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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Lignocellulose Recalcitrance Screening by Integrated High Throughput Hydrothermal Pretreatment and Enzymatic Saccharification  

SciTech Connect

We report a novel 96-well multiplate reactor system for comparative analysis of lignocellulose recalcitrance via integrated hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. The system utilizes stackable nickel/gold-plated 96-well aluminum reactor plates, a clamping device fit to a standard Parr reactor, and robotics for efficient liquids and solids handling. A capacity of 20 plates allows up to 1,920 separate hydrothermal reactions per run. Direct and rapid analysis of key end-products, glucose and xylose, is facilitated by the use of glucose oxidase/peroxidase and xylose dehydrogenase-linked assays. To demonstrate efficacy, a set of 755 poplar core samples from the US Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center was tested. Total sugar release ranged from 0.17 to 0.64 g/g of biomass and correlated strongly with the ratio of syringyl to guaiacyl lignins in the samples. Variance among sample replicates was sufficiently minimal to permit clear assignment of differences in recalcitrance throughout this large sample set.

Selig, M. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Sykes, R. W.; Reichel, K. L.; Brunecky, R.; Himmel, M. E.; Davis, M. F.; Decker, S. R.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fractionating Recalcitrant Lignocellulose at Modest Reaction Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effectively releasing the locked polysaccharides from recalcitrant lignocellulose to fermentable sugars is among the greatest technical and economic barriers to the realization of lignocellulose biorefineries because leading lignocellulose pre-treatment technologies suffer from low sugar yields, and/or severe reaction conditions, and/or high cellulase use, narrow substrate applicability, and high capital investment, etc. A new lignocellulose pre-treatment featuring modest reaction conditions (50 C and atmospheric pressure) was demonstrated to fractionate lignocellulose to amorphous cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and acetic acid by using a non-volatile cellulose solvent (concentrated phosphoric acid), a highly volatile organic solvent (acetone), and water. The highest sugar yields after enzymatic hydrolysis were attributed to no sugar degradation during the fractionation and the highest enzymatic cellulose digestibility ({approx}97% in 24 h) during the hydrolysis step at the enzyme loading of 15 filter paper units of cellulase and 60 IU of beta-glucosidase per gram of glucan. Isolation of high-value lignocellulose components (lignin, acetic acid, and hemicellulose) would greatly increase potential revenues of a lignocellulose biorefinery.

Zhang, Y.-H. Percival [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ding, Shi-You [National Energy Renewable Laboratory; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Cui, Jing-Biao [Dartmouth College; Elander, Richard T. [Dartmouth College; Laser, Mark [Dartmouth College; Himmel, Michael [ORNL; McMillan, James R. [National Energy Renewable Laboratory; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

High Throughput Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis of Biomass: Screening Recalcitrance in Large Sample Populations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the execution of the first high-throughput thermochemical pretreatment/enzyme digestion pipeline for screening biomass for recalcitrance.

Decker, S. R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Novel System for Recalcitrance Screening Will Reduce Biofuels Production Costs, The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This new system will allow researchers to much more rapidly screen large numbers of samples This new system will allow researchers to much more rapidly screen large numbers of samples and identify the most promising biomass feedstocks for higher efficiency and lower cost bio- fuels conversion processes. NREL will be screening thousands of variants of different biomass feedstocks to link genetic traits with environmental factors that can enhance biomass conver- sion efficiencies. Identifying the genes controlling the anatomical, chemical, and morphologi- cal features of biomass is essential to develop the next generation of low-cost, easily convert- ible biomass feedstocks. To identify superior performing biomass feedstocks using approaches that account for natural diversity and randomness, researchers must measure the cell wall chemistry and recalcitrance

6

High-Solids Enzymatic Saccharification Screening Method for Lignocellulosic Biomass (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to screen new biomass pretreatments and advanced enzyme systems at process-relevant conditions is key to developing economically viable lignocellulosic ethanol. While much research is being invested in developing pretreatment technologies and enzyme systems that will more efficiently convert cellulosic biomass to sugars, the current standard reactor vessel, a shake flask, that is used for screening enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic biomass is inadequate at high-solids conditions. Shake flasks do not provide adequate mixing at high solids conditions. In this work, a roller bottle reactor was identified as a small-scale high-solids saccharification reaction vessel, and a method was developed for use in screening both pretreated biomass and enzyme systems at process-relevant conditions. This new method addresses mixing issues observed in high-solids saccharifications. In addition, yield calculations from sugar concentrations on a mass basis were used to account for the two-phase nature of the saccharification slurry, which eliminates discontinuities in comparing high-solids to low-solids saccharifications that occur when using concentrations on a volume basis. The roller bottle reactors out-performed the shake flasks by 5% for an initial insoluble solids loading of 15% and 140% for an initial soluble solids loading of 30%. The reactor system and method was compared at bench and floor scales and determined to be scalable for initial insoluble solids loading in the range of 15% to 30%. Pretreatment and enzyme screening results indicate that mid severity pretreated biomass is more digestible than the low and high severity biomass and GC220 is a superior enzyme to Spezyme CP.

Roche, C. M.; Stickel, J. J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Novel System for Recalcitrance Screening Will Reduce Biofuels Production Costs; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes a high-throughput screening process, developed at NREL, that enables researchers to screen a large variety of biomass feedstocks for traits that indicate they would easily convert to fermentable sugars.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Development of New Methods in Scanning Probe Microscopy for Lignocellulosic Biomass Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods Development of New Methods in Scanning Probe Microscopy for Lignocellulosic Biomass implicated in recalcitrance is important for utili- zation of lignocellulosic biomass in the world new technologies to explore the ultrastructure of biomass at nanoscale.4 Mode-synthesizing atomic

9

Biomass Characterization: Recent Progress in Understanding Biomass Recalcitrance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reviews Reviews Biomass Characterization: Recent Progress in Understanding Biomass Recalcitrance Marcus Foston and Arthur J. Ragauskas BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA Abstract The ever-increasing global demand for energy and materials has a pronounced effect on worldwide economic stability, diplomacy, and technical advancement. In response, a recent key research area in bio- technology has centered on the biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to simple sugars. Lignocellulosic biomass, converted to fer- mentable sugars via enzymatic hydrolysis of cell wall polysaccharides, can be utilized to generate a variety of downstream fuels and chemicals. Ethanol, in particular, has a high potential as transportation fuel to supplement or even replace

10

New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Received: Received: 7 September 2012 Accepted: 13 September 2012 Published online in Wiley Online Library: (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI 10.1002/jctb.3959 New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, a† Anthe George b,c and Y-H Percival Zhang a,d,e∗ Abstract Non-food lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable bioresource as a collectable, transportable, and storable chemical energy that is far from fully utilized. The goal of biomass pretreatment is to improve the enzymatic digestibility of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. Many substrate factors, such as substrate accessibility, lignin content, particle size and so on, contribute to its recalcitrance. Cellulose accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes is believed to be the most important substrate characteristic limiting enzymatic hydrolysis. Cellulose

11

Ethanol production from lignocellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

High-Throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-throughput High-throughput Pretreatment and Hydrolysis Systems for Screening Biomass Species in Aqueous Pretreatment of Plant Biomass Jaclyn D. DeMartini 1,2,3,Ã and Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, USA 2 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 22.1 Introduction: The Need for High-throughput Technologies The primary barrier to low-cost biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to renewable fuels and chemicals is plant recalcitrance, that is to say, resistance of cell walls to deconstruction by enzymes or microbes [1,2]. However, the discovery and use of biomass species with reduced recalcitrance, when com- bined with optimized pretreatment processes and enzyme mixtures, could potentially

13

Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant ...  

Surfactant biocatalyst for remediation of recalcitrant organics and heavy metals United States Patent. Patent Number: 7,906,315: Issued: March 15, ...

14

Identify Molecular Structural Features of Biomass Recalcitrance Using Nondestructive Microscopy and Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify Molecular Structural Features of Biomass Recalcitrance Using Non- Identify Molecular Structural Features of Biomass Recalcitrance Using Non- destructive Microscopy and Spectroscopy Shi-You Ding 1 , Mike Himmel 1 , Sunney X. Xie 2 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 2 Harvard University, Cambridge, MA Lignocellulosic biomass has long been recognized as a potential sustainable source of mixed sugars for fermentation to fuels and other bio-based products. However, the chemical and enzymatic conversion processes developed during the past 80 years are inefficient and expensive. The inefficiency of these processes is in part due to the lack of knowledge about the structure of biomass itself; the plant cell wall is indeed a complex nano-composite material at the molecular and nanoscales. Current processing strategies have been derived empirically, with

15

Prehydrolysis of lignocellulose - Energy Innovation Portal  

The invention relates to the prehydrolysis of lignocellulose by passing an acidic or alkaline solution through solid lignocellulosic particles with removal of soluble ...

16

Chemical, ultrastructural and supramolecular analysis of tension wood in Populus tremula x alba as a model substrate for reduced recalcitrance  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is one of the most abundant potential sustainable sources for fuel and material production, however to fully realize this potential an improved understanding of lignocellulosic recalcitrance must be developed. In an effort to appreciate the underlying phenotypic, biochemical and morphological properties associated with the reduced recalcitrance observed in tension stress-induced reaction wood, we report the increased enzymatic sugar yield and corresponding chemical and ultrastructural properties of Populus tension wood. Populus tremula x alba (PTA) was grown under tension and stem segments containing three different wood types: normal wood (NW), tension wood (TW) from the elongated stem side and opposite wood (OW) from the compressed stem side were collected. A variety of analytical techniques were used to describe changes occurring as a result of the tension stress-induced formation of a gelatinous cell wall layer (G-layer). For example, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that the molecular weight and crystallinity of cellulose in TW is greater than that of cellulose acquired from NW. Whole cell ionic liquid and other solid-state NMR analysis detailed the structure of lignin and hemicellulose in the samples, detecting the presence of variations in lignin and hemicellulose sub-units, linkages and semi-quantitatively estimating the relative amounts of syringyl (S), guaiacyl (G) and p-hydroxybenzoate (PB) monolignol units. It was confirmed that TW displayed an increase in PB or H-like lignin and S to G ratio from 1.25 to 1.50 when compared to the NW sample. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) were also used to evaluate the morphology and corresponding spatial distribution of the major lignocellulosic components. We found changes in a combination of cell wall properties appear to influence recalcitrance more than any single factor alone.

Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Hubbell, Christopher A [ORNL; Samuel, Reichel [ORNL; Jung, Seung-Yong [ORNL; Ding, Shi-You [ORNL; Zeng, Yining [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Sykes, Virginia R [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

High-Speed Biomass Recalcitrance Pipeline Speeds Up Bio ...  

High-Speed Biomass Recalcitrance Pipeline Speeds Up Bio-Mass Analysis Robotic pipeline allows for rapid analysis of optimal substrate/enzyme ...

18

Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulosic Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment Lee Lynd 1,2 and Mark Laser 1 1 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2.1 Our Place in History The two most profound societal transformations in history have been spawned by radical shifts in human- kind's use of natural resources. The agricultural revolution, which spanned about two millennia beginning around 4000 BC, saw hunter-gatherer societies subsisting on wild plants and animals being largely dis- placed by those cultivating the land to produce crops and domesticated livestock. The industrial revolution followed, beginning around 1700 and lasting roughly two hundred years, during which time preindustrial agricultural societies gave way to those harnessing precious metals and fossil energy to develop sophisti- cated economies centered

19

Preprocessing Moist Lignocellulosic Biomass for Biorefinery Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Biomass preprocessing is one of the primary operations in the feedstock assembly system of a lignocellulosic biorefinery. Preprocessing is generally accomplished using industrial grinders to format biomass materials into a suitable biorefinery feedstock for conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Many factors affect machine efficiency and the physical characteristics of preprocessed biomass. For example, moisture content of the biomass as received from the point of production has a significant impact on overall system efficiency and can significantly affect the characteristics (particle size distribution, flowability, storability, etc.) of the size-reduced biomass. Many different grinder configurations are available on the market, each with advantages under specific conditions. Ultimately, the capacity and/or efficiency of the grinding process can be enhanced by selecting the grinder configuration that optimizes grinder performance based on moisture content and screen size. This paper discusses the relationships of biomass moisture with respect to preprocessing system performance and product physical characteristics and compares data obtained on corn stover, switchgrass, and wheat straw as model feedstocks during Vermeer HG 200 grinder testing. During the tests, grinder screen configuration and biomass moisture content were varied and tested to provide a better understanding of their relative impact on machine performance and the resulting feedstock physical characteristics and uniformity relative to each crop tested.

Neal Yancey; Christopher T. Wright; Craig Conner; J. Richard Hess

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Technoeconomic analysis of a lignocellulosic ethanol biorefinery ...  

poplar wood. Biotechnol Progr 25(2):323332 (2009). 6. Zhao X, Cheng K and Liu D, Organosolv pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil ...  

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing ...

22

Nanoporous Membranes for Pretreatment of Lignocellulose ...  

source biomass not only is renewable and abundant, but also does not impact food supplies or prices. However, hydrolysis of lignocellulose from ...

23

Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass ...  

A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other bio ...

24

Plant Biomass and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Lead: Debra Mohnen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Biomass and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Lead: Debra Mohnen 1.2 Cell Wall Synthesis and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity Lead: Al Darvill TASK 1. Nucleotide-sugar/polysaccharide domain - Bar-Peled TASK 2. Cellulose domain - Kalluri TASK 3. Xylan and other hermiceluloses domain - York TASK 4. Pectin domain - Mohnen TASK 5. APAP1 domain - Tan TASK 6. Lignin domain - Dixon TASK 7. Transcription factor domain - Dixon TASK 8. Cellular/subcellular localization domain - Hahn 1.2.1: Cell Wall Synthesis and Mechanisms of Recalcitrance Activity (Darvill) 1.1 TOP and Elite Populus and Switchgrass and System Analysis Lead: Tuskan / Dixon 1.1.2: TOP and Elite Line Analysis Platform and Protocols (Nelson) 1.1.1: Selection of the TOP Populus and Switchgrass Lines

25

An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

Wiki-based Techno Economic Analysis of a Lignocellulosic ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Wiki-based Techno Economic Analysis of a Lignocellulosic Biorefinery Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About ...

27

Nanoporous Membranes for Pretreatment of Lignocellulose and Other Applications  

Researchers at ORNL have developed an inorganic membrane element and a flowthrough recycle (FTR) process for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass to ...

28

Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

29

Generalized Two-Dimensional Perturbation Correlation Infrared Spectroscopy reveals Mechanisms for the Development of Surface Charge and Recalcitrance in Plant-derived Biochars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental knowledge of how biochars develop surface-charge and resistance to environmental degradation (or recalcitrance) is crucial to their production for customized applications or, understanding their functions in the environment. Two-dimensional perturbation-based correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-PCIS) was used to study the biochar formation process in three taxonomically-different plant biomass, under oxygen-limited conditions along a heat-treatment-temperature gradient (HTT; 200-650 oC). Results from 2D-PCIS pointed to the systematic, HTT-induced defragmenting of lignocellulose H-bonding network, and demethylenation/demethylation, oxidation or dehydroxylation/dehydrogenation of lignocellulose fragments as the primary reactions controlling biochar properties along the HTT gradient. The cleavage of OH O-type H-bonds, oxidation of free primary hydroxyls (HTT?500 oC), and their subsequent dehydrogenation/dehydroxylation (HTT>500 oC) controlled surface charge on the biochars; while the dehydrogenation of methylene groups, which yielded increasingly condensed structures (R-CH2-R ?R=CH-R ?R=C=R), controlled biochar recalcitrance. Variations in biochar properties across plant biomass type were attributable to taxa-specific transformations. For example, apparent inefficiencies in the cleavage of wood-specific H-bonds, and their subsequent oxidation to carboxyls, lead to lower surface charge in wood biochars (compared to grass biochars). Both non-taxa and taxa-specific transformations highlighted by 2D-PCIS could have significant implications for biochar functioning in fire-impacted or biochar-amended systems.

Harvey, Omar R.; Herbert, Bruce; Kuo, Li-Jung; Louchouarn, Patrick

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Simultaneous consumption of pentose and hexose sugars: an optimal microbial phenotype for efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bacteria for lignocellulosic biomass utilization CCR forfermentation of lignocellulosic biomass Jae-Han Kim & DavidAbstract Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive carbon

Kim, Jae-Han; Block, David E.; Mills, David A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance Henrik Vibeenergy stored in plant biomass. The papers in this volumefeedstocks development and biomass deconstruction. Keywords

Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Currently, the primary barrier to low cost biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to renewable fuels is a plant's recalcitrance to sugar release. The energy-intensive pretreatments (more)

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EA-1628: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project LIBERTY, LLC (POET) for the construction and operation of the lignocellulosic ethanol production facility (Project LIBERTY) near the City of Emmetsburg, Iowa. PUBLIC...

34

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sugar yields for biofuel production. Nat Biotechnol 25(7):research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose A keylignocellulosic biofuel production and highlight scientific

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics - Energy ...  

Building Energy Efficiency ... Solar Thermal; ... loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to ...

36

Hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-function process is described for the hydrolysis and fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass to separate hemicellulosic sugars from other biomass components such as extractives and proteins; a portion of the solubilized lignin; cellulose; glucose derived from cellulose; and insoluble lignin from said biomass comprising one or more of the following: optionally, as function 1, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing a lignocellulosic biomass material at a temperature of about 94 to about 160.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 120 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of extractives, lignin, and protein by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 2, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0, either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing either fresh biomass or the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 1 at a temperature of about 94-220.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of hemicellulosic sugars, semisoluble sugars and other compounds, and amorphous glucans by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; as function 3, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 2 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process; and as function 4, optionally, introducing a dilute acid of pH 1.0-5.0 either as virgin acid or an acidic stream from another function, into a continual shrinking bed reactor containing the partially fractionated lignocellulosic biomass material from function 3 at a temperature of about 180-280.degree. C. for a period of about 10 to about 60 minutes at a volumetric flow rate of about 1 to about 5 reactor volumes to effect solubilization of cellulosic sugars by keeping the solid to liquid ratio constant throughout the solubilization process.

