Sample records for liieu crystals view

  1. Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SSRL's Monochromator Crystal Glitch Library allows users to view glitch spectra online, list specific crystal orientations, and download PDF files of the glitch spectra. (Specialized Interface)

  2. Prarie View RDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PRAIRIE VIEW RDF 2 Prairie View RDF Located at JAAP (approx. 40 miles southwest of Chicago), 223 acres on 455 Acre Parcel Will County Owner; Waste Management, Operator ...

  3. Optomechanical Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichenfield, Matt; Camacho, Ryan M; Vahala, Kerry J; Painter, Oskar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structured, periodic optical materials can be used to form photonic crystals capable of dispersing, routing, and trapping light. A similar phenomena in periodic elastic structures can be used to manipulate mechanical vibrations. Here we present the design and experimental realization of strongly coupled optical and mechanical modes in a planar, periodic nanostructure on a silicon chip. 200-Terahertz photons are co-localized with mechanical modes of Gigahertz frequency and 100-femtogram mass. The effective coupling length, which describes the strength of the photon-phonon interaction, is as small as 2.9 microns, which, together with minute oscillator mass, allows all-optical actuation and transduction of nanomechanical motion with near quantum-limited sensitivity. Optomechanical crystals have many potential applications, from RF-over-optical communication to the study of quantum effects in mesoscopic mechanical systems.

  4. World Views From fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................11 2. The Seven Components of a World View...................................................... 20 3. The Unity of the Seven Sub........................................... 25 5. The Purpose of the group `Worldviews

  5. NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    NEWS & VIEWS Glass dynamics Diverging views on glass transition Gregory B. mc.mckenna@ttu.edu T he glass transition is one of the most intriguing phenomena in the world of soft condensed matter. Despite decades of study, many aspects of the behaviour of glass-forming liquids remain elusive

  6. NEWS AND VIEWS PERSPECTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahler, D. Luke

    NEWS AND VIEWS PERSPECTIVE Niche diversification follows key innovation in Antarctic fish radiation Oxford Street, Cambridge MA 02138, USA Antarctic notothenioid fishes provide a fascinating evolu- tionary diversification has occurred repeatedly and in parallel. Keywords: community ecology, fish, macroevolution, phylo

  7. Forward viewing OCT endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Kaicheng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A forward viewing fiber optic-based imaging probe device was designed and constructed for use with ultrahigh speed optical coherence tomography in the human gastrointestinal tract. The light source was a MEMS-VCSEL at 1300 ...

  8. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  9. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Chae Un (Ithaca, NY); Gruner, Sol M. (Ithaca, NY)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  10. JOURNAL OF DISPLAY TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 9, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2013 87 Time-Multiplexed Dual-View Display Using a Blue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Using a Blue Phase Liquid Crystal Jian-Peng Cui, Yan Li, Jin Yan, Hui-Chuan Cheng, and Qiong-Hua Wang Abstract--A time-multiplexed dual-view display device using a blue phase liquid crystal is proposed. In this design, a vertical field switching blue phase liquid crystal display (VFS-BPLCD) panel is used to achieve

  11. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  12. Crystal-field effects in fluoride crystals for optical refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids has recently seen an important breakthrough. The cooling of a YLiF{sub 4} (YLF) crystal doped with 5 mol% Yb3+ to 155 K by Seletskiy et al [NPhot] has surpassed the lowest temperatures ({approx}170 K for {approx}100 mW cooling capacity) that are practical with commercial multi-stage thermoelectric coolers (TEC) [Glaister]. This record performance has advanced laser cooling into an application relevant regime and has put first practical optical cryocoolers within reach. The result is also relevant from a material perspective since for the first time, an Yb3+-doped crystal has outperformed an Yb3+-doped glass. The record temperature of 208 K was held by the Yb3+-doped fluorozirconate glass ZBLAN. Advanced purification and glass fabrication methods currently under development are expected to also advance ZBLAN:Yb3+ to sub-TEC temperatures. However, recent achievements with YLF:Yb3+ illustrate that crystalline materials may have two potentially game-changing advantajes over glassy materials. First, the crystalline environment reduces the inhomogeneous broadening of the Yb3+ electronic transitions as compared to a glassy matrix. The respective sharpening of the crystal-field transitions increases the peak absorption cross section at the laser excitation wavelength and allows for more efficient pumping of the Yb3+ ions, particularly at low temperatures. Second, many detrimental impurities present in the starting materials tend to be excluded from the crystal during its slow growth process, in contrast to a glass where all impurities present in the starting materials are included in the glass when it is formed by temperature quenching a melt. The ultra high purity required for laser cooling materials [PRB] therefore may be easier to realize in crystals than in glasses. Laser cooling occurs by laser excitation of a rare-earth ion followed by anti-Stokes luminescence. Each such laser-cooling cycle extracts thermal energy from the solid and carries it away as high-entropy light, thereby cooling the material. In the ideal case, the respective laser-cooling power is given by the pump wavelength ({lambda}{sub p}), the mean fluorescence wavelength ({bar {lambda}}{sub L}), and the absorption coefficient (a{sub r}) of the pumped transition. These quantities are solely determined by crystal field interactions. On one hand, a large crystal-field splitting offers a favorably large difference of {lambda}{sub p} - {bar {lambda}}{sub L} and thus a high cooling efficiency {eta}{sub cool} = ({lambda}{sub p} - {bar {lambda}}{sub L})/{bar {lambda}}{sub L}. On the other hand, a small crystal-field splitting offers a high thermal population (n{sub i}) of the initial state of the pumped transition, giving a high pump absorption coefficient and thus high laser cooling power, particularly at low temperatures. A quantitative description of crystal-field interactions is therefore critical to the understanding and optimization of optical refrigeration. In the case of Yb3+ as the laser cooling ion, however, development of a crystal-field model is met with substantial difficulties. First, Yb3+ has only two 4/multiplets, {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} and {sup 2}F{sub 5/2}, which lead to at most 7 crystal-field levels. This makes it difficult, and in some cases impossible, to evaluate the crystal-field Hamiltonian, which has at least 4 parameters for any Yb3+ point symmety lower than cubic. Second, {sup 2}F{sub 7/2}{leftrightarrow}{sup 2}F{sub 5/2} transitions exhibit an exceptionally strong electron-phonon coupling compared to 4f transitions of other rare earths. This makes it difficult to distinguish electronic from vibronic transitions in the absorption and luminescence spectra and to reliably identify the crystal-field levels. Yb3+ crystal-field splittings reported in the literature should thus generally be viewed with caution. This paper explores the effects of crystal-field interactions on the laser cooling performance of Yb3+-doped fluoride crystals. It is shown that the total crystal-field splitting o

  13. Engineering Aerial view of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    -neutral Torus 2 Climate Change 4 Combustion and Catalysis Laboratory #12;4 5 1Engineering Revolution 5 #12;6 7Columbia Engineering Plus #12;1 1 2 3 4 5 6 Aerial view of Columbia campus with Columbia Engineering-a liated buildings highlighted in blue Columbia Engineering Plus Engineering Revolution 4

  14. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, Clifford S. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved optical system which provides the operator a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  15. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallman, C.S.

    1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  16. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  17. Origin of platy calcite crystals in hot-spring deposits in the Kenya Rift Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, B. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Renault, R.W. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Platy calcite crystals, which have their c axis parallel to their shortest length axis, are common components of travertine deposits found around some hot springs in the Kenya Rift Valley. They are composite crystals formed of numerous paper-thin subcrystals. Individual plates allowed to grow without obstruction develop a hexagonal motif. The Kenyan crystals typically form in hot (>75 C) waters that have a low Ca content (<10 mg/l), a high CO{sub 2} content, and a high rate of CO{sub 2} degassing. At Chemurkeu, aggregates of numerous small platy crystals collectively form lattice crystals that superficially resemble ray crystals. The walls of the lattice crystals are formed of large platy crystals that have their long and intermediate length axes aligned parallel to the plane of the long axis of the lattice crystal. Internally, the lattice crystals are formed of small platy calcite crystals arranged in a boxlike pattern that creates the appearance of a lattice when viewed in thin section. Lattice crystals are highly porous, with each pore being enclosed by platy crystals. At Lorusio, travertines are mainly formed of pseudodentrites that are constructed by numerous small platy crystals attached to a main stem which is a large platy crystal that commonly curves along its long axis. The pseudodentrites are the main construction blocks in ledges and lilypads that form in the vent pool and spring outflow channels, where the water is too hot for microbes other than hyperthermophiles. The platy calcite crystals in the Kenyan travertines are morphologically similar to platy calcite crystals that form as scale in pipes in the geothermal fields of New Zealand and hydrothermal angel wing calcite from the La Fe mine in Mexico. Comparison of the Kenyan and New Zealand crystals indicates that platy calcite crystals form from waters with a low Ca{sup 2+} content and a high CO{sub 3}/Ca ratio due to rapid rates of CO{sub 2} degassing.

  18. Multi-view kernel construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sa, Virginia R.; Gallagher, Patrick W.; Lewis, Joshua M.; Malave, Vicente L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5157-z Multi-view kernel construction Virginia R. de Sa ·multiple different graph construction algorithms. The Ng et

  19. TotalView Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliances » Top InnovativeTopoisomeraseTotalView

  20. Protective laser beam viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

  1. Ion Coulomb Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Thompson

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion Coulomb crystals (ICC), formed by atomic ions at low temperatures in radiofrequency and Penning ion traps, are structures that have remarkable properties and many applications. Images of Coulomb crystals are striking and reveal the crystal structure, which arises from a balance between the trapping forces acting on the ions and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. Applications of these structures range from frequency standards and quantum simulation through to measurement of the cross sections of chemical reactions of ions.

  2. Phononic crystal devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Phononic crystals that have the ability to modify and control the thermal black body phonon distribution and the phonon component of heat transport in a solid. In particular, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be modified by altering the phonon density of states in a phononic crystal. The present invention is directed to phononic crystal devices and materials such as radio frequency (RF) tags powered from ambient heat, dielectrics with extremely low thermal conductivity, thermoelectric materials with a higher ratio of electrical-to-thermal conductivity, materials with phononically engineered heat capacity, phononic crystal waveguides that enable accelerated cooling, and a variety of low temperature application devices.

  3. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  4. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to create an angular profile plot which was compared to what was produced by Yazynin's code for a beam with no multiple scattering. The results were comparable, with volume reflection and channeling effects observed and the range of crystal orientations at which volume reflection is seen was about 1 mrad in both simulations.

  5. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  6. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  7. False color viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  8. The view from Kiev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiselyov, S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports the observations of correspondents for the Bulletin (two Russian journalists, one based in Moscow, the other in Kiev) who investigated the status of the Soviet Union's Black Sea Fleet and Ukraine's status as a non-nuclear-weapons state. After two years of wrangling and two earlier failed settlements, Russian President Boris Yeltsin met with Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk at Massandra in Crimea. On September 3, the leaders announced that Russia would buy out Ukraine's interest in the fleet and lease the port at Sevastopol. The Massandra summit was also supposed to settle Ukraine's status as a non-nuclear-weapons state. Described here are the Kiev-based correspondent's views on the Massandra summit (and its major topics), which was to have been called off by the Russian foreign ministry when Ukrainian Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma resigned.

  9. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  10. A Regulator's View of Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanaman, S. M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the total national electric generation. In view of the energy requirements of Pennsylvania's industry and the impact of increasing energy costs on employment the Commission directed its technical staff to investigate the potential for industrial cogeneration...

  11. Frequency doubling crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Francis (Danville, CA); Velsko, Stephan P. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  12. Viewing device for electron-beam equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasyrov, R.S.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Viewing devices are used to observe melting, welding, and so on in vacuum systems, an it is necessary to protect the windows from droplets and vapor. A viewing device for electron-beam equipment is described in which the viewing tube and mounting flange are made as a tubular ball joint enclosed in a steel bellows, which render the viewing device flexible. Bending the viewing tube in the intervals between observations protects the viewing window from sputtering and from drops of molten metal.

  13. Journal of Crystal Growth ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) at high pressure of CO2 (initial PCO2 ¼ 55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 1C) was used and the dissolved quantity of CO2 have a significant effect on the average particle size, specific surface areaJournal of Crystal Growth ] (

  14. Silicon crystal growing by oscillating crucible technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwuttke, G.H.; Kim, K.M.; Smetana, P.

    1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for growing silicon crystals from a molten melt comprising oscillating the container during crystal growth is disclosed.

  15. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  16. Input a journal Viewing Journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Journals Contents: Input a journal Viewing Journals Deleting a journal Entering jnl into different period Problems Input a journal 1 Login to Bluqube 2 Select 3 Enter relevant Doc type To select the number of journals you will processing & the total credit value 6 Click on 7 Enter brief description 8

  17. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 28, 2006 ... For defining the NSO functions composing the battery, we consider two categories: – randomly generated functions, either defined as the ...

  18. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    a battery of benchmark instances of up to 200 nodes are reported. These seem to be the largest instances that have been solved exactly for this problem.

  19. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    May 14, 2010 ... Generally, even testing whether a matrix is in C? is co-NP-complete [23]. ...... One concrete example is the following: ?. ?. ?. ?. ?. ?. 1 1/3 1/3 ...

  20. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    based on median finding, variable fixing, and secant techniques. Keywords: ..... arithmetic operations, the overall complexity is O(n2). D. The worst case bound in ..... always work on its rated clock speed, we turned force the Linux system to use the ..... dimensionally equidistributed uniform pseudo-random number generator.

  1. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-31-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 3, 2003 ... Landau (TDGL) equation, the Maxwell equations, and an energy equation ... varying currents and magnetic fields generate thermal energy, ...

  2. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Approach. ?. Selin Damla Ahipasao?glu the date of receipt and acceptance should be .... which has the minimum volume is a natural choice from both theoretical and ... This problem has important applications in statistics and solving this prob- ...... the SDPT3 algorithm using the CVX platform on MATLAB, which is a classic.

  3. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    all real solutions of a given system of polynomial equations. ... A crucial ingredient is a semidefinite characterization of the real radical ideal ...... The options.

  4. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Let fbe a meromorphic function satisfying condition (1.2), and let rj be a sequence with property (2.5). Then the set S is finite and for some subsequence of ...

  5. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    project of the classification of (simple) nuclear separable C*-algebras [E]. Let C? denote the category of separable C*-algebras and ?-homomorphisms.

  6. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    the classification results of Kirchberg and Phillips using the notion of nuclear absorbing ... A simple purely infinite nuclear separable C*-algebra is called.

  7. View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to give a survey of some basic theory of semi-infinite programming. .... operations of addition and multiplication by a scalar. We associate ...

  8. Views of the solar system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, C.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Views of the Solar System has been created as an educational tour of the solar system. It contains images and information about the Sun, planets, moons, asteroids and comets found within the solar system. The image processing for many of the images was done by the author. This tour uses hypertext to allow space travel by simply clicking on a desired planet. This causes information and images about the planet to appear on screen. While on a planet page, hyperlinks travel to pages about the moons and other relevant available resources. Unusual terms are linked to and defined in the Glossary page. Statistical information of the planets and satellites can be browsed through lists sorted by name, radius and distance. History of Space Exploration contains information about rocket history, early astronauts, space missions, spacecraft and detailed chronology tables of space exploration. The Table of Contents page has links to all of the various pages within Views Of the Solar System.

  9. For current viewing resistor loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Gregory R. (Tijeras, NM); Hass, Jay B. (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention comprises a terminal unit for a flat cable comprising a BNC-PCB connector having a pin for electrically contacting one or more conducting elements of a flat cable, and a current viewing resistor having an opening through which the pin extends and having a resistor face that abuts a connector face of the BNC-PCB connector, wherein the device is a terminal unit for the flat cable.

  10. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  11. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  12. ParaView at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysics LabInterconnection RiskMarch StudyParaView

  13. Chisolm View | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDataset Country ChileDialogue,China:Chisolm View

  14. crystal nickel a hree dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Zhenting 1 Department 2 Departmen ABSTRACT This pape crystal nickel a hree dimension photonic cryst polystyrene op silicon chips, volume fraction can be controlle nickel structure hen sacrificed volume fraction reports microm crystal structur or alumina she nickel microca microstructure further electrop volume

  15. Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's...

  16. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- December 2013 | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- December 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- December 2013 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the...

  17. Better Buildings Network View | November 2014 | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 2014 More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014 Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Better Buildings Network View | January...

  18. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - August 2012 | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - August 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - August 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S....

  19. Lamella settler crystallizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maimoni, A.

    1990-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystallizer is described which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as well as in other electrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities. 3 figs.

  20. Lamella settler crystallizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maimoni, Arturo (Orinda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystallizer which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as well as in other electrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities.

  1. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Laura E. (Manteca, CA); Webb, Mark (Salida, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  2. Cosmology: a bird's eye view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan A. Coley; Sigbjorn Hervik; Woei Chet Lim

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this essay we discuss the difference in views of the Universe as seen by two different observers. While one of the observers follows a geodesic congruence defined by the geometry of the cosmological model, the other observer follows the fluid flow lines of a perfect fluid with a linear equation of state. We point out that the information these observers collect regarding the state of the Universe can be radically different; while one observes a non-inflating ever-expanding ever-lasting universe, the other observer can experience a dynamical behaviour reminiscent to that of quintessence or even that of a phantom cosmology leading to a 'big rip' singularity within finite time (but without the need for exotic forms of matter).

  3. Better Buildings Network View | May 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    May 2014 More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014 Better Buildings Network View | June...

  4. Crystal-Like geometric modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landreneau, Eric Benjamin

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    faces, symmetry, and fractal geometry. The techniques have also been implemented in software, as a proof of concept. They are used in an interactive geometric modeling system, in which users can use these techniques to create crystal-like shapes...

  5. Arnold Schwarzenegger SINGLE CRYSTAL SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in this report. #12;ENERGY INNOVATIONS SMALL GRANT (EISG) PROGRAM INDEPENDENT ASSESSMENT REPORT (IAR) SINGLEArnold Schwarzenegger Governor SINGLE CRYSTAL SILICON SHEET GROWTH Prepared For: California Energy Commission Energy Innovations Small Grant Program Prepared By: Energy Materials Research

  6. Active materials in photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter (Peter A.)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I analyze new phenomena arising from embedding active materials inside of photonic crystal structures. These structures strongly modify the photonic local density of states (LDOS), leading to quantitative and qualitative ...

  7. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cockroft, Nigel J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  8. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  9. Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin Ahlbrandt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    Crystal Potential Formula for the Calculation of Crystal Lattice Sums1 Don Steiger and Calvin; In Final Form: April 7, 1998 A new formula is derived for the determination of the potential energy of the central unit cell of a finite crystal; this formula is called the crystal potential formula. The crystal

  10. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power consumption by ALCWs allows for on-board power electronics for automatic matching of transmission through windows to varying climate conditions without drawing the power from the power grid. ALCWs are capable of transmitting more sunlight in winters to assist in heating and less sunlight in summers to minimize overheating. As such, they can change the window from being a source of energy loss to a source of energy gain. In addition, the scalable AMI’s roll-to-roll process, proved by making 1ft × 1ftALCW prototype panels, allows for cost-effective production of large-scale window panels along with capability to change easily their color and shape. In addition to architectural glazing in houses and commercial buildings, ALCWs can be used in other applications where control of sunlight is needed, such as green houses, used by commercial produce growers and botanical gardens, cars, aircrafts, etc.

  11. MyRED Mobiles Student Views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    tap on Shopping Cart, then select term. Tap on Class Search to find courses to place in your shoppingMyRED Mobiles Student Views Mar 2014 Page 1 Login/Sign-in Enter your MyRED /TrueYou credentials. Tap on any Term bar to view a schedule for the selected term. Home Screen/Main Menu Class Schedule

  12. Groundwater Modeling in ArcView: by integrating ArcView, MODFLOW and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Raja

    Groundwater Modeling in ArcView: by integrating ArcView, MODFLOW and MODPATH Abstract Modeling. This paper addresses groundwater modeling which is one of the many entities in environmental modeling in ArcView 3.2a. The objective was to create an integrated system where a user could do groundwater

  13. Honors Enrichment Contracts Faculty View Page 1 Honors Enrichment Contracts Faculty View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honors Enrichment Contracts ­ Faculty View Page 1 Honors Enrichment Contracts ­ Faculty View INITIAL APPROVAL #12;Honors Enrichment Contracts ­ Faculty View Page 2 Summary This document contains information about how to make initial and final decisions on Honors Enrichment Contracts submitted by honors

  14. Optical Mineralogy Lab #7A & #7B Biaxial Minerals In this lab, you will view various optical characteristics of orthorhombic, monoclinic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dundas, Robert G.

    Optical Mineralogy Lab #7A & #7B ­ Biaxial Minerals In this lab, you will view various optical characteristics of orthorhombic, monoclinic and triclinic crystals. All minerals that are within these three and (d) insert the Bertrand lens. Directions: PART I 1. For the following minerals: diopside Bxa, biotite

  15. automated crystal screening: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high crystallization rates and the production of diffraction-quality crystals. microfluidics Quake, Stephen R. 5 Data Mining Crystallization Databases: Knowledge-Based...

  16. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  17. Crystallization during processing of nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glassmaking are reviewed.

  18. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  19. A view-sequential 3D display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cossairt, Oliver S. (Oliver Strider), 1978-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines the various techniques for creating electronic 3D displays and analyzes their commercial potential. The thesis argues for the use of view-sequential techniques in the design of 3D displays based on ...

  20. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon capture and storage, especially as a technology thatCarbon capture and sequestration CCST California Council on Science and Technologytechnology California’s Energy Future - The View to 2050 becomes available. ? ? Fossil fuel with carbon capture

  1. The new option view of investment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Avinash K.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a simple introduction to the new option view of investment. We explain the shortcomings of the orthodox theory, and then outline the basic ideas behind the option framework. Several industry examples ...

  2. JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of viewing an employee matrix within SuccessFactors Learning.

  3. Incorporating video into Google Mobile Street View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Christina (Christina E.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Street View is a compelling application but suffers from significant latency problems, especially in limited bandwidth circumstances. Currently, the application uses static images to display street level information. ...

  4. Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dane R Spearing, Gary L Smith, SK Sundaram

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review outlines important aspects of crystallization in HLW glasses, such as equilibrium, nucleation, growth, and dissolution. The impact of crystallization on continuous melters and the chemical durability of high-level waste glass are briefly discussed.

  5. Jefferson and Hamilton as viewed by historians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jungmeyer, Paul Edward

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JEFFERSON AND HAMILTON AS VIEHED BY HISTORIANS A Thesis Paul Edward Jungmeyer Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in ' partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August, 1970 Major Subject...: History JEFFERSON AND HAMILTON AS VIEWED BY HISTORIANS A Thesis by Paul Edward Jungmeyer Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee d i~) (Member) (M er) August, 1970 ABSTRACT JEFFERSON AND HAMILTON AS VIEWED BY HISTORIANS...

  6. Potash Crystallization Lynn Batten1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsatsomeros, Michael

    fertilizer and industrial chemical, from saturated brines. Typically, hot brine at about 100 C is cooled, knowledge of the spatial distribution of the chemical supersaturation state of the brine would help to improve the process control objectives: · Define conditions for crystal growth · Minimize occluded brine

  7. Robotic CCD microscope for enhanced crystal recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Segelke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA); Toppani, Dominique (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic CCD microscope and procedures to automate crystal recognition. The robotic CCD microscope and procedures enables more accurate crystal recognition, leading to fewer false negative and fewer false positives, and enable detection of smaller crystals compared to other methods available today.

  8. axial view inductively: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    View of Induction Reasoning for First-Order Logic Physics Websites Summary: , The Alan Turing Centenary Conference (2012)" 12;A Unified View of Induction Reasoning for First in...

  9. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base...

  10. Better Buildings Network View | April 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 2014 More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Better Buildings Network View | November...

  11. Better Buildings Network View | February 2014 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    February 2014 Better Buildings Network View | February 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential...

  12. Better Buildings Network View | January 2015 | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Better Buildings Network View | November 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation...

  13. Better Buildings Network View | June 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2014 Better Buildings Network View | June 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network....

  14. Better Buildings Network View | March 2014 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    March 2014 Better Buildings Network View | March 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential...

  15. Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    December 2014 Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential...

  16. Better Buildings Network View | January 2014 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Better Buildings Network View | January 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network....

  17. Better Buildings Network View | October 2014 | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 2014 Better Buildings Network View | October 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential...

  18. Better Buildings Network View | February 2015 | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | November 2014 Better Buildings Network View | September 2014 Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study:...

  19. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstraße 4, Göttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  20. Measurements using tangentially viewing bolometers on TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, C.E.; Schivell, J.; Budny, R.; Ellis R.A. III; Goldston, R.J.; McCune, D.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.; Towner, H.H.; Wieland, R.M.; and others

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co- and counter-viewing bolometers aimed along a common tangency chord are being used to study power losses due to charge exchange (CX) of fast ions in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated TFTR plasmas. For unidirectional injection, tangential bolometers oriented to view CX loss of circulating fast ions detect losses from the thermal target plasma (impurity radiation and CX) plus power due to the fast ion CX loss, whereas bolometers oppositely directed measure only the target plasma contribution. The difference between the two signals is a measure of the fast ion CX loss. Additional information is obtained by comparing the tangential bolometer signals with those of perpendicularly viewing bolometer monitors and arrays. The measurements are compared to results of the TRANSP code analysis.

  1. Commercial Application of Freeze Crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorgol, R. G.

    COMMERCIAL APPLICATION OF FREEZE CRYSTALLIZATION ROBERT G. GORGOL, MARKETING MANAGER, HPD INCORPORATED, NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS ABSTRACT Industrial usc of frcezing for componcnt purification and separation is well understood, but commercial... of purification, but they did understand the water they obtained from ice was potable. RECENT APPLICATIONS Scientists have understood the basic mechanism of the freezing phase change for many years. ID an effort to harness the power of this phenomena...

