually for fishery products

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 115 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 115 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MASCARENE PLATEAU - CARBONATE DISSOLUTION

  17. Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Shylesh

    2012-01-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 156 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 156 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHERN BARBADOS RIDGE Dr. Tom Shipley Dr The main objectives of the northern Barbados Ridge ODP Leg 156 are to examine the rates, effects

  19. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem

  20. Ocean fronts trigger high latitude phytoplankton blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    Density fronts are ubiquitous features of the upper ocean. Here, numerical simulations show that restratification at fronts inhibits vertical mixing, triggering phytoplankton blooms in low-light conditions. The stability ...

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 112 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut coast. The interplay of wind regime, oceanic circulation and biological productivity result

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis E. Garrison Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Operations Louis E. Garrison Deputy Director ODP/TAMU July 1985 #12;Material in this publication may

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 193 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Chief Scientist CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining P.O. Box 136, North Ryde NSW 2113 Australia Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for Ocean Drilling (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Iceland

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 127 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français, Iceland, Italy, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions (Geochemisches Institut, Goldschmidtstr. 1, D-3400 Gottingen, Federal Republic of Germany) Charlotte A. Brunner

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 158 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 158 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français de Recherche pour 1, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings, and conclusions

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Francais de Recherche pour I1 Exploitation de la Mer (France) Ocean, Switzerland and Turkey) Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed (Geologisches Institut, Universitat Tubingen, Tubingen, Federal Republic of Germany) Blanc, Gerard (Laboratorie

  7. Stylistic control of ocean water simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Root, Christopher Wayne

    2009-05-15

    This thesis presents a new method for controlling the look of an ocean water simulation for the purpose of creating cartoon-styled fluid animations. Two popular techniques to simulate fluid, a statistical height field ...

  8. Corals and Ocean Acidification: Insights on Reef Community Development and Coral Calcification in an Acidified Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crook, Elizabeth Derse

    2015-01-01

    reefs under rapid climate change and ocean acidification.concentrations. Nature Climate Change, 1:165-169. Fine M,extinction risk from climate change and local impacts.

  9. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  10. What is the skill of ocean tracers in reducing uncertainties about ocean diapycnal mixing and projections of the Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) structural errors in current Earth system models and (2) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean

  11. The Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the El Niño/La Niña cycle in the Pacific Ocean and how it impacts the climate of the Southeast UThe Cold Dark Ocean This talk will help younger students understand that most of the ocean is an expansive cold dark abyss. The concepts of solar heating of the ocean surface and effects of temperature

  12. Ocean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN AND WHIT G. ANDERSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    shortwave penetration in the high-latitude Southern Ocean causes an increase in the formation of mode waterOcean Water Clarity and the Ocean General Circulation in a Coupled Climate Model ANAND GNANADESIKAN Jersey (Manuscript received 11 October 2007, in final form 17 July 2008) ABSTRACT Ocean water clarity

  13. Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penetration of UV-visible solar radiation in the global oceans: Insights from ocean color remote 2013. [1] Penetration of solar radiation in the ocean is determined by the attenuation coefficient (Kd indicated that the penetration of the blue-green radiation for most oceanic waters is $30­40% deeper than

  14. A synthesis of marine predator migrations, distribution, species overlap, and use of Pacific Ocean Exclusive Economic Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Autumn-Lynn

    2012-01-01

    North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .month in the North Pacific Ocean . . . . . . . . . . . .tracked in the Pacific Ocean during 2002-2009. Adapted from

  15. COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR TOPOGRAPHY (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell) Introduction This lecture is the development of the lithospheric cooling problem. For researchers in the areas important thermal boundary layer which is at the core-mantle boundary. As the lithosphere cools it becomes

  16. Ocean Sci., 5, 115139, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/115/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Ekman layers in the Southern to remove energy from the system by other means than shear-induced dissipation. How- ever, the Ekman depth is believed to be a primary location of surface ocean mixing as a result of wind energy input

  17. It's DE-licious: a recipe for differential expression analyses of RNA-seq experiments using quasi-likelihood methods in edgeR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    ] and because the quasi-likelihood functions provide more robust and reliable error rate control when the number the mouse mammary gland [3]. edgeR, Rsubread and other packages used in this article are publicly available for library-specific biases. We also give a brief introduction to the statistical

  18. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

  19. A Spatial Deconvolution of Molecular Signals in Oceanic Dissolved Organic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis B

    2008-01-01

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,central equatorial Pacific Ocean, 1992: Daily and finescale

  20. Effect of ocean mesoscale variability on the mean state of tropical Atlantic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, H; Jochum, M; Murtugudde, R; Miller, A J

    2006-01-01

    Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean State ofthe effect of oceanic mesoscale features on the mean climatemodel, resolving oceanic mesoscale variability leads to a

  1. A spatial deconvolution of molecular signals in oceanic dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meador, Travis Blake

    2008-01-01

    subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 47: 1595-the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D. ,in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 388: Karl, D;

  2. Eddy correlation measurements of the air/sea flux of dimethylsulfide over the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    radon over the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , 6,in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (1982 to 1996): Evidence ofover the northeast Pacific Ocean, J. Atmos. Chem. , Bates,

  3. Module for the Ocean Environment Prepared for the NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Regional Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................ 11 3.4 North Pacific Ocean ............................................................................................................................ 19 4.1.3. North Pacific Ocean ............................................................................................................................ 25 4.2.3. North Pacific Ocean

  4. Intermediate-depth circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans measured by autonomous floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Russ E

    2005-01-01

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomousthe tropical and South Pacific Ocean and 228 were deployed

  5. A powerful likelihood method for the analysis of linkage disequilibrium between trait loci and one or more polymorphic marker loci

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, J.D. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01

    Historically, most methods for detecting linkage disequilibrium were designed for use with diallelic marker loci, for which the analysis is straightforward. With the advent of polymorphic markers with many alleles, the normal approach to their analysis has been either to extend the methodology for two-allele systems (leading to an increase in df and to a corresponding loss of power) or to select the allele believed to be associated and then collapse the other alleles, reducing, in a biased way, the locus to a diallelic system. I propose a likelihood-based approach to testing for linkage disequilibrium, an approach that becomes more conservative as the number of alleles increases, and as the number of markers considered jointly increases in a multipoint test for linkage disequilibrium, while maintaining high power. Properties of this method for detecting associations and fine mapping the location of disease traits are investigated. It is found to be, in general, more powerful than conventional methods, and it provides a tractable framework for the fine mapping of new disease loci. Application to the cystic fibrosis data of Kerem et al. is included to illustrate the method. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Comparison of wind stress algorithms, datasets and oceanic power input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Shaoyu

    2009-01-01

    If the ocean is in a statistically steady state, energy balance is a strong constraint, suggesting that the energy input into the world ocean is dissipated simultaneously at the same rate. Energy conservation is one of the ...

  7. Decoding Ancient Ocean Acidification Signals from Plankton Shells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a measure of ancient ocean pH and adds confidence to its use in reconstructing ocean and atmospheric chemistry, as well as past climate change. The measurements also revealed...

  8. Ernest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) and document imaging and workflow processing system (Nolij); developed data warehouse queries; identifiedErnest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty Research Assistant Conduct

  9. Variability of the Indo-Pacific Ocean exchanges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    The ECCO–GODAE global estimate of the ocean circulation 1992–2007 is analyzed in the region of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), including the Southern Ocean flow south of Australia. General characteristics are an intense ...