Torget, Robert W. (Littleton, CO); Padukone, Nandan (Denver, CO); Hatzis, Christos (Denver, CO); Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants and Enzymes for Biofuels Production. Science. 2007;Lignocellulose. Biotechnol. for Biofuels 2009; 2:11. KumarPretreatment. Biotechnol. for Biofuels 2010; 3:27. Lionetti

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative Accomplishments 2009 Lead lignocellulosic "drop-in" biofuels. "Drop-in" means they are compatible with the existing petroleum refining and distribution infrastructure. With this project Texas can become a leader in biofuels production

39

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested through lower severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new transgenic maize was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass, as manifested. This biomass recalcitrance makes costly thermochemical pretreatment necessary. Scientists at the National. This engineered feedstock was observed to be less recalcitrant than wild-type biomass when subjected to reduced

40

EA-1628: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

628: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic 628: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, Emmetsburg, Iowa EA-1628: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, Emmetsburg, Iowa SUMMARY This EA evaluated the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to provide financial assistance (the Proposed Action) to POET Project LIBERTY, LLC (POET) for the construction and operation of the lignocellulosic ethanol production facility (Project LIBERTY) near the City of Emmetsburg, Iowa. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 2008 EA-1628: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, POET Project LIBERTY, LLC, Emmetsburg, Iowa September 29, 2008

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation ena- Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocellulose fractionation ena- bled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, Zhiguang Zhu, Y.-H. Percival Zhang PII: S0960-8524(12)00712-2 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.04.088 Reference: BITE 9966 To appear in: Bioresource Technology Received Date: 29 February 2012 Revised Date: 21 April 2012 Accepted Date: 21 April 2012 Please cite this article as: Sathitsuksanoh, N., Zhu, Z., Percival Zhang, Y.-H., Cellulose solvent- and organic solvent- based lignocellulose fractionation enabled efficient sugar release from a variety of lignocellulosic feedstocks, Bioresource Technology (2012), doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.04.088 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers

42

F  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

o r P e e r R e v i e w Journal Name: http:mc.manuscriptcentral.comindbiotech Lignocellulose Recalcitrance Screening by Integrated High Throughput Hydrothermal Pretreatment and...

43

Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

(Biotechnology for the conversion of lignocellulosics)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the traveler's participation in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Network planning meeting for Biotechnology for the Conversion of Lignocellulosics,'' held at the Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), Rueil-Malmaison, France. It also summarizes the results of discussions held at Aston University, Birmingham, UK, with Dr. Martin Beevers with whom the traveler is attempting to initiate a collaborative research project that will be beneficial to ongoing research programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The itinerary for the trip is given in Appendix A; the names of the people contacted are listed in Appendix B. Also, pertinent information about the Institut Francais du Petrole is attached (Appendix C). 1 tab.

Woodward, J.

1990-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

Nguyen, Q.A.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is disclosed for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material. The apparatus consists of a tower bioreactor which has mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

Nguyen, Q.A.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards of downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Developing genome-enabled sustainable lignocellulosic biofuels technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing genome-enabled sustainable lignocellulosic biofuels technologies Timothy Donohue a technically advanced biofuels industry that is economically & environmentally sustainable." [GLBRC Roadmap sugars, lignin content, etc.) Cellulosic Biofuels "Opportunities & Challenges" 5 #12;Variable Composition

50

Cellobiohydrolase Hydrolyzes Crystalline Cellulose on Hydrophobic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from lignocellulosic biomass is considered a promising route to sustainable energy production. Unfortunately, lignocellulosic material is intrinsically recalcitrant to...

51

13September 2011 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13September 2011 2010 Lignocellulosic Biofuels from New Bioenergy Crops Federal Initiative- tonnage bioenergy crop on a commercial scale and convert it into an advanced biofuel (gasoline) in a pilot the biofuels production goals of the United States while helping to alleviate constraints on food and feed

52

FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Genetic manipulation of lignin reduces recalcitrance and improves biomass ethanol production from switchgrass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Switchgrass is a leading dedicated bioenergy feedstock because it is a native, high yielding, perennial prairie grass with broad cultivation range and low agronomic input requirements. Biomass conversion research has developed pilot scale processes for production of ethanol and other alcohols but they remain costly primarily due to the intrinsic recalcitrance of biomass. We show here that switchgrass genetic modification can produce normal plants that have reduced thermochemical and enzymatic recalcitrance. Downregulation of the switchgrass caffeic O-methyltransferase gene decreases lignin content modestly, reduces the syringyl to guaiacyl lignin monomer ratio and increases the ethanol yield by up to a third using conventional biomass fermentation processes. The downregulated lines have wild-type biomass yields but require reduced pretreatment severity and 300-400% lower cellulase dosages for equivalent product yields significantly lowering processing costs. Alternately, our modified transgenic switchgrass lines should yield significantly more fermentation chemicals per hectare under identical process conditions.

Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Fu, Chunxiang [Noble Foundation; Xiao, Xirong [Noble Foundation; Ge, Yaxin [Noble Foundation; Chen, Fang [Noble Foundation; Bouton, Joseph [Noble Foundation; Foston, Marcus [Georgia Institute of Technology; Dixon, Richard A [Noble Foundation; Wang, Zeng-Yu [Noble Foundation; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Changes in composition and sugar release across the annual rings of Populus wood and implications on recalcitrance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

composition composition and sugar release across the annual rings of Populus wood and implications on recalcitrance Jaclyn D. DeMartini, Charles E. Wyman ⇑ Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 9 July 2010 Received in revised form 30 August 2010 Accepted 31 August 2010 Available online xxxx Keywords: Pretreatment Enzymatic hydrolysis Biomass recalcitrance Age effects Populus wood a b s t r a c t Understanding structural characteristics that are responsible for biomass recalcitrance by identifying why it is more difficult for some plants, or portions of plants, to release their sugars would be extremely valuable in overcoming this barrier. With this in mind, this study investigated the recalcitrance of wood

55

Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility  

SciTech Connect

Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Why sequence genome closure of lignocellulosic degrader Verrucomicrobium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome closure of lignocellulosic genome closure of lignocellulosic degrader Verrucomicrobium sp. strain TAV2? Wood-feeding termites have microbial communities in their guts that are capable of converting cellulose and hemicellulose into sugars, hydrogen and methane. They can break down as much as a billion tons of raw plant biomass annually, and are of interest to bioenergy researchers hoping to harness these abilities for commercial biofuel production. To better understand the interactions and roles within the gut microbial community, the project focuses on sequencing a Termite Associated Verrucomicrobium (TAV) bacterial strain of Verrucomicrobium known as TAV2. Members of the Verrucomicrobia phylum are found in a number of environments both in water and in soils. As members of the soil microbial community,

58

Engineered microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

752; 752; NO. OF PAGES 6 Please cite this article in press as: Elkins JG, et al. Engineered Q1microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass, Curr Opin Biotechnol (2010), doi:10.1016/ j.copbio.2010.05.008 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Engineered microbial systems for enhanced conversion of lignocellulosic biomass James G Elkins, Babu Raman and Martin Keller In order for plant biomass to become a viable feedstock for meeting the future demand for liquid fuels, efficient and cost- effective processes must exist to breakdown cellulosic materials into their primary components. A one-pot conversion strategy or, consolidated bioprocessing, of biomass into ethanol would provide the most cost-effective route to renewable fuels and the realization of this technology is being actively pursued by both multi-disciplinary research centers and

59

Method for the delignification of lignocellulosic material by adding a dialkyl substituted octahydroanthraquinone  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for the synthesis of substituted octahydroanthraquinones and substituted anthraquinones which are effective for pulping of lignocellulosics.

Dimmel, Donald R. (Dunwoody, GA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effects of nutrients supplementation on fermentability of lignocellulosic hydrolysates under high gravity conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bioethanol produced from lignocellulosic materials is emerging as a promising alternative to fossil fuels. Fermentation of these substrates results in low yields due to the (more)

Claesson, Kjersti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Improving the bioconversion yield of carbohydrates and ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improving the efficiency of lignocellulosic ethanol production is of the utmost importance if cellulosic bioethanol is to be competitive with fossil fuels and first generation (more)

Ewanick, Shannon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A STRATEGY TO FACILITATE THE CONVERSION OF LIGNOCELLULOSE TO BIOETHANOL VIA LIGNIN MODIFICATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on developing a novel strategy to increase the digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass in bioethanol production by introducing peptides to the plant cell (more)

Cong, Fang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Performance Of Clostridium Phytofermentans For Biofuels Production From Lignocellulosic Biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol produced from lignocellulosic biomass is an alternative transportation fuel with the potential to lower greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy security. Source-separated organic waste (more)

Percy, Benjamin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

17th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition 2009, Hamburg, Germany Lignocellulosic Ethanol: The Path to Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition 2009, Hamburg, Germany Lignocellulosic Ethanol of transport fuels from biomass is essential if the EU aspiration to substitute 10% of transport fuels investment in R&D in the US, Europe and Asia. The production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

66

Study of Lignocellulosic Material Degradation with CARS Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program of research undertaken by our Harvard group, in collaboration with Dr. Ding at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO, seeks to introduce, validate and apply a new analytical technique to study the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. This conversion process has been the subject of intense interest over the past few years because of its potential to provide a clean, renewable source of energy to meet increasing global demand. During the funding period, we have clearly demonstrated visualization of lignin and cellulose using intrinsic vibrational contrast with simulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, developed at Harvard. Our approach offers high spatial resolution and time resolution that is sufficient to capture the kinetics of a pre?treatment process. This is reflected by the publications listed below, as well as the use of SRS microscopy at NREL as a routine analysis tool for research on lignocellulosic biomass. In our original proposal, we envisioned moving to near?field CARS imaging in order to perform chemical mapping at the nanoscale. However, given the dramatic progress made by our group in SRS imaging, we concentrated our efforts on using multi?component SRS (lignin, cellulose, lipid, water, protein, deuterated metabolites, etc.) to quantitatively understand the spatially dispersed kinetics in a variety of plant samples under a variety of conditions. In addition, we built a next generation laser system based on fiber laser technology that allowed rugged and portable instrumentation for SRS microscopy. We also pursued new imaging approaches to improve the acquisition speed of SRS imaging of lignocellulose without sacrificing signal?to?noise ratio. This allowed us to image larger volumes of tissue with higher time resolution to get a more comprehensive picture of the heterogeneity of this chemical process from the submicron up to the centimeter scale.

Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Ding, Shi-You

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cellulosic ethanol: progress towards a simulation model of lignocellulosic biomass;  

SciTech Connect

A CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived. Parameterization is based on reproducing quantum mechanical data of model compounds. Partial atomic charges are derived by the examination of methoxybenzene:water interactions. Dihedral parameters are optimized by fitting to critical rotational potentials, and bonded parameters are obtained by optimizing vibrational frequencies and normal modes. The force field is validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work will enable full simulations of lignocellulose. This work presents a molecular mechanics force field for lignin that is compatible with the CHARMM potential energy function. The parameterization was based on reproducing quantum-mechanically derived target data. Special care was taken to correctly describe the most common lignin linkage: the {beta}-O-4{prime} bond. The partial atomic charge of the oxygen and carbon atoms participating in the linkage were derived by examining interactions between a lignin fragment model compound and a water molecule. Dihedral parameters were obtained by reproducing QM potential energy profiles, with emphasis placed on reproducing accurately the thermally sampled low energy regions. The remaining bond and angle parameters were derived using the AFMM method. In order to test the validity of the force field a simulation of a lignin-dimer crystal was performed. The overall good agreement between the structural properties of the MD run and the experiment provide confidence that the force field can be used in simulation of biomass. The accurate computer simulation of lignin in lignocellulose will present significant challenges. Unlike many biological macromolecules that have been studied with molecular simulation, both the chemical and three-dimensional structures of lignin are relatively poorly researched. However, the present force field provides a basis for constructing molecular models of lignin systems, and, in combination with a range of biophysical measurements, significant progress in determining structures of lignocellulosic biomass can be expected in the near future.

Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Comparative Life Cycle Assessments of Lignocellulosic and Algae Biomass Conversion to Various Energy Products through Different Pathways.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bioenergy has the potential to reduce the world's dependence on fossil fuels, and to decrease the CO2 emissions due to fossil combustion. Lignocellulosic and algae (more)

Pinilla, Maria Juliana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Determining the Cost of Producing Ethanol from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mature corn-to-ethanol industry has many similarities to the emerging lignocellulose-to-ethanol industry. It is certainly possible that some of the early practitioners of this new technology will be the current corn ethanol producers. In order to begin to explore synergies between the two industries, a joint project between two agencies responsible for aiding these technologies in the Federal government was established. This joint project of the USDA-ARS and DOE/NREL looked at the two processes on a similar process design and engineering basis, and will eventually explore ways to combine them. This report describes the comparison of the processes, each producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol. This paper attempts to compare the two processes as mature technologies, which requires assuming that the technology improvements needed to make the lignocellulosic process commercializable are achieved, and enough plants have been built to make the design well-understood. Ass umptions about yield and design improvements possible from continued research were made for the emerging lignocellulose process. In order to compare the lignocellulose-to-ethanol process costs with the commercial corn-to-ethanol costs, it was assumed that the lignocellulose plant was an Nth generation plant, built after the industry had been sufficiently established to eliminate first-of-a-kind costs. This places the lignocellulose plant costs on a similar level with the current, established corn ethanol industry, whose costs are well known. The resulting costs of producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol from each process were determined. The figure below shows the production cost breakdown for each process. The largest cost contributor in the corn starch process is the feedstock; for the lignocellulosic process it is the capital cost, which is represented by depreciation cost on an annual basis.

McAloon, A.; Taylor, F.; Yee, W.; Ibsen, K.; Wooley, R.

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

CONVERSION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC MATERIAL TO CHEMICALS AND FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A direct conversion of cellulosic wastes, including resin-bonded furniture and building waste, to levulinate esters is being investigated with the view to producing fuels, solvents, and chemical intermediates as well as other useful by-products in an inexpensive process. The acid-catalyzed reaction of cellulosic materials with ethanol or methanol at 200 C gives good yields of levulinate and formate esters, as well as useful by-products, such as a solid residue (charcoal) and a resinous lignin residue. An initial plant design showed reasonable rates of return for production of purified ethyl levulinate and by-products. In this project, investigations have been performed to identify and develop reactions that utilize esters of levulinic acid produced during the acid-catalyzed ethanolysis reaction. We wish to develop uses for levulinate esters that allow their marketing at prices comparable to inexpensive polymer intermediates. These prices will allow a sufficient rate of return to justify building plants for utilizing the waste lignocellulosics. If need is demonstrated for purified levulinate, the initial plant design work may be adequate, at least until further pilot-scale work on the process is performed.

Edwin S. Olson

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

New Innovations in Highly Ion Specific Media for Recalcitrant Waste stream Radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

Specialty ion specific media were examined and developed for, not only pre- and post-outage waste streams, but also for very difficult outage waste streams. This work was carried out on first surrogate waste streams, then laboratory samples of actual waste streams, and, finally, actual on-site waste streams. This study was particularly focused on PWR wastewaters such as Floor Drain Tank (FDT), Boron Waste Storage Tank (BWST), and Waste Treatment Tank (WTT, or discharge tank). Over the last half decade, or so, treatment technologies have so greatly improved and discharge levels have become so low, that certain particularly problematic isotopes, recalcitrant to current treatment skids, are all that remain prior to discharge. In reality, they have always been present, but overshadowed by the more prevalent and higher activity isotopes. Such recalcitrants include cobalt, especially Co 58 [both ionic/soluble (total dissolved solids, TDS) and colloidal (total suspended solids, TSS)] and antimony (Sb). The former is present in most FDT and BWST wastewaters, while the Sb is primarily present in BWST waste streams. The reasons Co 58 can be elusive to granulated activated carbon (GAC), ultrafiltration (UF) and ion exchange (IX) demineralizers is that it forms submicron colloids as well as has a tendency to form metal complexes with chelating agents (e.g., ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, or EDTA). Such colloids and non-charged complexes will pass through the entire treatment skid. Antimony (Sb) on the other hand, has little or no ionic charge, and will, likewise, pass through both the filtration and de-min skids into the discharge tanks. While the latter will sometimes (the anionic vs. the cationic or neutral species) be removed on the anion bed(s), it will slough off (snow-plow effect) when a higher affinity anion (iodine slugs, etc.) comes along; thus causing effluents not meeting discharge criteria. The answer to these problems found in this study, during an actual Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) outage cycle and recovery (four months), was the down-select and development of a number of highly ion specific media for the specific removal of such elusive isotopes. Over three dozen media including standard cation and anion ion exchangers, specialty IX, standard carbons, and, finally, chemically doped media (e.g., carbon and alumina substrates). The latter involved doping with iron, manganese, and even metals. The media down-select was carried out on actual plant waste streams so that all possible outage affects were accounted for, and distribution coefficients (Kd's) were determined (vs. decontamination factors, DF's, or percent removals). Such Kd's, in milliliters of solution per gram of media (mug), produce data indicative of the longevity of the media in that particular waste stream. Herein, the down-select is reported in Pareto (decreasing order) tables. Further affects such as the presence of high cobalt concentrations, high boron concentrations, the presence of hydrazine and chelating agents, and extreme pH conditions. Of particular importance here is to avoid the affinity of competing ions (e.g., a Sb specific media having more than a slight affinity for Co). The latter results in the snow-plow effect of sloughing off 3 to 4 times the cobalt into the effluent as was in the feed upon picking up the Sb. The study was quite successful and resulted in the development of and selection of a resin-type and two granular media for antimony removal, and two resin-types and a granular media for cobalt removal. The decontamination factors for both media were hundreds to thousands of times that of the full filtration and de-min. (authors)

Denton, M. S.; Wilson, J.; Ahrendt, M. [RWE NUKEM Corporation (RNC), 800 Oak Ridge Tnpk., Suite A701, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Bostick, W. D. [Materials and Chemistry Laboratory (MCL), Inc., East Tennessee Technology Park, Building K-1006, 2010 Highway 58, Suite 1000, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); DeSilva, F.; Meyers, P. [ResinTech, Inc., 1 ResinTech Plaza, 160 Cooper Road, West Berlin, NJ 08091 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermochemical Ethanol via Direct Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermochemical Ethanol via Thermochemical Ethanol via Direct Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass A. Dutta and S.D. Phillips Technical Report NREL/TP-510-45913 July 2009 Technical Report Thermochemical Ethanol via NREL/TP-510-45913 Direct Gasification and Mixed July 2009 Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass A. Dutta and S.D. Phillips Prepared under Task No. BB07.3710 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

73

Changes in lignocellulosic supramolecular and ultrastructure during dilute acid pretreatment of Populus and switchgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lignocellulosic lignocellulosic supramolecular and ultrastructure during dilute acid pretreatment of Populus and switchgrass Marcus Foston, Art J. Ragauskas* BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 23 March 2009 Received in revised form 17 July 2010 Accepted 23 July 2010 Available online xxx Keywords: Dilute acid pretreatment Cellulose Supramolecular structure Populus Switchgrass a b s t r a c t Dilute acid pretreatment (DAP) is commonly employed prior to enzymatic deconstruction of cellulose to increase overall sugar and subsequent ethanol yields from downstream bioconversion processes. Typically optimization of pretreatment is evaluated by deter- mining hemicellulose removal, subsequent reactivity towards

74

Chapter 3: Atomistic Simulation of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Associated Cellulosomal Protein Complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer simulations have been performed to obtain an atomic-level understanding of lignocellulose structure and the assembly of its associated cellulosomal protein complexes. First, a CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived and validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work provides the basis for full simulations of lignocellulose. Second, the underlying molecular mechanism governing the assembly of various cellulosomal modules is investigated by performing a novel free-energy calculation of the cohesin-dockerin dissociation. Our calculation indicates a free-energy barrier of {approx}17 kcal/mol and further reveals a stepwise dissociation pathway involving both the central {beta}-sheet interface and its adjacent solvent-exposed loop/turn regions clustered at both ends of the {beta}-barrel structure.