  2. Abstract crystals Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Arun

    is a normal crystal define a bijection si : B B by sib = ~f wti(b) i b, if wti(b) 0, ~e -wti(b) i b, if wti, b2 B2} with wti(b1 b2) = wti(b1) + wti(b2), i(b1 b2) = max{i(b1), i(b2) - wt(b1), i }, i(b1 b2

  3. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  4. BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    WELCOME TO BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan is flexible and easy to use, your discounts, and much more! Blue View Vision InsightSM University of California Student Health Insurance Plan (UC SHIP) 2013/14 Your Blue View Vision Insight Network Blue View Vision Insight offers you

  5. BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    WELCOME TO BLUE VIEW VISION INSIGHT! Good news--your vision plan is flexible and easy to use, your discounts, and much more! Blue View Vision InsightSM University of California Student Health Insurance Plan (UC SHIP) 2012/13 Your Blue View Vision Insight Network Blue View Vision Insight offers you

  6. Project Title: Older People's View of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    /AGECONCERN/10/NP Age Concern Canterbury provides support for older people, many of whom face loneliness, lowProject Title: Older People's View of Community Support Bachelor of Arts Internship Company information, support and advocacy, to enable older people in Canterbury to have real choices". (http

  7. CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW April 12, 2011 .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ordinance ordinance? Projected effective date: September 1, 2011 Green building or stand-alone energy Energy Ordinance in Combination with Green Building ordinance? Do minimum energy requirements increase No afterCITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW April 12, 2011 . CaUfomia Energy Commission Attn: Joe Loyer 1516 Ninth

  8. Friction in full view A. P. Merklea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    Friction in full view A. P. Merklea and L. D. Marksb Materials Science and Engineering proposed friction mechanisms explaining the unique tribological properties of graphite. Wear of graphite chemical or struc- tural information from the interface during a friction experi- ment. Examples

  9. INVESTIGATION Retrospective View of North American Potato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    INVESTIGATION Retrospective View of North American Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Breeding in the 20, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706 ABSTRACT Cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), a vegetatively propagated explore the effects of potato breeding at the genome level, we used 8303 single-nucleotide polymorphism

  10. Crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Dongfeng, E-mail: dongfeng@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Keyan [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China); Sun, Congting; Chen, Kunfeng [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we briefly summarized our recent work on the studies of crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials. On the basis of the chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth, we can quantitatively simulate Cu{sub 2}O crystallization processes in solution system. We also kinetically controlled Cu{sub 2}O crystallization process in the reduction solution route. Lithium ion battery and supercapacitor performances of some oxides such as Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO{sub 2} were shown to elucidate the important effect of crystallization on functionality of inorganic materials. This work encourages us to create novel functionalities through the study of crystallization of inorganic materials, which warrants more chances in the field of functional materials.

  11. Phonon manipulation with phononic crystals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim Bongsang; Hopkins, Patrick Edward; Leseman, Zayd C.; Goettler, Drew F.; Su, Mehmet F. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Reinke, Charles M.; Olsson, Roy H., III

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrated engineered modification of propagation of thermal phonons, i.e. at THz frequencies, using phononic crystals. This work combined theoretical work at Sandia National Laboratories, the University of New Mexico, the University of Colorado Boulder, and Carnegie Mellon University; the MESA fabrication facilities at Sandia; and the microfabrication facilities at UNM to produce world-leading control of phonon propagation in silicon at frequencies up to 3 THz. These efforts culminated in a dramatic reduction in the thermal conductivity of silicon using phononic crystals by a factor of almost 30 as compared with the bulk value, and about 6 as compared with an unpatterned slab of the same thickness. This work represents a revolutionary advance in the engineering of thermoelectric materials for optimal, high-ZT performance. We have demonstrated the significant reduction of the thermal conductivity of silicon using phononic crystal structuring using MEMS-compatible fabrication techniques and in a planar platform that is amenable to integration with typical microelectronic systems. The measured reduction in thermal conductivity as compared to bulk silicon was about a factor of 20 in the cross-plane direction [26], and a factor of 6 in the in-plane direction. Since the electrical conductivity was only reduced by a corresponding factor of about 3 due to the removal of conductive material (i.e., porosity), and the Seebeck coefficient should remain constant as an intrinsic material property, this corresponds to an effective enhancement in ZT by a factor of 2. Given the number of papers in literature devoted to only a small, incremental change in ZT, the ability to boost the ZT of a material by a factor of 2 simply by reducing thermal conductivity is groundbreaking. The results in this work were obtained using silicon, a material that has benefitted from enormous interest in the microelectronics industry and that has a fairly large thermoelectric power factor. In addition, the techniques and scientific understanding developed in the research can be applied to a wide range of materials, with the caveat that the thermal conductivity of such a material be dominated by phonon, rather than electron, transport. In particular, this includes several thermoelectric materials with attractive properties at elevated temperatures (i.e., greater than room temperature), such as silicon germanium and silicon carbide. It is reasonable that phononic crystal patterning could be used for high-temperature thermoelectric devices using such materials, with applications in energy scavenging via waste-heat recovery and thermoelectric cooling for high-performance microelectronic circuits. The only part of the ZT picture missing in this work was the experimental measurement of the Seebeck coefficient of our phononic crystal devices. While a first-order approximation indicates that the Seebeck coefficient should not change significantly from that of bulk silicon, we were not able to actually verify this assumption within the timeframe of the project. Additionally, with regards to future high-temperature applications of this technology, we plan to measure the thermal conductivity reduction factor of our phononic crystals as elevated temperatures to confirm that it does not diminish, given that the nominal thermal conductivity of most semiconductors, including silicon, decreases with temperature above room temperature. We hope to have the opportunity to address these concerns and further advance the state-of-the-art of thermoelectric materials in future projects.

  12. Singular Limits in Polymer Stabilized Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-31-00T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate equilibrium configurations for a polymer stabilized liquid crys- tal material ... eling the cross section of the liquid crystal-polymer fiber composite.

  13. Photonic crystals for high temperature applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeng, Yi Xiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the design, optimization, fabrication, and experimental realization of metallic photonic crystals (MPhCs) for high temperature applications, for instance thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion ...

  14. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  15. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D. (Richmond, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  16. Crystal Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy Offshore Place:WindOilCowal Wind Energy LtdCrystal

  17. Lab 9 LabVIEW and GPIB LabVIEW (National Instruments)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    Automatic data acquisition DAC 01010 Actuator, Heater... control Power amplifiers LabVIEW GPIB GPIB #12 Toolbar Retain Wire Values Button Step Function Buttons #12;Block Diagram Window Front Panel Window

  18. Journal of Crystal Growth 250 (2003) 499515 Induction time in crystallization of gas hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Crystal Growth 250 (2003) 499­515 Induction time in crystallization of gas hydrates Dimo. Kern Abstract The kinetics of the initial stage of crystallization of one-component gas hydrates of gas consumed are determined. Expressions are derived for the supersaturation dependence of the hydrate

  19. First results of the experiment to search for double beta decay of 106Cd with 106CdWO4 crystal scintillator in coincidence with four crystals HPGe detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tretyak, V I; Bernabei, R; Brudanin, V B; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Mokina, V M; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Podviyanuk, R B; Tupitsyna, I A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment to search for double beta processes in 106Cd by using cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator enriched in 106Cd (106CdWO4) in coincidence with the four crystals HPGe detector GeMulti is in progress at the STELLA facility of the Gran Sasso underground laboratory of INFN (Italy). The 106CdWO4 scintillator is viewed by a low-background photomultiplier tube through a lead tungstate crystal light-guide produced from deeply purified archaeological lead to suppress gamma quanta from the photomultiplier tube. Here we report the first results of the experiment after 3233 hours of the data taking. A few new improved limits on double beta processes in 106Cd are obtained, in particular T1/2(2nuECb+) > 8.4e20 yr at 90% C.L.

  20. View of software for HEP experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnstad, H.; Lebrun, P.; Lessner, E.S.; Montgomery, H.E.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A view of the software structure typical of a High Energy Physics experiment is given and the availability of general software modules in most of the important regions is discussed. The aim is to provide a framework for discussion of capabilities and inadequecies and thereby define areas where effort should be assigned and perhaps also to serve as a useful source document for the newcomer to High Energy Physics. 74 refs.

  1. A Complete Microfluidic Screening Platform for Rational Protein Crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Carl L.

    A Complete Microfluidic Screening Platform for Rational Protein Crystallization Billy T. C. Lau integration, and low reagent consumption, microfluidic devices have emerged as viable technologies for protein crystallization. Current microfluidic crystallization technologies have focused on two separate strategies: one

  2. Transverse acoustic actuation of Ni-Mn-Ga single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Jesse Matthew

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods for the transverse acoustic actuation of {110}-cut Ni-Mn-Ga single crystals are discussed. In this actuation mode, crystals are used that have the {110}- type twinning planes parallel to the base of the crystal. ...

  3. Trap Activation Energy and Transport Parameters of HgI$_2$ Crystals for Bubble-Plasma Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Miller; V. F. Kushniruk; A. V. Sermyagin

    2003-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent data on neutron induced acoustic cavitation in deuterium--containing liquids obtained by neutron measurements it was shown that very high temperatures could arise in some special cases. To study temperature of so--called bubble plasma it is desirable to have micro--detectors of X-rays, which can be prepared on the basis of room--temperature semiconductor detectors, in particular on mercuric iodide ($\\alpha$--HgI$_2$) crystals. Having in view this aim, the properties of gel--grown ($\\alpha$--HgI$_2$) crystals was studied by means of isothermal currents, and trap parameters was estimated. Results are promising for special aim of preparing X-ray detectors with moderate energy resolution needed in bubble--plasma diagnostic, though improving of crystal growing technology is necessary. {\\it PACS:} 29.40.Wk; 52.70.La {\\it Keywords:} X-ray and gamma--ray measurements; semiconductor detectors; mercuric iodide; plasma diagnostics; cavitation

  4. Coherent multilayer crystals and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, I.K.; Falco, C.M.

    1980-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material is described consisting of a coherent multilayer crystal of two or more elements where each layer is composed of a single element. Each layer may vary in thickness from about 2 A to 2500 A. The multilayer crystals are prepared by sputter deposition under conditions which slow the sputtered atoms to near substrate temperatures before they contact the substrate.

  5. Growth Of Oriented Crystals At Polymerized Membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charych, Deborah H. (Albany, CA), Berman, Amir (Ben-Shiva, IL)

    2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the growth and alignment of crystals at biopolymeric films. The methods and compositions of the present invention provide means to generate a variety of dense crystalline ceramic films, with totally aligned crystals, at low temperatures and pressures, suitable for use with polymer and plastic substrates.

  6. General recipe for designing photonic crystal cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    . Yariv and P. Yeh, Optical Waves in Crystals (Wiley and Sons, 2003). 13. A. Badolato, K. Hennessy, M and links 1. S. Johnson, S. Fan, A. Mekis, and J. Joannopoulos, "Multipole-cancellation mechanism for high. Vuckovi´c, M. Loncar, H. Mabuchi, and A. Scherer, "Design of photonic crystal microcavities for cavity QED

  7. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  8. Liquid crystal device and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Gu, Mingxia; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a liquid crystal device and method thereof. Subsequent to applying a first electrical voltage on a liquid crystal to induce a reorientation of the liquid crystal, a second electrical voltage with proper polarity is applied on the liquid crystal to assist the relaxation of the reorientation that was induced by the first electrical voltage. The "switch-off" phase of the liquid crystal can therefore be accelerated or temporally shortened, and the device can exhibit better performance such as fast response to on/off signals. The invention can be widely used LCD, LC shutter, LC lens, spatial light modulator, telecommunication device, tunable filter, beam steering device, and electrically driven LC device, among others.

  9. Analysis of Crystal Lattice Deformation by Ion Channeling. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Lattice Deformation by Ion Channeling. Analysis of Crystal Lattice Deformation by Ion Channeling. Abstract: A model of dislocations has been developed for the use in Monte...

  10. Microfluidic systems for continuous crystallization of small organic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultana, Mahmooda

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents one of the first demonstrations of continuous crystallization in microfluidic devices, and illustrates their use for various applications related to crystallization of small organic molecules. ...

  11. antiferroelectric liquid crystals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of phases in antiferroelectric liquid crystals Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: The free energy of antiferroelectric liquid crystal which takes into account polar order...

  12. antiferroelectric liquid crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of phases in antiferroelectric liquid crystals Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: The free energy of antiferroelectric liquid crystal which takes into account polar order...

  13. eSales Interactive Mapping -Viewing and Printing Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eSales Interactive Mapping - Viewing and Printing Introduction Our eSales system includes an integrated interactive map facility. This allows you to view and print maps for all lots on offer. Various

  14. Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material Erin Baker Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty; Environmental policy 2 #12;1 Introduction This paper contains supplementary material for "Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement

  15. Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014 | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    July-August 2014 Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014 The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings...

  16. Corrosion of Partially Crystallized Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Using existing data on corrosion of partially crystallized, simulated, high-level waste glasses, coefficients were introduced to evaluate the cumulative influence of secondary effects, such as residual stresses or concentration gradients on product consistency test response. As compared to predictions based solely on residual glass composition effects, the results showed that cristobalite, eucryptite, and nepheline had a higher-than-predicted impact on glass corrosion, while the effects of baddeleyite, hematite, calcium-zirconium silicate, and zircon were close to those predicted. The effects of acmite and lithium silicate were opposite to those expected based on their compositions. The analysis revealed important limitations of the databases currently available. Better understanding of corrosion phenomena will require quantitative composition data, microscopic characterization of pristine and corroded surfaces, and long-term tests with glass coupons or monoliths.

  17. Alternative Views on Knowledge: Presentation of Open Learner Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Susan

    a learner with a graphical view of their Bayesian learner model. STyLE-OLM [2] works with the learner

  18. Loop Quantum Gravity: An Inside View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Thiemann

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a (relatively) non -- technical summary of the status of the quantum dynamics in Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG). We explain in detail the historical evolution of the subject and why the results obtained so far are non -- trivial. The present text can be viewed in part as a response to an article by Nicolai, Peeters and Zamaklar [hep-th/0501114]. We also explain why certain no go conclusions drawn from a mathematically correct calculation in a recent paper by Helling et al [hep-th/0409182] are physically incorrect.

  19. Better Buildings Network View, March 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher|for1, 20114, 2013Better NewsNetwork View

  20. TotalView | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003Tool ofTopo II:7.1 7.0 8.04.2 7.6 16.6TotalView

  1. Lake View Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°,ILEDSGP/joinHavasuPalmdaleLake View

  2. View from the Bridge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report | DepartmentTRUVictor Der About Us VictorView

  3. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  4. Cold neutron scattering in imperfect deuterium crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Adamczak

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The differential cross sections for cold neutron scattering in mosaic deuterium crystals have been calculated for various target temperatures. The theoretical results are compared with the recent experimental data for the neutron wavelengths $\\lambda\\approx$~1--9~\\AA. It is shown that the structures of observed Bragg peaks can be explained by the mosaic spread of about $3^{\\circ}$ and contributions from a~limited number of crystal orientations. Such a~crystal structure should be also taken into account in ultracold neutron upscattering due to the coherent phonon annihilation in solid deuterium.

  5. Shearing Flows in Liquid Crystal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Timothy

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . The director field is the realization of local averaging to de- scribe the natural state in a nematic liquid crystal, Figure 1.1. For any natural alignment of the liquid crystal, n?, one prescribes that W (n?,?n?) = 0. Since the director field is used... derivative of h by the formula D Dt h(t,x) = ?h? t +(u · ~?)h. The acceleration is of the liquid crystal material through the point x is given by a(t,x) = Du Dt . Following the classical approach one assumes that for every open subset Wt ??, trav- eling along...

  6. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  7. NMR and NQR parameters of ethanol crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milinkovic, M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric field gradients and chemical shielding tensors of the stable monoclinic crystal phase of ethanol are computed. The projector-augmented wave (PAW) and gauge-including projector-augmented wave (GIPAW) models in the periodic plane-wave density functional theory are used. The crystal data from X-ray measurements, as well as the structures where either all atomic, or only hydrogen atom positions are optimized in the density functional theory are analyzed. These structural models are also studied by including the semi-empirical Van der Waals correction to the density functional theory. Infrared spectra of these five crystal models are calculated.

  8. Changes in mobility of plastic crystal ethanol during its transformation into the monoclinic crystal state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanz, Alejandro, E-mail: alejandro.sanz@csic.es; Nogales, Aurora; Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Puente-Orench, Inés [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France) [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, ICMA-CSIC, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Jiménez-Ruiz, Mónica [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Transformation of deuterated ethanol from the plastic crystal phase into the monoclinic one is investigated by means of a singular setup combining simultaneously dielectric spectroscopy with neutron diffraction. We postulate that a dynamic transition from plastic crystal to supercooled liquid-like configuration through a deep reorganization of the hydrogen-bonding network must take place as a previous step of the crystallization process. Once these precursor regions are formed, subsequent crystalline nucleation and growth develop with time.

  9. Semiconductor liquid crystal composition and methods for making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Li, Liang-shi

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor liquid crystal compositions and methods for making such compositions are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention is directed to a liquid crystal composition including a solvent and semiconductor particles in the solvent. The solvent and the semiconductor particles are in an effective amount in the liquid crystal composition to form a liquid crystal phase.

  10. Styrene Purification and Recovery Using Freeze Crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heist, J. A.; Wrobel, P. J.

    Lab tests have demonstrated the ability to separate styrene from ABS and SAN plastics wastes by cooling the waste until the styrene begins to crystallize. The same process that recovers styrene from these wastes can be used to purify styrene...

  11. Nanoparticle-chiral nematic liquid crystal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Jeffrey C. (Jeffrey Christopher), 1981-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of the fabrication of a one-dimensional photonic crystal without time-reversal and space-inversion symmetries was pursued. Theoretical studies predict that such a system would exhibit unusual optical ...

  12. Thermophysical parameters of the LBO crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechin, Sergei G [Scientific-Research Institute of Radioelectronics and Laser Technology at the N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zuev, A V; Fokin, A S [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Aviation Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kokh, Aleksandr E [V.S.Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Moiseev, N V; Popov, Petr A; Sidorov, Aleksei A [Acad. I. G. Petrovskii Bryansk State University, Bryansk (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermophysical parameters (linear thermal expansion coefficients, thermal conductivities, and heat capacity) of the lithium triborate (LBO) crystal are measured and compared with previously published data. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  13. Crystallization of carbon tetrachloride in confined geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Crystallization of carbon tetrachloride in confined geometries Adil Meziane1 , Jean-Pierre E 40 71 08 #12;2 Abstract The thermal behaviour of carbon tetrachloride confined in silica gels

  14. Electrically driven photonic crystal nanocavity devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shambat, Gary; Petykiewicz, Jan; Mayer, Marie A; Majumdar, Arka; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James; Haller, Eugene E; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in photonic crystal nanocavities is fueled by advances in device performance, particularly in the development of low-threshold laser sources. Effective electrical control of high performance photonic crystal lasers has thus far remained elusive due to the complexities associated with current injection into cavities. A fabrication procedure for electrically pumping photonic crystal membrane devices using a lateral p-i-n junction has been developed and is described in this work. We have demonstrated electrically pumped lasing in our junctions with a threshold of 181 nA at 50K - the lowest threshold ever demonstrated in an electrically pumped laser. At room temperature we find that our devices behave as single-mode light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which when directly modulated, have an ultrafast electrical response up to 10 GHz corresponding to less than 1 fJ/bit energy operation - the lowest for any optical transmitter. In addition, we have demonstrated electrical pumping of photonic crystal nanobeam LEDs...

  15. Method for solid state crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nolas, George S.; Beekman, Matthew K.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for high quality crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates is presented. The synthesis of high quality pure phase crystals has been complicated by the simultaneous formation of both clathrate type-I and clathrate type-II structures. It was found that selective, phase pure, single-crystal growth of type-I and type-II clathrates can be achieved by maintaining sufficient partial pressure of a chemical constituent during slow, controlled deprivation of the chemical constituent from the primary reactant. The chemical constituent is slowly removed from the primary reactant by the reaction of the chemical constituent vapor with a secondary reactant, spatially separated from the primary reactant, in a closed volume under uniaxial pressure and heat to form the single phase pure crystals.

  16. The Crystal Method: Asteroseismology of BPM 37093

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Metcalfe; M. H. Montgomery; A. Kanaan

    2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 40 years have passed since Ed Salpeter and others predicted that the carbon/oxygen cores of the coolest white dwarf stars in our Galaxy will theoretically crystallize. This effect has a dramatic impact on the calculated ages of cool white dwarfs, but until recently we have had no way of testing the theory. In 1992, pulsations were discovered in the massive potentially crystallized white dwarf BPM 37093, and in 1999 the theoretical effects of crystallization on the pulsation modes were determined. Observations from two Whole Earth Telescope campaigns in 1998 and 1999, combined with a new model-fitting method using a genetic algorithm, are now giving us the first glimpse inside of a crystallized star.

  17. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  18. Imaging with Spherically Bent Crystals or Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consists of two parts: Part I describes the working principle of a recently developed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, where the astigmatism of spherically bent crystals is being used with advantage to record spatially resolved spectra of highly charged ions for Doppler measurements of the ion-temperature and toroidal plasmarotation- velocity profiles in tokamak plasmas. This type of spectrometer was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, and its concept was recently adopted for the design of the ITER crystal spectrometers. Part II describes imaging schemes, where the astigmatism has been eliminated by the use of matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or reflectors. These imaging schemes are applicable over a wide range of the electromagnetic radiation, which includes microwaves, visible light, EUV radiation, and x-rays. Potential applications with EUV radiation and x-rays are the diagnosis of laserproduced plasmas, imaging of biological samples with synchrotron radiation, and lithography.

  19. Enhancement of crystal homogeneity of protein crystals under application of an external alternating current electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, H.; Uda, S.; Fujiwara, K.; Nozawa, J. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Tachibana, M. [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0027 (Japan); Kojima, K. [Department of Education, Yokohama Soei University, 1 Miho-tyou, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-0015 (Japan)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction rocking-curve measurements were performed on tetragonal hen egg white (HEW) lysozyme crystals grown with and without the application of an external alternating current (AC) electric field. The crystal quality was assessed by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for each rocking curve. For two-dimensional maps of the FWHMs measured on the 440 and the 12 12 0 reflection, the crystal homogeneity was improved under application of an external electric field at 1 MHz, compared with that without. In particular, the significant improvement of the crystal homogeneity was observed for the 12 12 0 reflection.

  20. Method for reducing energy losses in laser crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atherton, L.J.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.H.

    1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for reducing energy losses in crystals is disclosed which comprises: a. heating a crystal to a temperature sufficiently high as to cause dissolution of microscopic inclusions into the crystal, thereby converting said inclusions into point-defects, and b. maintaining said crystal at a given temperature for a period of time sufficient to cause said point-defects to diffuse out of said crystal. Also disclosed are crystals treated by the process, and lasers utilizing the crystals as a source of light. 12 figs.

  1. Demixing cascades in cluster crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigel B. Wilding; Peter Sollich

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In a cluster crystal, each lattice site is occupied by multiple soft-core particles. As the number density is increased at zero temperature, a `cascade' of isostructural phase transitions can occur between states whose site occupancy differs by unity. For low but finite temperature, each of these transitions terminates in a critical point. Using tailored Monte Carlo simulation techniques we have studied such demixing cascades in systems of soft particles interacting via potentials of the generalized exponential form $u(r)=\\epsilon\\exp[-(r/\\sigma)^n]$. We have estimated the critical parameters of the first few transitions in the cascade as a function of the softness parameter $n$. The critical temperature and pressure exhibit non-monotonic behaviour as $n$ is varied, although the critical chemical potential remains monotonic. The trends for the pressure and chemical potential are confirmed by cell model calculations at zero temperature. As $n\\to 2^+$, all the transitions that we have observed are preempted by melting although we cannot rule out that clustering transitions survive at high density.

  2. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  3. Liquid crystal variable retarders in atomic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furst, J.E.; Yu, D.H.; Hayes, P.A.; DSouza, C.M.; Williams, J.F. [Physics Department, Centre for Atomic, Molecular, and Surface Physics, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands. WA. 6907 (Australia)] [Physics Department, Centre for Atomic, Molecular, and Surface Physics, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands. WA. 6907 (Australia)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The applications of liquid crystal variable retarders in the production of spin-polarized electrons and in the determination of the polarization of optical radiation from atoms excited by polarized electrons are discussed. The advantages of using liquid crystal variable retarders in the measurement of Stokes parameters are insensitivity to the incident photon direction, large transmission diameter, variable retardation over large wavelength range without mechanical movement, and {ital in} {ital situ} calibration. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. DeepView: A collaborative framework for distributed microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parvin, B.; Taylor, J.; Cong, G.