  10. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    Isolating Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere in the KuroshioSST coupler . . . . Chapter 3 Mesoscale Ocean-Atmosphere4.2 Impact of Mesoscale SST on Precipitation Chapter 4 vi

  11. High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

    2006-01-01

    of enhanced carbon biomass and export at 55 degrees S duringM. , 2001. Upper ocean export of particulate organic carbonedge dynamics on production and export in the Southern Ocean

  12. Global isotopic signatures of oceanic island basalts / by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oschmann, Lynn A

    1991-01-01

    Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic analyses of 477 samples representing 30 islands or island groups, 3 seamounts or seamount chains, 2 oceanic ridges and 1 oceanic plateau [for a total of 36 geographic features] are compiled to form ...

  13. Earthquake behavior and structure of oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland, Emily Carlson

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic transform faults that accommodate strain at mid-ocean ridge offsets represent a unique environment for studying fault mechanics. Here, I use seismic observations and models to explore how fault structure affects ...

  14. U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Coastal Data Area Network) Project Description: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA consists of four separate components, an administrative local area network (LAN) component; a public access

  15. A relocatable ocean model in support of environmental emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominicis, Michela De

    During the Costa Concordia emergency case, regional, subregional, and relocatable ocean models have been used together with the oil spill model, MEDSLIK-II, to provide ocean currents forecasts, possible oil spill scenarios, ...

  16. UPDATE ON THE INTERNATIONAL EXPERIMENT ON CO2 OCEAN SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discussed strategies for ocean carbon sequestration are direct injection of CO2 into the deep ocean and iron effort is solely focused on the direct injection approach. In this method, liquid CO2 is injected

  17. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc. Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic Institutions ........................................................................................................... 6 1.2.1. Lead Agency Guidance: Platform Operating Costs vs. Science Operating Costs.............. 6

  18. Ocean and Plume Science Management Uncertainties, Questions and Potential Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in large woody debris (LWD) inputs and LWD density in the estuary, plume and near ocean influenced salmonid

  19. Adaptive Path Planning for Autonomous UAV Oceanic Search Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean is a growing problem for wildlife.1,2 The biggest threat comes from abandoned fishing nets which

  20. Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The company is working to develop a system to produce electricity using temperature differences in the ocean.

  1. Seabird associations with mesoscale eddies: the subtropical Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyrenbach, KD; Veit, RR; Weimerskirch, H; Jr, HGL

    2006-01-01

    Seabird associations with mesoscale eddies: the subtropicalsur- hydrographic fronts and mesoscale eddies (Haney & veyedclimatologies. J Clim mesoscale variability across ocean

  2. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint ..................................................................................................................................21 Organizational Chart ...........................................................................................................30 Organizational Chart

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 116 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean Drilling in the world, extending some 3000 km from the slope south of the Bengal delta to merge with the Sri Lanka

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 181 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 181 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHWEST PACIFIC GATEWAYS Dr. Robert M acknowledgment of this source. Scientific Prospectus No. 81 First Printing 1998 Distribution Electronic copies of this publication may be obtained from the ODP Publications Home Page on the World Wide Web at http

  5. Ocean Observing System Simulation Experiments at AOML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    criteria and rigorous validation methods developed for atmospheric OSSE systems* · Partnership with CIMAS The system has been rigorously validated to demonstrate that credible impact assessments are obtained without: Improve ocean analyses and forecasts for two applications · Predict transport and dispersion of oil spills

  6. Ocean Acidification: The Other CO2 Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childress, Michael J.

    reserved 1941-1405/09/0115-0169$20.00 Key Words biogeochemistry, calcification, carbon dioxide, climate of calcium carbonate saturation states, which impacts shell-forming marine organisms from plankton to benthic for marine organisms to adapt to increasing CO2 and broader implications for ocean ecosystems are not well

  7. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 146 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at two sites to determine its nature and whether free gas is present beneath it. At all drill site Program (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden Science Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research

  8. MFR PAPER 1174 Monitoring the Ocean Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1174 Monitoring the Ocean Environment L. E. EBER INTRODUCTION Atmospheric purposes of monitoring the marine environment are to collect synoptic observations adequate for in and oceanographic conditions in the vicinity of the sea sur- face have historically been monitored by mariners

  9. Diagnosis of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy Tracer Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    Diagnosis of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy Tracer Fluxes Baylor Fox-Kemper U. Colorado-Boulder, with Scott - 10,000 km, yrs->centuries) => resolved · Mesoscale variability (10 - 100 km, mo -> yrs) => resolved) => parameterized Boundary Layer Models Mesoscale resolving models Climate models Submesoscale variability Coupling

  10. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 05: 31 December 2014 Prepared Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  11. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 04: 30 September 2014 Prepared Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  12. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 30 January 2014 Prepared for: NOAA IOOS Association Coastal Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012 and ADCP assets lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality

  13. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 01: 30 April 2014 Prepared for Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand due to emerging economies like China, India, and Brazil. Coal and natural gas resources 7296 OOcean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean the OTEC plant. The difference between gross power and in-plant power consumption needed to run all sweater

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drilling Program, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3469, as well as appropriateOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE KANE FRACTURE ZONE Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of GermanyOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 PRELIMINARY REPORT CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Roland Schlich Co

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 114 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 114 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SUBANTARCTIC SOUTH ATLANTIC Dr. John L. La

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 101 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institutions, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 101 PRELIMINARY REPORT BAHAMAS James A. Austin, Jr. Co-Chief Scientist

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of GermanyOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS GALICIA BANK Gilbert Boillot Edward L

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DSDP HOLE 504B REVISITED Keir Becker

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 102PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of GermanyOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 102PRELIMINARY REPORT SITE 418A: DOWNHOLE MEASUREMENTS IN OLDOCEANIC

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institutions, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 103 PRELIMINARY REPORT GALICIA MARGIN Gilbert Boillot Edward L. Winterer

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 121 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) DeutscheOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 121 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BROKEN RIDGE / NINETYEAST RIDGE Dr. John

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 102 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institutions, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgeitieinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 102 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DOWNHOLE MEASUREMENTS IN THE WESTERN ATLANTIC

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract with the National Science Foundation. Funding for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of EnergyOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE

  7. INTRODUCTION Although accretion of oceanic sediments and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    an Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) well, Site 841 (Fig. 1), located on the middle slope of the Tonga forearc- mental stage in the Wilson cycle. In this paper, we present sedimentary and struc- tural data from vol- canics at ODP Site 841 (Shipboard Scientific Party, 1992), as well as on the islands of 'Eua

  8. Mid-ocean microseisms Peter D. Bromirski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    , and the Hawaiian Islands appear to be a significant source of LPDF energy in the North Pacific when waves arrive peak, is caused by ocean wave energy couplin Sciences and Technology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA (fkd@hawaii.edu) Ralph A

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas-water paleoceanography with those of the zonal and meridional paleo-wind circulation. OBJECTIVES The eleven oroposed

  10. www.hboi.fau.edu Ocean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    , in collaboration with FAU colleagues from the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC) led abundant marine energy resources, especially the Gulf Stream. The project dates back to 2007, when day find their lives enriched by the energy extracted by technology they helped to develop. Ocean

  11. Exploring the Deep... Ocean-Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    and the transfer of energy among these systems. Global energy balance The Sun is the primary source of energy), and biosphere (living organisms) that are driven by solar energy. The ocean and the atmosphere have the greatest on the others. To fully understand the dynamics of our climate, we must examine the global energy balance