Petridis, L.; Xu, J.; Crowley, M. F.; Smith, J. C.; Cheng, X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Recall the diagrams we saw before: Screen1Screen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Customer EnterOrder customers orders buttons · When we trace through the diagram there are a number of keyX-machines · Recall the diagrams we saw before: Start Customers Orders Screen1Screen1 Screen2 Customers Screen Screen2 Customers Screen Screen3 Orders Screen Screen3 Orders Screen ClickCustomer Click

Holcombe, Mike

76

Process for whole cell saccharification of lignocelluloses to sugars using a dual bioreactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention describes a process for saccharification of lignocelluloses to sugars using whole microbial cells, which are enriched from cultures inoculated with paper mill waste water, wood processing waste and soil. A three-member bacterial consortium is selected as a potent microbial inocula and immobilized on inedible plant fibers for biomass saccharification. The present invention further relates the design of a dual bioreactor system, with various biocarriers for enzyme immobilization and repeated use. Sugars are continuously removed eliminating end-product inhibition and consumption by cell.

Lu, Jue (Okemos, MI); Okeke, Benedict (Montgomery, AL)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fundamental study of structural features affecting enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lignocellulose is a promising and valuable alternative energy source. Native lignocellulosic biomass has limited accessibility to cellulase enzyme due to structural features; therefore, pretreatment is an essential prerequisite to make biomass accessible and reactive by altering its structural features. The effects of substrate concentration, addition of cellobiase, enzyme loading, and structural features on biomass digestibility were explored. The addition of supplemental cellobiase to the enzyme complex greatly increased the initial rate and ultimate extent of biomass hydrolysis by converting the strong inhibitor, cellobiose, to glucose. A low substrate concentration (10 g/L) was employed to prevent end-product inhibition by cellobiose and glucose. The rate and extent of biomass hydrolysis significantly depend on enzyme loading and structural features resulting from pretreatment, thus the hydrolysis and pretreatment processes are intimately coupled because of structural features. Model lignocelluloses with various structural features were hydrolyzed with a variety of cellulase loadings for 1, 6, and 72 h. Glucan, xylan, and total sugar conversions at 1, 6, and 72 h were linearly proportional to the logarithm of cellulase loadings from approximately 10% to 90% conversion, indicating that the simplified HCH-1 model is valid for predicting lignocellulose digestibility. Carbohydrate conversions at a given time versus the natural logarithm of cellulase loadings were plotted to obtain the slopes and intercepts which were correlated to structural features (lignin content, acetyl content, cellulose crystallinity, and carbohydrate content) by both parametric and nonparametric regression models. The predictive ability of the models was evaluated by a variety of biomass (corn stover, bagasse, and rice straw) treated with lime, dilute acid, ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX), and aqueous ammonia. The measured slopes, intercepts, and carbohydrate conversions at 1, 6, and 72 h were compared to the values predicted by the parametric and nonparametric models. The smaller mean square error (MSE) in the parametric models indicates more satisfactorily predictive ability than the nonparametric models. The agreement between the measured and predicted values shows that lignin content, acetyl content, and cellulose crystallinity are key factors that determine biomass digestibility, and that biomass digestibility can be predicted over a wide range of cellulase loadings using the simplified HCH-1 model.

Zhu, Li

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

Chan, Wai Kit, E-mail: kekyeung@ust.hk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Joueet, Justine; Heng, Samuel; Yeung, King Lun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Schrotter, Jean-Christophe [Water Research Center of Veolia, Anjou Recherche, Chemin de la Digue, BP 76. 78603, Maisons Laffitte, Cedex (France)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hypertension screening Influenza immunization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preventive services that providers and care systems must assess the need for and offer to each patient. These have the highest priority value (see Table 1) Alcohol abuse; hazardous and harmful drinking screening and brief counseling Aspirin chemoprophylaxis counseling Breast cancer screening Cervical cancer screening Chlamydia screening Colorectal cancer screening

S Ystems Improvement; Level I; Lipid Screening; Pneumococcal Immunization

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Feasibility Study for Co-Locating and Integrating Ethanol Production Plants from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation. Although none of the scenarios identified could produce ethanol at lower cost than a straight grain ethanol plant, several were lower cost than a straight cellulosic ethanol plant.

Wallace, R.; Ibsen, K.; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels.from lignocellulosic biomass (Blanch et al. , 2008): long-in the degradation of biomass. RESULTS NIMS analysis of

Reindl, W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comparison of Biological and Thermal (Pyrolysis) Pathways for Conversion of Lignocellulose to Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of the limited supply of imported crude oil and environmental degradation, renewable energy is becoming commercially feasible and environmentally desirable. In this research, biological and thermal (pyrolysis) conversion pathways for biofuel production from lignocellulosic feedstocks were compared. For biological conversions of sorghum, ethanol yield was improved using M81-E variety (0.072 g/g juice) over Umbrella (0.065 g/g juice) for first-generation biomass (sorghum juice), and 0.042 g/g sorghum was obtained from the cellulosic portion of second-generation biomass. When ultrasonication was combined with hot water pretreatment, yields increased by 15% and 7% for cellulose to glucose, and hemicellulose to pentose, respectively. Ethanol yield was 10% higher when this pretreatment was combined with Accellerase 1500+XC for saccharification. Biological conversion yielded 1,600?2,300 L ethanol/ha for first-generation biomass, and 4,300?4,500 L ethanol/ha from lignocellulosic biomass. For thermal (pyrolysis) conversion of lignocellulosic switchgrass at 600 degrees C, product yield was 37% bio-oil, 26% syngas, and 25% bio-char. At 400 degrees C, product yield was 22% bio-oil, 8% syngas, and 56% bio-char. Bio-oil from pyrolysis was highly oxygenated (37 wt%). It required chemical transformation to increase its volatility and thermal stability, and to reduce its viscosity by removing objectionable oxygen, so the product could be used as transportation fuel (gasoline). As a consequence of upgrading bio-oil by catalytic hydrogenation, bio-oil oxygen decreased from 37?2 wt%, carbon increased from 50?83 wt%, hydrogen increased from 9?15 wt% and heating value increased from 36?46 MJ/kg, resulting in a fuel that was comparable to gasoline. The upgraded product passed the thermal stability test when kept under an oxygen-rich environment. The upgraded product consisted of 14.8% parrafins, 21.7% iso-parrafins, 3% napthene, 42.6% aromatics, 4.7% olefin, 4.7% DMF, 8% alcohol, and 0.6% ketone on a mass basis. Comparing the two pathways, biological conversion had 11 wt% ethanol yield from sorghum, and thermal conversion had 13 wt% gasoline yield from switchgrass. For process efficiency, thermal conversion had 35% energy loss versus 45% energy loss for biological conversions. For the biological pathway, ethanol cost was $2.5/gallon ($4/gallon, gasoline equivalent), whereas for the thermal pathway, switchgrass gasoline cost was $3.7/gallon, both with 15% before tax profit.

Imam, Tahmina 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Metabolic engineering of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii yields increased hydrogen production from lignocellulosic biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metabolic Metabolic engineering of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii yields increased hydrogen production from lignocellulosic biomass Minseok Cha 1,3 , Daehwan Chung 1,3 , James G Elkins 2,3 , Adam M Guss 2,3 and Janet Westpheling 1,3* Abstract Background: Members of the anaerobic thermophilic bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are emerging candidates for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) because they are capable of efficiently growing on biomass without conventional pretreatment. C. bescii produces primarily lactate, acetate and hydrogen as fermentation products, and while some Caldicellulosiruptor strains produce small amounts of ethanol C. bescii does not, making it an attractive background to examine the effects of metabolic engineering. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation has set the stage for rational engineering of this genus for improved biofuel

86

The Zymomonas mobilis regulator hfq contributes to tolerance against multiple lignocellulosic pretreatment inhibitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yang et al. BMC Microbiology 2010, 10:135 Yang et al. BMC Microbiology 2010, 10:135 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/10/135 Open Access R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E BioMed Central © 2010 Yang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Research article The Zymomonas mobilis regulator hfq contributes to tolerance against multiple lignocellulosic pretreatment inhibitors Shihui Yang 1,2 , Dale A Pelletier 1 , Tse-Yuan S Lu 1 and Steven D Brown* 1,2 Abstract Background: Zymomonas mobilis produces near theoretical yields of ethanol and recombinant strains are candidate

87

Onestep production of biocommodities from lignocellulosic biomass by recombinant cellulolytic Bacillus subtilis: Opportunities and challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One-step One-step production of biocommodities from lignocellulosic biomass by recombinant cellulolytic Bacillus subtilis: Opportunities and challenges One-step consolidated bioprocessing that integrates cellulase production, cellulose hydrolysis, and product fermentation into a single step for decreasing costly cellulase use, increasing volumetric productivity, and reducing capital investment is widely accepted for low-cost production of biofuels or other value-added biochemicals. Considering the narrow margins between biomass and low-value biocommodities, good physiological performance of industrial microbes is crucial for economically viable production. Bacillus subtilis, the best-characterized Gram-positive microorganism, is a major industrial microorganism with numerous valuable features such as hexose and pentose utilization, low-nutrient needs,

88

Evaluations of cellulose accessibilities of lignocelluloses by solute exclusion and protein adsorption techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluations Evaluations of Cellulose Accessibilities of Lignocelluloses by Solute Exclusion and Protein Adsorption Techniques Q.Q. Wang, 1,2 Z. He, 3 Z. Zhu, 4,5 Y.-H.P. Zhang, 4,5 Y. Ni, 3 X.L. Luo, 1 J.Y. Zhu 2 1 State Key Lab of Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China 2 USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin; telephone: 608-231-9520; fax: 608-231-9538; e-mail: jzhu@fs.fed.us 3 Limerick Pulp and paper Center, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada 4 Department Biological Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia 5 U.S. DOE Bioenergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 31 May 2011; revision received 27 July 2011; accepted 30 August 2011 Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.23330 ABSTRACT:

89

Technoeconomic Analysis of a Lignocellulosic Biomass Indirect Gasification Process to Make Ethanol via Mixed Alcohols Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technoeconomic analysis of a 2000 tonne/day lignocellulosic biomass conversion process to make mixed alcohols via gasification and catalytic synthesis was completed. The process, modeled using ASPEN Plus process modeling software for mass and energy calculations, included all major process steps to convert biomass into liquid fuels, including gasification, gas cleanup and conditioning, synthesis conversion to mixed alcohols, and product separation. The gas cleanup area features a catalytic fluidized-bed steam reformer to convert tars and hydrocarbons into syngas. Conversions for both the reformer and the synthesis catalysts were based on research targets expected to be achieved by 2012 through ongoing research. The mass and energy calculations were used to estimate capital and operating costs that were used in a discounted cash flow rate of return analysis for the process to calculate a minimum ethanol selling price of $0.267/L ($1.01/gal) ethanol (U.S.$2005).

Phillips, S. D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Over production of lignocellulosic enzymes of Coriolus versicolor by genetic engineering methodology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project seeks to understand the biological and chemical processes involved in the secretion of the enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) by the hyphae, the basic unit of the filamentous fungus Coriolus versicolor. These studies are made to determine rational strategies for enhanced secretion of PPO, both with the use of recombinant DNA techniques and without. This effort focuses on recombinant DNA techniques to enhance enzyme production. The major thrust of this project was two-fold: to mass produce C. versicolor tyrosinase (polyphenol oxidase) by genetic engineering as well as cultural manipulations; and to utilize PPO as a biocatalyst in the processing of lignocellulose as a renewable energy resource. In this study, the assessment of genomic and cDNA recombinant clones with regards to the overproduction of PPO continued. Further, immunocytochemical techniques were employed to assess the mechanism(s) involved in the secretion of PPO by the hyphae. Also, factors influencing PPO secretion were examined.

Williams, A.L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Final Report on Development of Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum for the conversion of lignocellulose to ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project addressed the need for economical technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, specifically the conversion of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. The technology developed is a set of strains of the bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and an associated fermentation process for pretreated hardwood. Tools for genetic engineering and analysis of the organism were developed, including a markerless mutation method, a complete genome sequence and a set of gene expression profiles that show the activity of its genes under a variety of conditions relevant to lignocellulose conversion. Improved strains were generated by selection and genetic engineering to be able to produce higher amounts of ethanol (up to 70 g/L) and to be able to better tolerate inhibitory compounds from pretreated hardwood. Analysis of these strains has generated useful insight into the genetic basis for desired properties of biofuel producing organisms. Fermentation conditions were tested and optimized to achieve ethanol production targets established in the original project proposal. The approach proposed was to add cellulase enzymes to the fermentation, a method called Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). We had reason to think SSF would be an efficient approach because the optimal temperature and pH for the enzymes and bacterium are very close. Unfortunately, we discovered that commercially available cellulases are inactivated in thermophilic SSF by a combination of low redox potential and ethanol. Despite this, progress was made against the fermentation targets using bacterial cellulases. Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum may still prove to be a commercially viable technology should cellulase enzyme issues be addressed. Moreover, the organism was demonstrated to produce ethanol at approximately theoretical yield from oligomeric hemicellulose extracts, an ability that may prove to be uniquely valuable in pretreatment configurations in which cellulose and hemicellulose are separated.

Herring, Christopher D.; Kenealy, William R.; Shaw, A. Joe; Raman, Babu; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Brown, Steven D.; Davison, Brian H.; Covalla, Sean F.; Sillers, W. Ryan; Xu, Haowen; Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Hogsett, David A.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidionycetes (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

David Hibbett from Clark University on "Evolutionary Perspectives on Diversity of Lignocellulose Decay Mechanisms in Basidiomycetes" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

Hibbett, David [Clark University

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

Outlook for cellulase improvement: Screening and selection strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulose is the most abundant renewable natural biological resource, and the production of biobased products and bioenergy from less costly renewable lignocellulosic materials is important for the sustainable development of human beings. A reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. Here, we review quantitative cellulase activity assays using soluble and insoluble substrates, and focus on their advantages and limitations. Because there are no clear relationships between cellulase activities on soluble substrates and those on insoluble substrates, soluble substrates should not be used to screen or select improved cellulases for processing relevant solid substrates, such as plant cell walls. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on soluble substrates have been only moderately successful, and have primarily targeted improvement in thermal tolerance. Heterogeneity of insoluble cellulose, unclear dynamic interactions between insoluble substrate and cellulase components, and the complex competitive and/or synergic relationship among cellulase components limit rational design and/or strategies, depending on activity screening approaches. Herein, we hypothesize that continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates could be a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library displayed on the cell surface.

Zhang, Yiheng P [ORNL; Himmel, Michael [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion of Lignocellulosic Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis A. Dutta, M. Talmadge, and J. Hensley National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado M. Worley and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Atlanta, Georgia and Seattle, Washington D. Barton, P. Groenendijk, D. Ferrari, and B. Stears The Dow Chemical Company Midland, Michigan E.M. Searcy, C.T. Wright, and J.R. Hess Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-51400 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

95

Fungal glycoside hydrolases for saccharification of lignocellulose: outlook for new discoveries fueled by genomics and functional studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Genome sequencing of a variety of fungi is a major initiative currently supported by the Department of Energys Joint Genome Institute. Encoded within the genomes of many fungi are upwards of 200+ enzymes called glycoside hydrolases (GHs). GHs are known for their ability to hydrolyze the polysaccharide components of lignocellulosic biomass. Production of ethanol and next generation biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass represents a sustainable route to biofuels production. However this process has to become more economical before large scale operations are put into place. Identifying and characterizing GHs with improved properties for biomass degradation is a key factor for the development of cost effective processes to convert biomass to fuels and chemicals. With the recent explosion in the number of GH encoding genes discovered by fungal genome sequencing projects, it has become apparent that improvements in GH gene annotation processes have to be developed. This will enable more informed and efficient decision making with regard to selection and utilization of these important enzymes in bioprocess that produce fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic feedstocks.

Jovanovic, Iva; Magnuson, Jon K.; Collart, Frank R.; Robbertse, Barbara; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Baker, Scott E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Randy Montoya) Goal Unlock two powerful sources of bioenergy: lignocellulose and algae Strategies Understand biomass recalcitrance to enable the discovery of efficient,...

97

Interactions of Lignin and Hemicellulose and Effects on Biomass Deconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

777- 93. Himmel ME. Biomass recalcitrance : deconstructingEthanol from Cellulosic Biomass. Science. 1991 Mar 15;251(from Lignocellulosic Biomass - Technology, Economics, and

Li, Hongjia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350 and 375 C to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan. 2 figs.

Moens, L.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

The cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass -- A comparison of selected alternative processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to compare the cost of selected alternative processes for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. In turn, this information will be used by the ARS/USDA to guide the management of research and development programs in biomass conversion. The report will identify where the cost leverages are for the selected alternatives and what performance parameters need to be achieved to improve the economics. The process alternatives considered here are not exhaustive, but are selected on the basis of having a reasonable potential in improving the economics of producing ethanol from biomass. When other alternatives come under consideration, they should be evaluated by the same methodology used in this report to give fair comparisons of opportunities. A generic plant design is developed for an annual production of 25 million gallons of anhydrous ethanol using corn stover as the model substrate at $30/dry ton. Standard chemical engineering techniques are used to give first order estimates of the capital and operating costs. Following the format of the corn to ethanol plant, there are nine sections to the plant; feed preparation, pretreatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and dehydration, stillage evaporation, storage and denaturation, utilities, and enzyme production. There are three pretreatment alternatives considered: the AFEX process, the modified AFEX process (which is abbreviated as MAFEX), and the STAKETECH process. These all use enzymatic hydrolysis and so an enzyme production section is included in the plant. The STAKETECH is the only commercially available process among the alternative processes.

Grethlein, H.E.; Dill, T.

1993-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350.degree. and 375.degree. C. to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tailoring Lignocelluloses for a Sustainable Energy Future (462nd Brookhaven Lecture)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today, the world relies on fossil fuels as a primary energy resource. This resource, however, is limited and associated with rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. In consequence, the search for renewable biofuels has become increasingly vital. Solutions thus far have focused on first-generation biofuels, such as corn ethanol and biodiesel. But this is not enough. Chang-Jun Liu of the Biology Department discusses how he and his colleagues are studying a more abundant and environmentally friendly renewable energy source lignocellulosic biomass found in plant cell walls. Liu explaines, plant cell walls provide unlimited quantities of renewable biomass. However, the intertwined lignin and cellulose that make up the cell walls resist decomposition, so obtaining energy from cellulosic biomass is a challenge. Liu and his colleagues are exploring the biosynthesis and molecular regulation of plant cell walls, particularly that of the most formidable polymer lignin. With this knowledge, they will develop novel strategies to tailor plant cell walls structure and composition for efficient biofuel and biomaterial production.