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines the motivation, requirements, and architecture of a collaborative framework for distributed virtual microscopy. In this context, the requirements are specified in terms of (1) functionality, (2) scalability, (3) interactivity, and (4) safety and security. Functionality refers to what and how an instrument does something. Scalability refers to the number of instruments, vendor-specific desktop workstations, analysis programs, and collaborators that can be accessed. Interactivity refers to how well the system can be steered either for static or dynamic experiments. Safety and security refers to safe operation of an instrument coupled with user authentication, privacy, and integrity of data communication. To meet these requirements, we introduce three types of services in the architecture: Instrument Services (IS), Exchange Services (ES), and Computational Services (CS). These services may reside on any host in the distributed system. The IS provide an abstraction for manipulating different types of microscopes; the ES provide common services that are required between different resources; and the CS provide analytical capabilities for data analysis and simulation. These services are brought together through CORBA and its enabling services, e.g., Event Services, Time Services, Naming Services, and Security Services. Two unique applications have been introduced into the CS for analyzing scientific images either for instrument control or recovery of a model for objects of interest. These include: in-situ electron microscopy and recovery of 3D shape from holographic microscopy. The first application provides a near real-time processing of the video-stream for on-line quantitative analysis and the use of that information for closed-loop servo control. The second application reconstructs a 3D representation of an inclusion (a crystal structure in a matrix) from multiple views through holographic electron microscopy. These application require steering external stimuli or computational parameters for a particular result. In a sense, ''computational instruments'' (symmetric multiprocessors) interact closely with data generated from ''experimental instruments'' (unique microscopes) to conduct new experiments and bring new functionalities to these instruments. Both of these features exploit high-performance computing and low-latency networks to bring novel functionalities to unique scientific imaging instruments.

  5. Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of shapes of crystals are important: (i) growth shape and (ii) equilibrium shape Surface/interface energy surfaces. The joining of two phases creates an interface. (Two orientations of the same crystalline phase

  6. Development of single crystal filaments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milewski, J.V.; Shoultz, R.A.; Bourque-McConnell, M.M.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program just completed addresses a route to a more efficient longer-lasting electric light bulb filament. All current filaments for light bulbs are metallic in nature. They are subject to embrittlement with age (large grain growth) and relatively high vapor pressures which limits their operating temperature. There is evidence which suggests advantages to using high temperature refractory single crystal fibers as a filament for a light bulb. These refractory materials may include materials such as hafnium or tantalum carbide which have melting points about 500{degrees}C higher than tungsten. Another advantage is that single crystal fibers have a very high degree of crystalline perfection with very few voids and dislocations. Without these imperfections, the atomic mobility at high temperatures is highly restricted. Thus single crystal fibers are very stable at high temperature and will last longer. The efficiencies result from running these single crystal ceramic fiber filaments at higher temperatures and the higher emissivity of the carbide filaments compared to tungsten. The amount of visible light is proportional to the 4the power of the temperature thus a 500{degrees}C higher operating give about a 3-fold increase in radiation in the visible range. The program accomplishments can be summarized as follows: (1) Single crystal fibers of JfC sufficient crystal quality for light bulb filament applications were made. (2) The HfC fiber furnace growth chamber, power control and data collection system was developed for the laboratory scale plant. (3) method for mounting and apparatuses for testing the single crystal fiber filaments were developed and built.

  7. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Science Subject Feed Drug Retention Times Center for Human Reliability Studies (2007) 29 > Oleoresin Capsicum...

  8. ALS Technique Gives Novel View of Lithium Battery Dendrite Growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Technique Gives Novel View of Lithium Battery Dendrite Growth Print Lithium-ion batteries, popular in today's electronic devices and electric vehicles, could gain significant...

  9. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Science Subject Feed Carbon Dioxide Sequestering Using Microalgal Systems Daniel J. Stepan; Richard E. Shockey; Thomas A....

  10. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distributi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Lessons from Large-Scale Renewable Energy Integration Studies: Preprint Bird, L.; Milligan, M. Small punch...

  11. Newbie question: How to view commercial/residential load profile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Newbie question: How to view commercialresidential load profile datasets? Home > Groups > Buildings I have downloaded SAM (20112414) and cannot access open the .tar files. Help...

  12. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems Print Studying and identifying molecules at the mesoscale has always been challenging-even the best microscopes and spectrometers have...

  13. Better Buildings Network View | September 2014 | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Financing Program: On-Bill Financing Brings Lenders and Homeowners On Board Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 On-Bill Financing for Energy Efficiency Improvements...

  14. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine | OSTI...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Biology And Medicine Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET Volkow, N.D. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United...

  15. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - July 2013 | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood View - October 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Home Accomplishments History Better Buildings Partners Stories Interviews Videos Contact Us...

  16. Combining crystallography and EPR: crystal and solution structures of the multidomain cochaperone DnaJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barends, Thomas R. M., E-mail: thomas.barends@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Brosi, Richard W. W. [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Steinmetz, Andrea; Scherer, Anna; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Eschenbach, Jessica; Lorenz, Thorsten [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Seidel, Ralf [MPI for Molecular Physiology, Dortmund (Germany); Shoeman, Robert L.; Zimmermann, Sabine [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Bittl, Robert [Freie Universitat Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schlichting, Ilme; Reinstein, Jochen [MPI for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal part of T. thermophilus DnaJ unexpectedly showed an ordered GF domain and guided the design of a construct enabling the first structure determination of a complete DnaJ cochaperone molecule. By combining the crystal structures with spin-labelling EPR and cross-linking in solution, a dynamic view of this flexible molecule was developed. Hsp70 chaperones assist in a large variety of protein-folding processes in the cell. Crucial for these activities is the regulation of Hsp70 by Hsp40 cochaperones. DnaJ, the bacterial homologue of Hsp40, stimulates ATP hydrolysis by DnaK (Hsp70) and thus mediates capture of substrate protein, but is also known to possess chaperone activity of its own. The first structure of a complete functional dimeric DnaJ was determined and the mobility of its individual domains in solution was investigated. Crystal structures of the complete molecular cochaperone DnaJ from Thermus thermophilus comprising the J, GF and C-terminal domains and of the J and GF domains alone showed an ordered GF domain interacting with the J domain. Structure-based EPR spin-labelling studies as well as cross-linking results showed the existence of multiple states of DnaJ in solution with different arrangements of the various domains, which has implications for the function of DnaJ.

  17. Crystal Chemistry of Th in Fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y Luo; J Rakovan; Y Tang; M Lupulescu; J Hughes; Y Pan

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the complementary use of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we present in this paper the first direct results on the site occupancy of thorium in the fluorapatite structure and the structural distortion created by its substitution. Structure refinements based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data from synthetic Th-doped fluorapatite indicates that Th substitutes almost exclusively in the M2 site. A single-crystal X-ray study of natural fluorapatite from Mineville, New York, also indicated that substituting heavy scatterers (including Th) are concentrated in the apatite M2 site, but definitive site assignments of specific elements were not possible. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was used to probe the local structure of Th in the synthetic fluorapatite (single-crystal form) with a Th concentration of roughly 20000 ppm, as well as Th in the natural Mineville fluorapatite (powder form) with a Th concentration of {approx}2000 ppm. The EXAFS fitting results also indicate that Th partitions into the M2 site and yield a {approx}0.05-0.08 {angstrom} decrease of average M2-O bond distances associated with local structure distortions that are not obtainable from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  18. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiederrecht, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Galili, T.; Levanon, H. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Physical Chemistry

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  19. Nano-crystal growth in cordierite glass ceramics studied with X-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bras, Wim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-crystal growth in cordierite glass ceramics studiedmatrix in which crystalline nano-crystals are embedded. Bysample the Cr containing spinel nano crystals. In these SEM

  20. Performance viewing and editing in ASSESS Outsider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snell, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Key, B.; Bingham, B. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (US)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytic System and Software for Evaluation of Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) Facility module records site information in the path elements and areas of an Adversary Sequence Diagram. The ASSESS Outsider evaluation module takes this information and first calculates performance values describing how much detection and delay is assigned at each path element and then uses the performance values to determine most-vulnerable paths. This paper discusses new Outsider capabilities that allow the user to view how elements are being defeated and to modify some of these values in Outsider. Outsider now displays how different path element segments are defeated and contrasts the probability of detection for alternate methods of defeating a door (e.g., the lock or the door face itself). The user can also override element segment delays and detection probabilities directly during analysis in Outsider. These capabilities allow users to compare element performance and to verify correct path element performance for all elements, not just those on the most-vulnerable path as is the case currently. Improvements or reductions in protection can be easily checked without creating a set of new facility files to accomplish it.

  1. A HYPERSPECTRAL VIEW OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P. [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Grandmont, F. [ABB Bomem Inc., 585 boulevard Charest est, Suite 300, Quebec, Quebec G1K 9H4 (Canada); Binette, L., E-mail: maxime.charlebois.1@ulaval.c, E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.c, E-mail: anne-pier.bernier.1@ulaval.c [Instituto de AstronomIa, UNAM, Ap.70-264, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}4959, {lambda}5007, H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}6548, {lambda}6584, and [S II] {lambda}6717, {lambda}6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Cadez et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [S II] {lambda}6717 /[S II] {lambda}6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  2. Quantum Calabi-Yau and Classical Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Okounkov; Nikolai Reshetikhin; Cumrun Vafa

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new duality involving topological strings in the limit of large string coupling constant. The dual is described in terms of a classical statistical mechanical model of crystal melting, where the temperature is inverse of the string coupling constant. The crystal is a discretization of the toric base of the Calabi-Yau with lattice length $g_s$. As a strong evidence for this duality we recover the topological vertex in terms of the statistical mechanical probability distribution for crystal melting. We also propose a more general duality involving the dimer problem on periodic lattices and topological A-model string on arbitrary local toric threefolds. The $(p,q)$ 5-brane web, dual to Calabi-Yau, gets identified with the transition regions of rigid dimer configurations.

  3. Ultrasonically assisted deposition of colloidal crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollmann, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.wollmann@griffithuni.edu.au [Lehrstuhl für Experimentalphysik 1 and Augsburg Centre for Innovative Technologies (ACIT), Universität Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane 4111 (Australia); Patel, Raj B. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane 4111 (Australia); Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J. [Lehrstuhl für Experimentalphysik 1 and Augsburg Centre for Innovative Technologies (ACIT), Universität Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstr. 4, 80779 München (Germany)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Colloidal particles are a versatile physical system which have found uses across a range of applications such as the simulation of crystal kinetics, etch masks for fabrication, and the formation of photonic band-gap structures. Utilization of colloidal particles often requires a means to produce highly ordered, periodic structures. One approach is the use of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to direct the self-assembly of colloidal particles. Previous demonstrations using standing SAWs were shown to be limited in terms of crystal size and dimensionality. Here, we report a technique to improve the spatial alignment of colloidal particles using traveling SAWs. Through control of the radio frequency power, which drives the SAW, we demonstrate enhanced quality and dimensionality of the crystal growth. We show that this technique can be applied to a range of particle sizes in the ?m-regime and may hold potential for particles in the sub-?m-regime.

  4. Density functional theory for carbon dioxide crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yiwen; Mi, Jianguo, E-mail: mijg@mail.buct.edu.cn; Zhong, Chongli [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a density functional approach to describe the solid?liquid phase transition, interfacial and crystal structure, and properties of polyatomic CO{sub 2}. Unlike previous phase field crystal model or density functional theory, which are derived from the second order direct correlation function, the present density functional approach is based on the fundamental measure theory for hard-sphere repulsion in solid. More importantly, the contributions of enthalpic interactions due to the dispersive attractions and of entropic interactions arising from the molecular architecture are integrated in the density functional model. Using the theoretical model, the predicted liquid and solid densities of CO{sub 2} at equilibrium triple point are in good agreement with the experimental values. Based on the structure of crystal-liquid interfaces in different planes, the corresponding interfacial tensions are predicted. Their respective accuracies need to be tested.

  5. Three Views of a Secret in Relativistic Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadas K. Nakamura

    2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown three different views in relativistic thermodynamics can be derived from the basic formulation proposed by van Kampen and Israel. The way to decompose energy-momentum into the reversible and irreversible parts is not uniquely determined, and different choices result in different views. The effect of difference in the definition of a finite volume is also considered.

  6. O'Leary outlines policy views at confirmation hearing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, J.

    1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In her confirmation hearing, Secretary O'Leary outlined her views on various controversial issues. Among these were management of Yucca Mountain and the search for a nuclear waste repository, research on alternative fuels, encouragement of the use of renewable energy sources, and her views on intergrated resource planning.

  7. Updatable Process Views for Adapting Large Process Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Updatable Process Views for Adapting Large Process Models: The proView Demonstrator Jens Kolb. The increasing adoption of process-aware information sys- tems (PAISs) has resulted in large process model collections. To support users having different perspectives on these processes and related data, a PAIS should

  8. Anisotropic wave propagation in nematic liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Biscari; Antonio DiCarlo; Stefano S. Turzi

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the fact that quantitative experimental data have been available for more than forty years now, nematoacoustics still poses intriguing theoretical and experimental problems. In this paper, we prove that the main observed features of acoustic wave propagation through a nematic liquid crystal cell -- namely, the anisotropy of sound velocity and its frequency dependence -- may be plausibly explained by a first-gradient continuum theory characterized by a hyperelastic anisotropic response from an evolving relaxed configuration. We compare and contrast our proposal with a competing theory where the liquid crystal is modeled as an isotropically compressible, anisotropic second-gradient fluid.

  9. Interface control and snow crystal growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessica Li; Laura P. Schaposnik

    2015-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of snow crystals is dependent on the temperature and saturation of the environment. In the case of dendrites, Reiter's local two-dimensional model provides a realistic approach to the study of dendrite growth. In this paper we obtain a new geometric rule that incorporates interface control, a basic mechanism of crystallization that is not taken into account in the original Reiter's model. By defining two new variables, growth latency and growth direction, our improved model gives a realistic model not only for dendrite but also for plate forms.

  10. Seismic Crystals And Earthquake Shield Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Baykant Alagoz; Serkan Alagoz

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically demonstrate that earthquake shield made of seismic crystal can damp down surface waves, which are the most destructive type for constructions. In the paper, seismic crystal is introduced in aspect of band gaps (Stop band) and some design concepts for earthquake and tsunami shielding were discussed in theoretical manner. We observed in our FDTD based 2D elastic wave simulations that proposed earthquake shield could provide about 0.5 reductions in magnitude of surface wave on the Richter scale. This reduction rate in magnitude can considerably reduce destructions in the case of earthquake.

  11. A Benchmark Construction of Positron Crystal Undulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tikhomirov, Victor V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of a positron crystal undulator (CU) is addressed. The ways to assure both the maximum intensity and minimum spectral width of positron CU radiation are outlined. We claim that the minimum CU spectrum width of 3 -- 4% is reached at the positron energies of a few GeV and that the optimal bending radius of crystals planes in CU ranges from 3 to 5 critical bending radii for channeled particles. Following suggested approach a benchmark positron CU construction is devised and its functioning is illustrated using the simulation method widely tested by experimental data.

  12. Simulation of the hard-sphere crystal–melt interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidchack, Ruslan L.; Laird, Brian Bostian

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of coexisting crystal- and fluidlike domains that are quite mobile on the time scale of the simulation. We also observe the creation and propagation of vacancies into the bulk crystal....

  13. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Wednesday, 25 July 2012 00:00 Nature's proteins set a high bar...

  14. Two-dimensional Photonic Crystals Fabricated by Nanoimprint Lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, A.

    We report on the process parameters of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) for the fabrication of two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystals. The nickel mould with 2-D photonic crystal patterns covering the area up to 20mm² is ...

  15. Thin magnetic crystals are path to ferromagnetic graphene | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thin magnetic crystals are path to ferromagnetic graphene January 23, 2015 The crystal structure of CrI3 includes hexagonal nets formed by Cr atoms (blue) with magnetic moments...

  16. Engineering light using large area photonic crystal devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Sheila (Sheila N.), 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals are fabricated structures composed of a periodic arrangement of materials with differing indices of refraction. This research has focused on the realization of two distinct photonic crystal structures in ...

  17. Experimental studies of melting and crystallization processes in planetary interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krawczynski, Michael James

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Melting and crystallization processes on the Earth and Moon are explored in this thesis, and the topics of melt generation, transport, and crystallization are discussed in three distinct geologic environments: the Moon's ...

  18. Coupled mode theory for photonic crystal cavity-waveguide interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    nanocavity in a two-dimensional photonic crystal," Nature 425, 944­947 (2003) 16. A. Yariv. Optical in a two- dimensional photonic-crystal slab," App. Phys. Lett. 83, 407­409 (2003) 5. T. Asano et al. "A

  19. A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share Philip Coppens An x-ray crystal structure solved by Philip Coppens has been chosen as one of the world's...

  20. Nepheline crystallization in boron-rich alumino-silicate glasses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nepheline crystallization in boron-rich alumino-silicate glasses as investigated by multi-nuclear NMR, Raman, & Mö Nepheline crystallization in boron-rich alumino-silicate...

  1. Computer-aided rational solvent selection for pharmaceutical crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jie, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solvents play an important role in crystallization, a commonly used separation and purification technique in the pharmaceutical, chemical and food industries. They affect crystal properties such as particle size distribution, ...

  2. Morphological control of silicalite-1 crystals using microemulsion mediated growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung Ju

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mediated synthesis, it is concluded that the surfactant??silicate interactions are primarily responsible for the modulation of crystal morphology observed. The results indicate that surfactant adsorption on the growing crystal surface, not the confined...

  3. 5.841 Crystal Structure Refinement, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Peter

    This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and ...

  4. 5.067 Crystal Structure Refinement, Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Peter

    This course in crystal structure refinement examines the practical aspects of crystal structure determination from data collection strategies to data reduction and basic and advanced refinement problems of organic and ...

  5. Anomalous phenomena and spectral tailoring in photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghebrebrhan, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals are recently discovered meta-materials whose optical properties arise from periodic refractive index variations. In this thesis I examine various aspects of photonic crystals including a self-assembled ...

  6. Designing the properties of dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    crystal fibers," Electron. Lett. 35, 63-64 (1999). 4. P. J. Bennet, T. M. Monro, and D. J. Richardson

  7. Crystal Engineering Morphosynthesis of Rhombododecahedral Silver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Limin

    of metal nanoparticles; examples include silver nanorods,[17] nanoprisms,[18] and nano- cubes.[19] Hollow of primary building blocks into hollow spheres or cages,[9­14] as these hollow structures with nanometer, and as photonic crystals.[15] In most cases, however, only spherical hollow structures have been obtained either

  8. Crystal fields in UO2 - revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakotte, Heinz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rajatram, R [NMSU/UNIV OF N.C.; Kern, S [COLORADO STATE UNIV; Mcqueeney, R J [AMES LAB; Lander, G H [EUROPEAN COMMISIONS, JRC; Robinson, R A [BRAGG INSTITUTE

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in order to re-investigate the crystal-field ground state and the level splitting in UO{sub 2}. Previous INS studies on UO{sub 2} by Amorelli et al. [Physical Review B 15, 1989, 1856] uncovered four excitations at low temperatures in the 150-180 meV range. Considering the dipole-allowed transitions, only three of these transitions could be explained by the published crystal-field model. Our INS results on a different UO{sub 2} sample revealed that the unaccounted peak at about 180 meV is a spurious one, and thus not intrinsic to UO{sub 2}. In good agreement with Amoretti's results, we corroborated that the ground-state of UO{sub 2} is the {Lambda}{sub 5} triplet, and we computed that the fourth- and six-order crystal field parameters are V{sub 4} = -116 meV and V{sub 6} = 26 meV, respectively. We also studied the INS response of the non-magnetic U{sub 0.4}Th{sub 0.6}O{sub 2}. The splitting for this thorium-doped compound is similar to the one of UO{sub 2}, which orders antiferromagnetically at low temperatures. Therefore, we can conclude that magnetic interactions only weakly perturb the energy level splitting, which is dominated by strong crystal fields.

  9. Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Hopkins, Patrick; Reinke, Charles; Kim, Bongsang

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic thermoelectric materials comprising phononic crystals can simultaneously have a large Seebeck coefficient, high electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials can enable improved thermoelectric devices, such as thermoelectric generators and coolers, with improved performance. Such synthetic thermoelectric materials and devices can be fabricated using techniques that are compatible with standard microelectronics.

  10. Nanobeam photonic crystal cavity quantum dot laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    1. O. Painter, R. K. Lee, A. Scherer, A. Yariv, J. D. O'Brien, P. D. Dapkus, and I. Kim, "Two, J. Vuckovi´c, and A. Scherer, "Planar photonic crystal nanolasers (I): Porous cavity lasers," IEICE coupling factor," Phys. Rev. B 75, 195313 (2007). 9. S. Strauf, K. Hennessy, M. T. Rakher, Y.-S. Choi, A

  11. Nanostructured Calcite Single Crystals with Gyroid Morphologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steiner, Ullrich

    , the unconstrained crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) leads to the precipitation of brittle rhombohedral of these factors on CaCO3 nucleation and growth, which can also lead to control over polymorph and orientation. It is becoming increas- ingly apparent that the formation of crystalline CaCO3 is often preceded by an amorphous

  12. Discotic Liquid Crystals and Polymersomes: Molecule Goniometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ya-Wen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................ 6 1.2.4 Discotic Liquid Crystals ................................................... 9 1.2.5 Microfluidics .................................................................... 11 1.3. Dissertation Outline... ........................................................... 15 2.1.2 Di-block Copolymers, Lipids, and Particles .................... 15 2.1.3 Reactive Fluorophores ...................................................... 16 2.1.4 Surface Functionalization Chemicals...

  13. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Kway, Wayne L. (Fremont, CA); DeLoach, Laura D. (Manteca, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Chai, Bruce H. T. (Oviedo, FL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yb.sup.3+ and Nd.sup.3+ doped Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F, where the Sr.sup.2+ and F.sup.- ions are replaced by related chemical species, have similar properties.

  14. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, S.A.; Kway, W.L.; DeLoach, L.D.; Krupke, W.F.; Chai, B.H.T.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Yb[sup 3+] and Nd[sup 3+] doped Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F, where the Sr[sup 2+] and F[sup [minus

  15. Statistical Analysis of Crystallization Database Links Protein Physico-Chemical Features with Crystallization Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusco, Diana

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant method for obtaining atomic-scale information about biological macromolecules. Despite the success of the technique, obtaining well diffracting crystals still critically limits going ...

  16. Liquid crystals and Q-tensors The free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    Liquid crystals and Q-tensors The free energy A temperature-dependent model Mathematical results #12;Liquid crystals and Q-tensors The free energy A temperature-dependent model Mathematical results, Non-isothermal nematic liquid crystals flows with the Ball-Majumdar free energy, Ann. Mat. Pura Appl

  17. Giant Plasticity of a Quantum Crystal Ariel Haziot,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balibar, Sébastien

    Giant Plasticity of a Quantum Crystal Ariel Haziot,1 Xavier Rojas,1 Andrew D. Fefferman,1 John R crystals may irreversibly deform. This phenomenon is known as plasticity and it is due to the motion and in the zero temperature limit, helium 4 crystals present a giant plasticity that is anisotropic and reversible

  18. A multi-scale analysis of the crystallization of amorphous germanium telluride using ab initio simulations and classical crystallization theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anantram, M. P.

    simulations and classical crystallization theory Jie Liu, Xu Xu, Lucien Brush, and M. P. Anantram Citation telluride using ab initio simulations and classical crystallization theory Jie Liu,1 Xu Xu,1 Lucien Brush,2

  19. Crystal structure and interaction dependence of the crystal-melt interfacial free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidchack, Ruslan L.; Laird, Brian Bostian

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    we examine, via molecular simulation, the interfacial free energies for a large number of systems interacting with inverse-power potentials of varying range, crystal orientation, and crystal structure (fcc or bcc). By focusing on a general class... of model interaction potentials 0031-9007= understanding of the dependence of .0013 on is largely empirical. In 1950, Turnbull values of .0013 for a variety of materials, ob- from nucleation rate experiments. ed a strong correlation between the en- per...

  20. Growth and characterization of diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siva Sankari, R. [Department of Physics, Agni College of Technology, Thalambur, Chennai 603103 (India); Perumal, Rajesh Narayana, E-mail: r.shankarisai@gmail.com [Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam, Chennai 603110 (India)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate (DACS) is one of the most promising inorganic dielectric crystals with exceptional mechanical properties. Good quality crystals of DACS were grown by using solution method in a period of 30 days. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis in order to establish their crystalline nature. Thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis were performed for the crystal. Several solid state physical parameters have been determined for the grown crystals. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss and AC conductivity of the grown crystal were studied as a function of frequency and temperature has been calculated and plotted. - Highlights: • Diammonium copper disulphate is grown for the first time and CCDC number obtained. • Thermal analysis is done to see the stability range of the crystals. • Band gap and UV cut off wavelength of the crystal are determined to be 2.4 eV and 472.86 nm, respectively. • Dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity are plotted as a function of applied field. - Abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate is one of the most promising inorganic crystals with exceptional dielectric properties. A good quality crystal was harvested in a 30-day period using solution growth method. The grown crystal was subjected to various characterization techniques like single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis. Unit cell dimensions of the grown crystal have been identified from XRD studies. Functional groups of the title compounds have been identified from FTIR studies. Thermal stability of the samples was checked by TG/DTA studies. Band gap of the crystal was calculated. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss were studied as a function of frequency of the applied field. AC conductivity was plotted as a function of temperature.

  1. Mountain View Electric Association, Inc- Energy Efficiency Credit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mountain View Electric Association, Inc. (MVEA) and Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., MVEA’s power supplier, will pay credits to MVEA customers who install qualifying energy...

  2. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Kaltenbach...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    want to go anywhere else," said Clifton. Clifton, founder of Clifton View Homes, offers net zero energy homes and home designs. Clifton has been building high-performance homes...

  3. A Transformational View of Cartography W. R. Tobler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    A Transformational View of Cartography W. R. Tobler ABSTRACT. Cartographic transformations aliases are between points, lines, and areas. Substantive transformations occur in map interpolation transformational grammars, as originally devised for linguistics.2, 4 A similar, though less ambitious, attempt

  4. Sea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    through oil drilling. It is refined and separated, most easily by boiling In the oil industry, the term "North Sea" o`en includes areasSea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View Maurizio

  5. How can I view submitted materials? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    view submitted materials? Home > Groups > 2014 Geothermal Case Study Challenge Submitted by NickL on 6 May, 2014 - 07:41 1 answer Points: 0 For various reasons, you may want to...