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 177 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremerhaven Germany Dr. David Hodell Co-Chief Scientist Department of Geology University of Florida 1112/Canada/Chinese Taipei/Korea Consortium for Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) People

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 157 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vulkanologie und Pétrologie GEOMAR Research Center Wischhofstrasse 1-3 D-24148 Kiel Federal Republic of Germany/Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, Greece, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 154 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any, Federal Republic of Germany) William P. Chaisson (290 Laburnam Crescent, Rochester, New York 14620, U

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 151 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOMAR Wischhofstrasse 1-3, Gebàude 4 D-2300 Kiel 14 Federal Republic of Germany Dr. John Firth Staff/Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, Greece, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 162 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any, Germany; E-mail: khb@mail.sedpal.uni-bremen.de) Viviane Bout-Roumazeilles, Sedimentologist (Laboratoire de

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 144 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, Greece, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any Università^ Kiel, D-2300 Kiel-14, Germany) Bj0rn Buchardt (Department of Geology, University of Copenhagen, 0

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 157 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Republic of Germany United Kingdom Dr. John Firth Staff Scientist, Leg 157 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Francais de Recherche pour 1'Exploitation de la Mer (France, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 161 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D-24148 Kiel 18002 Granada Federal Republic of Germany Spain Dr. Adam Klaus Staff Scientist, Leg 161/Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, Greece, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 141 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    345 Middlefield Road Federal Republic of Germany Menlo Park, California 94025 Dr. Robert Musgrave Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean Drilling, Switzerland, and Turkey) Institut Français de Recherche pour TExploitation de la Mer (France) National Science

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 175 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Universität Bremen Postfach 33 04 40 D-28334 Bremen Germany Dr. Carl Richter Staff Scientist, Leg 175 Ocean Drilling Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français de Recherche pour, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings, and conclusions

  2. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 124 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannover Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Eli Silver Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 124 Department of Earth (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Francais de Recherche pour I1 Exploitation de la Mer (France) Ocean, Switzerland and Turkey) Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 151 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOMAR N-0316, Oslo 3 Wischhofstrasse 1-3, Gebáude 4 Norway D-24148 Kiel 14 Federal Republic of Germany/Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Greece, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 138 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) European Science, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Institut Français de Recherche pour 1-2300 Kiel, Federal Republic of Germany) John Farrell (Department of Geological Sciences, Brown

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 166 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions of Germany, E-mail: betzler@em.uni-frankfurt.d400.de) Beth A. Christensen, Stratigraphic Correlator, (Dept

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senckenbergstraße 3 6300 Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Francais de Recherche pour 1'Exploitation de la Mer (France, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed

  7. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 133 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Australia Consortium for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any für Geologie und Palàontologie, Sigwarstr. 10, D-7400 Tubingen, Federal Republic of Germany) Thomas C

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 160 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Germany Dr. Alastair Robertson Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 160 Grant Institute of Geology University for the Ocean Drilling Program Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany) Institut Français, Iceland, Italy, Greece, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any opinions

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 131 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Australia Consortium for the Ocean DrillingProgram Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Iceland, Italy, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey) Any, Stilleweg 2, D- 3000 Hannover 51, Federal Republic of Germany) Warner Brückmann (GEOMAR-Center for Marine

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Federal Republic of Germany Federal Republic of Germany Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A fi M-Chief Scientist (Geologisch- Palaeontologisches Institut, Universitaet Kiel, Kiel, Federal Republic of Germany

  11. Deepest Ocean Borehole to Plumb Earthquakes, Tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Deepest Ocean Borehole to Plumb Earthquakes, Tsunamis A grand challenge for Earth Sciences in devastating effects on heavily populated coastal areas from both ground shaking and tsunami. Robert Harris great earthquakes and tsunamis occur. Through Harris, COAS is involved in making fundamental temperature

  12. Ocean Sci., 10, 281322, 2014 www.ocean-sci.net/10/281/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    (s) 2014. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science OpenAccess Physical forcing and physical 28020, Spain 15Department of Solar Energy & Environmental Physics, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes

  13. Lost and Found: Mathematically Locating Ocean Downed Aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Abstract Given the vast size of the Earth's oceans, and the dynamics of their currents, any attempt to give the effects of the ocean's currents on the fuselage at the crash site, and 4) apply Bayesian search methods the effects of ocean currents on the fuselage to determine a maximum drift. Accordingly, our model will give

  14. A dynamical picture of the oceanic tides Eugene I. Butikova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    of the oceans, the actual system that responds with tides and tidal currents to the well-known tideA dynamical picture of the oceanic tides Eugene I. Butikova) Department of Physics, St. Petersburg waves. To clarify the underlying physics, we use a simple model of the ocean that consists of a water

  15. NOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the oceans, coastal waters, and estuaries. investigating their currents, the structure and con- toursNOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic, Atmospheric, and Environmental Activities NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, cele- brated its fifth anniversary 3

  16. HEAT STORAGE AND ADVECTION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    HEAT STORAGE AND ADVECTION IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE maintaining the seasonal heat storage in the 0 to 250 meter surface layer of the North Pacific Ocean. Approximately 140,000 bathy- thermograph observations taken in the Pacific Ocean from 10° South latitude to 70

  17. Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array The processes that shape. The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) will build a 25­30 year laboratory on the seafloor, in the water column, and at the ocean surface. It will make available novel platforms for oceanographic discovery

  18. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY10 Annual Report #12;Crane ball #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research program Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), programs that revolutionized our view

  19. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY09 Annual Report #12;Discrete core sampling #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), programs

  20. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY13 Annual Report #12;Tripping Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) monitored subseafloor environments and explored Earth's history Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), which revolutionized our view of Earth

  1. Toward an uncertainty budget for a coastal ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    budget for a coastal ocean model in a wind-forced regime are made, based on numerical simulations with knowledge only of the wind forcing, and no ocean data, for wind fields with these estimated errors it are of increasing interest. For the wind-forced Oregon coastal ocean regime, Kim et al. (2009) recently examined

  2. The HYCOM (HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model) data assimilative system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina, Rutgers, U. of South Florida, Fugro- GEOS, ROFFS, Orbimage, Shell, ExxonMobil. 0924-7963/$ - seeThe HYCOM (HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model) data assimilative system Eric P. Chassignet a,, Harley E and basin-scale ocean hindcast, nowcast, and prediction system in the context of the Global Ocean Data

  3. Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    6 Sediment permeability, distribution, and influence on fluxes in oceanic basement Glenn A. Spinelli, Emily R. Giambalvo, and Andrew T. Fisher 6.1 Introduction Sediments blanketing oceanic igneous basement rocks control the communication between fluid within the crust and the oceans. Seafloor sediments

  4. State of the Science FACT SHEET Ocean Acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research on changes in the ocean carbon chemistry and pH, impacts on major coastal and pelagic ecosystems generates as much as $30 billion per year and nearly 70,000 jobs. Healthy coral reefs are the foundation and hurricanes. What Are the Key Ocean Acidification Research Goals? · Monitor the changing ocean chemistry

  5. Implementation Plan for the Hybrid Ocean Modeling Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmosphere and cryosphere. The oceans operate in the climate system to transfer information (heat, saltImplementation Plan for the Hybrid Ocean Modeling Environment HOME R. Hallberg (NOAA/GFDL), A Recent advances in simulating the ocean through the use of generalized hybrid coordinate modeling