Liu, Chang-Jun (BNL Biology Dept)

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Screening | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Screening Screening Screening October 16, 2013 - 5:17pm Addthis Screening is typically performed by an outside party or an independent renewable energy expert or team. It is a review of the possible technology options that identifies dead-ends and further narrows the list to probable technologies for the project. A screening provides a preliminary assessment of how much energy could be produced by various renewable energy technologies and conducts a high-level analysis of expected costs and savings, utility considerations, and potential incentives. Federal agencies can analyze specific sites or conduct an agency-wide screening across properties to decide which areas have the greatest renewable energy potential. When conducted in conjunction with a new construction project or major renovation, an agency should get results from

103

Rapid Isotopic Screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cameca IMS-1270 is a high sensitivity large ... the capability to screen the enrichment levels of ... a test run of 100 particles of highly enriched uranium. ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

104

Metabolic engineering of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii yields increased hydrogen production from lignocellulosic biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: Members of the anaerobic thermophilic bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are emerging candidates for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) because they are capable of efficiently growing on biomass without conventional pretreatment. C. bescii produces primarily lactate, acetate and hydrogen as fermentation products, and while some Caldicellulosiruptor strains produce small amounts of ethanol C. bescii does not, making it an attractive background to examine the effects of metabolic engineering. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation has set the stage for rational engineering of this genus for improved biofuel production. Here, we report the first targeted gene deletion, the gene encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldh), for metabolic engineering of a member of this genus. Results: A deletion of the C. bescii L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldh) was constructed on a non-replicating plasmid and introduced into the C. bescii chromosome by marker replacement. The resulting strain failed to produce detectable levels of lactate from cellobiose and maltose, instead increasing production of acetate and H2 by 21-34% relative to the wild type and pyrFA parent strains. The same phenotype was observed on a real-world substrate switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Furthermore, the ldh deletion strain grew to a higher maximum optical density than the wild type on maltose and cellobiose, consistent with the prediction that the mutant would gain additional ATP with increased acetate production. Conclusions: Deletion of ldh in C. bescii is the first use of recently developed genetic methods for metabolic engineering of these bacteria. This deletion resulted in a redirection of electron flow from production of lactate to acetate and hydrogen. New capabilities in metabolic engineering combined with intrinsic utilization of lignocellulosic materials position these organisms to provide a new paradigm for consolidated bioprocessing of fuels and other products from biomass.

Cha, Minseok [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Chung, Daehwan [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Development of Oxidative Lime Pretreatment and Shock Treatment to Produce Highly Digestible Lignocellulose for Biofuel and Ruminant Feed Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, the United States generates biofuels (ethanol) from corn grain. Unfortunately, low crop yields and limited growth regions result in limited availability. Furthermore, the use of staple food crops for ethanol production has generated a highly controversial food vs. fuel debate. Because of its high abundance and relatively low cost, lignocellulosic biomass is a promising alternative feedstock for biofuel production; however, structural features of lignocellulose limit accessibility of enzymes or microorganisms. These structural barriers include high lignin content, acetyl groups on hemicellulose, high cellulose crystallinity, cellulose degree of polymerization, and small pore volume. To overcome these barriers, a variety of pretreatment processes (chemical and mechanical) have been developed. Oxidative-lime pretreatment (OLP) is highly effective at reducing lignin content and removing acetyl groups from hemicellulose. Combining OLP with a mechanical treatment process greatly enhances the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulose. Recommended OLP conditions were determined for Dacotah (120 C, 6.89-bar O2, 240 min) and Alamo (110 C, 6-89-bar O2, 240 min) switchgrass. Using recommended conditions, 72-h glucan digestibilities (g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g glucan in raw biomass; 15 filter paper units/g raw glucan) of 85.2 and 88.5 were achieved for Dacotah and Alamo, respectively. Adding ball milling to OLP further enhanced glucan digestibility to 91.1 (Dacotah) and 90.0 (Alamo). In previous studies, shock treatment achieved promising results, but was often inconsistent. This work refined shock treatment with a focus on using consistent procedures and performance analysis. The combination of OLP and shock treatment enhanced the 72-h glucan digestibility of several promising biomass feedstocks: bagasse (74.0), corn stover (92.0), poplar wood (94.0), sorghum (71.8), and switchgrass (89.0). Highly digestible lignocellulose can also be used as ruminant animal feed. Shock treatment plus OLP increased the total digestible nutrients (TDNN; g nutrients digested/100 g organic matter) of corn stover from 51.9 (untreated) to 72.6. Adding in pre-washed corn stover solubles to produce a combined feed (17.8 percent corn stover solubles and 82.2 percent shock OLP corn stover) increased TDNN to 74.9. Mixing in enough solubilized protein to match the crude protein content of corn grain further improved TDNN to 75.5, only 12.6 less than corn grain.

Falls, Matthew David

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Medical Screening Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Medical Screening: Provide medical screening exams that are designed to check for health conditions related to occupational exposures to former workers who choose to participate in the program, including a re-screen exam every three years.

107

Addressing the Recalcitrance of Cellulose Degradation through Cellulase Discovery, Nano-scale Elucidation of Molecular Mechanisms, and Kinetic Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project was designed to play a vital role in the development of low cost sugars from cellulosic biomass and contributing to the national effort to displace fossil fuel usage in the USA transportation sector. The goal was to expand the portfolio of cell wall degrading enzymes through innovative research at the nano-scale level, prospecting for novel cellulases and building a kinetic framework for the development of more effective enzymatic conversion processes. More precisely, the goal was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms for some cellulases that are very familiar to members of our research team and to investigate what we hope are novel cellulases or new enzyme combinations from the world of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Hydrolytic activities of various cellulases and cellulase cocktails were monitored at the nanoscale of cellulose fibrils and the microscale of pretreated cellulose particles, and we integrated this insight into a heterogeneous reaction framework. The over-riding approach for this research program was the application of innovative and cutting edge optical and high-throughput screening and analysis techniques for observing how cellulases hydrolyze real substrates.

Walker, Larry P., Bergstrom, Gary; Corgie, Stephane; Craighead, Harold; Gibson, Donna; Wilson, David

2011-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pinellas, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Pinellas, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE...

109

Plasma Screen Floating Mount  

Engineers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have invented a new mounting system for flat panel video technology. The plasma screen floating mount is a mounting system proven to eliminate vibration and dampen shock for mobile uses of ...

110

Determination of porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simons⠒ stain and NMR techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

porosity porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simons' stain and NMR techniques Xianzhi Meng a , Marcus Foston a,1 , Johannes Leisen b , Jaclyn DeMartini c , Charles E. Wyman c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,⇑ a BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th Street, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, BioEnergy Science Center, Riverside, CA 92507, USA h i g h l i g h t s  Cellulose accessibility was tested by Simons' stain and multiple NMR techniques.  Pretreatment increases the pore size and overall surface area of the

111

Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Engineering of a high-throughput screening system to identify cellulosic biomass, pretreatments, and enzyme formulations that enhance sugar release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering of a High-Throughput Screening System to Identify Cellulosic Biomass, Pretreatments, and Enzyme Formulations That Enhance Sugar Release Michael H. Studer, Jaclyn D. DeMartini, Simone Brethauer, Heather L. McKenzie, Charles E. Wyman Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: þ951-781-5791; fax: þ951-781-5790; e-mail: charles.wyman@ucr.edu Received 7 April 2009; revision received 21 August 2009; accepted 31 August 2009 Published online 3 September 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22527 ABSTRACT: The recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the only abundant, sustainable feedstock for making liquid fuels, is a primary

113

Screening Risk Evaluation methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) Guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on D&D facilities. These guidelines are designed specifically for the completion of the second (semi-quantitative screening) phase of the D&D Risk-Based Process. The SRE Guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the risk to human health and the environment from ongoing or probable releases within a one year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the risk to workers, occupants, and visitors in D&D facilities of contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risk-to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. The index of Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, determined on a project by project basis. The SRE is the first and most important step in the overall D&D project level decision making process.

Hopper, K.M. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE/EA-1628: Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, POET Project LIBERTY, LLC. (September 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Notice of Wetlands and Notice of Wetlands Involvement Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, POET Project LIBERTY, LLC. Emmetsburg, Iowa Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy by September 2008 September 2008 i POET Project LIBERTY - Final EA 9-26-08.doc Contents Executive Summary ............................................................................................................................................i Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Terms............................................................................................................iv 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1-1 1.1 Background......................................................................................................................................

115

Former Worker Medical Screening Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) provides ongoing medical screening examinations, at no cost, to all former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor workers who may be at risk for occupational diseases.

116

X-ray Security Screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National and International Standards for X-ray Security Screening Applications. Summary: The primary objective of this ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site:...

118

National Supplemental Screening Program | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Supplemental Screening Program The National Supplemental Screening Program (NSSP) offers medical screenings at no charge for former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site...

119

GPU Computational Screening  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GPU GPU Computational Screening of Carbon Capture Materials J. Kim 1 , A Koniges 1 , R. Martin 1 , M. Haranczyk 1 , J. Swisher 2 , and B. Smit 1,2 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 E-mail: jihankim@lbl.gov Abstract. In order to reduce the current costs associated with carbon capture technologies, novel materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks that are based on microporous networks are being studied. We have developed a GPU code that can characterize and screen a large database of zeolite structures and help identify the most e cient structures for carbon capture. The interactions between the atoms that constitute the zeolite structures and the gas molecules such as carbon dioxide and methane are described by the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb potentials.

120

DYNAMIC SCREENING IN SOLAR PLASMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the hot, dense plasma of solar and stellar interiors, Coulomb potentials are screened, resulting in increased nuclear reaction rates. Although Salpeter's approximation for static screening is widely accepted and used in stellar modeling, the question of screening in nuclear reactions has been revisited. In particular, the issue of dynamic effects has been raised by Shaviv and Shaviv who apply the techniques of molecular dynamics to the conditions in the Sun's core in order to numerically determine the effect of screening. By directly calculating the motion of ions and electrons due to Coulomb interactions, the simulations are used to compute the effect of screening without the mean field assumption inherent in Salpeter's approximation. In this paper, we reproduce their numerical analysis of the screening energy in the plasma of the solar core and conclude that the effects of dynamic screening are relevant and should be included when stellar nuclear reaction rates are computed.

Mao, Dan; Daeppen, Werner [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mussack, Katie [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mussack@ast.cam.ac.uk

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Medical Screening | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Implementation » Medical Screening Medical Screening Medical Screening: Provide medical screening exams that are designed to check for health conditions related to occupational exposures to former workers who choose to participate in the program, including a re-screen exam every three years. Conventional Medical Screening Program Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician. Early Lung Cancer Detection Program

122

Dynamic screening in solar plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the hot, dense plasma of solar and stellar interiors, Coulomb potentials are screened, resulting in increased nuclear reaction rates. Although Salpeter's approximation for static screening is widely accepted and used in stellar modeling, the question of screening in nuclear reactions has been revisited. In particular the issue of dynamic effects has been raised by Shaviv and Shaviv who apply the techniques of molecular dynamics to the conditions in the Sun's core in order to numerically determine the effect of screening. By directly calculating the motion of ions and electrons due to Coulomb interactions, the simulations are used to compute the effect of screening without the mean-field assumption inherent in Salpeter's approximation. In this paper we reproduce their numerical analysis of the screening energy in the plasma of the solar core and conclude that the effects of dynamic screening are relevant and should be included when stellar nuclear reaction rates are computed.

Mao, Dan; Dppen, Werner

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., Former Construction Worker Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades...

124

Efficient degradation of lignocellulosic plant biomass without pretreatment by the 9 thermophilic anaerobe, Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM 6725  

SciTech Connect

Very few cultivated microorganisms can degrade lignocellulosic biomass without chemical pretreatment. We show here that 'Anaerocellum thermophilum' DSM 6725, an anaerobic bacterium that grows optimally at 75 C, efficiently utilizes various types of untreated plant biomass, as well as crystalline cellulose and xylan. These include hardwoods such as poplar, low-lignin grasses such as napier and Bermuda grasses, and high-lignin grasses such as switchgrass. The organism did not utilize only the soluble fraction of the untreated biomass, since insoluble plant biomass (as well as cellulose and xylan) obtained after washing at 75 C for 18 h also served as a growth substrate. The predominant end products from all growth substrates were hydrogen, acetate, and lactate. Glucose and cellobiose (on crystalline cellulose) and xylose and xylobiose (on xylan) also accumulated in the growth media during growth on the defined substrates but not during growth on the plant biomass. A. thermophilum DSM 6725 grew well on first- and second-spent biomass derived from poplar and switchgrass, where spent biomass is defined as the insoluble growth substrate recovered after the organism has reached late stationary phase. No evidence was found for the direct attachment of A. thermophilum DSM 6725 to the plant biomass. This organism differs from the closely related strain A. thermophilum Z-1320 in its ability to grow on xylose and pectin. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 (optimum growth temperature, 70 C), a close relative of A. thermophilum DSM 6725, grew well on switchgrass but not on poplar, indicating a significant difference in the biomass-degrading abilities of these two otherwise very similar organisms.

Yang, Sung-Jae [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kataeva, Irina [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Doeppke, Crissa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Westpheling, Janet [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Techno-economic Analysis for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Gasoline via the Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). With gasification technology, biomass can be converted to gasoline via methanol synthesis and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies. Producing a gasoline product that is infrastructure ready has much potential. Although the MTG technology has been commercially demonstrated with natural gas conversion, combining MTG with biomass gasification has not been shown. Therefore, a techno-economic evaluation for a biomass MTG process based on currently available technology was developed to provide information about benefits and risks of this technology. The economic assumptions used in this report are consistent with previous U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biomass Programs techno-economic assessments. The feedstock is assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two kinds of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. The gasoline selling prices (2008 USD) excluding taxes were estimated to be $3.20/gallon and $3.68/gallon for indirectly-heated gasified and directly-heated. This suggests that a process based on existing technology is economic only when crude prices are above $100/bbl. However, improvements in syngas cleanup combined with consolidated gasoline synthesis can potentially reduce the capital cost. In addition, improved synthesis catalysts and reactor design may allow increased yield.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion  

SciTech Connect

Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in medium containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative {beta}-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC{center_dot}MSIMS). Also upregulated during growth on cellulose medium were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H202. These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H202 react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. Comparisons to the closely related white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which the capacity for efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.

Martinez, Diego [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brettin, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgenstern, Ingo [CLARK UNIV; Hibbett, David [CLARK UNIV.; Schmoll, Monika [UNIV WIEN; Kubicek, Christian P [UNIV WIEN; Ferreira, Patricia [CIB, CSIC, MADRID; Ruiz - Duenase, Francisco J [CIB, CSIC, MADRID; Martinez, Angel T [CIB, CSIC, MADRID; Kersten, Phil [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB; Hammel, Kenneth E [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber [U. WISCONSIN; Gaskell, Jill [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB; Lindquist, Erika [DOE JGI; Sabati, Grzegorz [U. WISCONSIN; Bondurant, Sandra S [U. WISCONSIN; Larrondo, Luis F [U. CATHOLICA DE CHILE; Canessa, Paulo [U. CATHOLICA DE CHILE; Vicunna, Rafael [U. CATHOLICA DE CHILE; Yadavk, Jagiit [U. CINCINATTI; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan [U. CINCINATTI; Subramaniank, Venkataramanan [U. CINCINATTI; Pisabarro, Antonio G [PUBLIC U. NAVARRE; Lavin, Jose L [PUBLIC U. NAVARRE; Oguiza, Jose A [PUBLIC U. NAVARRE; Master, Emma [U. TORONTO; Henrissat, Bernard [CNRS, MARSEILLE; Coutinho, Pedro M [CNRS, MARSEILLE; Harris, Paul [NOVOZYMES, INC.; Magnuson, Jon K [PNNL; Baker, Scott [PNNL; Bruno, Kenneth [PNNL; Kenealy, William [MASCOMA, INC.; Hoegger, Patrik J [GEORG-AUGUST-U.; Kues, Ursula [GEORG-AUGUST-U; Ramaiva, Preethi [NOVOZYMES, INC.; Lucas, Susan [DOE JGI; Salamov, Asaf [DOE JGI; Shapiro, Harris [DOE JGI; Tuh, Hank [DOE JGI; Chee, Christine L [UNM; Teter, Sarah [NOVOZYMES, INC.; Yaver, Debbie [NOVOZYMES, INC.; James, Tim [MCMASTER U.; Mokrejs, Martin [CHARLES U.; Pospisek, Martin [CHARLES U.; Grigoriev, Igor [DOE JGI; Rokhsar, Dan [DOE JGI; Berka, Randy [NOVOZYMES; Cullen, Dan [FOREST PRODUCTS LAB

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol via Acetic Acid Synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). This study performs a techno-economic analysis of the thermo chemical conversion of biomass to ethanol, through methanol and acetic acid, followed by hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol. The conversion of syngas to methanol and methanol to acetic acid are well-proven technologies with high conversions and yields. This study was undertaken to determine if this highly selective route to ethanol could provide an already established economically attractive route to ethanol. The feedstock was assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two types of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. Process models were developed and a cost analysis was performed. The carbon monoxide used for acetic acid synthesis from methanol and the hydrogen used for hydrogenation were assumed to be purchased and not derived from the gasifier. Analysis results show that ethanol selling prices are estimated to be $2.79/gallon and $2.81/gallon for the indirectly-heated gasifier and the directly-heated gasifier systems, respectively (1stQ 2008$, 10% ROI). These costs are above the ethanol market price for during the same time period ($1.50 - $2.50/gal). The co-production of acetic acid greatly improves the process economics as shown in the figure below. Here, 20% of the acetic acid is diverted from ethanol production and assumed to be sold as a co-product at the prevailing market prices ($0.40 - $0.60/lb acetic acid), resulting in competitive ethanol production costs.

Zhu, Yunhua; Jones, Susanne B.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass -- Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass, prepared by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), acknowledges the need and provides supportive designs for an evolutionary progression from present day conventional bale-based supply systems to a uniform-format, bulk solid supply system that transitions incrementally as the industry launches and matures. These designs couple to and build from current state of technology and address science and engineering constraints that have been identified by rigorous sensitivity analyses as having the greatest impact on feedstock supply system efficiencies and costs.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney; Erin M. Searcy

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Preliminary Screening | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Screening Preliminary Screening Preliminary Screening October 16, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis The first step in assessing renewable energy options is to conduct a preliminary screening to decide which technologies are worth investigating and which can be eliminated immediately. Preliminary screening involves using resource maps and other basic tools to choose technologies to pursue further. This should occur in the planning phase and can be completed at the agency level with some simple training. There should be no need to hire an outside consultant at this stage. When narrowing technology options during this phase of assessment, a range of factors are considered, such as: Available Renewable Resources Ability to Connect to the Grid Available Renewable Resources Renewable energy resources refer to the amount of energy that can be

130

Former Worker Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program The Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) provides ongoing medical screening examinations,...

131

Brookhaven National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Brookhaven National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site:...

132

Nevada, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Nevada, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: NNSS and...

133

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Battelle Laboratories...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Jefferson Former Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Battelle...

134

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Portsmouth Gaseous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population...

135

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Battelle Laboratories...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

King Avenue Former Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Battelle...

136

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Implementation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Implementation Former Worker Medical Screening Program Implementation Program implementation focuses on four specific activities, which are:...