  6. Plan-view Trajectory Estimation with Dense Stereo Background Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darrell, T.

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a known environment, objects may be tracked in multiple views using a set of back-ground models. Stereo-based models can be illumination-invariant, but often have undefined values which inevitably lead to foreground ...

  7. NEWS & VIEWS synchrotron or helium-lamp studies. But

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    NEWS & VIEWS synchrotron or helium-lamp studies. But the low energy of the laser photons raises that of a conventional metal. The effects of projection have led to detailed quantitative insights into the properties

  8. axis view techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 An Asymmetric, Energetic Type Ic Supernova Viewed Off-Axis, and a Link to Gamma-Ray Bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Type Ic supernovae, the explosions following the...

  9. ViewDependent Refinement of Progressive Meshes Hugues Hoppe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    to these criteria. The algorithm exploits view coherence, supports frame rate regulation, and is found to require not contribute to the image (Figure 12a). While these faces are typically culled early in the rendering pipeline

  10. View-Dependent Refinement of Progressive Meshes Hugues Hoppe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Michael

    to these criteria. The algorithm exploits view coherence, supports frame rate regulation, and is found to require in the rendering pipeline, this processing incurs a cost. Similarly, it is often unnecessary to render faces

  11. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Viewed Documents for Fission And Nuclear Technologies Behavior of spent nuclear fuel in water pool storage Johnson, A.B. Jr. (1977) 78 Estimation of gas leak rates through very...

  12. Challenges in Applying Formal Methods An SME View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Challenges in Applying Formal Methods An SME View Mathieu Clabaut Systerel, Aix-en-Provence, France classical B and event B to design safety related systems in an SME. 1 Activities Systerel is an SME doing

  13. A Narrower Spectrum for a Wider View of Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wider View of Matter July 9, 2014 Bookmark and Share Ultra-high-resolution dispersive optics of the new inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectrometer (top) and IXS spectrum of...

  14. A Unified View on Speeded Categorization Hongbin Gu 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Chuanshu

    A Unified View on Speeded Categorization Hongbin Gu 1 Chuanshu Ji 2 1 Introduction The research of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; hongbin

  15. Development of AeroView: an interactive flow diagnostics laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galls, Samuel Fernando

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research includes the development of a set of experimental flow-diagnostics techniques for low speed aerodynamics applications and an interactive software for flow field data acquisition and presentation called AeroView. The data collection...

  16. Host nutrition and infectious disease: an ecological view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Val H.; Jones II, Tyrees P.; Smith, Marilyn S.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrition is typically discussed in terms of maintaining a proper diet and avoiding nutrient deficiency diseases. However, nutrition can also be viewed from an ecological standpoint: mammalian hosts and their pathogens ...

  17. Kinetics of growth of spinel crystals in a borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alton, Jesse; Plaisted, Trevor J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of the kinetics of spinel crystallization in a high-level waste (HLW) glass were studied: (1) the effect of nucleation agents on the number density (ns) of spinel crystals, (2) crystallization kinetics in a crushed glass, and (3) crystallization kinetics in a glass preheated at T > TL (liquidus temperature). In glass lacking in nucleation agents, ns was a strong function of temperature. In glasses with noble metals (Rh, Ru, Pd, and Pt), ns increased by up to four orders of magnitude and was nearly independent of temperature. The kinetics of spinel crystallization in crushed glass lacking nucleation agents was dominated by surface crystallization and was described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation with the Avrami exponent n {at} 0.5. For application to HLW glass melter processing, it was necessary to preheat glass at T > TL to eliminate the impact of temperature history and surface crystallization on crystal nucleation and growth. In the temperature range of glass processing, crystals descend under gravity when they reach a critical size. Below this critical size, crystallization kinetics is described by the KJMA equation and above the critical size by the Hixson-Crowell equation. At low temperatures, at which glass viscosity is high and diffusion is slow, the KJMA equation represents crystal growth from nucleation to equilibrium. As ns increases, the temperature interval of the transition from the KJMA to Hixson-Crowell regime shifts to a higher temperature.

  18. Kinetics of growth of spinel crystals in a borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alton, Jesse; Plaisted, Trevor J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of the kinetics of spinel crystallization in a high-level waste (HLW) glass were studied: (1) the effect of nucleation agents on the number density (ns) of spinel crystals, (2) crystallization kinetics in a crushed glass, and (3) crystallization kinetics in a glass preheated at T>TL (liquidus temperature). In glass lacking in nucleation agens, ns was a strong function of temperature. In glasses with noble metals (Rh, Ru, Pd, and Pt), ns increased by up to four orders of magnitude and was nearly independent of temperature. The kinetics of spinel crystallization in crushed glass lacking nucleation agents was dominated by surface crystallization and was described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation with the Avrami exponent n~0.5. For application to HLW glass melter processing, it was necessary to preheat glass at T>TL to eliminate the impact of temperature history and surface crystallization on crystal nucleation and growth. In the temperature range of glass processing, crystals descend under gravity when they reach a critical size. Below this critical size, crystallization kinetics is described by the KJMA equation and above the critical size by the Hixson-Crowell equation. At low temperatures, at which glass viscosity is high and diffusion is slow, the KJMA equation represents crystal growth from nucleation to equilibrium. As ns increases, the temperature interval of the transition from the KJMA to Hisxon-Crowell regime shifts to a higher temperature.

  19. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alp, Ercan E. (Bolingbrook, IL); Mooney, Timothy M. (Westmont, IL); Toellner, Thomas (Green Bay, WI)

    1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

  20. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.

    1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut ({alpha}=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5--30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the {micro}eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator. 7 figs.

  1. Low Radioactivity Crystals for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dafinei, Ioan [Sezione INFN di Roma, P-le Aldo Moro 2, Roma I-00185 (Italy)

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of crystals needed for rare events physics represent a relatively new, exciting challenge in the field of materials science and engineering. Extremely low concentration of radioactive impurities and very high crystal perfection is required for the crystals to be used in experiments in which the main concerns are the reduction of the background and the use of high sensitivity detectors. A further complication is the fact that for an experiment with a significant discovery potential, relatively large quantities of crystals are needed. The present work makes a review of the general problems related to the production of crystals for rare events physics and gives details related to the production of the TeO{sub 2} crystals needed for the major experiment in this field using bolometric technique, namely the CUORE experiment. The potential use of crystals for future double beta decay experiments is also discussed.

  2. Influence of Substrate on Crystallization in Polythiophene/fullerene Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C He; D Germack; J Kline; D Delongchamp; D Fischer; C Snyder; M Toney; J Kushmerick; L Richter

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The nanoscale morphology of the active layer in organic, bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is crucial to device performance. Often a combination of casting conditions and post deposition thermal treatment is used to optimize the morphology. In general, the development of microscopic crystals is deleterious, as the exciton diffusion length is {approx}10 nm. We find that the microscopic crystallization behavior in polythiophene/fullerene blends is strongly influenced by the substrate on which the BHJ is cast. With a silicon oxide substrate, the crystal nucleation density is high and significant crystallization occurs at a temperature of 140 C. On more hydrophobic substrates, significantly higher temperatures are required for observable crystallization. This difference is attributed to the interfacial segregation of the PCBM, controlled by the substrate surface energy. The substrate dependence of crystallization has significant implications on the fullerene crystal growth mechanisms and practical implications for device studies.

  3. Partial rotational lattice order–disorder in stefin B crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renko, Miha [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Taler-Ver?i?, Ajda [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Miheli?, Marko [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Žerovnik, Eva [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Turk, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.turk@ijs.si [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystal lattice disorders are a phenomenon which may hamper the determination of macromolecular crystal structures. Using the case of the crystal structure of stefin B, identification of rotational order–disorder and structure determination are described. At present, the determination of crystal structures from data that have been acquired from twinned crystals is routine; however, with the increasing number of crystal structures additional crystal lattice disorders are being discovered. Here, a previously undescribed partial rotational order–disorder that has been observed in crystals of stefin B is described. The diffraction images revealed normal diffraction patterns that result from a regular crystal lattice. The data could be processed in space groups I4 and I422, yet one crystal exhibited a notable rejection rate in the higher symmetry space group. An explanation for this behaviour was found once the crystal structures had been solved and refined and the electron-density maps had been inspected. The lattice of stefin B crystals is composed of five tetramer layers: four well ordered layers which are followed by an additional layer of alternatively placed tetramers. The presence of alternative positions was revealed by the inspection of electron-density score maps. The well ordered layers correspond to the crystal symmetry of space group I422. In addition, the positions of the molecules in the additional layer are related by twofold rotational axes which correspond to space group I422; however, these molecules lie on the twofold axis and can only be related in a statistical manner. When the occupancies of alternate positions and overlapping are equal, the crystal lattice indeed fulfills the criteria of space group I422; when these occupancies are not equal, the lattice only fulfills the criteria of space group I4.

  4. Symmetric Satellite Swarms and Choreographic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham Boyle; Jun Yong Khoo; Kendrick Smith

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce a natural dynamical analogue of crystalline order, which we call choreographic order. In an ordinary (static) crystal, a high degree of symmetry may be achieved through a careful arrangement of the fundamental repeated elements. In the dynamical analogue, a high degree of symmetry may be achieved by having the fundamental elements perform a carefully choreographed dance. For starters, we show how to construct and classify all symmetric satellite constellations. Then we explain how to generalize these ideas to construct and classify choreographic crystals more broadly. We introduce a quantity, called the "choreography" of a given configuration. We discuss the possibility that some (naturally occurring or artificial) many-body or condensed-matter systems may exhibit choreographic order, and suggest natural experimental signatures that could be used to identify and characterize such systems.

  5. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin (Trinity)

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  6. DHS Internship Summary-Crystal Assembly at Different Length Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishchenko, L

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I was part of a project in which in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor growth and dissolution of atomic and colloidal crystals. At both length scales, the chemical environment of the system greatly altered crystal growth and dissolution. Calcium phosphate was used as a model system for atomic crystals. A dissolution-reprecipitation reaction was observed in this first system, involving the conversion of brushite (DCPD) to octacalcium phosphate (OCP). In the second system, polymeric colloidal crystals were dissolved in an ionic solvent, revealing the underlying structure of the crystal. The dissolved crystal was then regrown through an evaporative step method. Recently, we have also found that colloids can be reversibly deposited in situ onto an ITO (indium tin oxide) substrate via an electrochemistry setup. The overall goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the mechanisms that control crystallization and order, so that these might be controlled during material synthesis. Controlled assembly of materials over a range of length scales from molecules to nanoparticles to colloids is critical for designing new materials. In particular, developing materials for sensor applications with tailorable properties and long range order is important. In this work, we examine two of these length scales: small molecule crystallization of calcium phosphate (whose crystal phases include DCPD, OCP, and HAP) and colloidal crystallization of Poly(methyl methacrylate) beads. Atomic Force Microscopy is ideal for this line of work because it allows for the possibility of observing non-conducting samples in fluid during growth with high resolution ({approx} 10 nm). In fact, during atomic crystal growth one can observe changes in atomic steps, and with colloidal crystals, one can monitor the individual building blocks of the crystal. Colloids and atoms crystallize under the influence of different forces acting at different length scales as seen in Table 1. In particular, molecular crystals, which are typically dominated by ionic and covalent bonding, are an order of magnitude more strongly bonded than colloidal crystals. In molecular crystals, ordering is driven by the interaction potentials between molecules. By contrast, colloidal assembly is a competition between the repulsive electrostatic forces that prevent aggregation in solution (due to surface charge), and short-range van der Waals and entropic forces that leads to ordering. Understanding atomic crystallization is fundamentally important for fabrication of tailorable crystalline materials, for example for biological or chemical sensors. The transformation of brushite to OCP not only serves as a model system for atomic crystal growth (applicable to many other crystal growth processes), but is also important in bone cements. Colloidal crystals have unique optical properties which respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli, making them very important for sensing applications. The mechanism of colloidal crystal assembly is thus fundamentally important. Our in situ dissolution and regrowth experiments are one good method of analyzing how these crystals pack under different conditions and how defect sites are formed and filled. In these experiments, a silica additive was used to strengthen the colloidal crystal during initial assembly (ex situ) and to increase domain size and long range order. Reversible electrodeposition of colloids onto a conductive substrate (ITO in our case) is another system which can further our knowledge of colloidal assembly. This experiment holds promise of allowing in situ observation of colloidal crystal growth and the influence of certain additives on crystal order. The ultimate goal would be to achieve long range order in these crystals by changing the surface charge or the growth environment.

  7. UCN transport simulation in solid deuterium crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Pokotilovski

    2012-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The extraction efficiency of ultracold neutrons from cryogenic moderators depends critically on the neutron transparency of the moderator material. The Monte Carlo simulation of the probability of the UCN going out from non-ideal (disordered) solid deuterium crystals has been performed. It was based on the use of the correlation function describing the density fluctuations in a disordered material, the latter being inferred from the measured very low neutron energy total cross sections for this material.

  8. Dynamics of Quantum Dot Photonic Crystal Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Ellis; Ilya Fushman; Dirk Englund; Bingyang Zhang; Yoshihisa Yamamoto; Jelena Vuckovic

    2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum dot photonic crystal membrane lasers were fabricated and the large signal modulation characteristics were studied. We find that the modulation characteristics of quantum dot lasers can be significantly improved using cavities with large spontaneous emission coupling factor. Our experiments show, and simulations confirm, that the modulation rate is limited by the rate of carrier capture into the dots to around 30GHz in our present system.

  9. Method for fabricating apatite crystals and ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soules, Thomas F.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Tassano, Jr., John B.; Hollingsworth, Joel P.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of crystallizing Yb:C-FAP [Yb.sup.3+:Ca.sub.5(PO.sub.4).sub.3F], by dissolving the Yb:C-FAP in an acidic solution, following by neutralizing the solution. The present invention also provides a method of forming crystalline Yb:C-FAP by dissolving the component ingredients in an acidic solution, followed by forming a supersaturated solution.

  10. Predicting Polymeric Crystal Structures by Evolutionary Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhu; Vinit Sharma; Artem R Oganov; Rampi Ramprasad

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX proved to be a tool that enables accurate and reliable prediction of structures for a given chemical composition. Here we extend this method to predict the crystal structure of polymers by performing constrained evolutionary search, where each monomeric unit is treated as one or several building blocks with fixed connectivity. This greatly reduces the search space and allows the initial structure generation with different sequences and packings using these blocks. The new constrained evolutionary algorithm is successfully tested and validated on a diverse range of experimentally known polymers, namely polyethylene (PE), polyacetylene (PA), poly(glycolic acid) (PGA), poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), poly(oxymethylene) (POM), poly(phenylene oxide) (PPO), and poly (p-phenylene sulfide) (PPS). By fixing the orientation of polymeric chains, this method can be further extended to predict all polymorphs of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), and the complex linear polymer crystals, such as nylon-6 and cellulose. The excellent agreement between predicted crystal structures and experimentally known structures assures a major role of this approach in the efficient design of the future polymeric materials.

  11. New organic crystals for pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, G; Zaitseva, N; Cherepy, N; Newby, J; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient, readily-available, low-cost, high-energy neutron detectors can play a central role in detecting illicit nuclear weapons since neutrons are a strong indication for the presence of fissile material such as Plutonium and Highly-Enriched Uranium. The main challenge in detecting fast neutrons consists in the discrimination of the signal from the gamma radiation background. At present, the only well-investigated organic crystal scintillator for fast neutron detection, in a n/{gamma} mixed field, is stilbene, which while offering good pulse shape discrimination, is not widely used because of its limited availability and high cost. In this work we report the results of our studies made with a number of new organic crystals, which exhibit pulse shape discrimination for detection of fast neutrons. In particular 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene features a light yield higher than anthracene and a Figure of Merit (FOM) for the pulse shape discrimination better than stilbene. New crystals are good candidates for the low-cost solution growth method, thus representing promising organic scintillators for widespread deployment for high-energy neutron detection.

  12. Biogas From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition Biogas From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition Presentation about the value proposition for...

  13. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sangsoo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Yong-Hoon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kihyun; Shin, Yoo Gyun [Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC) method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND) devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) when heating up to 600?°C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  14. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); DeLoach, Laura D. (Manteca, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Keszler, Douglas A. (Corvallis, OK)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM'(BO.sub.3)F, where M, M' are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO.sub.3 F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator.

  15. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, K.I.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.; Keszler, D.A.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM{prime}(BO{sub 3})F, where M, M{prime} are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO{sub 3}F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator. 6 figs.

  16. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  17. Method for surface treatment of a cadmium zinc telluride crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Ralph (5420 Lenore Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Burger, Arnold (753 Adkisson La., Nashville, TN 37205); Chen, Kuo-Tong (7800 River Fork Dr., Nashville, TN 37221); Chang, Henry (6535 Premier Dr., Apt. A7, Nashville, TN 37209)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that reduces surface roughness (increases surface planarity) and provides an oxide coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve resolution. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of lactic acid and bromine in ethylene glycol, following the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, oxidizing the CZT crystal surface.

  18. Solution-grown crystals for neutron radiation detectors, and methods of solution growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia; Carman, M Leslie; Payne, Steve

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic crystal according to one embodiment includes an organic crystal comprising diphenylacetylene and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the crystal having physical characteristics of formation from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source. A system according to one embodiment includes an organic crystal comprising diphenylacetylene and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the crystal having physical characteristics of formation from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source; and a photodetector for detecting the signal response of the organic crystal. Methods of making such crystals are also provided.

  19. Use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive liquid crystals for hypersonic boundary-layer transition detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Croll, R.H.; Kuntz, D.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive (SSS/TI) liquid crystals (LCs) has been evaluated as a boundary-layer transition detection technique for hypersonic flows. Experiments were conducted at Mach 8 in the Sandia National Laboratories Hypersonic Wind Tunnel using a flat plate model at near zero-degree angle of attack over the freestream unit Reynolds number range 1.2-5.8x10{sup 6}/ft. Standard 35mm color photography and Super VHS color video were used to record LC color changes due to varying surface shear stress during the transition process for a range of commercial SSS liquid crystals. Visual transition data were compared to an established method using calorimetric surface heat-transfer measurements to evaluate the LC technique. It is concluded that the use of SSS/TI LCs can be an inexpensive, safe, and easy to use boundary-layer transition detection method for hypersonic flows. However, a valid interpretation of the visual records requires careful attention to illumination intensity levels and uniformity, lighting and viewing angles, some prior understanding of the general character of the flow, and the selection of the appropriate liquid crystal for the particular flow conditions.

  20. Unexpected crystal and magnetic structures in MnCu4In and MnCu4Sn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provino, A.; Paudyal, D.; Fornasini, ML; Dhiman, I.; Dhar, SK.; Das, A.; Mudryk, Y.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, VK

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We discovered a new compound MnCu4In with its own hexagonal structure type (hP12-P63mc, ternary ordered derivative of the hexagonal MgZn2-type) that becomes ferromagnetic at TC = 540 K. This transition temperature is higher than that found in the MnCu2In and MnCu2Sn alloys. In contrast, the homologous compound MnCu4Sn, which crystallizes in the cubic MgCu4Sn-type, orders antiferromagnetically with TN = 110 K. The neutron diffraction studies show ferromagnetic spin orientation in the {1 0 1} plane in MnCu4In with a magnetic moment of 4.5 ?B/Mn at 22 K, and a corresponding value of 4.7 ?B/Mn in the antiferromagnetic MnCu4Sn with propagation vector View the MathML source. The first-principles electronic structure calculations show that the unexpected difference in both magnetic and crystal structures of MnCu4In and MnCu4Sn is due to the difference in the Mn-3d bands and exchange interactions relating to different crystal anisotropy, coordination numbers, and interatomic distances.

  1. A Submarine Welded Ignimbrite-Crystal-Rich Sandstone Facies Associatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ignimbrite-Crystal-Rich Sandstone Facies Association In The Cambrian Tyndall Group, Western Tasmania, Australia Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  2. HYDROGEN CHEMISORPTION ON Pt SINGLE CRYSTAL SURFACES IN ACIDIC SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    t for the Adsorption of Hydrogen on Pt Single CrystalSubmitted to Surface Science HYDROGEN CHEMISORPTION ON Ptheats of adsorption of hydrogen on (111) and (100) sur-

  3. Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.4 The split-step Fourier method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 #12;iv CONTENTS 2

  4. Surface treatment and protection method for cadmium zinc telluride crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water.

  5. Surface Treatment And Protection Method For Cadium Zinc Telluride Crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treatment of the surface of a CdZnTe (CZT) crystal that provides a native dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals. A two step process is disclosed, etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and after attachment of electrical contacts, passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH4F and 10 w/o H2O2 in water.

  6. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies on manganous malate crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, J., E-mail: smartlabindia@gmail.com; Lincy, A., E-mail: lincymaria@gmail.com; Mahalakshmi, V.; Saban, K. V. [Smart Materials Analytic Research and Technology (SMART), Department of Physics, St. Berchmans College (India)] [Smart Materials Analytic Research and Technology (SMART), Department of Physics, St. Berchmans College (India)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prismatic crystals of manganous malate have been prepared by controlled ionic diffusion in hydrosilica gel. The structure was elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystals are orthorhombic with space group Pbca. Vibrations of the functional groups were identified by the FTIR spectrum. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) were carried out to explore the thermal decomposition pattern of the material. Structural information derived from FTIR and TG-DTA studies is in conformity with the single crystal XRD data.

  7. Observation of scattering and absorption centers in lead fluoride crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Achenbach

    2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, lead fluoride is used as a fast and compact material in electromagnetic calorimetry. Excellent optical and mechanical properties of the pure Cherenkov crystals are necessary for the A4 collaboration to perform a measurement of the nucleon's strange form factors. Visible scattering and absorption centers as well as surface damages have been investigated to characterize the quality of more than one thousand crystals. Besides, transmittance measurements have been performed on all crystals to reveal absorption bands produced by intrinsic or impurity related point-structure defects. As a consequence, 89 crystals had to be replaced by the Chinese manufacturer SICCAS.

  8. LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroshi [Center for Planetary Science, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

  9. Insights into the crystal chemistry of Earth materials rendered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    density between bonded pairs of atoms for a relatively large number of oxide and silicate crystals and siloxane molecules. The distribution of the electron density shows that...

  10. Damage due to salt crystallization in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noushine Shahidzadeh Bonn; Francois Bertrand; Daniel Bonn

    2009-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate salt crystallization in porous media that can lead to their disintegration. For sodium sulfate we show for the first time experimentally that when anhydrous crystals are wetted with water, there is very rapid growth of the hydrated form of sulfate in clusters that nucleate on anhydrous salt micro crystals. The molar volume of the hydrated crystals being four times bigger, the growth of these clusters can generate stresses in excess of the tensile strength of the stone and lead therefore to damage.

  11. Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ); Wu, Chung P. (Trenton, NJ)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

  12. Crystal_Reporting_9_1 LSUNO_LSUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , products and services. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates will not be responsible for any loss, costs........................................................................................3 Running Crystal Reports......................................................................................................13 Run a Single Report for Multiple Departments

  13. Diffraction crystals for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1982-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  14. Diffraction crystal for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ice, Gene E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sparks, Jr., Cullie J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  15. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Nature's proteins set a high bar for nanotechnology. Macromolecules forged from peptide chains of amino acids, these...

  16. Variation in Machinability of Single Crystal Materials in Micromachining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact on the critical DOC at which such materials can becritical depth of cut and crystallographic orientation was found on single crystal materials (

  17. Electric field effects in liquid crystals with dielectric dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D. [Kent State University

    2014-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is focused on the experimental and theoretical exploration of the coupling of an externally applied electric field and a nematic liquid crystal.

  18. Temperature-insensitive phase-matched optical harmonic conversion crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barker, C.E.; Eimerl, D.; Velsko, S.P.; Roberts, D.

    1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature-insensitive, phase-matched harmonic frequency conversion of laser light at a preferred wavelength of 1.064 microns can be achieved by use of a crystal of deuterated l-arginine phosphate. The crystal is cut and oriented so that the laser light propagates inside the crystal along one of several required directions, which correspond to a temperature-insensitive, phase-matching locus. The method of measuring and calculating the temperature-insensitive, phase-matching angles can be extended to other fundamental wavelengths and other crystal compositions. 12 figures.

  19. Temperature-insensitive phase-matched optical harmonic conversion crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barker, Charles E. (Sunnyvale, CA); Eimerl, David (Livermore, CA); Velsko, Stephan P. (Livermore, CA); Roberts, David (Sagamore Hills, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature-insensitive, phase-matched harmomic frequency conversion of laser light at a preferred wavelength of 1.064 microns can be achieved by use of a crystal of deuterated l-arginine phosphate. The crystal is cut and oriented so that the laser light propagates inside the crystal along one of several required directions, which correspond to a temperature-insensitive, phase-matching locus. The method of measuring and calculating the temperature-insensitive, phase-matching angles can be extended to other fundamental wavelengths and other crystal compositions.

  20. A computational investigation of nucleation processes in organic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckham, Gregg Tyler

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleation processes are ubiquitous in nature and technology. For instance, cloud formation in the atmosphere, the casting of metals, protein crystallization, biomineralization, the production of porous materials, and ...

  1. Method for the preparation of photochromic insulating crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abraham, Marvin M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boldu, Jose L. (Mexico City, MX); Chen, Yok (Oak Ridge, TN); Orera, Victor M. (Zaragosa, ES)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing reversible-photochromic magnesium oxide (MgO) crystals. Single crystals of MgO doped with both lithium (Li) and nickel (Ni) are grown by a conventional arc fusion method. The as-grown crystals are characterized by an amber coloration. The crystals lose the amber coloration and become photochromic when they are thermochemically reduced by heating at temperatures greater than 1000.degree. K. in a hydrogen atmosphere. Alternate irradiation with UV and visible light result in rejuvenation and bleaching of the amber coloration, respectively.