  6. Scholarly Paper Coupled Instability in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Scholarly Paper Coupled Instability in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Hua Chen Advisor: Raghu's a cycle or an event depends on the mean state of equatorial Pacific Ocean, which is influenced by mean problem in the equatorial Pacific ocean. The control run with a coupling coefficient 0.4 and relatively

  7. DEEP MAXIMA OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHLOROPHYLL IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEEP MAXIMA OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC CHLOROPHYLL IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN E. L. VENRICK, J. A. MCGOWAN, AND A Pacific Ocean show that during most of the year the maximum concentrations of chlorophyll occur below in the world's oceans. There are several thousands of these measurements in the Pacific. Most

  8. Extrapolating Oceanic Age Distributions: Lessons from the Pacific Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extrapolating Oceanic Age Distributions: Lessons from the Pacific Region David B. Rowley Department plate reconstructions. An area equal in size to the Pacific Basin oceanic lithosphere must-mail: rowley@geosci.uchicago.edu) A B S T R A C T Extrapolation of the age distribution of oceanic lithosphere

  9. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  10. Computational Studies of Three-Dimensional Ocean Sound Fields in Areas of Complex Seafloor Topography and Active Ocean Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duda, Timothy F.

    Time-evolving three-dimensional (four-dimensional) numerical modeling of sound is performed for ocean environmental conditions calculated using regional ocean flow models. The flow models solve the appropriate nonlinear ...

  11. Evolution of Anthropogenic Pb and Pb isotopes in the deep North Atlantic Ocean and the Indian Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong-Mi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    Pb and Pb isotopes in the ocean have varied on decadal to centennial time scales due to anthropogenic Pb inputs. Thus, tracing the temporal variation of Pb and Pb isotopes in the ocean provides information on the major ...

  12. Advanced geophysical studies of accretion of oceanic lithosphere in Mid-Ocean Ridges characterized by contrasting tectono-magmatic settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Min, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the oceanic lithosphere results from magmatic and extensional processes taking place at mid-ocean ridges (MORs). The temporal and spatial scales of the variability of these two processes control the degree ...

  13. Ocean heat transport in a Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA): structure, mechanisms, and impacts on climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yangxing

    2009-05-15

    Channel????????????????????????......... 112 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Importance of Ocean Heat Transport It has long been known that the sun distributes energy unequaly over the globe. Absorbed incoming shortwave radiation... stream_source_info ZHENG-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 190115 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ZHENG-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 OCEAN...

  14. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 1: Strategic summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    The proposed COPS (Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems) program is concerned with combining numerical models with observations (through data assimilation) to improve our predictive knowledge of the coastal ocean. It is oriented toward applied research and development and depends upon the continued pursuit of basic research in programs like COOP (Coastal Ocean Processes); i.e., to a significant degree it is involved with ``technology transfer`` from basic knowledge to operational and management applications. This predictive knowledge is intended to address a variety of societal problems: (1) ship routing, (2) trajectories for search and rescue operations, (3) oil spill trajectory simulations, (4) pollution assessments, (5) fisheries management guidance, (6) simulation of the coastal ocean`s response to climate variability, (7) calculation of sediment transport, (8) calculation of forces on structures, and so forth. The initial concern is with physical models and observations in order to provide a capability for the estimation of physical forces and transports in the coastal ocean. For all these applications, there are common needs for physical field estimates: waves, tides, currents, temperature, and salinity, including mixed layers, thermoclines, fronts, jets, etc. However, the intent is to work with biologists, chemists, and geologists in developing integrated multidisciplinary prediction systems as it becomes feasible to do so. From another perspective, by combining observations with models through data assimilation, a modern approach to monitoring is provided through whole-field estimation.

  15. 156 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 1997 The Structure of Ocean-Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    outfalls in the coastal ocean. In fact, surface current measurements have been used previously in several156 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 22, NO. 1, JANUARY 1997 The Structure of Ocean-Surface Currents Measured by Doppler Radar David A. Chin, Supraja Chinthamreddy, Lynn K. Shay, and Hans C. Graber

  16. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Faculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia transport. R. CENGIZ ERTEKIN Professor, PhD 1984, UC Berkeley. Hydrodynamics/elasticity, computational

  17. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  18. Search for Point Sources of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays Above 40 EeV Using a Maximum Likelihood Ratio Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye Collaboration; G. R. Farrar

    2004-12-23

    We present the results of a search for cosmic ray point sources at energies above 40 EeV in the combined data sets recorded by the AGASA and HiRes stereo experiments. The analysis is based on a maximum likelihood ratio test using the probability density function for each event rather than requiring an a priori choice of a fixed angular bin size. No statistically significant clustering of events consistent with a point source is found.

  19. Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

    1976-01-01

    and demolition debris Solid wastes 26 26 30 30 31 32 lii 1 i tary wastes. Radioactive wastes Disposal Methods. 32 32 34 Harges Containerized methods. Submarine outfalls CHASE. Indirect discharge . 40 44 Transport Mechanisms of iiaste... disposal of wastes is not a new idea, although it is only in recent years that this issue has received considerable attention. Man is concerned about the condition of the ocean because i+ is a valuable source of many resources from the marine environment...

  20. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  1. Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

  2. Oceanic stochastic parametrizations in a seasonal forecast system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrejczuk, M; Juricke, S; Palmer, T N; Weisheimer, A; Zanna, L

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of three stochastic parametrizations in the ocean component of a coupled model, on forecast reliability over seasonal timescales. The relative impacts of these schemes upon the ocean mean state and ensemble spread are analyzed. The oceanic variability induced by the atmospheric forcing of the coupled system is, in most regions, the major source of ensemble spread. The largest impact on spread and bias came from the Stochastically Perturbed Parametrization Tendency (SPPT) scheme - which has proven particularly effective in the atmosphere. The key regions affected are eddy-active regions, namely the western boundary currents and the Southern Ocean. However, unlike its impact in the atmosphere, SPPT in the ocean did not result in a significant decrease in forecast error. Whilst there are good grounds for implementing stochastic schemes in ocean models, our results suggest that they will have to be more sophisticated. Some suggestions for next-generation stochastic schemes are made.

  3. Sandia Energy - High-Fidelity Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean Renewable Power Company's (ORPC's) TidGen Turbine Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Computational...

  4. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator Southeastern...

  5. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer, Administrator, Bonneville...

  6. State-Ocean City Beach Erosion Control District (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Beach Erosion Control District constitutes part of the Ocean City shoreline. Land clearing, construction activity, or the construction or placement of permanent structures within the district is...

  7. Ocean Energy Technology Overview: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  8. Ecology, diversity and comparative genomics of oceanic cyanobacterial viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew Brian, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    The marine cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are numerically dominant primary producers in the oceans. Each genera consists of multiple physiologically and genetically distinct groups (termed "ecotypes" in ...

  9. Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications CX-004722: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Integration of Power Take-Off in VIVACE Ocean...

  10. SPOTL: Some Programs for Ocean-Tide Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of deep ocean tidal energy dissipation based onJ. H. (1973), Tidal patterns and energy balance in the Gulf

  11. Anthropogenic Lead Emissions in the Ocean: The Evolving Global Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong-Mi

    We review the current distribution of lead and lead isotopes in the ocean with regard to the evolving pattern of human emissions during the past decades and centuries.