137

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Brookhaven National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Brookhaven National Laboratory...

138

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Mallinckrodt Chemical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mallinckrodt Chemical Co. Former Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE...

139

Pantex Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Project Pantex Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Former Pantex Worker Medical Surveillance...

140

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Related Documents ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory Former Worker Medical Screening Program for the Ames Laboratory and the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant National Supplemental Screening Program...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Interpretation of screen factor measurements  

SciTech Connect

Screen viscometer measurements give different information about polymer molecular weight and molecular weight distribution than intrinsic viscosity or relative viscosity measurements. This study shows that conventional screen viscometers measure elongation flow properties of solutions, and that for flexible polymers such as polyacrylamides, a sharp transition in conformation from a coiled to a stretched state is observed, which occurs at a Deborah number of 0.5. Conventional screen viscometers operate just above this critical Deborah number. Evidence for this transition in polymer conformation comes from measurements on a modified screen viscometer, from extensive work by Durst and Interhal on the sudden pressure jumps during flow of polyacrylamide solutions through porous media, and from polymer kinetic theory modeling of molecular deformation in flow. ll references.

Lim, T.; Uhl, J.T.; Prud'Homme, R.K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Lectures on Screened Modified Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The acceleration of the expansion of the Universe has led to the construction of Dark Energy models where a light scalar field may have a range reaching up to cosmological scales. Screening mechanisms allow these models to evade the tight gravitational tests in the solar system and the laboratory. I will briefly review some of the salient features of screened modified gravity models of the chameleon, dilaton or symmetron types using $f(R)$ gravity as a template.

Philippe Brax

2012-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database.

R. Schreiner

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Ames Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Ames Laboratory, Former Production Workers...

145

Argonne National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Production Workers Screening Projects Argonne National Laboratory, Former Production Workers...

146

Sandia National Laboratory (NM), Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (NM), Former Production Workers Screening Projects...

147

Lignocellulosic feedstock resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides overall state and national information on the quantity, availability, and costs of current and potential feedstocks for ethanol production in the United States. It characterizes end uses and physical characteristics of feedstocks, and presents relevant information that affects the economic and technical feasibility of ethanol production from these feedstocks. The data can help researchers focus ethanol conversion research efforts on feedstocks that are compatible with the resource base.

Rooney, T.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hadronic Screening in Improved Taste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present our results on meson and nucleon screening masses in finite temperature two flavour QCD using smeared staggered valence quarks and staggered thin-link sea quarks with different lattice spacings and quark masses. We investigate optimization of smearing by observing its effects on the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) components of gluon and quark fields. The application of smearing to screening at finite temperature also provides a transparent window into the mechanism of the interplay of smearing and chiral symmetry. The improved hadronic operators show that above the finite temperature cross over, T_c, screening masses are consistent with weak-coupling predictions. There is also evidence for a rapid opening up of a spectral gap of the Dirac operator immediately above T_c.

Sourendu Gupta; Nikhil Karthik

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

Increasing cellulose accessibility is more important than removing lignin: A comparison of cellulose solventbased lignocellulose fractionation and soaking in aqueous ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing Increasing Cellulose Accessibility Is More Important Than Removing Lignin: A Comparison of Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation and Soaking in Aqueous Ammonia Joseph A. Rollin, 1 Zhiguang Zhu, 1 Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, 1,2 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,3 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061; telephone: 1-540-231-7414; fax: þ1- 540-231-3199; e-mail: ypzhang@vt.edu 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 18 May 2010; revision received 11 August 2010; accepted 17 August 2010 Published online 1 September 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22919

150

Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis for Corn Stover  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an update of NREL's ongoing process design and economic analyses of processes related to developing ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the development of ethanol from lignocellulosic feedstocks as an alternative to conventional petroleum-based transportation fuels. DOE funds both fundamental and applied research in this area and needs a method for predicting cost benefits of many research proposals. To that end, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has modeled many potential process designs and estimated the economics of each process during the last 20 years. This report is an update of the ongoing process design and economic analyses at NREL. We envision updating this process design report at regular intervals; the purpose being to ensure that the process design incorporates all new data from NREL research, DOE funded research and other sources, and that the equipment costs are reasonable and consistent with good engineering practice for plants of this type. For the non-research areas this means using equipment and process approaches as they are currently used in industrial applications. For the last report, published in 1999, NREL performed a complete review and update of the process design and economic model for the biomass-to-ethanol process utilizing co-current dilute acid prehydrolysis with simultaneous saccharification (enzymatic) and co-fermentation. The process design included the core technologies being researched by the DOE: prehydrolysis, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, and cellulase enzyme production. In addition, all ancillary areas--feed handling, product recovery and purification, wastewater treatment (WWT), lignin combustor and boiler-turbogenerator, and utilities--were included. NREL engaged Delta-T Corporation (Delta-T) to assist in the process design evaluation, the process equipment costing, and overall plant integration. The process design and costing for the lignin combustor and boiler turbogenerator was reviewed by Reaction Engineering Inc. (REI) and Merrick & Company reviewed the wastewater treatment. Since then, NREL has engaged Harris Group (Harris) to perform vendor testing, process design, and costing of critical equipment identified during earlier work. This included solid/liquid separation and pretreatment reactor design and costing. Corn stover handling was also investigated to support DOE's decision to focus on corn stover as a feedstock for lignocellulosic ethanol. Working with Harris, process design and costing for these areas were improved through vendor designs, costing, and vendor testing in some cases. In addition to this work, enzyme costs were adjusted to reflect collaborative work between NREL and enzyme manufacturers (Genencor International and Novozymes Biotech) to provide a delivered enzyme for lignocellulosic feedstocks. This report is the culmination of our work and represents an updated process design and cost basis for the process using a corn stover feedstock. The process design and economic model are useful for predicting the cost benefits of proposed research. Proposed research results can be translated into modifications of the process design, and the economic impact can be assessed. This allows DOE, NREL, and other researchers to set priorities on future research with an understanding of potential reductions to the ethanol production cost. To be economically viable, ethanol production costs must be below market values for ethanol. DOE has chosen a target ethanol selling price of $1.07 per gallon as a goal for 2010. The conceptual design and costs presented here are based on a 2010 plant start-up date. The key research targets required to achieve this design and the $1.07 value are discussed in the report.

Aden, A.; Ruth, M.; Ibsen, K.; Jechura, J.; Neeves, K.; Sheehan, J.; Wallace, B.; Montague, L.; Slayton, A.; Lukas, J.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion of Biochemical Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover D. Humbird, R. Davis, L. Tao, C. Kinchin, D. Hsu, and A. Aden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Schoen, J. Lukas, B. Olthof, M. Worley, D. Sexton, and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Seattle, Washington and Atlanta, Georgia Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-47764 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

152

Document Control Template-Instruction_Screen Shot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3_ADocument Control Template - Instruction_Screen Shot.doc_Screen ShotPage 1 of 6 3_ADocument Control Template - Instruction_Screen Shot.doc_Screen ShotPage 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Instruction Document Title: Document Control Template - Instruction-Screen Shot Document Number: F-003 Rev. A Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-001, Document Control Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-003_ADocument Control Template - Instruction_Screen Shot.doc_Screen ShotPage 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release B C D E F-003_ADocument Control Template - Instruction_Screen Shot.doc_Screen ShotPage 3 of 6 EOTA - Business Instruction Document Title: DocTitle Document Number:

153

BCHP Screening Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BCHP Screening Tool BCHP Screening Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BCHP Screening Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Industry Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Guide/manual User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.coolingheatingpower.org/about/bchp-screening-tool.php References: http://www.coolingheatingpower.org/about/bchp-screening-tool.php Logo: BCHP Screening Tool The BCHP Screening Tool is software that can be used to estimate the energy consumption and economics of CHP systems in commercial buildings. The BCHP Screening Tool is software that can be used to estimate the energy consumption and economics of CHP systems in commercial buildings. This tool

154

DOE: Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FWP provides no-cost medical screenings to all former DOE Federal, contractor and subcontractor employees. The screening exams are offered by third party providers from universities, labor unions,...

155

Rocky Flats, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flats, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Rocky Flats, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE...

156

DOE: Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) DOE: Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Addthis Description FWP provides no-cost medical screenings to all former DOE...

157

Kansas City Plant, Construction Worker Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Plant, Construction Worker Screening Projects Kansas City Plant, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medicl Screening Program...

158

Kansas City Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Kansas City Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening...

159

High-Throughput Screening Techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Throughput Throughput Screening Techniques for Biomass Conversion Stephen R. Decker & Roman Brunecky & Melvin P. Tucker & Michael E. Himmel & Michael J. Selig Published online: 14 October 2009 # US Government 2009 Abstract High-throughput (HTP) screening of biomass or biomass-degrading enzymes, regardless of the desired outcome, is fraught with obstacles and challenges not typically faced in more traditional biotechnology. The enzyme systems are complex and synergistic and the substrate is highly heterogeneous, insoluble, and difficult to dispense. Digestions are often carried out for days at temperatures of 50°C or higher, leading to significant challenges regarding evaporation control in small well volumes. Furthermore, it is often desirable to condition or "pretreat" the biomass at extreme temperatures and/or pH to enhance enzyme digestibility.

160

Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

E. Siegmann

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Distribution Screening for Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the deployment of renewable distributed generation increases, the need for traditional energy providers to interact with these resources increases. Detailed modeling and simulation of the distribution and distributed resources is a critical element to better analyze, understand and predict these interactions. EPRI has developed a tool for such analysis called OpenDSS. In addition, as part of the renewable integration program an applet was created for screening distributed generation (DG). This report ...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coal storage hopper with vibrating screen agitator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyor mechanism. The vibrating screen agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

Daw, Charles S. (Knoxville, TN); Lackey, Mack E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sy, Ronald L. (Clinton, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Conventional Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician. The medical screening exam offered by the FWP evaluates an employee's health as it relates to their potential occupational exposures to hazardous agents. The FWP uses a customized medical screening protocol that was developed by a team of independent physicians specializing in occupational

164

Reverberatory screen for a radiant burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to porous mat gas fired radiant burner panels utilizing improved reverberatory screens. The purpose of these screens is to boost the overall radiant output of the burner relative to a burner using no screen and the same fuel-air flow rates. In one embodiment, the reverberatory screen is fabricated from ceramic composite material, which can withstand higher operating temperatures than its metallic equivalent. In another embodiment the reverberatory screen is corrugated. The corrugations add stiffness which helps to resist creep and thermally induced distortions due to temperature or thermal expansion coefficient differences. As an added benefit, it has been unexpectedly discovered that the corrugations further increase the radiant efficiency of the burner. In a preferred embodiment, the reverberatory screen is both corrugated and made from ceramic composite material.

Gray, Paul E. (North East, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Amchitka Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amchitka Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Amchitka Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Amchitka Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Amchitka Worker Population Served: All workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training, an applied

166

Preliminary Screening for Project Feasibility and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Best Practices Preliminary Screening for Project Feasibility and Applications for Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofit Projects GHPs Should Always be Considered for Federal Sites...

167

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Lawrence Livermore...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livermore National Laboratory Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: LLNL...

168

Improving Screening Strategies for Prostate Cancer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Th is thesis describes research on screening for prostate cancer. To improve understanding of the thesis, some background information will be provided in this introduction. (more)

Wolters, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

BSCL Use Plan: Solving Biomass Recalcitrance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical report describing NREL's new Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (BSCL). The BSCL was constructed to provide the most modern commercial surface characterization equipment for studying biomass surfaces.

Himmel, M.; Vinzant, T.; Bower, S.; Jechura, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

BSCL Use Plan: Solving Biomass Recalcitrance  

SciTech Connect

Technical report describing NREL's new Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (BSCL). The BSCL was constructed to provide the most modern commercial surface characterization equipment for studying biomass surfaces.

Himmel, M.; Vinzant, T.; Bower, S.; Jechura, J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Toward Direct Biosynthesis of Drop-in Ready Biofuels in Plants: Rapid Screening and Functional Genomic Characterization of Plant-derived Advanced Biofuels and Implications for Coproduction in Lignocellulosic Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advanced biofuels that are drop-in ready, completely fungible with petroleum fuels, and require minimal infrastructure to process a finished fuel could provide transportation fuels in (more)

Joyce, Blake Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Beryllium Vender Screening Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Worker » Former Worker Program » Beryllium Worker » Former Worker Program » Beryllium Vender Screening Program Beryllium Vender Screening Program In February 2005, DOE expanded the beryllium screening program to include former employees of defunct DOE beryllium vendors who were employed with these companies while they performed work for DOE. This change was made to ensure that workers who no longer have an employer to turn to for beryllium disease testing could receive this important screening. DOE will offer these individuals a blood test at no cost to check for beryllium sensitization. DOE will pay for both the costs of drawing the blood and the analysis of the blood. If a screened individual receives an abnormal test for beryllium sensitization, they can receive medical monitoring for beryllium disease

173

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

174

Production Worker Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Production Worker Screening Projects Production Worker Screening Projects Sites listed below are the primary DOE sites served. Production workers from DOE sites not listed below are covered by the National Supplemental Screening Program (NSSP). Additional information regarding NSSP can be found on their website or by calling 1-866-812-6703. California: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, CA) Colorado: Rocky Flats Florida: Pinellas Idaho: Argonne National Laboratory-West Idaho National Laboratory Illinois: Argonne National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Iowa: Ames Laboratory Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Kentucky: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Missouri: Kansas City Plant Nevada:

175

Updating Interconnection Screens for PV System Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This white paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offer short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen. Short-term and longer-term alternatives approaches are offered as examples; however, specific modifications to screening procedures should be discussed with stakeholders and must ultimately be adopted by state and federal regulatory bodies.

Coddington, M.; Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Ellis, A.; Hill, R.; Key, T.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Construction Worker Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Worker » Former Worker Program » Worker » Former Worker Program » Construction Worker Screening Projects Construction Worker Screening Projects Sites listed below are the primary DOE sites served. Construction workers from DOE sites not listed below are covered by the Building Trades National Medical Screening Program (BTMed). Additional information regarding BTMed can be found on their website or by calling 1-800-866-9663. Alaska: Amchitka California: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, CA) Colorado: Rocky Flats Florida: Pinellas Idaho: Argonne National Laboratory-West Idaho National Laboratory Illinois: Argonne National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Iowa: Ames Laboratory Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

177

Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives...

178

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site:...

179

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Pinellas Former Construction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pinellas Former Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Pinellas...

180

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Mound Former Construction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Mound Worker Population...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Brush Luckey Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brush Luckey Plant Former Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site:...

182

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Weldon Spring Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weldon Spring Plant Former Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site:...

183

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Amchitka Former Workers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amchitka Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Amchitka Worker Population...

184

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Pinellas Former Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Pinellas Worker Population Served:...

185

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Savannah River Site...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site: SRS Worker Population Served: Production...

186

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE...

187

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Fernald Former Construction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Fernald Worker Population...

188

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Savannah River Site...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: SRS Worker Population Served:...

189

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Oak Ridge Reservation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservation Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Oak Ridge K-25...

190

Sandia National Laboratory (CA), Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Sandia National Laboratory (CA), Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered...

191

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Kansas City Plant Former...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas City Plant Former Construction Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Building Trades National Medicl Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Kansas...

192

Argonne National Laboratory-West, Former Production Workers Screening...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory) Argonne National Laboratory-West, Former Production Workers Screening Projects (now known as...

193

Agency-Wide Screening | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agency-Wide Screening Agency-Wide Screening Agency-Wide Screening October 16, 2013 - 4:36pm Addthis Federal agencies face energy-related requirements on new construction projects and major renovations. These Federal requirements range from reductions in fossil-fuel use to specifying the use of certain renewable energy technologies. As some agencies have already found out, not all sites or construction projects are created equal. Because many of the requirements are agency-wide, an effective and efficient way to meet these requirements is to consider and identify appropriate locations for these technologies across all agency land and building assets. FEMP can help Federal agencies conduct a renewable energy screening at all of its sites, or just at all of its upcoming construction project

194

Smart Screen Management on Mobile Phones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an energy management strategy that uses the history of userthe energy consumed by the deterministic schedules historyenergy pro?le of a mobile phone screen, and the usage history

Falaki, Hossein; Govindan, Ramesh; Estrin, D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High-throughput in vivo vertebrate screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a high-throughput platform for cellular-resolution in vivo chemical and genetic screens on zebrafish larvae. The system automatically loads zebrafish from reservoirs or multiwell plates, and positions and ...

Pardo-Martin, Carlos

196

Design of the CTX diagnostics screen room  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of a shielded enclosure (or screen room) to house data acquisition equipment in an area in which substantial, time varying magnetic fields are present and capable of producing significant interference is described.

Chandler, G.I. II

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and high-level waste (HLW). Average and outlying (high burnup, high initial enrichment, low age, or otherwise exceptional) forms of each waste-form type are considered. This analysis has been prepared in accordance with a technical work plan (BSC 2002c). In a review of Revision 00 of this radionuclide screening analysis, the NRC found that ''processes that affect transport in the biosphere, such as uptake by plants and bioaccumulation are not accounted for'' and that ''the direct exposure pathway is not accounted for'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). The NRC also found that the solubility and sorption classes were too broadly defined, noting, for example, that Se is in the same solubility and sorptivity groups as Np and U, yet is ''more soluble than Np and U by several orders of magnitude'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). This revision seeks to build upon the strengths of the earlier screening method while responding to the specific concerns raised by the NRC and other reviewers. In place of simple inhalation and ingestion dose conversion factors, the revised radionuclide screening uses screening factors that also take into account soil accumulation, uptake by plants, exposure to contaminated ground, and other features of the biosphere that were neglected in the previous screening. Whereas the previous screening analysis allowed only two solubility classes (soluble and insoluble), the revised screening introduces an intermediate solubility class to better segregate the radionuclides into transport groups.

G. Ragan

2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

198

Screening Analysis : Volume 1, Description and Conclusions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SOR consists of three analytical phases leading to a Draft EIS. The first phase Pilot Analysis, was performed for the purpose of testing the decision analysis methodology being used in the SOR. The Pilot Analysis is described later in this chapter. The second phase, Screening Analysis, examines all possible operating alternatives using a simplified analytical approach. It is described in detail in this and the next chapter. This document also presents the results of screening. The final phase, Full-Scale Analysis, will be documented in the Draft EIS and is intended to evaluate comprehensively the few, best alternatives arising from the screening analysis. The purpose of screening is to analyze a wide variety of differing ways of operating the Columbia River system to test the reaction of the system to change. The many alternatives considered reflect the range of needs and requirements of the various river users and interests in the Columbia River Basin. While some of the alternatives might be viewed as extreme, the information gained from the analysis is useful in highlighting issues and conflicts in meeting operating objectives. Screening is also intended to develop a broad technical basis for evaluation including regional experts and to begin developing an evaluation capability for each river use that will support full-scale analysis. Finally, screening provides a logical method for examining all possible options and reaching a decision on a few alternatives worthy of full-scale analysis. An organizational structure was developed and staffed to manage and execute the SOR, specifically during the screening phase and the upcoming full-scale analysis phase. The organization involves ten technical work groups, each representing a particular river use. Several other groups exist to oversee or support the efforts of the work groups.