  2. View from the Bridge: Commercial Vehicle Perspective | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report | DepartmentTRUVictor Der About Us VictorViewView

  3. Orientationally Glassy Crystals of Janus Spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan Jiang; Jing Yan; Jonathan K. Whitmer; Stephen M. Anthony; Erik Luijten; Steve Granick

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Colloidal Janus spheres in water (one hemisphere attractive and the other repulsive) assemble into two-dimensional hexagonal crystals with orientational order controlled by anisotropic interactions. We exploit the decoupled translational and rotational order to quantify the orientational dynamics. Via imaging experiments and Monte Carlo simulations we demonstrate that the correlations in the orientation of individual Janus spheres exhibit glasslike dynamics that can be controlled via the ionic strength. Thus, these colloidal building blocks provide a particularly suitable model glass system for elucidating nontrivial dynamics arising from directional interactions, not captured by the consideration of just translational order.

  4. Crystallization of M-CSF.alpha.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pandit, Jayvardhan (Mystic, CT); Jancarik, Jarmila (Walnut Creek, CA); Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Koths, Kirston (El Cerrito, CA); Halenbeck, Robert (San Rafael, CA); Fear, Anna Lisa (Oakland, CA); Taylor, Eric (Oakland, CA); Yamamoto, Ralph (Martinez, CA); Bohm, Andrew (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and to a crystalline M-CSF produced thereby. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  5. Plasmonic crystal enhanced refractive index sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Benedikt; Devaux, Eloïse; Genet, Cyriaque, E-mail: genet@unistra.fr; Ebbesen, Thomas W. [ISIS and icRFC, University of Strasbourg and CNRS, 8 allée Gaspard Monge, 67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate experimentally how the local anisotropy of the dispersion relation of surface plasmon modes propagating over periodic metal gratings can lead to an enhancement of the figure of merit of refractive index sensors. Exploiting the possibility to acquire defocused images of the Fourier space of a highly stable leakage radiation microscope, we report a twofold increase in sensing sensitivity close to the band gap of a one-dimensional plasmonic crystal where the anisotropy of the band structure is the most important. A practical sensing resolution of O(10{sup ?6}) refractive index units is demonstrated.

  6. Super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purlys, V.; Gailevi?ius, D.; Peckus, M.; Gadonas, R. [Laser Research Center, Department of Quantum Electronics, Vilnius University, Saul?tekio Ave. 10, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Maigyte, L. [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Colom 11, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Staliunas, K. [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Colom 11, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Pg. Lluís Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and experimentally show the mechanism of beam super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals, specifically by periodic (in propagation direction) structure of layers of concentric rings. The physical mechanism behind the effect is an inverse scattering cascade of diffracted wave components back into on- and near-axis angular field components, resulting in substantial enhancement of intensity of these components. We explore the super-collimation by numerical calculations and prove it experimentally. We demonstrate experimentally the axial field enhancement up to 7 times in terms of field intensity.

  7. Surface Vibrations in a Model Hcp Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; DEWITTE, FW.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and F. W. de Wette, Phys. Rev. B4, 1661 (1971). PHYSICA L RE VIE W 8 VOLUME 6, NUMBE R 2 15 JULY 1972 Surface Vibrations in a Model hcp Crystal R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A @ M University, College Station, Texas 77843 and G. P.... Alldredge and F. %. de bette Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 16 February 1972) The surface relaxation, vibrational modes, mean-square amplitudes of vibration, etc. , have been calculated for the (0001) surface...

  8. Crystal McDonald | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergyRev. 1)Crystal McDonald About

  9. Silicon Crystals Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPowerSilcio SA Jump to: navigation,Crystals

  10. Crystal, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCpWing County, Minnesota:Crystal, Minnesota: Energy

  11. Toward photonic-crystal metamaterials: Creating magnetic emitters in photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    explore the possibility of designing photonic crystals to act as magnetic metamaterials: structures the constituents of natural para- and ferromagnetic materials, these synthetic magnetic emitters can be designed, quantitatively demonstrating that point-defect modes can be designed to have a magnetic character. We choose

  12. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices *

  13. Levitated crystals and quasicrystals of metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goree, John A [Dept Phys and Astron., University of Iowa

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    New scientific and technological opportunities exist by marrying dusty plasma research with metamaterials. Specifically, by balancing control and self-assembly, certain laboratory plasmas can become a generic levitation platform for novel structure formation and nanomaterial synthesis. We propose to experimentally investigate two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) levitated structures of metamaterials and their properties. Such structures can self assemble in laboratory plasmas, similar to levitated dust crystals which were discovered in the mid 1990's. Laboratory plasma platform for metamaterial formation eliminates substrates upon which most metamaterials have to be supported. Three types of experiments, with similar setups, are discussed here. Levitated crystal structures of metamaterials using anisotropic microparticles are the most basic of the three. The second experiment examines whether quasicrystals of metamaterials are possible. Quasicrystals, discovered in the 1980's, possess so-called forbidden symmetries according to the conventional crystallography. The proposed experiment could answer many fundamental questions about structural, thermal and dynamical properties of quasicrystals. And finally, how to use nanoparticle coated microparticles to synthesize very long carbon nanotubes is also described. All of the experiments can fit inside a standard International Space Station locker with dimensions of 8-inch x 17-inch X 18-inch. Microgravity environment is deemed essential in particular for large 3D structures and very long carbon nanotube synthesis.

  14. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  15. Stretchable liquid crystal blue phase gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Castles; S. M. Morris; J. M. C. Hung; M. M. Qasim; A. D. Wright; S. Nosheen; S. S. Choi; B. I. Outram; S. J. Elston; C. Burgess; L. Hill; T. D. Wilkinson; H. J. Coles

    2014-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystalline polymers are materials of considerable scientific interest and technological value to society [1-3]. An important subset of such materials exhibit rubber-like elasticity; these can combine the remarkable optical properties of liquid crystals with the favourable mechanical properties of rubber and, further, exhibit behaviour not seen in either type of material independently [2]. Many of their properties depend crucially on the particular mesophase employed. Stretchable liquid crystalline polymers have previously been demonstrated in the nematic, chiral nematic, and smectic mesophases [2,4]. Here were report the fabrication of a stretchable gel of blue phase I, which forms a self-assembled, three-dimensional photonic crystal that may have its optical properties manipulated by an applied strain and, further, remains electro-optically switchable under a moderate applied voltage. We find that, unlike its undistorted counterpart, a mechanically deformed blue phase exhibits a Pockels electro-optic effect, which sets out new theoretical challenges and new possibilities for low-voltage electro-optic devices.

  16. In all cases, ALOX5AP and its synonyms were highlighted automati-cally in each view. To highlight disease terms in these views, we

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    the results easy to explore. The novo|seek search box interface allows the user to enter a term (or the production of substances that cause inflammation, such as leukotrienes1. When we entered ALOX5AP as a search a simple view (title, journal and author), a snippet view (a simple view and the search term with flanking

  17. View Management for Driver Assistance in an HMD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cases. Nevertheless, an increasing number of companies have started to develop light- weight of (currently handheld) mobile augmented reality applications. For cars, this setup seems equally plausible factors need to be considered by future application developers. In view of this question we performed

  18. Analyzing and Visualizing Cosmological Simulations with ParaView

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodring, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Heitmann, Katrin [ORNL; Ahrens, James P [ORNL; Fasel, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hsu, Chung-Hsing [ORNL; Habib, Salman [ORNL; Pope, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of large cosmological sky surveys - ushering in the era of precision cosmology - has been accompanied by ever larger cosmological simulations. The analysis of these simulations, which currently encompass tens of billions of particles and up to a trillion particles in the near future, is often as daunting as carrying out the simulations in the first place. Therefore, the development of very efficient analysis tools combining qualitative and quantitative capabilities is a matter of some urgency. In this paper, we introduce new analysis features implemented within ParaView, a fully parallel, open-source visualization toolkit, to analyze large N-body simulations. A major aspect of ParaView is that it can live and operate on the same machines and utilize the same parallel power as the simulation codes themselves. In addition, data movement is in a serious bottleneck now and will become even more of an issue in the future; an interactive visualization and analysis tool that can handle data in situ is fast becoming essential. The new features in ParaView include particle readers and a very efficient halo finder that identifies friends-of-friends halos and determines common halo properties, including spherical overdensity properties. In combination with many other functionalities already existing within ParaView, such as histogram routines or interfaces to programming languages like Python, this enhanced version enables fast, interactive, and convenient analyses of large cosmological simulations. In addition, development paths are available for future extensions.

  19. Viewable image size Max view area (W x H)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    standards Environmental Preset resolutions Presets / user settings Viewing adjustments Rotating screen768 WXGA+: 1440x900 1600x900 WSXGA+: 1680x1050 Standard presets: VGA/DisplayPort: 26; DVI-D: 25; user 90 degrees from landscape to portrait (requires image rotation support from graphics controller

  20. Viewable image size Max view area (W x H)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    standards Environmental Preset resolutions Presets / user settings Viewing adjustments Rotating screen: 1920x1200 Standard presets: 30; user settings: 20 Tilt: 30° back, 0° forward; lift: 4.3" (110mm rotation support from graphics controller) On screen display with digital user controls (8 languages

  1. Self-Calibration from Two Views Richard I. Hartley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Richard

    Self-Calibration from Two Views Richard I. Hartley G.E. CRD, Schenectady, NY, 12301. Email : hartley@crd.ge.com Abstract A new practical method is given for the self-calibration of a camera and calibration is computed from an analysis of point matches between the two images. The method requires

  2. Self-Calibration from Multiple Views with a Rotating Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Richard

    Self-Calibration from Multiple Views with a Rotating Camera Richard I. Hartley G.E. CRD, Schenectady, NY, 12301. Email : hartley@crd.ge.com Abstract. A new practical method is given for the self-calibration orientations of the camera and calibration is computed from an analysis of point matches between the images

  3. adaptive optics views: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optics views First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Design of an Adaptive Scanning Optical...

  4. General view on nuclear fission Karl-Heinz Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    General view on nuclear fission Karl-Heinz Schmidt Beatriz Jurado CENBG, CNRS/IN2 P3 Chemin du.amouroux@cea.fr 1 in2p3-00976648,version1-10Apr2014 #12;Abstract: A general approach to nuclear fission is described which ex- plains the complex appearance of fission observables by universal principles of theoretical

  5. Learning the Topology of Object Views Jan Wieghardt1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Würtz, Rolf P.

    Malsburg2,3 1 SIEMENS AG, CT SE 1, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81730 M¨unchen, Germany jan.wieghardt@mchp.siemens such a representation by deriving transformations between the different views of a given object, so that they can be pa, we construct such a representation by deriving transformations between the different visual

  6. NEWS AND VIEWS Modeling gene expression control using Omes Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dat H.

    NEWS AND VIEWS Modeling gene expression control using Omes Law Harmen J Bussemaker Department class of methods that fit simple mathematical models of transcription regulation to DNA microarray data factors (TFs) to specific sites in the genome is a crucial step in the molecular process controlling gene

  7. Home Timeslide View Flipcard Voice RecognitionApplication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Home Timeslide View Flipcard Voice RecognitionApplication Solar DefectAnalysis Search N O V E M B E EnergyPanels 4. The Future In Technology 5. Hands On Solar Training 6. Wind EnergySolutions ads by media R 1 0 , 2 0 Revolutionary ultrasonic nozzle can reduce water and energy used for cleaning by ten

  8. The view-based approach to dynamic inter-organizational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    The view-based approach to dynamic inter-organizational workflow cooperation Issam Chebbi, Samir Distributed Systems Group This paper presents a novel approach to inter-organizational workflow co- operation of workflows and their resources, thus providing powerful ways for inter- organizational workflow configuration

  9. Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide: A View of Lithium Ion Solvation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collum, David B.

    Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide: A View of Lithium Ion Solvation through a Glass-Bottom Boat BRETT L and reactivities, we were drawn to lithium hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS; (Me3Si)2NLi) by its promi- nence principles of lithium ion coordination chemistry.2 Understanding how solvation influences organolithium

  10. www.advmat.de www.MaterialsViews.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    by plasma- enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Methane (CH4) was used as the carbon source to synthesize. The strong protein-based adhesives found in marine mussel Mytilus edulis, provide an important insight for the solidification by oxidative chemical crosslinking.[21­24] From a chemical point of view, covalent crosslinking

  11. How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    How species interact Altering the Standard View on Trophic Ecology Roger Arditi and Lev R. Ginzburg, the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, in the research unit of Ecology and Evolution of ecology and evolution at Stony Brook University since 1977. He has published widely on theoretical

  12. View-Based Query Processing: On the Relationship Between Rewriting,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvanese, Diego

    amounts to computing the tuples satisfying the query in all databases consistent with the views. Rewriting in the setting of semistructured databases, and in particular for the basic query class in this setting, i-0311326, IIS-9908435, IIS-9978135, EIA-0086264, and ANI-0216467, by US-Israel BSF grant 9800096, by Texas

  13. The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    The Once and Future Warm Earth: A Paleoceanographic View Dr. Ted C. Moore, Jr., University of Michigan Predictions of climatic warming in the near future, if true, will approximate the very warm--and ended. In the early and mid Eocene the Arctic Ocean was ice-free and subtropical flora and fauna were

  14. news and views nucleotide binds to the polymerase and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schedl, Paul

    news and views nucleotide binds to the polymerase and before it is incorporated into DNA. Recent structures of several structurally diverse DNA polymerases complexed to DNA and nucleotide substrates have shown that their active sites adopt a closed conforma- tion upon binding to the correct nucleotide12

  15. Multiple Field of View MR Fluoroscopy Pelin Aksit,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    Multiple Field of View MR Fluoroscopy Pelin Aksit,1 J. Andrew Derbyshire,2 Jean-Michel Serfaty,1 by several investigators (1­ 8). Intravascular MR compares favorably with other clini- cal diagnostic methods and Ergin Atalar1* This work describes a real-time imaging and visualization tech- nique that allows

  16. NEWS & VIEWS X-RaY oPtiCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    NEWS & VIEWS X-RaY oPtiCS Clarity through a keyhole Janos Hajdu1,2 & Filipe R. n. C. maia2 are at 1 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo, as it does in conventional crystallography, but only on the wavelength used, the extent of ionization damage

  17. APOLLO OVER THE MOON A View From Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    #12;s Near ride #12;APOLLO OVER THE MOON A View From Orbit #12;#12;NASA SP-362 APOLLO OVER THE MOO Catalogingin Publication Data Main entry under title: Apollo over the moon. (NASA SP ;362) Bibliography: p. 251. 1. Moon-Photographs from space. 2. Project Apollo. I. Masursky, Harold, 1922- 11. Colton, George

  18. An Integrated View of Security Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldini, Alessandro

    An Integrated View of Security Analysis and Performance Evaluation: Trading QoS with Covert Channel@sti.uniurb.it Abstract. Security analysis and performance evaluation are two funda- mental activities in the system. This is accomplished by proposing a tool-supported methodology that combines noninterference-based security analysis

  19. On the Design of Crystallization-Based Separation Processes: Review and Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    flow sheets for separations based on fractional crystallization. A series of rules are derived that may Keywords: fractional crystallization, process design, process synthesis Introduction Crystallization. In spite of the popularity of this operation, exceeded in scope only by distillation processes

  20. Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals: a tutorial [Invited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystals: a tutorial [Invited] Jin Yan and Shin-Tson Wu@mail.ucf.edu Abstract: Blue phase liquid crystals exhibit several attractive features, such as self-assembled three, and submillisecond response time. This tutorial gives step-by-step introduction on basic blue- phase materials

  1. Electromagnetic space-time crystals. II. Fractal computational approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. N. Borzdov

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A fractal approach to numerical analysis of electromagnetic space-time crystals, created by three standing plane harmonic waves with mutually orthogonal phase planes and the same frequency, is presented. Finite models of electromagnetic crystals are introduced, which make possible to obtain various approximate solutions of the Dirac equation. A criterion for evaluating accuracy of these approximate solutions is suggested.

  2. Hydrogen plasma enhanced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen plasma enhanced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films K. Pangal,a) J. C August 1998; accepted for publication 21 October 1998 We report that a room temperature hydrogen plasma thermal crystallization of amorphous silicon time by a factor of five. Exposure to hydrogen plasma reduces

  3. InfoCrystal: A visual tool for information retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoerri, Anselm

    of interest. The InfoCrystal allows users to specify Boolean as well as vector-space queries graphically continuous, multi-variate fields that vary over space and time. Hence, the transformation problem the InfoCrystalTM, that can be used as a visualiza- tion tool as well as a visual query language to help

  4. Simultaneous SHG of orthogonally polarized fundamentals in single QPM crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -order parametric nonlinear processes in a single lithium niobate crystal is being undertaken using a new technique cascading interactions can be realized. The use of the higher QPM orders (3rd, 5th or7th) for the type-0, as the respective nonlinear coefficients are dzzz ~27 pm/V and dyyz ~ 4.7 pm/V in lithium niobate crystals. Possible

  5. Crystal engineering of zeolites with graphene Paul Gebhardt,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    - dimensional materials to engineer functional inorganic crystals. Introduction The morphology of zeolite that affect crystal synthesis.9­11 Zeolites are microporous materials widely used in industrial catalytic uncover a simple new method for controlling the synthesis of zeolitic materials and, through

  6. Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane 1 Funded by Environmental. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, Austin #12;Motivation No other chip based optical Similar to: Doping of Semiconductor 3 #12;4 Photonic Crystal Bio-Chemical Sensors Loncar et al, Appl. Phys

  7. Light trapping in photonic crystals Ken Xingze Wang,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Light trapping in photonic crystals Ken Xingze Wang,ab Zongfu Yu,bc Victor Liu,bd Aaswath Raman,b Yi Cuief and Shanhui Fan*b We consider light trapping in photonic crystals in the weak material-integrated absorption enhancement by light trapping is proportional to the photonic density of states. The tight bound

  8. Switchable Fresnel lens using polymer-stabilized liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Switchable Fresnel lens using polymer-stabilized liquid crystals Yun-Hsing Fan, Hongwen Ren@mail.ucf.edu http:/lcd.creol.ucf.edu Abstract: A switchable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using a polymer controllable liquid crystal Fresnel lens," Proc. SPIE 1168, 352-357 (1989). 2. J. S. Patel and K. Rastani

  9. Reflection of focused beams from opal photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonsson, Fredrik

    . Chutinan, "Full Three-Dimensional Photonic Bandgap Crystals at Near-Infrared Wavelengths," Science 289, 604Reflection of focused beams from opal photonic crystals Karri Varis, Marco Mattila Optoelectronics 10-14, D-55099 Mainz, Germany Abstract: We present a robust method for computing the reflection

  10. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCann, Michael P. (Oliver Springs, TN); Chen, Chung H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  11. Studying the magnetic properties of CoSi single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narozhnyi, V. N., E-mail: narozhnyivn@gmail.com; Krasnorussky, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Vereshchagin Institute for High Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic properties of CoSi single crystals have been measured in a range of temperatures T = 5.5-450 K and magnetic field strengths H {<=} 11 kOe. A comparison of the results for crystals grown in various laboratories allowed the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) = M(T)/H to be determined for a hypothetical 'ideal' (free of magnetic impurities and defects) CoSi crystal. The susceptibility of this ideal crystal in the entire temperature range exhibits a diamagnetic character. The {chi}(T) value significantly increases in absolute value with decreasing temperature and exhibits saturation at the lowest temperatures studied. For real CoSi crystals of four types, paramagnetic contributions to the susceptibility have been evaluated and nonlinear (with respect to the field) contributions to the magnetization have been separated and taken into account in the calculations of {chi}(T).

  12. Shallow melt apparatus for semicontinuous czochralski crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  13. Growing intermetallic single crystals using in situ decanting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrovic, Cedomir; Canfield, Paul; Mellen, Jonathan

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature metallic solution growth is one of the most successful and versatile methods for single crystal growth, and is particularly suited for exploratory synthesis. The method commonly utilizes a centrifuge at room temperature and is very successful for the synthesis of single crystal phases that can be decanted from the liquid below the melting point of the silica ampoule. In this paper, we demonstrate the extension of this method that enables single crystal growth and flux decanting inside the furnace at temperatures above 1200°C. This not only extends the number of available metallic solvents that can be used in exploratory crystal growth but also can be particularly well suited for crystals that have a rather narrow exposed solidification surface in the equilibrium alloy phase diagram.

  14. CrystalPlan: an Experiment Planning Tool for Crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zikovsky, Janik L [ORNL; Peterson, Peter F [ORNL; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL; Frost, Matthew J [ORNL; Hoffmann, Christina [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam time at large user program based x-ray and neutron scattering facilities is in high demand and always at a premium. CrystalPlan, a highly efficient experiment planning software has been developed to maximize the use of available beamtime per sample per experiment. This program can calculate and optimize the data coverage of a crystal in reciprocal space in a single-crystal diffraction time-of- flight experiment. CrystalPlan can help a user build an experiment plan that will acquire the most data possible, with sufficient coverage but limited redundancy, therefore increasing scientific productivity. A user friendly GUI including a 3D viewer, an automated coverage optimizer, and an option to reorient the crystal for the measurement of selected hkls on specific detector positions are among its useful features. A sample use case of the program with the TOPAZ beamline at SNS will be presented.

  15. EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR FORMULATION OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HLW GLASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATYAS J; HUCKLEBERRY AR; VIENNA JD; RODRIGUEZ CA

    2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, high-level waste (HLW) glasses have been formulated with a low liquideus temperature (T{sub L}), or temperature at which the equilibrium fraction of spinel crystals in the melt is below 1 vol % (T{sub 0.01}), nominally below 1050 C. These constraints cannot prevent the accumulation of large spinel crystals in considerably cooler regions ({approx} 850 C) of the glass discharge riser during melter idling and significantly limit the waste loading, which is reflected in a high volume of waste glass, and would result in high capital, production, and disposal costs. A developed empirical model predicts crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass, and thereby provides guidance in formulating crystal-tolerant glasses that would allow high waste loadings by keeping the spinel crystals small and therefore suspended in the glass.

  16. Macromolecular Crystallization with Microfluidic Free-Interface Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segelke, B

    2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidigm released the Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 crystallization chips in the fall of 2004. Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 are the latest evolution of Fluidigm's microfluidics crystallization technologies that enable ultra low volume rapid screening for macromolecular crystallization. Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 are similar to each other but represent a major redesign of the Topaz system and have of substantially improved ease of automation and ease of use, improved efficiency and even further reduced amount of material needed. With the release of the new Topaz system, Fluidigm continues to set the standard in low volume crystallization screening which is having an increasing impact in the field of structural genomics, and structural biology more generally. In to the future we are likely to see further optimization and increased utility of the Topaz crystallization system, but we are also likely to see further innovation and the emergence of competing technologies.

  17. PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF CRYSTALS: ANALYTICAL AND COMPUTER SIMULATION STUDIES OF DISLOCATION GLIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altintas, Sabri

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Rate Processes in Plastic Deformation of Materials, J. C.PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF CRYSTALS: ANALYTICAL AND COMPUTERCAPTIONS FIGURES - iii - PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF CRYSTALS:

  18. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  19. Electrochemical system including lamella settler crystallizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maimoni, Arturo (Orinda, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A crystallizer which incorporates a lamella settler and which is particularly applicable for use in batteries and power cells for electric vehicles or stationary applications. The lamella settler can be utilized for coarse particle separation or for agglomeration, and is particularly applicable to aluminum-air batteries or power cells for solving the hydrargillite (aluminum-hydroxide) removal problems from such batteries. This invention provides the advantages of very low energy consumption, turbulence, shear, cost and maintenance. Thus, due to the low shear and low turbulence of this invention, it is particularly effective in the control of aluminum hydroxide particle size distribution in the various sections of an aluminum-air system, as will as in other elecrochemical systems requiring separation for phases of different densities.

  20. Halide electroadsorption on single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocko, B.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wandlowski, T. [Univ. of Ulm (Germany). Dept. of Electrochemistry

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and phase behavior of halides have been investigated on single crystals of Ag and Au using synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques. The adlayer coverages are potential dependent. For all halides studied the authors found that with increasing potential, at a critical potential, a disordered adlayer transforms into an ordered structure. Often these ordered phases are incommensurate and exhibit potential-dependent lateral separations (electrocompression). The authors have analyzed the electrocompression in terms of a model which includes lateral interactions and partial charge. A continuous compression is not observed for Br on Ag(100). Rather, they find that the adsorption is site-specific (lattice gas) in both the ordered and disordered phases. The coverage increases with increasing potential and at a critical potential the disordered phase transforms to a well-ordered commensurate structure.

  1. The Crystal Structure of Human Argonaute2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schirle, Nicole T.; MacRae, Ian J. (Scripps)

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans.

  2. Recent results from the Crystal Ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, F.C.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past year, the Crystal Ball experiment has continued the investigation of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at SPEAR. In the course of the year, we have slightly more than doubled the available datasets at the J/psi (to 2.2 x 10/sup 6/ produced J/psi) and the psi' (to 1.8 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi') resonances, and have increased the data in the 5.2 to 7.4 GeV center-of-mass (E/sub c.m./) region. The present discussion is limited to recent results obtained with the J/psi and psi' datasets, primarily dealing with transitions among the charmonium bound states.