  12. New Insights into Light in the Oceans Tommy Dickey, UCSB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    biogeochemistry (carbon dioxide) with optics c. Global climate change and ocean ecosystems #12;Fundamental Problem and apparent optical properties * Light absorption, scattering, polarization * Radiative transfer at air

  13. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ocean currents in the United States and the database created with that data. energyproductionoceancurrentsus.pdf More Documents & Publications Assessment of Energy Production...

  14. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t DClimateOcean and Sea

  15. Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon:Corp Jump to:India Renewables(RedirectedOcean

  16. Ocean Energy Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,Ocean Energy

  17. Ocean Flow Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,Ocean

  18. Ocean Prospect Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,OceanLtd Jump

  19. MHK Technologies/Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMI Combined EnergyOcean < MHK

  20. Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050EnermarGenerationMainsa InstalacionesMakai Ocean

  1. Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:InformationInformationOorja Protonics Jump to:Open Ocean Energy

  2. Improving the Ocean Initialization of Coupled HurricaneOcean Models Using Feature-Based Data Assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    oceanic features in the Gulf of Mexico, including the Loop Current (LC), Loop Current eddies [i.e., warm-assimilated" case, the LC, a single WCR, and a single CCR are assimilated into NAVOCEANO's Global Digitized to the depth of the 26°C isotherm. Assuming the AXBT profiles are truth, the TCHP rms error for the F-B SHA

  3. Ocean Sci., 5, 203217, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/203/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emile-Geay, Julien

    (i) and (iii) with en- hanced vertical mixing at depth. Geothermal heating and di- apycnal mixing the density structure that supports a geothermal circulation. For strong vertical mix- ing rates, geothermal is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Geothermal heating, diapycnal

  4. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK to waves and current, sediment transport, high pressure and temperature variations, and renewable energy methods, water wave mechanics, sediment transport. R. CENGIZ ERTEKIN Professor, PhD 1984, UC Berkeley

  5. Ocean Sci., 8, 10411054, 2012 www.ocean-sci.net/8/1041/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    southward along the African coast near 30­35 S (e.g. Warren and Speer, 1991; Speer et al., 1995; Zangenberg the African coast in the Cape Basin to then enter the Indian Ocean (Speer et al., 1995; Van Aken et al., 2004

  6. Ocean Sci., 5, 4758, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/47/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Hartmut

    under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Ocean Science Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K) balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition

  7. 2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and Interna onal Ocean Discovery Program from #12;22014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Introduc on At the end of each fiscal year, the Interna onal

  8. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01

    atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean: Spatial distribution,winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and

  9. Examining Management Issues for Incidentally Caught Species in Highly Migratory Species Fisheries in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Valerie Ann

    2014-01-01

    dynamics in the central Pacific Ocean, 1952- 1998. II. Afishing for tunas in the Pacific Ocean. Ecology and Societywestern and central north Pacific Ocean. ISC. 2013a. Stock

  10. In both climate states the changing oceanic heat con-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    circulations ­ regions that are normally dry become wet and vice versa. Also, during El Nino the at- mosphere, scientists have known that El Nino/La Nina change sea- sonal rainfall totals over many regions of the globe. What remains a mystery is whether El Nino/La Nina can impact the likelihood of an extreme rain event

  11. Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

  12. Methods for hydrographic data collection and use applied to infer biogeochemistry in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Brendan Rae

    2011-01-01

    Lima (2007), Enhanced CO 2 outgassing in the Southern OceanLima (2007), Enhanced CO 2 outgassing in the Southern OceanLima (2007), Enhanced CO2 outgassing in the Southern Ocean

  13. Overflows and upper ocean interactions : a mechanism for the Azores current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kida, Shinichiro

    2006-01-01

    The oceanic response to overflows is explored using a two-layer isopycnal model. Overflows are a major source of the dense water of the global deep ocean, originating from only a few marginal seas. They enter the open ocean ...

  14. Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomsovic, Steve

    Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: Internal wave fine structure 2004 Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted As acoustic waves propagate long ranges through the deep ocean, they are refracted by inhomogeneities

  15. n intriguing class of ocean-circulation pattern is that exhibiting a retroflec-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    , is the considerable `leakage' of water from the Indian Ocean into the upper kilometre of the Atlantic Ocean as a `valve' regulating the buoyancy of water in the upper kilometre of the South Atlantic Ocean and may

  16. Localization of Deep Water Formation: Role of Atmospheric Moisture Transport and Geometrical Constraints on Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    A series of coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice aquaplanet experiments is described in which topological constraints on ocean circulation are introduced to study the role of ocean circulation on the mean climate of the coupled ...

  17. Relative Roles of Climate Sensitivity and Forcing in Defining the Ocean Circulation Response to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffery R.

    The response of the ocean’s meridional overturning circulation (MOC) to increased greenhouse gas forcing is examined using a coupled model of intermediate complexity, including a dynamic 3D ocean subcomponent. Parameters ...

  18. On the role of wind driven ocean dynamics in tropical Atlantic variability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Meyre Pereira

    2006-08-16

    The response of the tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind stress forcing on seasonal and interannual time scales is examined using an ocean data assimilation product from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and an ocean general circulation...

  19. Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    Experiment (WOCE), vol. 2, Pacific Ocean DRAFT, edited by M.over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during SAGA 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics A

  20. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01

    eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean during the past 3 M.Y. ,in the western tropical Pacific Ocean in the Holocene epoch,eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271–

  1. Boundary scavenging in the Pacific Ocean: a comparison of 10Be and 231Pa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, RF; Lao, Y; Broecker, WS; Trumbore, SE; Hofmann, HJ; Wolfli, W

    1990-01-01

    sedi- ments of the Pacific Ocean, Geochim. Cosmochim. Actadust input to the North Pacific Ocean during the past 30,000rates within the Pacific Ocean, in: Dynamic Processes in the

  2. Sedimentary and mineral dust sources of dissolved iron to the world ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J. K; Braucher, O.

    2008-01-01

    of the tropi- cal Pacific Ocean II. Iron biogeochemistry,in the Northeast Pacific Ocean Gyre: Aerosols, iron, and theF. M. M. : The equatorial Pacific Ocean: Grazer-controlled

  3. Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurbrick, Cheryl Marie

    2014-01-01

    and North Central Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Res. Part II Top.Lead Within the Northwest Pacific Ocean Evidenced by Leadventilation flux of the Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 106(

  4. Lecture(s) 9 Slides from atmosphere-ocean lectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the required energy poleward. the atmosphere is a heat engine, with Hadley convection cells driven moisture: both the `sensible' and `latent' heat fuels the vigorous overturning of the cloud visible albedo and ice can insulate the ocean from the atmosphere above. When the ocean surface freezes

  5. Human Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Human Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate When: March 12, 2013, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm@usc.edu) by March 5, 2013 Morning Session: Ocean Health in a Changing Climate 9:30 - 10:00 Registration (coffee Health Index Lunch (Lunch will be provided) 12:30 - 1:45 Steve Lamy, USC The Geopolitics of Climate

  6. High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    1 High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan Lamont-Doherty of Earth Observatory based scatterometer instruments provide crucial surface wind measurements with high resolution over winds at high wind bands because these regions host the strongest wind fields at the ocean surface

  7. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between ? 0.2 and ? 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previousmore »studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds. « less

  8. CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN F. Williams A series of skipjack oceanography cruises is planned for two offshore areas in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean October 23 and arrived in Honolulu November 29; and the David Starr Jordan (Fishery-Oceanography C en t e