Bonneville Power Administration; Corps of Engineers; Bureau of Reclamation

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

1. Lignocellulosic materials Lignocellulose is a renewable organic material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the key yeast gene involved in the conversion of the grape precursors to the thiol compound, using: Key Techniques: Basic microbiology; PCR and DNA sequencing; construction of gene knockouts; sugar uptake assays Aim of Project: Currently in New Zealand, Gull generates bioethanol from the lactose

Qin, Wensheng

200

CHEMICAL SENSOR AND FIELD SCREENING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: FUELS IN SOILS FIELD SCREENING METHOD VALIDATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new screening method for fuel contamination in soils was recently developed as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-583 1-95, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. In addition, it is fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the available information concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil, can be determined. The screening method for fuels in soils was evaluated by conducting a collaborative study on the method and by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. In the collaborative study, a sand and an organic soil spiked with various concentrations of diesel fuel were tested. Data from the collaborative study were used to determine the reproducibility (between participants) and repeatability (within participant) precision of the method for screening the test materials. The collaborative study data also provide information on the performance of portable field equipment versus laboratory equipment for performing the screening method and a comparison of diesel concentration values determined using the screening method versus a laboratory method. Data generated using the method to screen soil samples in the field provide information on the performance of the method in atypical real-world application.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

RENEWABLE ENERGY SCREENING FOR ALL ESPCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RENEWABLE ENERGY SCREENING FOR ALL ESPCs RENEWABLE ENERGY SCREENING FOR ALL ESPCs The Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) program has funded DOE National Laboratories to support agencies with increasing use of renewable energy technologies required per EPACT 2005 and Executive Order 13423. To utilize the no-cost support, the National Laboratories require some easily accessible high-level site and related energy data to conduct pre- screening analysis. The objective is to identify the economic feasibility of renewable technologies - wind, solar, and biomass power generation applications - that could be considered as Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) in your ESPC. The National Laboratories commit to turning around

202

Dainippon Screen Mfg Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dainippon Screen Mfg Co Dainippon Screen Mfg Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Dainippon Screen Mfg Co Place Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan Sector Solar Product Japan-based company engaged in the manufacture and sale of electronic equipment and image information processing and solar PV product production equipment Coordinates 35.098129°, 135.718933° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.098129,"lon":135.718933,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Levulinic acid from lignocellulosic biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary objective of this thesis is to define optimum catalysts, reaction conditions and reactor configurations for the conversion of water hyacinth plant to LA. (more)

Girisuta, Buana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Levulinic Acid from Lignocellulosic Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and information to create a widely distributed automated energy delivery network. In this article, we survey of electricity and information to create an automated and distributed advanced energy delivery network. Table I system automation and attempted to provide a better understanding of the hybrid network architecture

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

205

Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Design and Economics Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Dilute-Acid and Enzymatic Deconstruction of Biomass to Sugars and Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons R. Davis, L. Tao, E.C.D. Tan, M.J. Biddy, G.T. Beckham, and C. Scarlata National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Jacobson and K. Cafferty Idaho National Laboratory J. Ross, J. Lukas, D. Knorr, and P. Schoen Harris Group Inc. Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-60223 October 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications.

206

Virtual screening on large scale grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large scale grids for in silico drug discovery open opportunities of particular interest to neglected and emerging diseases. In 2005 and 2006, we have been able to deploy large scale virtual docking within the framework of the WISDOM initiative against ... Keywords: Avian influenza, Large scale grids, Malaria, Virtual screening

Nicolas Jacq; Vincent Breton; Hsin-Yen Chen; Li-Yung Ho; Martin Hofmann; Vinod Kasam; Hurng-Chun Lee; Yannick Legr; Simon C. Lin; Astrid Maa; Emmanuel Medernach; Ivan Merelli; Luciano Milanesi; Giulio Rastelli; Matthieu Reichstadt; Jean Salzemann; Horst Schwichtenberg; Ying-Ta Wu; Marc Zimmermann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Grid-enabled high throughput virtual screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large scale grids for in silico drug discovery open opportunities of particular interest to neglected and emerging diseases. In 2005 and 2006, we have been able to deploy large scale virtual docking within the framework of the WISDOM initiative against ... Keywords: avian influenza, large scale grids, malaria, virtual screening

Nicolas Jacq; Vincent Breton; Hsin-Yen Chen; Li-Yung Ho; Martin Hofmann; Hurng-Chun Lee; Yannick Legr; Simon C. Lin; Astrid Maa; Emmanuel Medernach; Ivan Merelli; Luciano Milanesi; Giulio Rastelli; Matthieu Reichstadt; Jean Salzemann; Horst Schwichtenberg; Mahendrakar Sridhar; Vinod Kasam; Ying-Ta Wu; Marc Zimmermann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sharing the viewing experience through second screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the ever expanding forms of digital entertainment and the emergence of consumer recording facilities, allowing viewers to time shift their TV viewing habits, there are still certain TV shows and events that create an audience desire to be part ... Keywords: interactive, mobile, narrative, performance, second screen, shared experience, television, twitter

Mark Lochrie; Paul Coulton

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Robust regression for high throughput drug screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective analysis of high throughput screening (HTS) data requires automation of dose-response curve fitting for large numbers of datasets. Datasets with outliers are not handled well by standard non-linear least squares methods, and manual outlier ... Keywords: Agonist activity, Dose-response curve, HTS, IRLS, M-estimation, Robust regression

Igor Fomenko; Mark Durst; David Balaban

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Brochure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medical Screening Program Brochure Medical Screening Program Brochure Former Worker Medical Screening Program Brochure June 2012 The FWP brochure provides important information to inform former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees about the benefits and services offered under the DOE Former Worker Medical Screening Program. Some of the topics described in the brochure include: a description of the program, how it is implemented, who is eligible to participate, what tests are offered, where exams are conducted, and what organizations provide the exams. Former Worker Medical Screening Program Brochure More Documents & Publications Former Worker Program Brochure Former Worker Program Summary of Services 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report

211

D & D screening risk evaluation guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Licensing : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inventions Inventions 32 records A Broad Environmental Stress-Inducible Promoter and its Application in Crops A Novel Monolignol that reduces recalcitrance of plant cell walls Caloramator sp. Tolerance of Pretreatment Inhibitors from LIgnocellulosics Cellulose and xylan fermentation by novel anaerobic thermophilic clostridia isolated from self-heated biocompost Compositions and Methods for Improved Plant Feedstock Consolidated Bioprocessing Method using Thermophilic Microorganisms Engineering male sterility or non-transgenic pollen by pollen-specific expression of a restriction enzyme Flow-through Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass with Inorganic Nanoporous Membranes Gene and Gene Clusters that Enable Degradation of Recalcitrant Biological Materials Genes to Increase Growth in Monocots

213

Development and optimization of high-throughput zebrafish screening platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high-throughput zebrafish screening platform is a revolutionary tool that enables subcellular precision in vivo whole animal screening of Danio Rerio. It can perform laser surgery and/or imaging in less than twenty ...

Koo, Bryan Kyo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Site-specific waste management instruction - radiological screening facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction provides guidance for managing waste generated from radiological sample screening operations conducted to support the Environmental Restoration Contractor`s activities. This document applies only to waste generated within the radiological screening facilities.

G. G. Hopkins

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microfluidic in vivo screen identifies compounds enhancing neuronal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compound screening is a powerful tool to identify new therapeutic targets, drug leads, and elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of biological processes. We report here the results of the first in vivo small-molecule screens ...

Haggarty, Stephen

216

Laboratory Evaluation of Fine-mesh Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of four years of laboratory evaluations on performance of fine-mesh traveling water screens to protect larval fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). Prior to this study, the biological effectiveness of fine-mesh screens was uncertain because performance data from the few existing facilities that use fine-mesh screens have been highly variable. This project is producing additional data necessary to determine biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

217

Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This Page Intentionally Left Blank EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document describes the process used to derive a set of risk-based ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for many of the soil contaminants that are frequently of ecological concern for plants and animals at hazardous waste sites and provides guidance for their use. The Eco-SSL derivation process represents the group effort of a multi-stakeholder workgroup consisting of federal, state, consulting, industry, and academic participants led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). The

218

NRC LICENSE RENEWAL SCOPING/SCREENING INSPECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Mr. Nazar: On May 21, 2004, the NRC completed an inspection regarding the application for license renewal for the D. C Cook Nuclear Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection results, which were discussed with members of your staff. The purpose of this inspection was an examination of activities that support the application for a renewed license for D. C. Cook. The inspection consisted of a selected examination of procedures and representative records, and interviews with personnel regarding the process of scoping and screening plant equipment to select equipment subject to an aging management review. The inspection concluded that the scoping and screening portion of license renewal activities was conducted as described in the License Renewal Application and that documentation supporting the application is in an auditable and retrievable form. With the exception of the items identified in this report, your scoping and screening process was successful in identifying those systems, structures, and components required to be considered for aging management. In accordance with 10 CFR 2.390 of the NRCs "Rules of Practice, " a copy of this letter and its enclosure will be available electronically for public inspection in the NRC Public Document Room or from the Publicly Available Records (PARS) component of NRCs document system (ADAMS). ADAMS is accessible from the NRC Web site at

Cynthia D. Pederson; M. Finissi; Plant Manager; G. White; Michigan Public; Service Commission

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Updating Technical Screens for PV Interconnection: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar photovoltaics (PV) is the dominant type of distributed generation (DG) technology interconnected to electric distribution systems in the United States, and deployment of PV systems continues to increase rapidly. Considering the rapid growth and widespread deployment of PV systems in United States electric distribution grids, it is important that interconnection procedures be as streamlined as possible to avoid unnecessary interconnection studies, costs, and delays. Because many PV interconnection applications involve high penetration scenarios, the process needs to allow for a sufficiently rigorous technical evaluation to identify and address possible system impacts. Existing interconnection procedures are designed to balance the need for efficiency and technical rigor for all DG. However, there is an implicit expectation that those procedures will be updated over time in order to remain relevant with respect to evolving standards, technology, and practical experience. Modifications to interconnection screens and procedures must focus on maintaining or improving safety and reliability, as well as accurately allocating costs and improving expediency of the interconnection process. This paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offers potential short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen.

Coddington, M.; Ellis, A.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Key, T.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hill, R.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The interpretation of screen-factor measurements  

SciTech Connect

Screen-factor (SF) measurements are widely used in the petroleum industry to characterize polymer solutions. The measurements are easy to perform and provide information that is different from solution-viscosity measurements. However, there has been no quantitative explanation of what solution property is being measured by SF. The authors show that SF measures the elongational viscosity of a polymer solution. Experiments on a modified commercial screen viscometer show the relationship between SF measurements and elongational-flow measurements performed by Durst and coworkers. Durst has shown that the elongational flow field in a packed bed of spheres triggers a transition in the conformation of a flexible polymer molecule, such as polyacrylamide, from a coiled to a stretched state. This transition in conformation is accompanied by a jump in the resistance to flow by an order of magnitude. They show that conventional screen viscometers operate in the regime where the molecules are in the highly stretched state. On the basis of Durst's work, it is calculated that the SF measurement is sensitive to high-molecular-weight tails in the polymer molecular-weight distribution.

Lim, T.; Uhl, J.T.; Prud'homme, R.K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Savannah River Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Savannah River Site, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site: SRS Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Donna Cragle, PhD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 812-6703 Website: http://www.orau.org/nssp/ This project is conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), as a component of its National Supplemental Screening Program. ORAU has teamed with its partners, Comprehensive Health Services, National Jewish Health, the University of Colorado Denver, and Axion Health, to run the program. Construction Worker Screening Projects Construction Worker Projects, Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)

222

Screening analysis of solar thermochemical hydrogen concepts.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A screening analysis was performed to identify concentrating solar power (CSP) concepts that produce hydrogen with the highest efficiency. Several CSP concepts were identified that have the potential to be much more efficient than today's low-temperature electrolysis technology. They combine a central receiver or dish with either a thermochemical cycle or high-temperature electrolyzer that operate at temperatures >600 C. The solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies of the best central receiver concepts exceed 20%, significantly better than the 14% value predicted for low-temperature electrolysis.

Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Kolb, Gregory J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Screen payback on cogeneration-system options  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are charts that provide a quick look at the relationship among the primary variables that affect the viability of a cogeneration project. The graphs are not intended to be complete feasibility studies, but rather screening aids for understanding the important interrelationships. Use of the charts will enable engineers to compare the predominant system options: gas turbine with heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG), diesel engine with HRSG, and fired boiler with steam turbine. The three options are presented separately because of differing capital costs and heat balances.

Wilson, F.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2001 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accomplishments of the John Day, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Fish Passage and Screening Programs include the following: Operation and maintenance of 364 existing fish screening devices (see Table 4), replacement of 18 outdated fish screening devices that totaled 31 rotary drums (some were multiple drum systems), 4 new screens at unscreened diversions, 26 pump intake fish screens, fabrication of components for 16 additional fish screens for the Rogue basin, construction of two fish passage structures, and participation in other activities. After the replacement or construction of 22 fish screening devices during 2001, we now have 108 screening devices that meet NMFS criteria. Funding for these projects was attained from BPA, NMFS and OWEB. The John Day Fish Passage and Screening Program focused construction efforts into new and replacement fish screening devices for these various programs throughout the state of Oregon. The program also continued to develop and implement innovative designs to meet the diverse and expanding needs for the state of Oregon. Projects completed during this report period meet the current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria. Fish species targeted for protection include ESA Listed Mid-Columbia steelhead, Columbia basin bull trout, anadromous and resident salmonids, and numerous non-game fish species. Priority project locations have been identified as the upper reaches of the Middle Fork, North Fork, South Fork and the Mainstem of the John Day River and their tributaries. These upper reaches contain critical salmon and steelhead spawning and rearing habitat.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant (FRESA) Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Solar, Wind Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: analysis.nrel.gov/fresa/ OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, FRESA, Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant References: FRESA homepage [1] Logo: Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant (FRESA) FRESA, is designed to help identify which renewable energy technologies are appropriate for implementation at both the facility and building scale. The Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant, or FRESA, is designed to help identify which renewable energy technologies are appropriate for

227

Oak Ridge Reservation Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Reservation Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Oak Ridge Reservation Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Oak Ridge Reservation Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Oak Ridge K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL or X-10) Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Kim Cranford, RN 708 South Illinois Avenue, Suite E103 Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos,

228

Fernald, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fernald, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Fernald, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Fernald, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Fernald Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: 1-888-464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Lou Doll 1550 Chase Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45223 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

229

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Worker Screening Construction Worker Screening Projects Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: WIPP Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPh, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training, an applied

230

Brush Luckey Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brush Luckey Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Brush Luckey Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Brush Luckey Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Brush Luckey Plant Worker Population Served: Construction workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: 1-888-464-0009 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training, an applied

231

Weldon Spring Plant, Former Construction Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Screening Projects Workers Screening Projects Weldon Spring Plant, Former Construction Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Weldon Spring Plant Worker Population Served: Construction workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training, an applied

232

Hanford Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Hanford Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Hanford Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Hanford Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Sherry Gosseen 3021 W. Clearwater Ave., Ste. 204 Kennewick, WA 99336 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

233

Weldon Spring Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weldon Spring Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Weldon Spring Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Weldon Spring Plant, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Weldon Spring Plant Worker Population Served: Construction workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training, an applied

234

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HT Combinatorial HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Video (Text Alternative) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Video (Text Alternative) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Video (Text Alternative) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Video (Text Alternative) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Video (Text Alternative) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: HT Combinatorial Screening of

235

Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Savannah River Site, Former Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: SRS Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Charles Jernigan 1250 A Reynolds Street Augusta, GA 30901 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

236

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Implementation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Former Worker Medical Screening Program Implementation Former Worker Medical Screening Program Implementation Program implementation focuses on four specific activities, which are: Outreach: Identify and notify eligible DOE workers about FWP medical screening services. Medical Screening: Provide medical screening exams that are designed to check for health conditions related to occupational exposures to former workers who choose to participate in the program, including a re-screen exam every three years. Communicating Results: Provide exam results to participants, as well as information regarding any conditions that may require follow-up medical care with their personal physicians or specialists, and provide information regarding possible compensation for work-related illnesses. Follow-up care

237

2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center » Worker » Former Worker Program » 2012 Information Center » Worker » Former Worker Program » 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report February 2013 The 2012 Annual Report presents a detailed overview of the accomplishments, progress, and future endeavors of the U.S. Department of Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program. The report describes how the program is implemented, what organizations are involved in the medical screening efforts, and what the medical findings have been to date. 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report More Documents & Publications Former Worker Program Medical Protocol Former Worker Medical Screening Program Brochure Former Worker Program Brochure DOE Technical Standards Program

238

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program February 23, 2005 - 10:27am Addthis Former employees of DOE vendors eligible for free screening WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the Department of Energy (DOE) will expand a beryllium screening program to include former employees of now-defunct DOE beryllium vendor companies across the country. Beryllium is a component used in nuclear weapons built by the Department of Energy. "Through no fault of their own, these Cold Warriors were left out in the cold when their former employers went out of business. By expanding this screening program, President Bush and the Department of Energy honor these

239

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Construction Worker Screening Project Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 464-0009 Local Outreach Office: Joe Hudson 1930 North 13th Street Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

240

Natural convection in a vertical enclosure with internal permeable screen  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the thermal insulation effect of a screen installed inside a vertical rectangular enclosure (e.g., double-glazed window). The screen is a venetian blind system made out of horizontal strips that can be rotated. The focus is on the closed position, where the strips almost touch. The effect of this permeable screen on the temperature field, the flow field, and the overall heat transfer rate is determined numerically. The study shows that there exists a ceiling (critical) conductance for the air leakage through the screen, above which the screen does not cause a significant drop in the overall heat transfer rate. A numerical example shows how this critical conductance can be used to calculate the critical spacing that can be tolerated between two consecutive strips in the screen.

Zhang, Z.; Bejan, A.; Lage, J.L. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Bound Electron Screening Corrections to Reactions in Hydrogen Burning Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How important would be a precise assessment of the electron screening effect, on determining the bare astrophysical $S$-factor ($S_b(E)$) from experimental data? We compare the $S_b(E)$ obtained using different screening potentials, (1) in the adiabatic limit, (2) without screening corrections, and (3) larger than the adiabatic screening potential in the PP-chain reactions. We employ two kinds of fitting procedures: the first is by the conventional polynomial expression and the second includes explicitly the contribution of the nuclear interaction and based on a statistical model. Comparing bare $S$-factors that are obtained by using different screening potentials, all $S_b(E)$ are found to be in accord within the standard errors for most of reactions investigated, as long as the same fitting procedure is employed. $S_b(E)$ is, practically, insensitive to the magnitude of the screening potential.

Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

Former Worker Program - Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) In February 2005, DOE expanded the beryllium screening program to include former employees of defunct DOE beryllium vendors who were employed with these companies while they performed work for DOE. This change was made to ensure that workers who no longer have an employer to turn to for beryllium disease testing could receive this important screening. DOE will offer these individuals a blood test at no cost to check for beryllium sensitization. DOE will pay for both the costs of drawing the blood and the analysis of the blood. If a screened individual receives an abnormal test for beryllium sensitization, they can receive medical monitoring for beryllium disease through DOL's EEOICP.