  3. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); McClelland, John [Ames Laboratory-USDOE, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lu, Meng, E-mail: menglu@iastate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  4. Crystal-Tolerant Glass Approach For Mitigation Of Crystal Accumulation In Continuous Melters Processing Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lang, Jesse B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huckleberry, Adam R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Owen, Antoinette T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level radioactive waste melters are projected to operate in an inefficient manner as they are subjected to artificial constraints, such as minimum liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) or maximum equilibrium fraction of crystallinity at a given temperature. These constraints substantially limit waste loading, but were imposed to prevent clogging of the melter with spinel crystals [(Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr){sub 2}O{sub 4}]. In the melter, the glass discharge riser is the most likely location for crystal accumulation during idling because of low glass temperatures, stagnant melts, and small diameter. To address this problem, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed with specially formulated glasses to simulate accumulation of spinel in the riser. Thicknesses of accumulated layers were incorporated into empirical model of spinel settling. In addition, T{sub L} of glasses was measured and impact of particle agglomeration on accumulation rate was evaluated. Empirical model predicted well the accumulation of single crystals and/or smallscale agglomerates, but, excessive agglomeration observed in high-Ni-Fe glass resulted in an under-prediction of accumulated layers, which gradually worsen over time as an increased number of agglomerates formed. Accumulation rate of ~14.9 +- 1 nm/s determined for this glass will result in ~26 mm thick layer in 20 days of melter idling.

  5. Solution-grown crystals for neutron radiation detectors, and methods of solution growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Hull, Giulia; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method according to one embodiment includes growing an organic crystal from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source. A system according to one embodiment includes an organic crystal having physical characteristics of formation from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source; and a photodetector for detecting the signal response of the organic crystal. A method according to another embodiment includes growing an organic crystal from solution, the organic crystal being large enough to exhibit a detectable signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source. An organic crystal according to another embodiment includes an organic crystal having physical characteristics of formation from solution, the organic crystal exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the organic crystal has a length of greater than about 1 mm in one dimension.

  6. Heterogeneity and dynamics in villin headpiece crystal structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Jianmin; McKnight, Christopher James, E-mail: cjmck@bu.edu [Boston University School of Medicine (United States)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New crystal structures of the well studied protein-folding model system villin headpiece in a new space group provide insights into the conformations available in the folded state. The villin headpiece domain (HP67) is the C-terminal F-actin-binding motif that confers F-actin-bundling activity to villin, a component of the actin bundles that support the brush-border microvilli. It has been investigated extensively by both experimental and theoretical measurements. Our laboratory, for example, has determined both its NMR and its crystal structures. This study presents the structures of HP67 and its pH-stabilized mutant (H41Y) in a different crystal form and space group. For both constructs, two molecules are found in each asymmetric unit in the new space group P6{sub 1}. While one of the two structures (Mol A) is structurally similar to our previously determined structure (Mol X), the other (Mol B) has significant deviations, especially in the N-terminal subdomain, where lattice contacts do not appear to contribute to the difference. In addition, the structurally most different crystal structure, Mol B, is actually closer to the averaged NMR structure. Harmonic motions, as suggested by the B-factor profiles, differ between these crystal structures; crystal structures from the same space group share a similar pattern. Thus, heterogeneity and dynamics are observed in different crystal structures of the same protein even for a protein as small as villin headpiece.

  7. Entanglement Generation Using Discrete Solitons in Coulomb Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Landa; A. Retzker; T. Schaetz; B. Reznik

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser cooled and trapped ions can crystallize and feature discrete solitons, that are nonlinear, topologically-protected configurations of the Coulomb crystal. Such solitons, as their continuum counterparts, can move within the crystal, while their discreteness leads to the existence of a gap-separated, spatially-localized motional mode of oscillation above the spectrum. Suggesting that these unique properties of discrete solitons can be used for generating entanglement between different sites of the crystal, we study a detailed proposal in the context of state-of-the-art experimental techniques. We analyze the interaction of periodically-driven planar ion crystals with optical forces, revealing the effects of micromotion in radio-frequency traps inherent to such structures, as opposed to linear ion chains. The proposed method requires Doppler cooling of the crystal and sideband cooling of the soliton's localized modes alone. Since the gap separation of the latter is nearly independent of the crystal size, this approach could be particularly useful for producing entanglement and studying system-environment interactions in large, two- and possibly three-dimensional systems.

  8. Single crystal Processing and magnetic properties of gadolinium nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreve, Andrew John [Ames Laboratory

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    GdNi is a rare earth intermetallic material that exhibits very interesting magnetic properties. Spontaneous magnetostriction occurs in GdNi at T{sub C}, on the order of 8000ppm strain along the c-axis and only until very recently the mechanism causing this giant magnetostriction was not understood. In order to learn more about the electronic and magnetic structure of GdNi, single crystals are required for anisotropic magnetic property measurements. Single crystal processing is quite challenging for GdNi though since the rare-earth transition-metal composition yields a very reactive intermetallic compound. Many crystal growth methods are pursued in this study including crucible free methods, precipitation growths, and specially developed Bridgman crucibles. A plasma-sprayed Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} W-backed Bridgman crucible was found to be the best means of GdNi single crystal processing. With a source of high-quality single crystals, many magnetization measurements were collected to reveal the magnetic structure of GdNi. Heat capacity and the magnetocaloric effect are also measured on a single crystal sample. The result is a thorough report on high quality single crystal processing and the magnetic properties of GdNi.

  9. Optical-diffraction method for determining crystal orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.

    1982-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an optical diffraction technique for characterizing the three-dimensional orientation of a crystal sample. An arbitrary surface of the crystal sample is texture etched so as to generate a pseudo-periodic diffraction grating on the surface. A laser light beam is then directed onto the etched surface, and the reflected light forms a farfield diffraction pattern in reflection. Parameters of the diffraction pattern, such as the geometry and angular dispersion of the diffracted beam are then related to grating shape of the etched surface which is in turn related to crystal orientation. This technique may be used for examining polycrystalline silicon for use in solar cells.

  10. An optical surface resonance may render photonic crystals ineffective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. García-Santamaría; Erik C. Nelson; P. V. Braun

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we identify and study the presence of extremely intense surface resonances that frustrate the coupling of photons into a photonic crystal over crucial energy ranges. The practical utility of photonic crystals demands the capability to exchange photons with the external medium, therefore, it is essential to understand the cause of these surface resonances and a route to their elimination. We demonstrate that by modifying the surface geometry it is possible to tune the optical response or eliminate the resonances to enable full exploitation of the photonic crystal.

  11. Generation and manipulation of nonclassical light using photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelena Vuckovic; Dirk Englund; David Fattal; Edo Waks; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystal cavities can localize light into nanoscale volumes with high quality factors. This permits a strong interaction between light and matter, which is important for the construction of classical light sources with improved properties (e.g., low threshold lasers) and of nonclassical light sources (such as single and entangled photon sources) that are crucial pieces of hardware of quantum information processing systems. This article will review some of our recent experimental and theoretical results on the interaction between single quantum dots and photonic crystal cavity fields, and on the integration of multiple photonic crystal devices into functional circuits for quantum information processing.

  12. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, S.D.; Marshall, K.L.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite optical devices are disclosed using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device. 7 figures.

  13. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Stephen D. (Pittsford, NY); Marshall, Kenneth L. (Henrietta, NY); Cerqua, Kathleen A. (Fairport, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite optical devices using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device.

  14. Epitaxial electrodeposition of freestanding large area single crystal substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Jae Wook; Standley, Adam; Chason, Eric [Brown University, Box D, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on a method for producing freestanding single crystal metal films over large areas using electrodeposition and selective etching. The method can be turned into an inexpensive continuous process for making long ribbons or a large area of single crystal films. Results from a 5x5 mm{sup 2} Ni single crystal film using electron backscattering pattern pole figures and x-ray diffraction demonstrate that the quality of material produced is equivalent to the initial substrate without annealing or polishing.

  15. The crystal structure of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3}: New single-crystal data for an old problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitscheider, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Oeckler, Oliver [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of the orthoborate {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were synthesized from Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 2 GPa and 800 {sup o}C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic pseudowollastonite-type structure, space group C2/c, with the lattice parameters a=1128.4(2) pm, b=652.6(2) pm, c=954.0(2) pm, and {beta}=112.8(1){sup o} (R{sub 1}=0.0124 and wR{sub 2}=0.0404 for all data). -- graphical abstract: The first satisfying single-crystal structure determination of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} sheds light on the extensively discussed structure of {pi}-orthoborates. The application of light pressure during the solid state synthesis yielded in high-quality crystals, due to pressure-induced crystallization. Research highlights: {yields} High-quality single crystals of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were prepared via high-pressure-induced crystallization. {yields} At least five different space groups for the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are reported. {yields} {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} is isotypic to the pseudowollastonite-type CaSiO{sub 3}. {yields} Remaining ambiguities regarding the structure of the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are resolved.

  16. Nepal: Western Views of the Maoist Insurgency and the Royal Takeover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burleigh, Peter

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Governance Presentation No. 2 Nepal: Western Views of theworkingpapers/index.html NEPAL: Western Views of the Maoistof the Maoist revolt in Nepal in 1996, there have been a

  17. Crystal-melt interfacial free energies of hard-dumbbell systems Yan Mu and Xueyu Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    Crystal-melt interfacial free energies of hard-dumbbell systems Yan Mu and Xueyu Song Department September 2006; published 29 September 2006 The crystal-melt interfacial free energies of different crystal that for the plastic crystal phase, the interfacial free energies decrease as the reduced bond length L* increases

  18. LIQUID CRYSTAL THERMOGRAPHY ON THE FLUID SOLID INTERFACE OF ROTATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    = Aluminum c = centrifugal lc = liquid crystal o = aerodynamic wall friction related p = at constant pressu

  19. acid dhsa crystals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Characterise Micro-swimmers CERN Preprints Summary: We study the behaviour of hydrogen-peroxide-fuelled self-propelled Janus colloids in a 2D colloidal crystal matrix. The...

  20. aluminum-induced crystallization comparison: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of charges on the particles is studied. S. Kondrat; M. Bier; L. Harnau 2010-04-15 413 Giant Lamb Shift in Photonic Crystals Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We obtain a general...

  1. Curvature-directed Crystallization of Polymer Dielectrics in Nanopores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Dariya

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of isotactic poly(propylene) (iPP) and polycarbonate (PC) nanowires of tunable diameter was demonstrated by melt-wetting the polymer into nanoporous anodic alumina. The crystallization process was analyzed using differential scanning...

  2. Design of polymeric substrates for controlled molecular crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diao, Ying, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is essential to control crystallization in many areas of science and technology, such as the production of pharmaceuticals, pigments, concrete, semiconductors, as well as the formation of biominerals. In most practical ...

  3. Reversible Attraction-Mediated Colloidal Crystallization on Patterned Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Gregory

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation we used tunable particle-particle and particle-substrate attraction to achieve reversible two-dimensional crystallization of colloids on homogeneous and patterned substrates. Total internal reflection and video microscopy...

  4. Terahertz Room-Temperature Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirk Englund; Hatice Altug; Ilya Fushman; Jelena Vuckovic

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an efficient surface-passivated photonic crystal nanocavity laser, demonstrating room-temperature operation with 3-ps total pulse duration (detector response limited) and low-temperature operation with ultra-low-threshold near 9uW.

  5. Superconducting Proximity Effect in Single-Crystal Nanowires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haidong

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes experimental studies of the superconducting proximity effect in single-crystal Pb, Sn, and Zn nanowires of lengths up to 60 um, with both ends of the nanowires in contact with macroscopic electrodes that are either...

  6. Synthesis and physical characterization of thermoelectric single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porras Pérez Guerrero, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is much current interest in thermoelectric devices for sustainable energy. This thesis describes a research project on the synthesis and physical characterization of thermoelectric single crystals. 1In?Se?-[delta] ...

  7. Melt generation, crystallization, and extraction beneath segmented oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia M.

    We examine mantle melting, fractional crystallization, and melt extraction beneath fast slipping, segmented oceanic transform fault systems. Three-dimensional mantle flow and thermal structures are calculated using a ...

  8. Crystallization process development and spherical agglomerates for pharmaceutical processing applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quon, Justin (Justin Louie)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control of crystallization steps is essential in the production of many materials in the pharmaceutical, materials, and chemical industries. Additionally, due to increasing costs of research and development, reductions ...

  9. The Gamma Intensity Monitor at the Crystal-Barrel-Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGehee, William R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the motivation, design, construction, and testing of the Gamma Intensity Monitor (GIM) for the Crystal-Barrel-Experiment at the Universität Bonn. The CB-ELSA collaboration studies the baryon excitation ...

  10. Constitutive modeling of creep of single crystal superalloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Sharat Chand

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a constitutive theory is developed, within the context of continuum mechanics, to describe the creep deformation of single crystal superalloys. The con- stitutive model that is developed here is based on the fact that as bodies deform...

  11. Enhancing cholesteric liquid crystal laser performance using a cholesteric reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    laser based on a free- standing film of photo polymerized cholesteric liquid crystal," Appl. Phys. Lett as an optic fiber-based temperature sensor," Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2691-2693 (2004). 15. Y. Huang, Y. Zhou

  12. Enhanced photodetection in graphene-integrated photonic crystal cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiue, Ren-Jye

    We demonstrate the controlled enhancement of photoresponsivity in a graphene photodetector by coupling to slow light modes in a long photonic crystal linear defect cavity. Near the Brillouin zone (BZ) boundary, spectral ...

  13. Electro-optical Modulation in Graphene Integrated Photonic Crystal Nanocavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Xuetao

    We demonstrate high-contrast electro-optic modulation in a graphene integrated photonic crystal nanocavity, providing a modulation depth of more than 10 dB at telecom wavelengths. This work shows the feasibility of ...

  14. GaBo{sub 3} crystal growth from flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, V.V. [Institute of Physics, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis of the chemical compound GaBO{sub 3} was first reported in paper, and the crystallographic determination of its structure and unit cell parameters was presented in paper. The chemical compound GaBO{sub 3} crystallizes in a calcite structure type with the hexagonal unit cell Parameters a{sub H} = 4.568 and c{sub H} = 14.18 {Angstrom}. GaBO{sub 3} crystals in the form of (111) hexagonal plates were grown from the solvent B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} by the method of sponvineous crystallization. That technique was hard to reproduce, however. We decided to grow a GaBO{sub 3} crystal as an object for possible studies of various physical properties. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Classical crystal formation of dipoles in two dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, K K; Jensen, A S; Zinner, N T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a two-dimensional layer of dipolar particles at zero temperature in the regime of strong dipole moments. Here we can describe the system using classical methods and determine the crystal structure that minimizes the total energy. The dipoles are assumed to be aligned by an external field and we consider different orientations of the dipolar moments with respect to the two-dimensional plane of motion. We observe that when the orientation angle changes away from perpendicular and towards the plane, the crystal structure will change from a hexagonal form to one that has the dipoles sitting in equidistant rows, i.e. a striped configuration. In addition to calculating the crystal unit cell, we also consider the phonon spectrum and the speed of sound. As the orientation changes away from perpendicular the phonon spectrum develops local minima that are a result of the deformation to the crystal structure.

  16. Materials for freeform fabrication of GHz tunable dielectric photonic crystals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niehaus, Michael Keith; Lewis, Jennifer A. (University of Illinois, Urbana, IL); Smay, James Earl; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Cesarano, Joseph, III (,; ); Carroll, James F.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals are of interest for GHz transmission applications, including rapid switching, GHz filters, and phased-array technology. 3D fabrication by Robocasting enables moldless printing of high solid loading slurries into structures such as the ''woodpile'' structures used to fabricate dielectric photonic band gap crystals. In this work, tunable dielectric materials were developed and printed into woodpile structures via solid freeform fabrication (SFF) toward demonstration of tunable photonic crystals. Barium strontium titanate ceramics possess interesting electrical properties including high permittivity, low loss, and high tunability. This paper discusses the processing route and dielectric characterization of (BaxSr1-XTiO3):MgO ceramic composites, toward fabrication of tunable dielectric photonic band gap crystals.

  17. Novel advancements in nanofabrication for photonic crystal applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheong, Lin Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress of large-area 2D- and 3D-photonic crystals (PCs) at optical and near infra-red frequencies has been limited by fabrication challenges. Periodic nanostructures must be patterned in high-index and crystalline ...

  18. A microprocessor driven liquid crystal graphics display for aircraft use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzke, Lee Howard

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete graphics system for use in modular avionics is built around a liquid crystal flat panel display. Screen refresh is handled by display controller that provides a bit mapped representation of the display in RAM. ...

  19. Jefferson Lab Builds First Single Crystal Single Cell Accelerating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single Cell Cavity This single cell cavity was made from a single crystal of niobium. Made in the same shape as the low-loss design proposed as an improvement to the baseline for...

  20. Broadband super-collimation in a hybrid photonic crystal structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Rafif E.

    We propose a two dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) structure that supports super-collimation over a large frequency range (over 4 times that of a traditional square lattice of holes). We theoretically and numerically ...

  1. Molecular simulation of crystal growth in alkane and polyethylene melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waheed, Numan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular simulation has become a very powerful tool for understanding the process of polymer crystallization. By using carefully constructed simulations, one can independently observe the two phenomena responsible for ...

  2. Invariant patterns in crystal lattices: Implications for protein folding algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HART,WILLIAM E.; ISTRAIL,SORIN

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystal lattices are infinite periodic graphs that occur naturally in a variety of geometries and which are of fundamental importance in polymer science. Discrete models of protein folding use crystal lattices to define the space of protein conformations. Because various crystal lattices provide discretizations of the same physical phenomenon, it is reasonable to expect that there will exist invariants across lattices related to fundamental properties of the protein folding process. This paper considers whether performance-guaranteed approximability is such an invariant for HP lattice models. The authors define a master approximation algorithm that has provable performance guarantees provided that a specific sublattice exists within a given lattice. They describe a broad class of crystal lattices that are approximable, which further suggests that approximability is a general property of HP lattice models.

  3. Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Thermotropic Liquid Crystal Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jun Young

    This paper focuses on the fabrication via simple melt blending of thermotropic liquid crystal polyester (TLCP) nanocomposites reinforced with a very small quantity of modified carbon nanotube (CNT) and the unique effects ...

  4. Superconducting Proximity Effect in Single-Crystal Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haidong

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes experimental studies of the superconducting proximity effect in single-crystal Pb, Sn, and Zn nanowires of lengths up to 60 um, with both ends of the nanowires in contact with macroscopic electrodes that are either...

  5. al single crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Low-Leakage Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with a Single-Crystal Al2O3 Barrier* Computer Technologies and...

  6. al single crystals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Low-Leakage Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with a Single-Crystal Al2O3 Barrier* Computer Technologies and...

  7. Healing of defects in a two-dimensional granular crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Marie C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a macroscopic analog for a two dimensional hexagonal crystal, we perform an experimental investigation of the self-healing properties of circular grain defects with an emphasis on defect orientation. A circular grain ...

  8. A machine learning approach to crystal structure prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Christopher Carl

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a machine learning framework for predicting crystal structure and applies it to binary metallic alloys. As computational materials science turns a promising eye towards design, routine encounters with ...

  9. atomic resolution crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  10. angstrom resolution crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muller, David A; 10.1103PhysRevB.86.195415 2012-01-01 5 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  11. Travel, work, and telecommunications: a view of the electronics revolution and its potential impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, William L.; Deakin, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TELECOMMUNICATIONS: A VIEW OF THE ELECTRONICS REVOLUTION ANDtechnologies and other electronics innovations ontelecommunications and other electronics innovations on the

  12. On band gaps in photonic crystal fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shane Cooper; Ilia Kamotski; Valery Smyshlyaev

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Maxwell's system for a periodic array of dielectric `fibers' embedded into a `matrix', with respective electric permittivities $\\epsilon_0$ and $\\epsilon_1$, which serves as a model for cladding in photonic crystal fibers (PCF). The interest is in describing admissible and forbidden (gap) pairs $(\\omega,k)$ of frequencies $\\omega$ and propagation constants $k$ along the fibers, for a Bloch wave solution on the cross-section. We show that, for "pre-critical" values of $k(\\omega)$ i.e. those just below $\\omega (\\min\\{\\epsilon_0,\\epsilon_1\\}\\mu)^{1/2}$ (where $\\mu$ is the magnetic permeability assumed constant for simplicity), the coupling specific to the Maxwell's systems leads to a particular partially degenerating PDE system for the axial components of the electromagnetic field. Its asymptotic analysis allows to derive the limit spectral problem where the fields are constrained in one of the phases by Cauchy-Riemann type relations. We prove related spectral convergence. We finally give some examples, in particular of small size "arrow" fibers ($\\epsilon_0>\\epsilon_1$) where the existence of the gaps near appropriate "micro-resonances" is demonstrated by a further asymptotic analysis.

  13. Analogy between free electron laser and channeling by crystal planes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Artru

    2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The trapping of electrons in the ponderomotive potential wells, which governs a free electron laser or inverse free electron laser at high gain, is analogous to the channeling of charged particles by atomic planes of a crystal. A bent crystal is analogous to a period-tapered free electron laser. This analogy is different from the well-known one between channeling and undulator radiations.

  14. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  15. Growth and characterization of lithium yttrium borate single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, S. G.; Tyagi, M.; Desai, D. G.; Sen, Shashwati [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai- 400085 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of 0.1% Ce doped Li{sub 6}Y(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} have been grown using the Czochralski technique. The photoluminescence study of these crystals shows a broad emission at ? 420 nm corresponding to Ce{sub 3+} emission from 5d?4f energy levels. The decay profile of this emission shows a fast response of ? 28 ns which is highly desirable for detector applications.

  16. Liquid crystal devices especially for use in liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Kenneth L. (Rochester, NY)

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal point diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) systems that can provide real-time, phase-shifting interferograms that are useful in the characterization of static optical properties (wavefront aberrations, lensing, or wedge) in optical elements or dynamic, time-resolved events (temperature fluctuations and gradients, motion) in physical systems use improved LCPDI cells that employ a "structured" substrate or substrates in which the structural features are produced by thin film deposition or photo resist processing to provide a diffractive element that is an integral part of the cell substrate(s). The LC material used in the device may be doped with a "contrast-compensated" mixture of positive and negative dichroic dyes.

  17. View Maintenance in a Warehousing Environment Yue Zhuge, Hector Garcia-Molina, Joachim Hammer, Jennifer Widom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, Joachim

    information, avail- able for queries and analysis (e.g., decision support, or data mining) IK93]. As relevantView Maintenance in a Warehousing Environment Yue Zhuge, Hector Garcia-Molina, Joachim Hammer are updated. This view maintenance prob- lem di ers from the traditional one in that the view de nition

  18. GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    GenomeView: a next-generation genome browser Thomas Abeel1,2,3, *, Thomas Van Parys1,2 , Yvan Saeys GenomeView, a stand-alone genome browser specifically designed to visualize and manipulate a multitude of genomics data. GenomeView enables users to dynamically browse high volumes of aligned short-read data

  19. Phonons in a one-dimensional microfluidic crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsevi Beatus; Tsvi Tlusty; Roy Bar-Ziv

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a general theoretical framework for describing the behaviour of a crystal driven far from equilibrium has proved difficult1. Microfluidic crystals, formed by the introduction of droplets of immiscible fluid into a liquid-filled channel, provide a convenient means to explore and develop models to describe non-equilibrium dynamics2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Owing to the fact that these systems operate at low Reynolds number (Re), in which viscous dissipation of energy dominates inertial effects, vibrations are expected to be over-damped and contribute little to their dynamics12, 13, 14. Against such expectations, we report the emergence of collective normal vibrational modes (equivalent to acoustic 'phonons') in a one-dimensional microfluidic crystal of water-in-oil droplets at Reapprox10-4. These phonons propagate at an ultra-low sound velocity of approx100 mum s-1 and frequencies of a few hertz, exhibit unusual dispersion relations markedly different to those of harmonic crystals, and give rise to a variety of crystal instabilities that could have implications for the design of commercial microfluidic systems. First-principles theory shows that these phonons are an outcome of the symmetry-breaking flow field that induces long-range inter-droplet interactions, similar in nature to those observed in many other systems including dusty plasma crystals15, 16, vortices in superconductors17, 18, active membranes19 and nucleoprotein filaments20.

  20. SINGLE CRYSTAL NIOBIUM TUBES FOR PARTICLE COLLIDERS ACCELERATOR CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MURPHY, JAMES E [University of Nevada, Reno] [University of Nevada, Reno

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratory’s International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred ?C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 ?C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 ?C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was increased 0.18 mm and eventually to 0.21 mm. Again, with these larger tubes, single crystal tubes were usually produced by the crystallization process. The power supply was generally operated at full output during these tests, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In a few tests, the traverse rate was increased to 10 cm per hour, and at the faster traverse rate, single crystal growth was not achieved. In these tests with a faster traverse rate, it was thought that the tube was not heated to a high enough temperature to achieve single crystal growth. In the next series of tests, the tube OD was unchanged at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was increased to 0.30 mm. The increased wall thickness made it difficult to reach an operating temperature above 2,000 ?C, and although the single crystal process caused a large increase in the crystal grains, no single crystal tubes were produced. It was assumed that the operating temperature in these tests was not high enough to achieve single crystal growth. In FY 2012, a larger power supply was purchased and installed. With the new power supply, temperatures above the melting point of Nb were easily obtained regardless of the tube thickness. A series of crystallization tests was initiated to determine if indeed the operating temperature of the previous tests was too low to achieve single crystal growth. For these tests, the Nb tube OD remained at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was 0.30 mm. The first test had an operating temperature of 2,000 ?C. and the operating temperature was increased by 50 ?C increments for each successive test. The final test was very near the Nb melting temperature, and indeed, the Nb tube eventually melted in the center of the tube. These tests showed that higher temperatures did yield larger grain sizes if the traverse rate was held constant at 5 cm per hour, but no single crystal tubes were produced even at the highest operating temperature. In addition, slowing the traverse rate to as low as 1 cm per hour did not yield a single crystal tube regardless of operating temperature. At this time, it

  1. Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Ni; Martien A. Cohen Stuart; Marjolein Dijkstra; Peter G. Bolhuis

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystallization and vitrification are two different routes to form a solid. Normally these two processes suppress each other, with the glass transition preventing crystallization at high density (or low temperature). This is even true for systems of colloidal hard spheres, which are commonly used as building blocks for novel functional materials with potential applications, e.g. photonic crystals. By performing Brownian dynamics simulations of glassy systems consisting of mixtures of active and passive hard spheres, we show that the crystallization of such hard-sphere glasses can be dramatically promoted by doping the system with small amounts of active particles. Surprisingly, even hard-sphere glasses of packing fraction up to $\\phi = 0.635$ crystallize, which is around $0.5\\%$ below the random close packing at $\\phi \\simeq 0.64$. Our results suggest a novel way of fabricating crystalline materials from (colloidal) glasses. This is particularly important for materials that get easily kinetically trapped in glassy states, and crystal nucleation hardly occurs.