  9. OE 603: Oceanography for Ocean Engineers Fall Semester, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    OE 603: Oceanography for Ocean Engineers Fall Semester, 2006 Tues/Thurs 4:30-5:45 pm Holmes Hall Reading: "Ocean Circulation", The Open University (OC) "Oceanography: An Invitation to Marine Science Physical Oceanography: An Introduction", Pickard and Emery (PE) "Introductory Dynamical Oceanography", Pond

  10. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY11 Annual Report #12;Sunset aboard the JOIDES Resolution #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine as recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks. IODP builds upon the earlier successes of the Deep Sea Drilling

  11. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EAST PACIFIC RISE Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 124E ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 124E ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS PHILIPPINE SEA Michael A. Storms Supr. of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77840 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director ODP/TAMU- Barry W. Harding Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Louis

  13. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY12 Annual Report #12;Handling downhole tool string #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research in seafloor sediments and rocks. IODP builds upon the earlier successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP

  14. Input of 129 I into the western Pacific Ocean resulting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    Input of 129 I into the western Pacific Ocean resulting from the Fukushima nuclear event S. J characterization of the input of 129 I into the Pacific Ocean resulting from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident at the Fuku- shima Daiichi nuclear power plant that caused the release of radioactive elements

  15. Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effective low cost ocean observing system. This system was recently developed and deployed for offshore oil. The Fetch node was deployed in 550 feet of water to measure ocean temperature and pressure, and the Tsunami Observing Initiatives Pioneer Array. The Fetch will record pressure and temperatures at this site prior

  16. Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Global assessment of ocean carbon export by combining satellite observations and food-web models D Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia Abstract The export of organic carbon from cycle. Here we introduce a mechanistic assessment of the global ocean carbon export using satellite

  17. Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis E. Garrison Deputy Director #12;11 Material in this publication may be copied without restraint of This Handbook 1 B. The Ocean Drilling Program in Brief 1 C . JOI and JOIDES 3 D. National ODP Structures 4 E Submission 7 D. Scientific Participation in the Ocean Drilling Program 8 1. Selection Process for Co

  18. Biogeochemical Controls and Feedbacks on Ocean Primary Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkowski, Paul G.

    how oceanic biota responded to and affected natural climatic variability in the geological past flux and, in turn, affects nitrogen fixation and primary production in the oceans. The combination (1), almost all of the gas was produced through the photobiologically catalyzed oxida- tion

  19. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  20. Environmental Conditions for Ocean Drilling Program Operations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Conditions for Ocean Drilling Program Operations in the Weddell Sea and Sub Library. #12;ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS FOR OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 113 (WEDDELL SEA) AND LEG 114 (SUBANTARCTIC SOUTH ATLANTIC) PROPOSED DRILLING SCHEDULE: JANUARY-APRIL, 1987 MAY 30, 1986 HAN CHOI AMANDA

  1. Ocean energy projects may menace marine lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Ocean energy projects may menace marine migration lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com Published Monday, Dec. Scientists increasingly believe these marine creatures and others use the earth's magnetic fields to navigate vast distances. But as the search for green energy turns to the oceans, there are concerns that tidal

  2. Deep water properties, velocities, and dynamics over ocean trenches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Deep water properties, velocities, and dynamics over ocean trenches by Gregory C. Johnson1 ABSTRACT Observations of water properties and deep currents over several trenches in the Paci c Ocean central basins and modeled owing away from an eastern deep-water source (Warren, 1982) and toward an eastern deep-water sink

  3. Natural Radiocarbon Distribution in the Deep Ocean Katsumi MATSUMOTO1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumoto, Katsumi

    , World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), ocean ventilation, North Atlantic Deep Water, Antarctic Bottom Water, Circumpolar Deep Water, Pacific Deep Water, thermohaline circulation 1. INTRODUCTION Deep in the subtropical North Atlantic, revealed that much of the deep water is cold, and warm water is confined to a thin

  4. On zonal jets in oceans Balasubramanya T. Nadiga1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

    On zonal jets in oceans Balasubramanya T. Nadiga1 Received 26 January 2006; revised 29 March 2006 to the recently observed alternating zonal jets in oceans, the formation of these jets can be explained as due of alternating jets in Jovian atmospheres and two dimensional turbulence in zonally-periodic configurations

  5. TSUNAMI INUNDATION MAPPING FOR OCEAN CITY, MD NGDC DEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    TSUNAMI INUNDATION MAPPING FOR OCEAN CITY, MD NGDC DEM BY BABAK TEHRANIRAD, SAEIDEH BANIHASHEMI BY THE NATIONAL TSUNAMI HAZARD MITIGATION PROGRAM NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRANT NA10NWS4670010 CENTER FOR APPLIED COASTAL RESEARCH Ocean Engineering Laboratory University of Delaware Newark, Delaware 19716 #12;Tsunami

  6. Numerical Simulation of the December 26, 2004: Indian Ocean Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical Simulation of the December 26, 2004: Indian Ocean Tsunami J. Asavanant1, M. Ioualalen2, N. Kaewbanjak1, S. Grilli3, P. Watts4, and J. Kirby5 Abstract: The December 26, 2004 tsunami is one of the most devastating tsunami in recorded history. It was generated in the Indian Ocean off the western coast

  7. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface Abstract. A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model current. In order to analyze the eect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the ®rst one

  8. 21st century change in ocean response to climate forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar?elja, Stjepan

    2015-01-01

    Modeling globally averaged information on climate forcing from the land surface temperature data, the sea surface temperatures (SST) and the empirically determined relationship between the changes in SST and the turbulent diffusion of heat into the upper ocean demonstrates a consistent link. The modeling is accurate throughout the 20th century despite the different phases of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) or the strong divergence between land and ocean surface warming. It only fails during the last 15 years when SST drops well below the trend. The finding reinforces the view that slower global warming over the previous 15 years is not a caused by a negative phase of the IPO or by the variations in the upper ocean (top 700 m) warming but results from a change in the ocean behavior leading to increased heat transfer into the deeper ocean.

  9. Understanding the ocean carbon and sulfur cycles in the context of a variable ocean : a study of anthropogenic carbon storage and dimethylsulfide production in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Naomi Marcil

    2010-01-01

    Anthropogenic activity is rapidly changing the global climate through the emission of carbon dioxide. Ocean carbon and sulfur cycles have the potential to impact global climate directly and through feedback loops. Numerical ...