243

Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary 1 Glossary 1 Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1.0.0 Goal The primary goal of this glossary is to help PARS II end users understand the items of data that they are viewing or entering on their PARS II application screens. It does not provide technical information on the schema of the PARS II database. A separate PARS II Data Dictionary document is being provided for PARS II users who need such technical information. Overview This document consists of a table defining each data label displayed on PARS II screens. It is divided into sections by PARS II screen title. To find the meaning of a data item, first find the section describing the relevant screen, then find the particular screen label description. The sections are listed in order of the major functional area of the PARS II System:

244

Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects Pinellas Former Construction Worker, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Pinellas Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-866-9663 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica and/or solvents. The project is being carried out by a large group led by

245

Catalyst Screening and Kinetic Studies Using Microchannel Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A multi-parallel microchannel reactor system is described, as related to catalyst screening and discovery for heat-intensive heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Example systems are detailed, in which the rapid heat transfer of the screening device is utilized to maintain isothermal operation in multiple channels for catalyst screening as well as kinetic investigations. The advantages of the system and pertinent results are discussed, specifically for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, methanol oxidation to formaldehyde, and methanol steam reforming.

Cao, Chunshe; Palo, Daniel R.; Tonkovich, Annalee Y.; Wang, Yong

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Handheld Touch Screen Device May Lead to Mobile ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Handheld Touch Screen Device May Lead to Mobile Fingerprint ID. ... rescue teams lug around to aid in their anti-terrorism efforts, and this led to NIST ...

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

247

Roof screening for underground coal mines: recent developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of screens to control falls of the immediate roof or roof skin (that is between the installed primary and secondary roof supports) is described. 5 figs.

Compton, C.S.; Gallagher, S.; Molinda, G.M.; Mark, C.; Wilson, G.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Lawrence Berkeley National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley National Laboratory Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: LBNL...

249

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Nevada Former Workers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: NNSS and other DOE locations in Las Vegas...

250

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Mound Former Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Mound Worker Population Served: Production Workers...

251

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Pantex Former Workers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Former Pantex Worker Medical Surveillance Program Covered DOE Site: Pantex Worker Population...

252

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Sandia National Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CA) Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: SNL (CA) Worker Population Served: All workers...

253

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Oak Ridge Y-12 and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Former Production Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Y-12...

254

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Iowa Army Ammunition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa...

255

Method of Rapidly Screening Buffer Layers in Photovoltaics  

ORNL 2010-G0647/jcn UT-B ID 200902275 Method of Rapidly Screening Buffer Layers in Photovoltaics Technology Summary This ORNL invention offers a new method to ...

256

Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2012 Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bureaus. Lou Doll, BTMed local outreach coordinator, participating at the Cincinnati AFL-CIO Labor Day Picnic. 6 * 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program However, from the...

257

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Kansas City Plant Former...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(FWP) Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Kansas City Plant Worker Population Served: Production workers Principal Investigator: Donna...

258

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Argonne National Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplemental Screening Program. ORAU has teamed with its partners, Comprehensive Health Services, National Jewish Health, the University of Colorado Denver, and Axion Health,...

259

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplemental Screening Program. ORAU has teamed with its partners, Comprehensive Health Services, National Jewish Health, the University of Colorado Denver, and Axion Health,...

260

High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop HIGH THROUGHPUTCOMBINATORIAL SCREENING OF HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS June 26, 2007 Tom Boussie Symyx Technologies Symyx develops and applies proprietary high-throughput...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

1982-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Free film screening at Bradbury Science Museum September 7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free Film Screening At Bradbury Science Museum Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues submit Free film...

263

Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low Natural Gas Price Environment: Case Study of a Midwestern Residential Energy Upgrade Program NOTICE Due to the...

264

A Basic Overview of the Former Worker Medical Screening Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the privacy rights, the rights and welfare of any participant in former worker medical screening or research performed under DOE authorities is of prime importance to...

265

Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Virtual Screening of Materials for Gaseous Fuel Storage .... Numerical Study on Behavior of Top-Blown Supersonic Jets and Their Interaction ...

266

2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 2012 Annual Report presents a detailed overview of the accomplishments, progress, and future endeavors of the U.S. Department of Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program.

267

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING SOIL SCREENING LEVELS FOR...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Waste and Environmental Protection Emergency Response December 2002 Agency OSWER 9355.4-24 Superfund SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE FOR DEVELOPING SOIL SCREENING LEVELS FOR SUPERFUND...

268

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Ames Laboratory Former...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ames Laboratory Former Workers Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Workers at the Ames National Laboratory Covered DOE Site:...

269

Medical Screening Protocol for the Former Worker Medical Screening Program U.S. Department of Energy, April 16, 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4/16/13 4/16/13 MEDICAL SCREENING PROTOCOL FOR THE FORMER WORKER MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY General Principles: 1) The purpose of the medical evaluation component of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) is to provide interested former workers with targeted testing to screen for selected adverse health effects potentially related to their work in DOE operations. The program does not test for all potentially work-related conditions; for example, screening for work- related musculoskeletal conditions is not included in the medical evaluation. 2) The following table is intended to identify work-related health outcomes of relevance to DOE workers for which there are screening tests that are reasonably likely to be effective and beneficial to program

270

Medical Screening Protocol for the Former Worker Medical Screening Program U.S. Department of Energy, April 16, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4/16/13 4/16/13 MEDICAL SCREENING PROTOCOL FOR THE FORMER WORKER MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY General Principles: 1) The purpose of the medical evaluation component of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) is to provide interested former workers with targeted testing to screen for selected adverse health effects potentially related to their work in DOE operations. The program does not test for all potentially work-related conditions; for example, screening for work- related musculoskeletal conditions is not included in the medical evaluation. 2) The following table is intended to identify work-related health outcomes of relevance to DOE workers for which there are screening tests that are reasonably likely to be effective and beneficial to program

271

Reservoir screening criteria for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly designed and executed underbalanced drilling operations can eliminate or significantly reduce formation damage, mud or drill solids invasion, lost circulation, fluid entrainment and trapping effects, and potential adverse reactions of drilling fluids with the reservoir matrix or in-situ reservoir fluids. The key to selecting appropriate reservoir candidates is achieving a balance of technical, safety and economic factors. Not every reservoir is an ideal candidate for an underbalanced drilling operation and in some cases distinct disadvantages may exist in trying to execute an underbalanced drilling operation in comparison to a simpler more conventional overbalanced application. Extensive field experience has played an important role in determining the following key criteria and design considerations that should be examined when evaluating a well. Screening criteria are also provided to help operators ascertain if a given formation is, in fact, a viable underbalanced drilling candidate.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

273

Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2012 Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Published February 2013 Published February 2013 Pu Pu Publ b blis s ishe he hed d d Fe Fe Febr br brua ua u ry ry 2 201 013 3 FORMER WORKER MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2 0 1 2 STC STONETURN CONSULTANTS 2012 Former Worker Medical Screening Program * i Table of Contents Abbreviations ............................................................................................................................................iii Foreword .................................................................................................................................................... v Executive Summary .................................................................................................................................

274

Screening criteria help select formations for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain laboratory screening procedures can help determine the effectiveness of underbalanced drilling in a specific application. These screening criteria can help in analyzing the types of reservoirs which present good applications for underbalanced drilling technology. This paper discusses the types of information that should be obtained for any reservoir prior to designing the underbalanced drilling program for optimum performance.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

A pilot study of four cultural touch-screen games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four simple single-player games (based on the "Four Arts" of traditional Chinese culture) have been designed in Flash for a touch-screen display. The aim is to allow players to experience a digital interactive recreation of traditional Chinese culture, ... Keywords: Chinese, Daoism, Flash, Four Arts, calligraphy, cultural heritage, go, interactive games, music, touch screen

Li Wang; Erik Champion

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Rocky Flats Former Construction Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Covered DOE Site: Rocky Flats Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Dwayne Adkins 7510 W. Mississippi Ave., Suite 230 Lakewood, CO 80226 Website: http://www.btmed.org This project is intended to provide free medical screening to former workers in the building trades (construction workers). The screening targets health problems resulting from exposures, including asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, noise, radiation, silica

277

One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Former Worker Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Worker Medical Screening Former Worker Medical Screening Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program The Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) provides ongoing medical screening examinations, at no cost, to all former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor workers who may be at risk for occupational diseases. The FWP is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) and reflects our commitment to the health and safety of all DOE workers - past and present - who have served the Nation in its National security and other missions. The FWP was established following the issuance of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 (PL 102-484), which called for DOE to assist workers with determining whether they had health issues related

279

Screening criteria for microbial for processes  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) has maintained a microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) field project data base since 1985. One of the major goals of this data base is to continue to document characteristics of reservoirs used for MEOR field projects and to assist the US Department of Energy by revising published screening criteria for MEOR processes. Since the last update of this data base in 1987, the number of MEOR field projects entered has increased from 39 to 65. Microbial EOR has been recognized as a potentially cost-effective method, particularly for stripper well production. Stripper wells are particularly in need of cost-effective EOR because independent operators produce about 40% of the total oil recovered, but cannot conduct needed EOR research. Microbial methods for improving oil recovery are potentially cost-effective and particularly well suited to be applied in today's economic climate. The lower price of crude oil as well as a more general acceptance of use of biotechnological processes has probably contributed to this increase. Although in some instances information was unavailable or not reported for each element of the data base, there exists adequate data to demonstrate both the viability and variety of options for using microbial technology for improved oil production. this report updates the data base and provides summary of several of the more important MEOR field experiments conducted during the 1970s and 1980s. 19 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Bryant, R.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant User's Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FRESA computer program, Version 2.1 provides an easy way to collect and process building and facility data to indicate opportunities for renewable energy applications in federal facilities and buildings. The purpose of this analytic tool is to focus feasibility study efforts on those applications most likely to prove cost-effective. The program is a supplement to energy and water conservation audits, which must be completed for all federal buildings and will flag renewable energy opportunities by facilitating the evaluation and ranking process. FRESA results alone are generally not sufficient to establish project feasibility. Software location: http://www.eren.doe.gov/femp/techassist/softwaretools/softwaretools.html. The FRESA User's Manual provides instruction on getting started; an overview of the FRESA program structure; an explanation of the screening process; detailed information on using the functions of Facility/Building Info, Building/Facility Analysis, Input/Output, and We ather Data or Adding a Zip Code; troubleshooting, and archiving data. Appendices include Algorithms Used in FRESA Prescreening, Excel Spread sheets for FRESA Inputs, Other Useful Information, and Acronyms and Abbreviations.

Brown, T.; Tapia, D.; Mas, C.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

How much is a health insurer willing to pay for colorectal cancer screening tests?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colorectal Cancer (CRC) screening tests have proven to be cost-effective in preventing cancer incidence. Yet, as recent studies have shown, CRC screening tests are noticeably underutilized. Among the factors influencing CRC screening test utilization, ...

Reza Yaesoubi; Stephen D. Roberts

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 Glossary of Screen Labels for PARS II V1 More Documents & Publications PARS II Standard Operating...

283

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Related Documents & Links |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Former Worker Medical Screening Program Related Documents & Links Former Worker Medical Screening Program Related Documents & Links Related Documents & Links Beryllium Information-ORISE Chronic Beryllium Disease Information-National Jewish Health Department of Energy Human Subjects Protection Program DOE Covered Facilities Database Department of Labor Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) Department of Labor EEOICP - Upcoming Events Department of Labor Office of the Ombudsman for EEOICPA NIOSH Advisory Board and Public Meetings NIOSH Division of Compensation Analysis and Support Project Websites Building Trades National Medical Screening Program Medical Exam Program for Former Workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

284

A TCL/TK widget for display of MEDM screens.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Tcl/Tk widget has been created to display MEDM screens inside a Tcl/Tk application. Tcl/Tk parses the MEDM input files and the appropriate widgets are created and linked to the associated process variables. One advantage of this approach is that an X-Windows emulator is not required to view and manipulate the MEDM screen under a Windows operating system. Another benefit is that the MEDM screen can now be tightly integrated into a scripting language to attach higher-level logic to various process variable manipulations. Further details and examples of the new widget will be discussed.

Soliday, R.; APS Operations Division

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Maps Resource Maps and Screening Tools Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools October 7, 2013 - 9:42am Addthis Renewable energy resources are available across the United States but vary greatly depending on exact location and micro-climate. This page outlines renewable energy resource maps and screening tools to help Federal agencies assess the viability of on-site renewable energy projects. Before initiating a project, resources in your area must be measured and verified. Resource maps and screening tools are a good start, but it is important to consult an expert for a professional evaluation before implementing renewable energy projects. Resource Maps The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory compiled the following renewable energy resource maps.

286

Outreach (Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outreach (Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Outreach (Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Outreach (Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Outreach: Identify and Notify Eligible DOE Workers About FWP Medical Screening Services All former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees from all facilities are eligible to participate in the program. Although the historical best estimate for the population of former workers who are entitled to receive medical evaluations under the FWP is upwards of 600,000 individuals, the precise number of workers remains unknown. Most of the FWP projects use multiple outreach methods to increase the visibility of the program in communities surrounding DOE sites and to notify potentially eligible DOE workers about the availability of FWP services. These methods are three-fold: 1) roster-based, 2)

287

Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Pantex, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Former Pantex Worker Medical Surveillance Program Covered DOE Site: Pantex Worker Population Served: All Workers Principal Investigator: Arthur Frank, MD, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (888) 378-8939 Local Medical Clinics: WTAMU Health Partners Clinic 4400 S. Washington Street Amarillo, TX 79110 Texas Diagnostic Imaging Center (X-rays only) 1000 Coulter Drive Amarillo, TX 79106 Former workers at risk from exposures while working at Pantex are offered a free medical screening. This project is carried out by Drexel University School of Public Health in conjunction with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler. Workers from this site who do not live in close proximity to the above

288

Magnetic and electric screening masses from Polyakov-loop correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Screening properties of the quark gluon plasma are studied from Polyakov-loop correlation in lattice QCD simulations with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks at temperatures $T/\\Tpc \\simeq 1$--4 where $\\Tpc$ is the pseudocritical temperature. Using the Euclidean-time reflection symmetry and the charge conjugation symmetry, we introduce various types of Polyakov-loop correlation functions and extract screening masses in magnetic and electric sectors. We find that the temperature dependence of the screening masses are well described by the weak coupling expansion. We also find that a ratio of the screening masses in the electric sector to the magnetic sector shows qualitative agreement with a prediction from the dimensionally-reduced effective field theory and the N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at $1.3 < T/\\Tpc < 3$.

Y. Maezawa; S. Aoki; S. Ejiri; T. Hatsuda; N. Ishii; K. Kanaya; N. Ukita; T. Umeda

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Automatic Misregistration Testing Apparatus for Line Screen Color CRT'S  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimum color CRT performance requires that the electron beam impinge on the screen at the proper phosphor stripe. The extent to which the beam fails to strike the intended phosphor stripe is referred to as misregistration. Misregistration leads to loss ...

Allan D. Kautz

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Bush Administration to Expand Beryllium Disease Screening Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, DC U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced the Department of Energy (DOE) will expand a beryllium screening program to include former employees of now-defunct DOE...

291

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha sub-basins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha subbasins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

NETL: News Release - NETL Receives Blue Pencil and Gold Screen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The honor was awarded at the NAGC Blue Pencil and Gold Screen Awards Reception and Banquet on Monday, May 17,2010, in Bethesda, Md., during the 2010 NAGC Communications School....

294

High-throughput vertebrate total analysis/screening platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-throughput screening (HTS) is seen as one of the most promising technologies to facilitate biomedical studies and pharmaceutical discoveries. Although large varieties of in vitro HTS technologies have opened great ...

Chang, Tsung-Yao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Improved screen-bowl centrifuge recovery using polymer injection technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper reports the improved screen-bowl centrifuge recovery process using polymer injection technology. Field test and economic analysis are also included in the paper. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Burchett, R.T.; McGough, K.M.; Luttrell, G.H.

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

FREE FILM SCREENING AND DISCUSSION Abstract from Jezebel Productions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FREE FILM SCREENING AND DISCUSSION Abstract from Jezebel Productions: "No Dinosaurs in Heaven charge: free and open to the public. THURSDAY OCTOBER 27, 2011 7:00 PM Mackey Auditorium Ruby Gerontology

de Lijser, Peter

297

Screening China : China in popular geopolitics, 2000-2009.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Looking at global box-office winners from the years 2000-2009, this paper finds that the China we encounter on the silver screen, is rarely an antagonist. (more)

Braastad, J. Steffen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilize...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilized hydrogen storage materials Speaker(s): Robin Gremaud Date: October 16, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122...

299

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa Covered DOE Site: IAAP Worker Population Served: All Line 1/Division B Workers Principal Investigator: Laurence Fuortes, MD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 282-5818 Local Medical Clinics: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, IA 52242 Henry County Health Center 407 South White Street Mt. Pleasant, IA 62641 Great River Medical Center 1221 S. Gear Avenue West Burlington, IA 52655 Website: http://cph.uiowa.edu/iowafwp/ This project is intended to screen for occupational health conditions among

300

Stochastic dominance for project screening and selection under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At any given moment, engineering and chemical companies have a host of projects that they are either trying to screen to advance to the next stage of research or select from for implementation. These choices could range ...

Adeyemo, Adekunle M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AND HABITAT CHARACTERIZATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AVIAN AND BAT SCREENING ANALYSIS AND HABITAT CHARACTERIZATION Barr Engineering Company UMore Park Research Wind Turbine Dakota County, Minnesota June 2010 Prepared For: Barr Engineering Company 4700 West 77 th St. Minneapolis, MN 55435 Prepared By: 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 200 Denver, Colorado 80202 Phone: (720) 330-7280 Fax: (303) 458-5701 www.nrcdifference.com NRC Project # 0010-0110-01

303

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a simplified methodology to compare supply and demand-side resources. The screening curve approach supplements with load shape information the data contained in a supply curve of conserved energy. In addition, a screening curve contains information on competing supply technologies, such as annualized capital costs, variable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The information in the screening curve allows policymakers to promptly and conveniently compare the relevant parameters affecting supply and demand-side investment decisions. While many sophisticated computer models have evolved to account for the load shape impacts of energy efficiency investments, this sophistication has, by and large, not trickled down to spreadsheet-level or back-of-the-envelope analyses. This methodology allows a simple summary of load shape characteristics based on the output of the more complicated models. It offers many advantages, principal of which is clarity in analyzing supply and demand-side investment choices. This paper first describes how supply-side screening curves have been used in the past, and develops the conceptual tools needed to apply integrated supply/demand screening curves in the least-cost utility planning process. It then presents examples of supply and demand-side technologies and plots them on a representative screening curve. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Koomey, J.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Gadgil, A.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

BESC - A novel monolignol that reduces recalcitrance of plant cell ...  

synthesis of cell walls of switchgrass and other bioenergy grasses and crops, including woody perennial species, for more facile deconstruction in energy, ...