  2. Photorefractivity in polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiederrecht, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.]|[Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer-stabilized liquid crystals, consisting of low concentrations of a polymeric electron acceptor, are shown to exhibit significantly enhanced photorefractive properties. The charge generation and transport properties of these composite systems are strongly modified from nematic liquid crystals doped with electron donors and acceptors. The new composites are produced by polymerizing a small quantity of a 1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide electron acceptor functionalized with an acrylate group in an aligned nematic liquid crystal. Photopolymerization creates an anisotropic gel-like medium in which the liquid crystal is free to reorient in the presence of a space charge field, while maintaining charge trapping sites in the polymerized regions of the material. The presence of these trapping sites results in the observation of longer lived, higher resolution holographic gratings in the polymer-stabilized liquid crystals than observed in nematic liquid crystals alone. These gratings display Bragg regime diffraction. Asymmetric beam coupling, photo-conductivity, and four-wave mixing experiments are performed to characterize the photophysics of these novel materials.

  3. Radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Belli; R. Bernabei; F. Cappella; R. Cerulli; F. A. Danevich; A. M. Dubovik; S. d'Angelo; E. N. Galashov; B. V. Grinyov; A. Incicchitti; V. V. Kobychev; M. Laubenstein; L. L. Nagornaya; F. Nozzoli; D. V. Poda; R. B. Podviyanuk; O. G. Polischuk; D. Prosperi; V. N. Shlegel; V. I. Tretyak; I. A. Tupitsyna; Ya. V. Vasiliev; Yu. Ya. Vostretsov

    2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators has been measured deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN in Italy with a total exposure 3197 kg x h. Monte Carlo simulation, time-amplitude and pulse-shape analyses of the data have been applied to estimate the radioactive contamination of the ZnWO4 samples. One of the ZnWO4 crystals has also been tested by ultra-low background gamma spectrometry. The radioactive contaminations of the ZnWO4 samples do not exceed 0.002 -- 0.8 mBq/kg (depending on the radionuclide), the total alpha activity is in the range: 0.2 - 2 mBq/kg. Particular radioactivity, beta active 65Zn and alpha active 180W, has been detected. The effect of the re-crystallization on the radiopurity of the ZnWO4 crystal has been studied. The radioactive contamination of samples of the ceramic details of the set-ups used in the crystals growth has been checked by low background gamma spectrometry. A project scheme on further improvement of the radiopurity level of the ZnWO4 crystal scintillators is briefly addressed.

  4. Ground control failures. A pictorial view of case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book shows, in pictorial views, many forms and/or stages of types of failures in mines, for instance, cutter, roof falls, and cribs. In each case, the year of occurrence is stated in the beginning so that the environment or technological background under which it occurred are reflected. The narrative than begins with the mining and geological conditions, followed by a description of the ground control problems and recommended solutions and results, if any. The sections cover failure of pillars, roof falls, longwall, roof bolting, multiple-seam mining, floor heave, longwall, flooding and weathering of coal, old workings, and shortwall and thin-seam plow longwall.

  5. Prairie View A&M University Whole Campus Energy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the guaranteed-savings energy management program at the Prairie View Campus. The two primary findings are as follows: (1) Savings to date. The current (April 1990) calculated guaranteed savings equal or exceed the monthly contracted savings rate. Electricity... consumption has decreased sharply since April 1987. Natural gas usage, and electric demand have also decreased significantly. The savings began to appear in October of 1987 at a rate of about $5,000 per month. These savings grew at a steady pace for the next...

  6. Chevy Chase View, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric SurveyChelanVermont: EnergyView, Maryland: Energy Resources

  7. Skyline View, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish, Washington: Energy ResourcesView,

  8. A View from the Bridge - DOE Perspective | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThisthe National EnergyLookBroad view

  9. LabVIEW Core 2 Course | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -LabgrantsLab team makesLab'sLabVIEW

  10. Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratiniEdwards,PoseyPoudrePowers EnergyCityPrairieRose,View

  11. Logan View Public Schools Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other AlternativePark,CedarPowerView Public

  12. Mountain View, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountain Electric Coop, IncView,

  13. OpenEI:Neutral point of view | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia Green FuelsperCivicVersionNeutral point of view

  14. Better Buildings Network View | April 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2, 2015Energyon23264Compare energy use byNew1Network View

  15. Bay View, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions IncBay County, Florida: Energy Resources JumpHill,250986°,View,

  16. A View from the Bridge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 A Strategic Framework for SMRA View from the Bridge - DOEThis

  17. A View from the Bridge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 A Strategic Framework for SMRA View from the Bridge - DOEThisOn-

  18. A View from the Bridge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 A Strategic Framework for SMRA View from the Bridge -

  19. Forest View, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity, Florida:Oklahoma:Forest View,

  20. Valley View, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. Large single domain 123 material produced by seeding with single crystal rare earth barium copper oxide single crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todt, Volker (Lemont, IL); Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Shi, Donglu (Oak Park, OH); Sengupta, Suvankar (Columbus, OH)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of fabricating bulk YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x where compressed powder oxides and/or carbonates of Y and Ba and Cu present in mole ratios to form YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x are heated in the presence of a Nd.sub.1+x Ba.sub.2-x Cu.sub.3 O.sub.y seed crystal to a temperature sufficient to form a liquid phase in the YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x while maintaining the seed crystal solid. The materials are slowly cooled to provide a YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x material having a predetermined number of domains between 1 and 5. Crack-free single domain materials can be formed using either plate shaped seed crystals or cube shaped seed crystals with a pedestal of preferential orientation material.

  2. Correlation functions in liquids and crystals : Free energy functional and liquid - crystal transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atul S. Bharadwaj; Swarn L. Singh; Yashwant Singh

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A free energy functional for a crystal that contains both the symmetry conserved and symmetry broken parts of the direct pair correlation function has been used to investigate the crystallization of fluids in three-dimensions. The symmetry broken part of the direct pair correlation function has been calculated using a series in ascending powers of the order parameters and which contains three- and higher-bodies direct correlation functions of the isotropic phase. It is shown that a very accurate description of freezing transitions for a wide class of potentials is found by considering the first two terms of this series. The results found for freezing parameters including structure of the frozen phase for fluids interacting via the inverse power potential u(r) = \\epsilon (\\sigma/r)^{n} for n ranging from 4 to \\infty are in very good agreement with simulation results. It is found that for n > 6.5 the fluid freezes into a face centred cubic (fcc) structure while for n \\leq 6 the body centred cubic (bcc) structure is preferred. The fluid-bcc-fcc triple point is found to be at 1/n = 0.158 which is in good agreement with simulation result.

  3. Crystal chemistry of thorium nitrates and chromates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigmon, Ginger E. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.ed [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures and infrared spectra of six novel thorium compounds are reported. Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=14.050(1), b=8.992(7), c=5.954(5) A, {beta}=101.014(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (2), P-3, a=13.606(1), c=6.641(6) A. (C{sub 12}H{sub 28}N){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} (3), P2{sub 1}/c, a=14.643(4), b=15.772(5), c=22.316(5) A, {beta}=131.01(1){sup o}. KTh(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (4), P2{sub 1}/c, a=10.070(8), b=12.731(9), c=13.231(8) A, {beta}=128.647(4){sup o}. Th(CrO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (5), P2{sub 1}/n, a=12.731(1), b=9.469(8), c=12.972(1) A, {beta}=91.793(2){sup o}. K{sub 2}Th{sub 3}(CrO{sub 4}){sub 7}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} (6), Ama2, a=19.302(8), b=15.580(6), c=11.318(6) A. The coordination polyhedra about Th in these structures are diverse. Th is coordinated by 9 O atoms in 5 and 6, seven of which are from monodentate (CrO{sub 4}) tetrahedra and two are (H{sub 2}O). The Th in compound 1 is coordinated by ten O atoms, four of which are O atoms of two bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and six of which are (OH) and (H{sub 2}O). In compounds 2, 3 and 4 the Th is coordinate by 12 O atoms. In 2 and 3 there are six bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles, and in 4 ten of the O atoms are part of five bidentate (NO{sub 3}) triangles and the others are (H{sub 2}O) groups. The structural units of these compounds consist of a chain of thorium and nitrate polyhedra (1), isolated thorium hexanitrate clusters (2, 3), an isolated thorium pentanitrate dihydrate cluster (4), and a sheet (6) and framework (5) of thorium and chromate polyhedra. These structures illustrate the complexity inherent in the crystal chemistry of Th. - Graphical Abstract: The structures and infrared spectra of four new Th nitrates and two Th chromates are reported. The coordination numbers of the Th cations range from nine to 12 in these compounds. Structural units consist of isolated clusters, chains, sheets and frameworks.

  4. Polymer Crystallization at NBS/NIST (1960s-1980s) The earliest studies of the crystallization of polymeric materials at NBS/NIST date back to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymer Crystallization at NBS/NIST (1960s-1980s) F. Khoury The earliest studies. Mandelkern on the thermodynamics of the bulk crystallization of polymers. The next sustained studies on the crystallization of polymers encompassing extensive structure/property investigations, followed the seminal papers

  5. Skeletal crystals of calcite and trona from hot-spring deposits in Kenya and New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, B. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Renaut, R.W. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Skeletal crystals are hollow crystals that develop because their outer walls grow before their cores. The presence of skeletal crystals of calcite (three types--trigonal prisms, hexagonal prisms, and plates) and trona in hot (> 90 C) spring deposits in New Zealand (Waikite Springs and Ohaaki Pool) and Kenya (Lorusio hot springs) shows that they can form in natural sedimentary regimes. Analysis of samples from these deposits shows that this crystal morphology develops under disequilibrium conditions that are unrelated to a specific environmental or diagenetic setting. Skeletal crystals transform into solid crystals when subsequent precipitation fills their hollow cores. In some cases, this may involve precipitation of crystalline material that has a sieve-like texture. In other examples, the skeletal crystal provides a framework upon which other materials can be precipitated. Walls in the skeletal trigonal calcite prisms from Waikite Springs are formed of subcrystals that mimic the shape of the parent crystal. Similarly, plate-like skeletal crystals from Lorusio are formed of densely packed subcrystals that are < 0.5 {micro}m long. Conversely, the walls of the skeletal hexagonal calcite crystals from Ohaaki Pool and the skeletal trona crystals from Lorusio are not formed of subcrystals. Recognition of skeletal crystals is important because they represent growth that follows the reverse pattern of normal growth. Failure to recognize that crystal growth followed the skeletal motif may lead to false interpretations concerning the growth of a crystal.

  6. Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty five glasses were formulated. They were batched from HLW AZ-101 simulant or raw chemicals and melted and tested with a series of tests to elucidate the effect of spinel-forming components (Ni, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Zn), Al, and noble metals (Rh2O3 and RuO2) on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the high-level waste (HLW) melter. In addition, the processing properties of glasses, such as the viscosity and TL, were measured as a function of temperature and composition. Furthermore, the settling of spinel crystals in transparent low-viscosity fluids was studied at room temperature to access the shape factor and hindered settling coefficient of spinel crystals in the Stokes equation. The experimental results suggest that Ni is the most troublesome component of all the studied spinel-forming components producing settling layers of up to 10.5 mm in just 20 days in Ni-rich glasses if noble metals or a higher concentration of Fe was not introduced in the glass. The layer of this thickness can potentially plug the bottom of the riser, preventing glass from being discharged from the melter. The noble metals, Fe, and Al were the components that significantly slowed down or stopped the accumulation of spinel at the bottom. Particles of Rh2O3 and RuO2, hematite and nepheline, acted as nucleation sites significantly increasing the number of crystals and therefore decreasing the average crystal size. The settling rate of ?10-?m crystal size around the settling velocity of crystals was too low to produce thick layers. The experimental data for the thickness of settled layers in the glasses prepared from AZ-101 simulant were used to build a linear empirical model that can predict crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass. The developed model predicts the thicknesses of accumulated layers quite well, R2 = 0.985, and can be become an efficient tool for the formulation of the crystal-tolerant HLW glasses for higher waste loading. A physical modeling effort revealed that the Stokes and Richardson-Zaki equations can be used to adequately predict the accumulation rate of spinel crystals of different sizes and concentrations in the glass discharge riser of HLW melters. The determined shape factor for the glass beads was only 0.73% lower than the theoretical shape factor for a perfect sphere. The shape factor for the spinel crystals matched the theoretically predicted value to within 10% and was smaller than that of the beads, given the larger drag force caused by the larger surface area-to-volume ratio of the octahedral crystals. In the hindered settling experiments, both the glass bead and spinel suspensions were found to follow the predictions of the Richardson-Zaki equation with the exponent n = 3.6 and 2.9 for glass beads and spinel crystals, respectively.

  7. Getting Crystals Your Crystallographer Will Treasure Richard J. Staples 03/09/2005 1 X-Ray Crystallography Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    . What information do we get? A crystal structure provides positive identification of a single crystal to be able to perform these analysis. The positive identification of the compound leaves no interpretation material, solvents? What do we grow the crystals in? Other concerns · Crystal Growth · Crystallization

  8. Excitation of intense acoustic waves in hexagonal crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshits, V. I., E-mail: alshits@ns.crys.ras.ru; Bessonov, D. A.; Lyubimov, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant excitation of an intense elastic wave using reflection of a pump wave from a free surface of hexagonal crystal is described. A resonance arises in the case of specially chosen propagation geometry where the reflecting boundary slightly deviates from symmetric orientation and the propagation direction of an intense reflected wave is close to that of an exceptional bulk wave, which satisfies the free boundary condition in unperturbed symmetric orientation. It is shown that, in crystals with elastic moduli c{sub 44}>c{sub 66}, a resonance arises when the initial boundary is chosen parallel to the hexagonal axis 6, whereas in crystals characterized by the relation c{sub 44}crystals. Examples of crystals are presented in which the beam intensity can be increased by a factor of 5-10 at sufficiently high frequencies, with beam divergence remaining acceptable.

  9. Radiation from polarized electrons in oriented crystals at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Baier; V. M. Katkov

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation from high energy electrons in an oriented crystal can be considered in a frame of the quasiclassical operator method which appears to be a most satisfactory approach to the problem. Under some quite generic assumptions the general expression is derived for the probability of circularly polarized photon emission from the longitudinally polarized electron in oriented crystal. The particular mechanism of radiation depends on interrelation between the angle of incidence $\\vartheta_0$ (angle between the momentum of initial electron and axis (plane) of crystal) and angle $\\vartheta_v \\equiv V_0/m$ ($V_0$ is the scale of a potential of axis or a plane relative to which the angle $\\vartheta_0$ is defined). When $\\vartheta_0 \\ll \\vartheta_v$ one has magnetic bremsstrahlung type of radiation (with corrections $\\propto \\vartheta_0^2$ which are due to inhomogeneous character of field in crystal). When $\\vartheta_0 \\gg \\vartheta_v$ one obtains the theory of coherent bremsstrahlung, while for $\\vartheta_0 \\geq \\vartheta_v$ one arrives to the modified theory of coherent bremsstrahlung. At high energy radiation in oriented crystals is strongly enhanced comparing with standard bremsstrahlung.

  10. Damage in porous media due to salt crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noushine Shahidzadeh-Bonn; Julie Desarnaud; François Bertrand; Xavier Chateau; Daniel Bonn

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the origins of salt damage in sandstones for the two most common salts: sodium chloride and sulfate. The results show that the observed difference in damage between the two salts is directly related to the kinetics of crystallization and the interfacial properties of the salt solutions and crystals with respect to the stone. We show that, for sodium sulfate, the existence of hydrated and anhydrous crystals and specifically their dissolution and crystallization kinetics are responsible for the damage. Using magnetic resonance imaging and optical microscopy we show that when water imbibes sodium sulfate contaminated sandstones, followed by drying at room temperature, large damage occurs in regions where pores are fully filled with salts. After partial dissolution, anhydrous sodium sulfate salt present in these regions gives rise to a very rapid growth of the hydrated phase of sulfate in the form of clusters that form on or close to the remaining anhydrous microcrystals. The rapid growth of these clusters generates stresses in excess of the tensile strength of the stone leading to the damage. Sodium chloride only forms anhydrous crystals that consequently do not cause damage in the experiments.

  11. Radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belli, P; Cappella, F; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Dubovik, A M; d'Angelo, S; Galashov, E N; Grinyov, B V; Incicchitti, A; Kobychev, V V; Laubenstein, M; Nagornaya, L L; Nozzoli, F; Poda, D V; Podviyanuk, R B; Polischuk, O G; Prosperi, D; Shlegel, V N; Tretyak, V I; Tupitsyna, I A; Vasiliev, Ya V; Vostretsov, Yu Ya

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive contamination of ZnWO4 crystal scintillators has been measured deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN in Italy with a total exposure 3197 kg x h. Monte Carlo simulation, time-amplitude and pulse-shape analyses of the data have been applied to estimate the radioactive contamination of the ZnWO4 samples. One of the ZnWO4 crystals has also been tested by ultra-low background gamma spectrometry. The radioactive contaminations of the ZnWO4 samples do not exceed 0.002 â?? 0.8 mBq/kg (depending on the radionuclide), the total alpha activity is in the range: 0.2 - 2 mBq/kg. Particular radioactivity, beta active 65Zn and alpha active 180W, has been detected. The effect of the re-crystallization on the radiopurity of the ZnWO4 crystal has been studied. The radioactive contamination of samples of the ceramic details of the set-ups used in the crystals growth has been checked by low background gamma spectrometry. A project scheme on further improvement of the radiopur...

  12. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup ?1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  13. NMR STUDIES OF LIQUID CRYSTALS AND MOLECULES DISSOLVED IN LIQUID CRYSTAL SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drobny, G.P.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes several studies in which nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure, orientation and dynamics of liquid crystal mesogens and molecules dissolved in liquid crystalline phases. In addition, a modern high field nmr spectrometer is described which has been used to perform such nmr studies. Chapter 1 introduces the quantum mechanical formalisms used throughout this thesis and briefly reviews the fundamentals of nuclear spin physics and pulsed nmr spectroscopy. First the density operator is described and a specific form for the canonical ensemble is derived. Then Clebsch-Gordon coefficients, Wigner rotation matrices, and irreducible tensor operators are reviewed. An expression for the equilibrium (Curie) magnetization is obtained and the linear response of a spin system to a strong pulsed r.f. irradiation is described. Finally, the spin interaction Hamiltonians relevant to this work are reviewed together with their truncated forms. Chapter 2 is a deuterium magnetic resonance study of two 'nom' liquid crystals which possess several low temperature mesomorphic phases. Specifically, deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy is used to determine the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules in smectic phases, the changes in molecular orientation and motion that occur at smectic-smectic phase transitions, and the order of the phase transitions. For both compounds, the phase sequence is determined to be isotropic, nematic, smectic A, smectic C, smectic B{sub A}, smectic B{sub C}, and crystalline. The structure of the smectic A phase is found to be consistent with the well-known model of a two dimensional liquid in which molecules are rapidly rotating about their long axes and oriented at right angles to the plane of the layers. Molecules in the smectic C phase are found to have their long axes tilted with respect to the layer normal, and the tilt angle is temperature dependent, increasing from zero at the smectic A - smectic C transition and reaching a maximum at 9{sup o} at the smectic C - smectic B{sub A} transition. This finding contradicts the results of X-ray diffraction studies which indicate that the tilt angle is 18{sup o} and temperature independent. The smectic B{sub A} - smectic B{sub C} phase transition is observed for the first time, and is found to be first order, a result that contradicts the prediction of a mean theory by McMillian. Chapter 3 is a multiple quantum nmr study of n-hexane oriented in a nematic liquid crystal solvent. The basic three pulse multiple quantum experiment is discussed which enables the observation of transitions for which |{Delta}m|>1, and then the technique of the separation of multiple quantum orders by phase incrementation in the multiple quantum evolution period is reviewed (TPPI). An explicit example of multiple quantum nmr is given by the calculation of the multiple quantum spectrum of an oriented methyl group.

  14. High resolution ion Doppler spectroscopy at Prairie View Rotamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Yang Xiaokang [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Magee, Richard [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) diagnostic system is installed on the Prairie View Rotamak to measure ion temperature and plasma flow. The diagnostic employs a single channel photomultiplier tube and a Jarrell-Ash 50 monochromator with a diffraction grating line density of 1180 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra of 200-600 nm. The motorized gear of the monochromator allows spectral resolution of 0.01 nm. Equal IDS measurements are observed for various impurity emission lines of which carbon lines exhibit stronger intensities. Furthermore, the diagnostics is examined in an experiment where plasma experiences sudden disruption and quick recovery. In this case, the IDS measurements show {approx}130% increase in ion temperature. Flow measurements are shown to be consistent with plasma rotation.

  15. The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (regulator), is shown in stick representation. The "top" view shows that the C-terminal tail of the C subunit resides on the interface between the A and B subunits where it...

  16. Radioactive contamination of BaF2 crystal scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polischuk, O G; Bernabei, R; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Di Marco, A; Danevich, F A; Incicchitti, A; Poda, D V; Tretyak, V I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barium fluoride (BaF$_2$) crystal scintillators are promising detectors to search for double beta decay processes in $^{130}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 2619(3) keV) and $^{132}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 844(1) keV). The $^{130}$Ba isotope is of particular interest because of the indications on 2${\\beta}$ decay found in two geochemical experiments. The radioactive contamination of BaF$_2$ scintillation crystal with mass of 1.714 kg was measured over 113.4 hours in a low-background DAMA/R&D set-up deep underground (3600 m w.e.) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN (LNGS, Italy). The half-life of $^{212}$Po (present in the crystal scintillator due to contamination by radium) was estimated as $T_{1/2}$ = 298.8 $\\pm$ 0.8(stat.) $\\pm$ 1.4(syst.) ns by analysis of the events pulse profiles.

  17. Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  18. Atomic- Resolution Crystal Structure of the Antiviral Lectin Scytovirin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulaei,T.; Botos, I.; Ziolkowska, N.; Bokesch, H.; Krumpe, L.; McKee, T.; O'Keefe, B.; Dauter, Z.; Wlodawer, A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structures of the natural and recombinant antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) were solved by single-wavelength anomalous scattering and refined with data extending to 1.3 Angstroms and 1.0 Angstroms resolution, respectively. A molecule of SVN consists of a single chain 95 amino acids long, with an almost perfect sequence repeat that creates two very similar domains (RMS deviation 0.25 Angstroms for 40 pairs of Ca atoms). The crystal structure differs significantly from a previously published NMR structure of the same protein, with the RMS deviations calculated separately for the N- and C-terminal domains of 5.3 Angstroms and 3.7 Angstroms, respectively, and a very different relationship between the two domains. In addition, the disulfide bonding pattern of the crystal structures differs from that described in the previously published mass spectrometry and NMR studies.

  19. Crystal Structure Representations for Machine Learning Models of Formation Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faber, Felix; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an Ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix by using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a data set of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consi...

  20. Toward crystal design in organic conductors and superconductors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiser, U.

    1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have seen that many different types of intermolecular interactions in organic conducting cation radical salts. Hydrogen bonding between the donor molecules and the anions is weak but not negligible. The ionic Madelung energy is insufficient to completely intersperse anions and cations, thus the layers favored by the van der Waals interactions remain intact. The search for new conducting and superconducting salts has been mainly by trial-and-error methods, even though simple substitutions have been employed in order to obtain isostructural analogs of successful (e.g., superconducting) salts. However, even seemingly minor substitutions sometimes destroy the packing type, and different crystal structures result. Simulations with the aim at predicting crystal structures have not succeeded, mainly because the different interaction types are of comparable energy, and the delocalized and partial charges render the calculations of the ionic terms extremely unreliable. Clearly, the development of suitable crystal modeling techniques with predictive capabilities is one of the great needs of the field.

  1. Novel variational approach for photonic crystal slab mode calculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method based on variational principle for analysis of photonic crystal (PC) slabs. Most of the methods used today treat PC slab as a three-dimensional (3D) crystal and this makes them very time and/or memory consuming. In this method we use Bloch theorem to expand the field on infinite plane waves which their amplitudes depend on the component perpendicular to the slab surface. By approximating these amplitudes with appropriate functions, we can find modes of PC slabs almost as fast as we can find modes of a two-dimensional (2D) crystal. Besides this advantage, we can also calculate radiation modes with this method which is not feasible with 3D Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method.

  2. Long DNA molecule as a pseudoscalar liquid crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Petrosyan; Chin-Kun Hu

    2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a long DNA molecule can form a novel condensed phase of matter, the pseudoscalar liquid crystal, that consists of aperiodically ordered DNA fragments in right-handed B and left-handed Z forms. We discuss the possibility of transformation of B-DNA into Z-DNA and vice versa via first-order phase transitions as well as transformations from the phase with zero total chirality into pure B- or Z-DNA samples through second-order phase transitions. The presented minimalistic phenomenological model describes the pseudoscalar liquid crystal phase of DNA and the phase transition phenomena. We point out to a possibility that a pseudoscalar liquid nano-crystal can be assembled via DNA-programming.