  10. Physical properties of upper oceanic crust: Ocean Drilling Program Hole 801C and the waning of hydrothermal circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Lewis J.

    alteration continues, at a decreasing rate, throughout the lifetime of oceanic crust. INDEX TERMS: 3015 Marine Geology and Geophysics: Heat flow (benthic) and hydrothermal processes; 7220 Seismology: Oceanic, decreased porosity and permeability, and oxidation of magnetic minerals [e.g., Jacobson, 1992]. Hydrothermal

  11. Accomplishments and future perspective of coastal ocean observing systems Coastal oceans are the most densely urbanized regions on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are the most densely urbanized regions on the planet with populations growing at rapid rate. In the near future as communities increasingly rely on the coastal ocean to provide additional sources of energy (wind, waves, oil, our ability to map and forecast the coastal ocean remains low. While certain areas are difficult

  12. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

  13. Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the oceanic plate south of Iceland from ocean bottom recorded Rayleigh waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilmann, Frederik

    Constraints on crustal and mantle structure of the oceanic plate south of Iceland from ocean bottom- drophones in the North Atlantic south of Iceland. During the deployment period we recorded clear Rayleigh curve is sensitive to the structure just south of Iceland (average plate age 33 Myr). Both dispersion

  14. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics AAAS Annual Meeting St. Louis Missouri February 19, 2006 Walter Craig McMaster University Tsunamis and ocean-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Introduction Tsunami waves are generated relatively often, from various

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  16. Tsunami recorded on the open ocean floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filloux, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    On March 14, 1979 a sizeable earth-quake (Ms-7.6 Richter scale) occurred on the continential shelf adjacent to S.W. Mexico, near Petatlan in the state of Guerrero. This earthquake generated a small tsunami that was recorded in deep water, 1000 km away, thus providing for the first time a glance at a tsunami traveling in the open ocean. The same sea floor pressure record displays conspicuous signals associated with vertical sea floor motions generated at the passage of the first Rayleight seismic wave, R1. Seismic and tsunami travel velocities are in agreement with our present understanding of the phenomena, and tsunami detectability in deep water is demonstrated to be well within present day state of the art in the design of sea floor pressure transducers. As calculations anticipate, the E.M. signals associated with the passage of the tsunami were too faint to be detected.

  17. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  18. Jets, mixing, and topography in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Emma Joan Douglas

    2013-11-12

    .3 The Southern Ocean in models The Southern Ocean has been represented in models with a range of complexities, from full Earth system models to simple 2D quasi-geostrophic models to 1D flux models. Due to computational restrictions, modern global circulation... models and earth system models are eddy-permitting, rather than eddy-resolving. This requires some parametrisation of eddy activity, as previously mentioned. Lee and Coward (2003) studied the Southern Ocean in the OCCAM model at 1/4? (eddy permitting...

  19. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    science, for analyzing current and anticipated uses of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes areas. Coastal) #12;4 Ocean Uses Assessments ­ Maps and analyzes current and likely future ocean uses by kindsNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAAStrategic

  20. Re-evaluating the general dynamic theory of oceanic island biogeography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbauer, Manuel Jonas; Dolos, Klara; Field, Richard; Reineking, Björn; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2013-01-01

    oceanic island biogeography integrates temporal changes in ecological circumstances with diversification processes, and has stimulated current

  1. How well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyland, Gary

    currents, attracting set, basin of attraction, almost-invariant set, Markov chain, transfer operator OceanHow well-connected is the surface of the global ocean? Gary Froyland,1 Robyn M. Stuart,1 and Erik dynamics of the ocean surface circulation is known to contain attracting regions such as the great oceanic

  2. Quaternary Science Reviews 20 (2001) 15611576 Millennial scale climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northwest North America based on radiolaria and pollen N.G. Pisiasa, *, A in the Northeast Pacific and the northwestern United States. 2. Study region 2.1. Ocean climate and biota.C. Mixa , L. Heusserb a College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 Ocean

  3. Closure of the global overturning circulation through the Indian, Pacific and Southern Oceans: schematics and transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    internal diapycnal transformation in the deep Indian and Pacific Oceans. All three northern-source Deep and Pacific Oceans; only 0.1 PW is gained at the surface in the Southern Ocean. Thus, while an adiabatic model full participation of the diffusive Indian and Pacific Oceans, with a basin-averaged diffusivity

  4. Effort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories Research Assitant, Institute of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Ocean

  5. For JCLI CCSM Special Issue The influence of sea ice on ocean heat uptake in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    and the rate of ocean heat uptake. The warming rate in response to increasing green- house gases in models CO2 are investigated with CCSM3: A deep warming below 500 m and extending down several kilometers in the Southern Ocean and warming in a 200-m layer just below the surface in the Arctic Ocean. Ocean heat uptake

  6. A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations by S. D of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations written by S. D. Bachman has been approved for the Department and Oceanic Sciences) A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy

  7. Separating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the atmosphere to the ocean on a similar time scale and that they penetrate into the ocean in a similar mannerSeparating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method M. Key Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA

  8. Evaluating the effect of interannual variations of surface chlorophyll on upper ocean temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of interactions between ocean biology, ocean dynamics, and irradiance penetration. The bulk of the essential]. The biota, in turn, modulate the penetration of solar radia- tion in the upper ocean and control, to some that the SST differences are not the result of the direct effect of ocean biota on light penetration. Rather

  9. Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

  10. Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 60, pp. 163 to 188, 2004 Pacific Ocean,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    163 Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 60, pp. 163 to 188, 2004 Keywords: Pacific Ocean, decadal. Decadal-Scale Climate and Ecosystem Interactions in the North Pacific Ocean ARTHUR J. MILLER 1 *, FEI CHAI variations in the Pacific Ocean wield a strong influence on the oceanic ecosystem. Two dominant patterns

  11. MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF PACIFIC OCEAN PERCH, SEBASTES ALUTUS, OFF WESTERN NORTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MORPHOMETRIC VARIATION OF PACIFIC OCEAN PERCH, SEBASTES ALUTUS, OFF WESTERN NORTH AMERICA JAY C. QUAST' ABSTRACT Pacific ocean perch. Sebastes alufus, vary in body form over the eastern Pacific Ocean be phenotypic. Pacific ocean perch, Sebastes alutus, a commer- cially important rockfish IScorpaenidae

  12. Recent Bottom Water Warming in the Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Recent Bottom Water Warming in the Pacific Ocean* GREGORY C. JOHNSON NOAA/Pacific Marine) ABSTRACT Decadal changes of abyssal temperature in the Pacific Ocean are analyzed using high-quality, full the source of bottom water for the Pacific Ocean, which enters the main deep basins of this ocean southeast

  13. ATOC/CHEM 5151 Problem 27 Oceanic Uptake of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    ATOC/CHEM 5151 ­ Problem 27 Oceanic Uptake of CO2 Answers will be posted Thursday, December 11, 2014 It is well known that as abundances of CO2 increase in the atmosphere, the pH of the oceans' of CO2 in the ocean begins with exchange between the atmosphere and ocean, a process that can be written

  14. JETS: intense circulations in atmospheres and ocean OC569c Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 JETS: intense circulations in atmospheres and ocean OC569c Spring 2008 Room 211 Ocean Teaching.ocean.washington.edu/research/gfd Outline a look at the extratropical jet stream with synoptic data: transport, energy, vertical structure or veering with height) the Hadley cell and its limited size oceanic jets and boundary currents Why

  15. Segmentation of mesoscale ocean surface dynamics using satellite SST and SSH observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Segmentation of mesoscale ocean surface dynamics using satellite SST and SSH observations Pierre about ocean circulation, espe- cially mesoscale ocean dynamics which may involve strong spatio- temporal to which mesoscale ocean dynamics may be decomposed into a mixture of dynamical modes, characterized

  16. Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Working Group 3) · Trophic ecology · Chemical indicators · Bioenergetics · Niche separation · Climate indicators Bioenergetics Niche separation Climate change 7 | Trophic understanding of tunas of the Southwest of tunas of the Southwest Pacific Ocean Trophic ecology Chemical indicators Bioenergetics Niche separation

  17. Mechanical and Acoustic Studies of Deep Ocean Glass Sphere Implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    Mechanical and Acoustic Studies of Deep Ocean Glass Sphere Implosions P. W. Gorham, M. Rosen, J. W of the dynamics and kinematics of the events. The mechanical forces on the ancillary mooring hardware during