  3. Luminescence from Edge Fracture in Shocked Lithium Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turley, W. D. [NSTec; Stevens, G. D. [NSTec; Capelle, G. A. [NSTec; Grover, M. [NSTec; Holtkamp, D. B. [LANL; LaLone, B. M. [NSTec; Veeser, L. R. [NSTec, LANL

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light emitted from a [100] lithium fluoride crystal was characterized under shock wave compression to 28GPa followed by complete stress release at the edges. The light was examined using time-gated optical spectrometry and imaging, time-resolved optical emission measurements, and hydrodynamic modeling. The shock arrival at the circumference of the crystal was delayed relative to the center so that the two regions could be studied at different times. The majority of the light emission originated when the shock waves released at the circumference of the crystal. Unlike previously reported results for shocked lithium fluoride, we found that the light spectrum is not strictly broad band, but has spectral lines associated with atomic lithium in addition to a broad band background. Also, the emission spectrum depends strongly on the gas surrounding the sample. Based on our observations, the line emission appears to be related to fracture of the lithium fluoride crystal from the shock wave releasing at the edges. Experimenters frequently utilize lithium fluoride crystals as transparent windows for observing shock compressed samples. Because of the experimental geometries used, the shock wave in such cases often reaches the circumference of the window at nearly the same moment as when it reaches the center of the sample-window interface. Light generated at the circumference could contaminate the measurement at the interface when this light scatters into the observed region. This background light may be reduced or avoided using experimental geometries which delay the arrival of the shock wave at the edges of the crystal.

  4. Equilibrium configurations of nematic liquid crystals on a torus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Segatti; Michael Snarski; Marco Veneroni

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The topology and the geometry of a surface play a fundamental role in determining the equilibrium configurations of thin films of liquid crystals. We propose here a theoretical analysis of a recently introduced surface Frank energy, in the case of two-dimensional nematic liquid crystals coating a toroidal particle. Our aim is to show how a different modeling of the effect of extrinsic curvature acts as a selection principle among equilibria of the classical energy, and how new configurations emerge. In particular, our analysis predicts the existence of new stable equilibria with complex windings.

  5. Non-polar Flexoelectrooptic Effect in Blue Phase Liquid Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Outram; S. J. Elston; F. Castles; M. M. Qasim; H. Coles; H. -Y. Chen; S. -F. Lu

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Blue phase liquid crystals are not usually considered to exhibit a flexoelectrooptic effect, due to the polar nature of flexoelectric switching and the cubic or amorphous structure of blue phases. Here, we derive the form of the flexoelectric contribution to the Kerr constant of blue phases, and experimentally demonstrate and measure the separate contributions to the Kerr constant arising from flexoelectric and dielectric effects. Hence, a non-polar flexoelectrooptic effect is demonstrated in blue phase liquid crystals, which will have consequences for the engineering of novel blue-phase electrooptic technology.

  6. Graphene and chiral nematic liquid crystals: a focus on lasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Ammar; Kamarudin, Muhammad Akmal; Kidambi, Piran; Hofmann, Stephan; Wilkinson, Tim; Qasim, Malik

    2015-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and chiral nematic liquid crystals: a focus on lasing Journal: RSC Advances Manuscript ID: RA-ART-05-2015-009415.R1 Article Type: Paper Date Submitted by the Author: 11-Jun-2015 Complete List of Authors: Khan, Ammar... margins Please do not adjust margins Received 00th January 20xx, Accepted 00th January 20xx DOI: 10.1039/x0xx00000x www.rsc.org/ Graphene and chiral nematic liquid crystals: a focus on lasing Ammar A. Khana, Muhammad A. Kamarudina, Piran. R...

  7. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N[sub 2] is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation. 7 figs.

  8. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N.sub.2 is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

  9. Visualization of stacking faults in fcc crystals in plastic deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeshi Kawasaki; Akira Onuki

    2011-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the dynamics of stacking faults in fcc crystals in uniaxial stretching in a Lennard-Jones binary mixture composed of 4096 particles in three dimensions. We visualize stacking faults using a disorder variable $D_j(t)$ for each particle $j$ constructed from local bond order parameters based on spherical harmonics (Steinhardt order parameters). Also introducing a method of bond breakage, we examine how stacking faults are formed and removed by collective particle motions. These processes are relevant in plasticity of fcc crystals.

  10. Apparatus And Method For Producing Single Crystal Metallic Objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Shyh-Chin (Latham, NY); Gigliotti, Jr., Michael Francis X. (Scotia, NY); Rutkowski, Stephen Francis (Duanesburg, NY); Petterson, Roger John (Fultonville, NY); Svec, Paul Steven (Scotia, NY)

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mold is provided for enabling casting of single crystal metallic articles including a part-defining cavity, a sorter passage positioned vertically beneath and in fluid communication with the part-defining cavity, and a seed cavity positioned vertically beneath and in fluid communication with the sorter passage. The sorter passage includes a shape suitable for encouraging a single crystal structure in solidifying molten metal. Additionally, a portion of the mold between the sorter passage and the part-defining cavity includes a notch for facilitating breakage of a cast article proximate the notch during thermal stress build-up, so as to prevent mold breakage or the inclusion of part defects.

  11. Nonisothermal kinetics of spinel crystallization in a HLW glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casler, D.G.; Hrma, P.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonisothermal kinetics of spinel crystallization in a high-level waste (HLW) glass was predicted using Mehl-Avrami-Johnson-Kolmogorov equation coefficients from isothermal data. The volume fraction of spinel was determined as a function of time, temperature, and cooling rate. The results were verified experimentally. Also predicted was the spatial distribution of spinel in a HLW glass canister. Finally, a parameter study was performed, and an empirical equation was proposed relating the final spinel volume fraction in glass to dimensionless numbers for cooling rate, phase equilibrium, and crystallization kinetics.

  12. Effective dislocation lines in continuously dislocated crystals. III. Kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Trzesowski

    2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of congruences of principal Volterra-type effective dislocation lines associated with a dislocation density tensor is distinguished in order to investigate the kinematics of continuized defective crystals in terms of their dislocation densities (tensorial as well as scalar). Moreover, it shown, basing oneself on a formula defining the mean curvature of glide surfaces for principal edge effective dislocation lines, that the considered kinematics of continuized defective crystals is consistent with some relations appearing in the physical theory of plasticity (e.g. with the Orowan-type kinematic relations and with the treatment of shear stresses as driving stresses of moving dislocations).

  13. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011R - 445 CU - 2 3New CrystalNew Crystal

  14. Crystal Structure of a Protein Kinase A Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of WeeklyCrystal Structure of aCrystal

  15. The crystal chemistry of four thorium sulfates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Amanda J.; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Moore-Shay, Laura; Wei, Rebecca; Dawes, Colleen; Szymanowski, Jennifer [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C., E-mail: pburns@nd.edu [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four thorium sulfate compounds have been synthesized and characterized. [Th(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}].2H{sub 2}O (ThS1) crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}/m, a=7.2488(4), b=12.1798(7), c=8.0625(5) A, {beta}=98.245(1){sup o}; Na{sub 10}[Th{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 9}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (ThS2), Pna2{sub 1}, a=17.842(2), b=6.9317(8), c=27.550(3) A; Na{sub 2}[Th{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}].H{sub 2}O (ThS3), C2/c, a=16.639(2), b=9.081(1), c=25.078(3) A, {beta}= 95.322(2){sup o}; [Th{sub 4}(SO{sub 4}){sub 7}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}].2H{sub 2}O (ThS4), Pnma, a=18.2127(9), b=11.1669(5), c=14.4705(7) A. In all cases the Th cations are coordinated by nine O atoms corresponding to SO{sub 4} tetrahedra, OH groups, and H{sub 2}O groups. The structural unit of ThS1 is an isolated cluster consisting of a single Th polyhedron with two monodentate SO{sub 4} tetrahedra and seven H{sub 2}O groups. A double-wide Th sulfate chain is the basis of ThS2. The structures of ThS3 and ThS4 are frameworks of Th polyhedra and sulfate tetrahedra, and each contains channels that extend through the framework. One of the Th cations in ThS3 is coordinated by a bidentate SO{sub 4} tetrahedron, and ThS4 is unusual in the presence of a pair of Th cations that share a polyhedral face. - Graphical abstract: The structures of four hydrous thorium sulfates are reported that have structural units consisting of finite clusters, chains, and frameworks. Highlights: > Four hydrous thorium sulfates have structural units consisting of finite clusters, chains, and frameworks. > In each the Th cations are coordinated by nine O atoms from SO{sub 4} tetrahedra, OH groups, and H{sub 2}O groups. > The details of the linkages of ThO{sub 9} polyhedra and sulfate tetrahedra vary considerably in these structures.

  16. INVESTIGATING PHARMACEUTICAL CO-CRYSTALS AS A MEANS TO IMPROVE THE SOLUBILITY OF A DRUG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Rebecca Anderson

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently co-crystals have emerged as a potential approach to improve the solubility, dissolution, and bioavailability of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API). Often co-crystal formation is studied in the development stage in order to solve...

  17. Xenocryst assimilation and formation of peritectic crystals during magma contamination: An experimental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Xenocryst assimilation and formation of peritectic crystals during magma contamination Minéralogie, Switzerland c Dalhousie University, Department of Earth Sciences, Canada Abstract Contamination and peritectic crystals that form through incongruent melting or dissolution of the original contaminants

  18. Solar energy trapping with modulated silicon nanowire photonic crystals Guillaume Demsy and Sajeev John

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    Solar energy trapping with modulated silicon nanowire photonic crystals Guillaume Demésy and Sajeev://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Solar energy trapping with modulated silicon nanowire photonic crystals Guillaume Demesya

  19. Formation of Spatially Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals through the Control of Capillary Forces and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    Formation of Spatially Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals through the Control of Capillary planar colloidal crystals. These methods rely on controlled gravitational settling or solvent evaporation a concentrated aqueous colloidal sol sand- wiched between a clean, hydrophilic glass and a patterned

  20. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using textured photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yi, Yasha (Somerville, MA); Kimerling, Lionel C. (Concord, MA); Duan, Xiaoman (Amesbury, MA); Zeng, Lirong (Cambridge, MA)

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell includes a photoactive region that receives light. A photonic crystal is coupled to the photoactive region, wherein the photonic crystal comprises a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for trapping the light.

  1. Soluble fullerene derivative in liquid crystal: polymer composites and their impact on photorefractive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soluble fullerene derivative in liquid crystal: polymer composites and their impact photorefractive efficiency in polymer­ liquid crystal composites in comparison to previous works on similar) and containing a conducting polymer matrix, such as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) doped with N

  2. Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water. Crystallization Kinetics and Excess Free Energy of H2O and D2O Nanoscale...

  3. Predicting material parameters for intrinsic point defect diffusion in Silicon Crystal Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bebendorf, Mario

    by a macroscopic heat transfer model in the entire crystal growth system, taking into account heat conduction [2,3,4]. With such transient heat transfer models the temperature distribution in the crystal can

  4. A process for separation by semi-continuous counter-current crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aumock, Nathan M. (Nathan Micheal)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is proposed to perform separations via crystallization by using multiple tanks and constraining crystal growth to solid surfaces. Multiple tanks allow multiple recrystallizations to improve product purity and to ...

  5. Optical studies of photonic crystals and high index-contrast microphotonic circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakich, Peter Thomas

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both high index-contrast (HIC) photonic crystals and HIC microphotonic circuits are presented in this thesis. Studies of macro-scale 2D photonic crystal meta-materials are first described. Through comparison of experimental ...

  6. Pairing of valence electrons as necessary condition for energy minimization in a crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolgopolov Stanislav Olegovich

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Pairing of valence electrons can lead to energy minimization of a crystal. It can be proved by use of representation of the valence electrons as plane waves in periodic potential of the crystal.

  7. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers enabled by an accidental Dirac point

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  8. Edinburgh Research Explorer Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure 2012, 'Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure in the Lanthanides' Physical Review to the work immediately and investigate your claim. Download date: 27. Jun. 2014 #12;Europium

  9. Electrolysis at an anthracene crystal/aqueous NO sub 3 sup minus solution interface: The role of crystal defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, M.; Mao, B.; Steigman, J.; Geacintov, N.E. (New York Univ., NY (USA))

    1990-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrolysis of a 1 M solution of NaNO{sub 3} by means of an anthracene crystal electrode results in the production of many surface reaction products, including 9-nitroanthracene (9NA), bianthronyl (BA), and anthraquinone (AQ). The production of 9NA and BA have been shown to depend on the square of the current density. This dependence was rationalized by hypothesizing the need for the simultaneous discharge of two carriers at adjoining lattice defect sites. By annealing the crystals, it was found that the efficiency of producing 9NA was reduced by a factor of as much as 6; this supports the hypothesis.

  10. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Yaho; Nam, Gnu; Jeon, Jieun; Kim, Youngjo [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); You, Tae-Soo, E-mail: tsyou@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 410 Seungbong-ro Heungduk-gu Chungbuk 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} has been synthesized using the high-temperature reaction method and characterized by both powder and single-crystal X-ray diffractions. The title compound crystallized in the orthorhombic crystal system (space group Immm, Z=2, Pearson symbol oI78) with fifteen crystallographically unique atomic positions in the asymmetric unit, and the lattice parameters are refined as a=4.5244(4) A, b=6.9932(6) A, and c=53.043(5) A. The complex crystal structure of the title compound can be described as a 2:1 intergrowth of two closely related compounds: La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (Ce{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}-type) and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} (Zr{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}Si{sub 4}-type) acting like 'building-blocks' along the c-axis. Six La sites are categorized into three distinct types based on the local coordination environment showing the coordination numbers of 12-14. Three unique Li sites are placed in the centers of local tetrahedra formed by four Ge atoms which eventually construct Ge{sub 2} dimers or 1-dimensional cis-/trans-Ge chains. Theoretical investigations using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method provide rationales for an improved structural stability and for unique local coordination geometries established by anionic elements including [LiGe{sub 4}] tetrahedra, cis-/trans-Ge chain and Ge{sub 2} dimers. - Graphical abstract: Reported is a novel ternary Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}. The complex crystal structure can be viewed as a simple combination of two closely related known compounds acting as 'building-blocks', La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}G{sub 3} and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}, in a 2:1 stoichiometric ratio. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex crystal structure was easily explained as a combination of two known compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical calculations indicated that the Fermi level was located near the pseudogap.

  11. Report of Energy Efficiency Study and Metering/Utilities Profile for Electricity Deregulation at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) Prairie View, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; Giebler, T.; Abushakra, B.; Turner, W. D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical plant director and staff at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) do a good job of maintaining PVAMU facilities and keeping expenses down. During our visit, however, we were able to identify several opportunities for improving energy...

  12. Optical surface resonance may render photonic crystals ineffective Florencio Garca-Santamara,* Erik C. Nelson, and Paul V. Braun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Optical surface resonance may render photonic crystals ineffective Florencio García crystals and render them ineffective. This surface resonance is dem- onstrated for two different 3D

  13. Role of dye structure in photoinduced reorientation of dye-doped liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    -doped nematic liquid crystals has been measured for a homologous set of dyes belonging to the anthraquinone

  14. Method and apparatus for producing monochromatic radiography with a bent laue crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhong, Zhong (Apt. I 1131 Chaping 700 E. Loop Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11790); Chapman, Leroy Dean (4 Vermont Cir., Bolingbrook, IL 60440); Thomlinson, William C. (32 E. Masem, East Patchogue, NY 11772)

    2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for producing a monochromatic beam. A plurality of beams are generated from a polyenergetic source. The beams are then transmitted through a bent crystal, preferably a bent Laue crystal, having a non-cylindrical shape. A position of the bent crystal is rocked with respect to the polyenergetic source until a plurality of divergent monochromatic beams are emitted from the bent crystal.

  15. Tunable crystals of ultracold polar molecules! Sergey Alyabyshev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krems, Roman

    Jie Cui Marina Li9nskaya Jesus Perez Rios Ping Xiang Funding: Peter Wall Ins9tute for Advanced + Hcomplicating #12;Quantum Simulation! Design simple controllable systems with some of the same properties as complex quantum systems, such as solid-state crystals! #12;"Cold Controlled Chemistry" PCCP 10, 479 (2008

  16. Crystallization process to reduce NORM-containing waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayden, C.G. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kraemer, T.F.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a process of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) waste reduction for scales, sludges, and soils. The process involves dissolution and fractional crystallization steps that concentrate the radioactive material into a small mass of barite. The concentration of radium in the product, barite, can be increased or decreased. The NORM-containing barite product is suitable for slurry injection into sandstone formations.

  17. Computation of the scattering properties of nonspherical ice crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhibo

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is made up of three parts on the computation of scattering properties of nonspherical particles in the atmosphere. In the first part, a new crystal type-droxtal-is introduced to make a better representation of the shape of small ice...

  18. Thermo-optically tunable silicon photonic crystal light modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeong-Bong

    Thermo-optically tunable silicon photonic crystal light modulator Yonghao Cui,* Ke Liu, Duncan L (Doc. ID 130726); published October 21, 2010 We designed, fabricated, and characterized a thermo frequency in a silicon-based line defect PhC. The cutoff frequency is shifted because of the thermo

  19. Thermo-optic photonic crystal light modulator Mark T. Tinkera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeong-Bong

    Thermo-optic photonic crystal light modulator Mark T. Tinkera and Jeong-Bong Lee Department be capable of driving substantial changes in the refractive index through the thermo-optic effect. Since the thermo-optic coefficient of silicon is approximately 2.4 10-4 K-1 over this temperature range

  20. Glassy and plastic crystals of cyanoadamantane : a Brillouin scattering investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-617 « Glassy » and plastic crystals of cyanoadamantane : a Brillouin scattering investigation J. Abstract. 2014 The elastic constants ofcyanoadamantane have been measured in the plastic and « glassy temperature. The temperature dependence of C11 in the plastic phase has been explain- ed by the setting

  1. Phonon-enhanced crystal growth and lattice healing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Bertoni, Mariana; Newman, Bonna

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for modifying dislocation distributions in semiconductor materials is provided. The system includes one or more vibrational sources for producing at least one excitation of vibrational mode having phonon frequencies so as to enhance dislocation motion through a crystal lattice.

  2. Liquid Crystal Optics and Photonics CPHY Assignment 2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    Liquid Crystal Optics and Photonics CPHY 74495 Assignment 2. P. Pal¤y-Muhoray Jan. 24, 2014 Due: Feb 4, 2014 1. Read pages 25 - 37 of the text (Guenther, Modern Optics). 2. Read Ch 2., Review of Electricity and Magnetism (http://mpal¤y.lci.kent.edu/optics) 3. Red light with wavelength = 632:8nm

  3. Linewidth narrowing and Purcell enhancement in photonic crystal cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    . Rev. 69, 681 (1946). 7. O. Painter, R. K. Lee, A. Scherer, A. Yariv, J. D. O'Brien, P.D. Dapkus, and I. References and links 1. L. Pavesi, "A review of the various approaches to a silicon laser," Proc. SPIE 4997. Loncar, T. Yoshie, A. Scherer, P. Gogna, and Y. Qiu, "Low-threshold photonic crystal laser," Appl. Phys

  4. Optical properties of photonic crystal heterostructure cavity lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choquette, Kent

    ; (230.5298) Photonic crystals. References and links 1. O. Painter, R. K. Lee, A. Scherer, A. Yariv, J. D," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 22, 2581­2595 (2005). 11. F. Bordas, M. J. Steel, C. Seassal, and A. Rahamani

  5. Competition between vitrification and crystallization of methanol at high pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    Competition between vitrification and crystallization of methanol at high pressure Marco J. P methanol at high pressure up to 33 GPa at room temperature with x-ray diffraction, optical polarization and vitrification is observed when methanol is superpressed beyond the freezing pressure of 3.5 GPa: between 5

  6. Antireflection and Enhanced Absorption in Tapered Silicon Photonic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coldren, Larry A.

    as applying this structure for solar energy conversion. (a) (b) (c) Figure 1 (a) SEM picture and photograph Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (050.5298) Photonic crystals; (160.4760) Optical properties ; (220 studied as the building blocks to realize functional devices for optical networking, image display, bio

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Synthesis and Crystal Structure of the Azoxydichinyl Helicene,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    by treatment of 6-hydroxylamino- quinoline with xanthine oxidase or treatment of 6-nitroq uinoline with glucose angle of 25.0° between the planes of the two quinoline ring systems. In the crystal, water molecules by Galbraith et al. [9], sug- gesting that 3 was produced in good yield by a different reaction involving

  8. CARIBBEAN SEACRUISE IN LUXURY ABOARD CRYSTAL SERENITY BEST MEDIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    CARIBBEAN SEACRUISE IN LUXURY ABOARD CRYSTAL SERENITY WORLD'S BEST MEDIUM CRUISE LINE SIX and brilliantly colored colonial architecture -- this forms the backdrop for our Cruise the Caribbean Sea program at the Caribbean's many offerings, from picturesque lagoons to quaint towns to bustling beaches. Experience

  9. D-D Nuclear Fusion Using Different Size Pyroelectric Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    D-D Nuclear Fusion Using Different Size Pyroelectric Crystals A. M. Kovanen, D. J. Gillich, T. Z of Homeland Security under cooperative agreement number 2007-DN-077-ER0003. The authors are with the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. A. M

  10. Collective phenomena in defect crystals Reimer Kuhn1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühn, Reimer

    by quantum effects. Both thermal and dynamical properties are considered. The influence of interactions Talence cedex, France Received 25 April 2000 We investigate the effects of interactions between substitutional defects on the properties of defect crystals at low temperatures, where defect motion is governed

  11. Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Optical Absorption Spectrometer for Highly sensitive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    months -Remote Monitoring of BTEX hydrocarbons in water needed -Real-time detection and identification of BTEX hydrocarbons in water needed · Sample collection after-the-fact. -Continuous monitoring of water pollutants in water #12;What is Photonic Crystal? · Periodic electromagnetic media comparable to wavelength

  12. STATISCAL PROCESS CONTROL FOR QUARTZ-CRYSTAL FILTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    .07 #12; SPC spc Abstract The title of the thesis for graduation is statiscal process Process Control (SPC),at the process control we use process flow chart ,cause and effect chart process control (spc) Quartz-crystal filter Control chart Process flow chart Control line #12

  13. Blow up criterion for incompressible nematic liquid crystal flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guochun Wu

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the short time classical solution to a simplified hydrodynamic flow modeling incompressible, nematic liquid crystal materials in dimension three. We establish a criterion for possible breakdown of such solutions at a finite time. More precisely, if $(u,d)$ is smooth up to time $T$ provided that $\\int_0^T|\

  14. Microfluidic Generation of Lipidic Mesophases for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Microfluidic Generation of Lipidic Mesophases for Membrane Protein Crystallization Sarah L. Perry Mathews AVenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 ReceiVed March 11, 2009 ABSTRACT: We report on a microfluidic conditions of membrane proteins from a membrane-like phase in sub-20 nL volumes. This integrated microfluidic

  15. Radioactive contamination of SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belli, P; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Galenin, E; Gektin, A; Incicchitti, A; Isaienko, V; Kobychev, V V; Laubenstein, M; Nagorny, S S; Podviyanuk, R B; Tkachenko, S; Tretyak, V I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A strontium iodide crystal doped by europium (SrI2(Eu)) was produced by using the Stockbarger growth technique. The crystal was subjected to characterisation that included relative photoelectron output and energy resolution for gamma quanta. The intrinsic radioactivity of SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator was tested both in scintillation mode and by using ultra-low background HPGe gamma spectrometry deep underground. The response of the SrI2(Eu) detector to alpha particles (alpha/beta ratio and pulse shape) was estimated by analysing the 226Ra trace contamination internal to the crystal. We have found alpha/beta=0.55 and no difference in scintillation decay for alpha particles and gamma quanta. The application of the obtained results in the search for the double electron capture and electron capture with positron emission in 84Sr has been investigated at a level of sensitivity T_1/2 \\sim 10^15-10^16 yr. The results of these studies demonstrate the potentiality of this material for a variety of scintillation appli...

  16. Polarization controllable Fresnel lens using dye-doped liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Polarization controllable Fresnel lens using dye- doped liquid crystals Tsung-Hsien Lin,1,2 Yuhua controllable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using a photo-induced alignment of the dye-doped liquid. X. Ren, S. Liu, and X. Zhang, "Fabrication of off-axis holographic Fresnel lens used as multiplexer

  17. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

  18. A MOLECULAR THEORY OF SURFACE TENSION IN NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1187 A MOLECULAR THEORY OF SURFACE TENSION IN NEMATIC LIQUID CRYSTALS J. D. PARSONS Departamento de 1976, accepte le 10 mai 1976) Résumé. - On calcule la tension superficielle à la surface libre d le plan de la surface; b) il y a un saut de la tension de surface à la transition nématique

  19. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Peter

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

  20. Einstein, incompleteness, and the epistemic view of quantum states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Harrigan; Robert W. Spekkens

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Does the quantum state represent reality or our knowledge of reality? In making this distinction precise, we are led to a novel classification of hidden variable models of quantum theory. Indeed, representatives of each class can be found among existing constructions for two-dimensional Hilbert spaces. Our approach also provides a fruitful new perspective on arguments for the nonlocality and incompleteness of quantum theory. Specifically, we show that for models wherein the quantum state has the status of something real, the failure of locality can be established through an argument considerably more straightforward than Bell's theorem. The historical significance of this result becomes evident when one recognizes that the same reasoning is present in Einstein's preferred argument for incompleteness, which dates back to 1935. This fact suggests that Einstein was seeking not just any completion of quantum theory, but one wherein quantum states are solely representative of our knowledge. Our hypothesis is supported by an analysis of Einstein's attempts to clarify his views on quantum theory and the circumstance of his otherwise puzzling abandonment of an even simpler argument for incompleteness from 1927.