  18. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22

    The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean�an expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean�s role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)�s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council�s Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation�s attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions�enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments becomes an imperative to address societal needs. Such a plan should be based upon known priorities and should be reviewed every 5-10 years to optimize the federal investment. The committee examined the past 20 years of technological advances and ocean infrastructure investments (such as the rise in use of self-propelled, uncrewed, underwater autonomous vehicles), assessed infrastructure that would be required to address future ocean research questions, and characterized ocean infrastructure trends for 2030. One conclusion was that ships will continue to be essential, especially because they provide a platform for enabling other infrastructure � autonomous and remotely operated vehicles; samplers and sensors; moorings and cabled systems; and perhaps most importantly, the human assets of scientists, technical staff, and students. A comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan should be implemented in order to retain access to the sea. The current report also calls for continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. The committee also provided a framework for prioritizing future investment in ocean infrastructure. They recommend that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit, with particular consideration given to usefulness for addressing important science questions; affordability, efficiency, and longevity; and ability to contribute to other missions or applications. These criteria are the foundation for prioritizing ocean research infrastructure investments by estimating

  19. 13.017 Design of Ocean Systems I, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consi, Thomas R., 1956-

    A two-semester subject sequence (of which this is the first half) that demonstrates the design process through its application to a working model-scale ocean system. Emphasis is on carrying out the design and implementation ...

  20. High order hybrid discontinuous Galerkin regional ocean modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2014-01-01

    Accurate modeling of physical and biogeochemical dynamics in coastal ocean regions is required for multiple scientific and societal applications, covering a wide range of time and space scales. However, in light of the ...

  1. On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Xiaoming

    The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using available observations, focusing on the role of the synoptically ...

  2. Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Sean J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hecht, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Petersen, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Strelitz, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maltrud, Mathew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hlawitschka, Mario [UC DAVIS; Hamann, Bernd [UC DAVIS

    2010-10-15

    Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

  3. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  4. Distribution of thiols in the northwest Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kading, Tristan James

    2013-01-01

    Thiol substances can form stable complexes with metals (especially copper and mercury) in the surface ocean that can impact cycling and bioavailability of those elements. In this study, I present seven concentration profiles ...

  5. Accelerated simulation of passive tracers in ocean circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    to be particularly powerful tools when combined with ocean general circulation models (GCMs). (See England and Maier's circulation, such as the poleward transport of heat, water mass transfor- mation and ventilation

  6. 13.853 Computational Ocean Acoustics, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Wave equations for fluid and visco-elastic media. Wave-theory formulations of acoustic source radiation and seismo-acoustic propagation in stratified ocean waveguides. Wavenumber Integration and Normal Mode methods for ...

  7. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY College of Earth, Ocean, & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    and River Dominated Margins", Santiago de Compostela, Spain, June 19-24, 2005. · 2009 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation Meeting, "Significance of River-Ocean Coherence for Fluxes and Fate of Terrestrial

  8. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decrease-case scenario, they also allow users to anticipate the effects of environmental hazards and pollution crises

  9. 12.003 Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans, Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    The laws of classical mechanics and thermodynamics are used to explore how the properties of fluids on a rotating Earth manifest themselves in, and help shape, the global patterns of atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and ...

  10. Gulf of Maine Strategic Regional Ocean Science Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    The Gulf of Maine Regional Ocean Science Initiative evolved from an awareness of the importance of integrated approaches to addressing ecological, environmental, and social influences in coastal and marine ecosystems at ...

  11. Hidden cycle of dissolved organic carbon in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Repeta, Daniel J.

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a large (660 Pg C) reactive carbon reservoir that mediates the oceanic microbial food web and interacts with climate on both short and long timescales. Carbon isotopic content ...

  12. School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences 907-474-7289

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    and Oceanic Administration, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Alaska Department of Fish and game admission requirements: a. Prerequisites: calculus, elementary statistics, ichthyology, biology of fish: FISH F699--Thesis .......................................................................... 6 ­ 12

  13. The biogeochemistry and residual mean circulation of the southern ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Takamitsu, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    I develop conceptual models of the biogeochemistry and physical circulation of the Southern Ocean in order to study the air-sea fluxes of trace gases and biological productivity and their potential changes over ...

  14. Chaotic Lagrangian transport and mixing in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Prants

    2015-02-05

    Dynamical systems theory approach has been successfully used in physical oceanography for the last two decades to study mixing and transport of water masses in the ocean. The basic theoretical ideas have been borrowed from the phenomenon of chaotic advection in fluids, an analogue of dynamical Hamiltonian chaos in mechanics. The starting point for analysis is a velocity field obtained by this or that way. Being motivated by successful applications of that approach to simplified analytic models of geophysical fluid flows, researchers now work with satellite-derived velocity fields and outputs of sophisticated numerical models of ocean circulation. This review article gives an introduction to some of the basic concepts and methods used to study chaotic mixing and transport in the ocean and a brief overview of recent results with some practical applications of Lagrangian tools to monitor spreading of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the ocean.

  15. Chaotic Lagrangian transport and mixing in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prants, S V

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical systems theory approach has been successfully used in physical oceanography for the last two decades to study mixing and transport of water masses in the ocean. The basic theoretical ideas have been borrowed from the phenomenon of chaotic advection in fluids, an analogue of dynamical Hamiltonian chaos in mechanics. The starting point for analysis is a velocity field obtained by this or that way. Being motivated by successful applications of that approach to simplified analytic models of geophysical fluid flows, researchers now work with satellite-derived velocity fields and outputs of sophisticated numerical models of ocean circulation. This review article gives an introduction to some of the basic concepts and methods used to study chaotic mixing and transport in the ocean and a brief overview of recent results with some practical applications of Lagrangian tools to monitor spreading of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in the ocean.

  16. Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LLNL-CONF-491045 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: OCEANS'11, Kona, HI, United States, Sep 19 - Sep 22, 2011...

  17. A study on boundary separation in an idealized ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Düben, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    In numerical ocean models coast lines change the direction from one grid cell to its neighbor and the value for viscosity is set to be as small as possible. Therefore, model simulations are not converged with resolution and boundary separation points differ in essential properties from flow separation in continuous flow fields. In this paper, we investigate the quality of the representation of boundary separation points in global ocean models. To this end, we apply well established criteria for boundary separation within an idealized ocean model setup. We investigate an eddy-resolving as well as a steady test case with idealized and unstructured coast lines in a shallow water model that is based on a finite element discretization method. The results show that well established criteria for separation fail to detect boundary separation points due to an insufficient representation of ocean flows along free-slip boundaries. Along no-slip boundaries, most separation criteria provide adequate results. However, a ve...

  18. OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OBSERVATIONS ON JUVENILE OCEANIC SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA SKIPJACK (KATSUWONUS PELAMIS) FROM HAWAIIAN WATERS AND SIERRA MACKEREL (SCOMBEROMORUS SIERRA) FROM September 1948. While operating in Hawaiian waters, seven juvenile KatsllwollllS pelamis (Linnaeus) 1758

  19. 2.019 Design of Ocean Systems, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chryssostomidis, Chryssostomos

    This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power ...

  20. Demographics of lytic viral infection of coastal ocean vibrio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauffman, Anne Kathryn Marie

    2014-01-01

    Viral predation on bacteria in the ocean liberates carbon from the particulate fraction, where it is accessible to higher trophic levels, and redirects it to the dissolved fraction, where it supports microbial growth. ...