305

Small Distributed Generation Applications in the Industrial Sector: A Screening Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a screening assessment of small distributed generation applications in the industrial sector.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Beryllium Screening - Informed Choice Document | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beryllium Screening - Informed Choice Document Beryllium Screening - Informed Choice Document Beryllium Screening - Informed Choice Document January 2007 Cases of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a legacy of the Department of Energy's (DOE) role in weapons production, have been increasing across the DOE complex. This trend has sparked increased concern about this serious occupational illness. In a national effort to identify current and former workers who have CBD or are sensitized to beryllium and to better understand the illness, DOE has set up a number of medical surveillance and research programs for both current and former workers. The way that workers enroll in the programs and the information that they are given prior to participating in the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation testing (Be-LPT) vary depending on where and when the worker was employed in a DOE

309

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

310

Fernald, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Production Workers Screening Projects Fernald, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Fernald Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office Ray Beatty and Mooch Callaway 1150 Harrison Ave., Suite 106 Harrison, OH 45030 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is being conducted by Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test. This program also offers CT scans for early lung cancer detection to workers who have an elevated risk of lung cancer as a result of a combination of occupational exposures, age,

311

Mound, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Projects Production Workers Screening Projects Mound, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Mound Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: 1-877-866-6802 Local Outreach Office Eric Parker, Paige Gibson and Mike Ball 113 East Central Avenue W. Carrollton, OH 45449 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is being conducted by the United Steelworkers, in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

312

Method for manufacturing a well production and sand screen assembly  

SciTech Connect

A method for forming and assembling a well production and sand screen assembly in a well having a screen therein forming an outer annulus and a wash pipe internally of the screen forming an inner annulus comprising further (A) mounting a high pressure fluid pump means and a valve means on each wash pipe, inner annulus, and outer annulus, and (B) connecting the valve means in fluid communication with the high pressure fluid pump means for controlling the ingress and egress of the high pressure fluids and removed formation material for forming a sand pack in the well and simultaneously for applying and maintaining a positive fluid pressure against the overburden during work in the well for preventing cave-ins and sloughing of the unconsolidated formation well walls until the sand pack is formed.

Widmyer, R.H.

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Production Workers Screening Production Workers Screening Projects Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Paducah Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: James Harbison 2525 Cairo Road Paducah, KY 42001 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing test, and an educational workshop. This program also offers CT

314

Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle inspection station Lanes two through five will be open 24 hours a day and won't be staffed by a Laboratory protective force officer. September 1, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

315

Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Idaho National Laboratory, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: INL Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: David Fry 1055 Austin Avenue Idaho Falls, ID 83404 Community Care 2725 Channing Way Idaho Falls, ID 83404 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers, in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing

316

Gauss-Codazzi thermodynamics on the timelike screen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a known result by Jacobson that the flux of energy matter through a local Rindler horizon is related with the expansion of the null generators in a way that mirrors the first law of thermodynamics. We extend such a result to a timelike screen of observers with finite acceleration. Since timelike curves have more freedom than null geodesics, the construction is more involved than Jacobson's and few geometrical constraints need to be imposed: the observers' acceleration has to be constant in time and everywhere orthogonal to the screen. Moreover, at any given time, the extrinsic curvature of the screen has to be flat. The latter requirement can be weakened by asking that the extrinsic curvature, if present at the beginning, evolves in time like on a cone and just rescales proportionally to the expansion.

Piazza, Federico [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Walla Walla River Basin Screening, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to meet the need for protective fish screening, the Walla Walla County Conservation District (WWCCD) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) formed a partnership to implement the WDFW Cooperative Compliance Review and Cost-Share Program. The program provides technical and financial assistance to irrigators in order to bring existing surface water diversions into compliance with state and federal juvenile fish screen criteria. The Walla Walla basin has two priority salmonid species currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, the Bull Trout and Mid-Columbia Basin Steelhead. Other partners in this effort include the Washington Department of Ecology, National Marine Fisheries Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Walla Walla Community College Irrigation Department. A Screening Oversight Committee of representatives from these agencies sets policy and resolves issues.

Ahmann, Audrey; Jones, Rick

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Simplified economic screening models for enhanced oil recovery processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective screening of reservoirs for implementation of enhanced oil recovery processes is critical to the financial success of a proposed project. Screening techniques that have been used in the past normally consisted of comparing individual reservoir and fluid properties with tables of the preferred values of these properties. The shortcoming of this procedure is that it does not account for interactions among the technical parameters, nor does it provide a measure of the economic attractiveness of the project. Intercomp has developed, under the sponsorship of the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center of DOE, a set of economic screening models for micellar-polymer, steam drive and CO/sub 2/ miscible EOR processes. These models include accurate oil production predictive algorithms and routines which provide measures of economic attractiveness based on time value of money economics. The formulation of these models is presented with examples of their use.

Paul, G.W.; Ford, M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Project Screening and Design Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Screening and Design Toolkit Screening and Design Toolkit (Redirected from Gateway:International/Project Screening and Design) Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

320

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Iowa Army Ammunition Plant Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects Project Name: Medical Monitoring of Former Atomic Weapons Workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAP) in Burlington, Iowa Covered DOE Site: IAAP Worker Population Served: All Line 1/Division B Workers Principal Investigator: Laurence Fuortes, MD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 282-5818 Local Medical Clinics: University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics 200 Hawkins Drive Iowa City, IA 52242 Henry County Health Center 407 South White Street Mt. Pleasant, IA 62641 Great River Medical Center 1221 S. Gear Avenue West Burlington, IA 52655 Website: http://cph.uiowa.edu/iowafwp/ This project is intended to screen for occupational health conditions among

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Derivation of the New Pressurized Thermal Shock Screening Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of a multi-year, multi-disciplinary effort on the part of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), its contractors, and the nuclear industry, a technical basis has been established to support a risk-informed revision to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) regulations originally promulgated in the mid-1980s. The revised regulations provide alternative (optional) reference-temperature (RT)-based screening criteria, which is codified in 10 CFR 50.61(a). How the revised screening criteria were determined from the results of the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses will be discussed in this paper.

Dickson, Terry L [ORNL; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Kirk, Mark [NRC; Chou, Hsuing-Wei [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin ...  

Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, ... Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search;

323

Natural Lignocellulosic Fibers as Special Engineering Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

K. K. Chawla's Seminal Contributions to the Field of Metal Matrix Composites Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades Studies of Nanocrystalline ...

324

Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials  

SciTech Connect

The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

McMillan, J.D.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Process for the treatment of lignocellulosic biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of biomass to render structural carbohydrates more accessible and/or digestible using concentrated ammonium hydroxide with or without anhydrous ammonia addition, is described. The process preferably uses steam to strip ammonia from the biomass for recycling. The process yields of monosaccharides from the structural carbohydrates are good, particularly as measured by the enzymatic hydrolysis of the structural carbohydrates. The monosaccharides are used as animal feeds and energy sources for ethanol production.

Dale, Bruce E.; Lynd, Lee R.; Laser, Mark

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

Pulping lignocellulose in continuous pressurized batch digesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A batch process to produce kraft pulp is described, in which a combination of black and white liquor is used for cooking of wood chips. In the process, the steam consumption to produce 357 tons/day pulp at 50% yield was approximately 1600 lb/ton pulp, compared with 4000 lb/ton for a batch digester of conventional type.

Green, F.B.

1980-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Lignocellulose Degradation during Solid-State Fermentation:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These include: Receive: RSS Feeds, eTOCs, free email alerts (when new articles cite this article), more Downloaded from

Phanerochaete Chrysosporium; Zohar Kerem; Dana Friesem; Yitzhak Hadar; Zohar Kerem; Dana Friesem; Yitzhak Hadar

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

Screening of nuclear pairing in nuclear and neutron matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The screening potential in the $^1S_0$ and $^3S_1$ pairing channels in neutron and nuclear matter in different approximations is discussed. It is found that the vertex corrections to the potential are much stronger in nuclear matter than in neutron matter.

Caiwan Shen; Umberto Lombardo; Peter Schuck

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

331

Electron Screening in 7Be + p --> 8B + photon reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the effect of screening by bound electron in (7Be,e) + p --> (8B,e) + photon transition in the framework of the adiabatic representation of the three particle problem. Comparison with two approaches (united nucleus and static) is presented. We discuss possible applications of this effect both for Solar Neutrinos and low energy fusion experiments.

V. B. Belyaev; D. E. Monakhov; D. V. Naumov; F. M. Penkov

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

332

Colon Cancer Screening The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

older than 50 years. There are sev- eral recommended CRC screening tests, including fecal occult blood- vasiveness, discomfort, and accuracy.2 Fecal occult blood testing is the least expensive intrusive test, whereas colo- noscopy is the most accurate but also the most invasive test. Fecal occult blood testing

Ottino, Julio M.

333

Demand Response Screening Assessment Tool Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Screeing Tool for Distribution Planners identifies opportunities for using demand response as a distribution resource. It serves as a screening tool to assist distribution planners to ascertain situations where demand response may be a cost45effective alternative to making distribution system asset investments. WindowsXP, Excel (MS Office 2003)

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

Directed Enzyme Evolution and High-Throughput Screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Directed Enzyme Evolution and High-Throughput Screening Michael J. McLachlan,1 Ryan P. Sullivan2, the tailoring of an enzyme can still be accomplished through the second route: directed evolution. Biocatalysis John Wiley & Sons Asia (Pte) Ltd. ISBN: 978-0-470-82314-9 #12;Directed evolution is the general term

Zhao, Huimin

335

Building a High Throughput Screening Facility in an Academic Setting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

being developed in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries as means to speed the identification share some of the same goals as their counterparts in industry, their needs also differ in key ways. For example, most industry screening programs focus their efforts on a relatively small number of disease

Mitchison, Tim

336

Is Screening Cargo Containers for Smuggled Nuclear Threats Worthwhile?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, Customs and Border Protection has installed radiation sensors to screen cargo containers entering the United States. They are concerned that terrorists could use containers to smuggle radiological material into the country and carry ... Keywords: applications, multiple-objective decision analysis, probability, terrorism

Jason R. W. Merrick; Laura A. McLay

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fatigue failure of regenerator screens in a high frequency Stirling engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Failure of Stirling Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) regenerator screens was investigated. After several hours of operation the SPDE was shut down for inspection and upon removal of the regenerator screens, debris of an unknown origin was discovered along with considerable cracking of the screens in localized areas. Metallurgical analysis of the debris determined it to be cracked-off-deformed pieces of the 41 pm thickness Type 304 stainless steel wire screen. Scanning electron microscopy of the cracked screens revealed failures occurring at wire crossovers and fatigue striations on the fracture surface of the wires. Thus, the screen failure can be characterized as a fatigue failure of the wires. The crossovers were determined to contain a 30 percent reduction in wire thickness and a highly worked microstructure occurring from the manufacturing process of the wire screens. Later it was found that reduction in wire thickness occurred because the screen fabricator had subjected the screen to a light cold-roll process after weaving. Installation of this screen left a clearance in the regenerator allowing the screens to move. The combined effects of the reduction in wire thickness, stress concentration (caused by screen movement), and highly worked microstructure at the wire crossovers led to the fatigue failure of the screens.

Hull, D.R.; Alger, D.L.; Moore, T.J.; Sheuermann, C.M.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Cost-Effectiveness of a Mailed Educational Reminder to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

controlled trial of faecal-occult-blood screening forcancer with faecal-occult-blood test. Lancet 1996, 348:1467-by screening for fecal occult blood. Minnesota Colon Cancer

Lee, Jeffrey K; Groessl, Erik J; Ganiats, Theodore G; Ho, Samuel B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Pilot Study of Lay Health Worker Outreach and Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Chinese Americans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by screening for fecal occult blood. Minnesota Colon Cancercontrolled trial of faecal-occult-blood screening forat baseline to 55.7% for fecal occult blood tests, 7.1% for

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

In vivo boron-10 analysis for the pre-screening of compounds for BNCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in vivo boron-10 screening technique was developed to analyze the boron biodistribution in a rabbit knee for the pre-screening of compounds for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). Three approaches were investigated: ...

Zhu, Xuping, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Velocity Measurements at Three Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima Basin, Washington : Summer 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) measured the velocity conditions at three fish screening facilities in the Yakima River Basin: Wapato, Chandler, and Easton Screens. The measurement objectives were different at the three screens. At Wapato, approach and sweep velocities were measured to evaluate the effect of rearing pens in the screen forebay. A complete survey was performed at the Chandler Screens. At Easton, velocity was measured behind the screens to provide information for the installation of porosity boards to balance flow through the screens. Salmon-rearing pens used at the Wapato Canal had a minimal effect on the magnitude of approach and sweep velocities at the face of the drum screens, although the pens caused increased turbulence and variability in water velocities. The net pens did not appear to affect flows through the three fish bypasses. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The development of a drug discovery virtual screening application on Taiwan unigrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of an in silico virtual screening application on Taiwan Unigrid. In silico virtual screening is one of the most promising approach to accelerate the drug development process. This pilot application implementation ...

Li-Yung Ho; Pangfeng Liu; Chien-Min Wang; Jan-Jan Wu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Environmental Impact Assesment in the Baltic Countries and Poland -- Screening and Quality Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In The Baltic Countries And Poland - Screening And QualityIn The Baltic Countries And Poland - Screening And QualityLatvia, Lithuania and Poland. All four of these countries

Marriott, A.; Doughty, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle...

345

First principles high throughput screening of oxynitrides for water-splitting photocatalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a first principles high throughput screening system to search for new water-splitting photocatalysts. We use the approach to screen through nitrides and oxynitrides. Most of the known photocatalytic ...

Wu, Yabi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Argonne National Laboratory-West, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West, Former Production Workers West, Former Production Workers Screening Projects (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory) Argonne National Laboratory-West, Former Production Workers Screening Projects (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory) Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Argonne National Laboratory-West Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: David Fry 1055 Austin Avenue Idaho Falls, ID 83404 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the United Steelworkers, in partnership with Queens College of the City University of New York. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and breathing

347

Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program Joint Outreach Task Group Former Workers Screening Program The Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) includes representatives from HSS, Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Offices of the Ombudsman for DOL and NIOSH, and the DOE-funded FWP projects. The JOTG was established in 2009 under the premise that agencies/programs with common goals can work together by combining resources and coordinating outreach efforts. Each involved agency has a different mission, but the missions are complementary. By working together, the agencies are better able to serve the DOE workforce. The JOTG focuses on educating the former workers on the programs and resources available to them.

348

Project Screening and Design Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Screening and Design Toolkit Project Screening and Design Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

349

Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilized  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilized Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilized hydrogen storage materials Speaker(s): Robin Gremaud Date: October 16, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Limited energy resources and increasing pollution associated with the use of fossil resources have stimulated the search for cleaner, cheaper and more efficient energy technologies. One promising technology involves hydrogen that can be used in fuel cells and is stored in metal hydrides. However, for replacing existing technologies, still a large number of problems have to be solved, demanding for extensive fundamental research in the field of material science. Our experimental strategy, aimed at finding of novel (complex) hydrides is to carry out systematic experiments for various light-weight metal-hydrides. In the standard approach followed so

350

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: Worker Health Protection Program Covered DOE Site: Portsmouth Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Jim Frederick Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Markowitz, MD Toll-free Telephone: (888) 241-1199 Local Outreach Office: Jeanne Cisco 2288 Wakefield Mound Road Piketon, OH 45661 Website: http://www.worker-health.org/ This project is conducted by the Unitedsteel Workers in conjunction with Queens College of the City University of New York. The program is being offered as a service to both former and current workers. Free of charge, eligible workers can receive a medical exam, including chest X-ray and

351

A Fisheries Evaluation of the Westside Ditch and Town Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities in the Westside Ditch and Town Canal, near Ellensburg, in south-central Washington State. At the Town Canal, we estimated that 0.3% of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss smolts released during tests were significantly descaled. The time required for 50% of the fish in the two steelhead test groups to exit from the Town Screens forebay ranged from 12 h to >85 h. Integrity tests at the Town Screens indicated that none of the rainbow trout fry released in front of the rotary drum screens passed through the screens, although 8.5% of the native zero-age chinook salmon fry diverted from the river into the screening facility were lost through the screens. At the Westside Screens, 16.8% of native zero-age chinook salmon fry passed through the screens. Most of the chinook salmon lost through the screens were small, <36 mm long. The methods used in 1990 were first used at the Sunnyside Screens in 1985. These methods were used again in subsequent years in tests at the Richland, Toppenish/Satus, Wapato, and Toppenish Creek screens. The methods used from 1985 through 1989 have been reviewed by the Washington State Department of Fisheries, US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Power Planning Council, and Yakima Indian Nation. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Hartenson, Gregg A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Web-based framework for spatiotemporal screen real estate management of interactive public displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a web-based framework for spatiotemporal screen real estate management of interactive public displays. The framework facilitates dynamic partitioning of the screen real estate into virtual screens assigned for multiple concurrent ... Keywords: ubi-hotspot, ubiquitous computing, urban computing

Tomas Linden; Tommi Heikkinen; Timo Ojala; Hannu Kukka; Marko Jurmu

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

BiDi screen : depth and lighting aware interaction and display  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I describe a new type of interactive display that supports both on-screen multi-touch interactions and off-screen hover-based gestures. This BiDirectional (BiDi) screen, capable of both image capture and ...

Hirsch, Matthew W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Laboratory Screening Tests and Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barrier Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary constituents of concern in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate are inorganic elements, which have generally received less attention in the remediation literature than organic compounds. EPRI is evaluating remediation options that are applicable to the unique matrix of inorganic constituents typically found at CCP disposal sites. This report presents screening level treatability data for three CCP leachate types using several media that may be considered for in situ groundwater remediation.

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

355

Enhancing and Testing Fast Fault Screening (FFS) Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this multi-year study is to develop a methodology for fast prediction of the most severe three-phase fault locations for transient stability studies and rank them in order of severity. The methodology is called Fast Fault Screening (FFS). The key advantage of the FFS is the ability to quickly scan through thousands of potential fault locations from transient stability perspective and identify the most severe locations. In the previous efforts, FFS was developed for angular ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Laboratory Screening Tests for Permeable Reactive Barrier Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary constituents of concern in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate are inorganic elements, which have generally received less attention in the remediation literature than organic compounds. EPRI is evaluating remediation options that are applicable to the unique matrix of inorganic constituents typically found at CCP disposal sites. This report presents screening level treatability data for three CCP leachate types using several media that may be considered for in situ groundwater remediation.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

An Improved Beam Screen for the LHC Injection Kickers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two LHC injection kicker magnet systems must produce a kick of 1.3 T.m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. Each system is composed of two resonant charging power supplies (RCPSs) and four 5 WW transmission line kicker magnets with matched terminating resistors and pulse forming networks (PFNs). A beam screen is placed in the aperture of the magnets: the screen consists of a ceramic tube with conductors on the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the image current of the, high intensity, LHC beam and screen the ferrite against Wake fields. The conductors initially used gave adequately low beam coupling impedance however inter-conductor discharges occurred during pulsing of the magnet: an alternative design was discharge free at the nominal operating voltage but the impedance was too high for the ultimate LHC beam. This paper presents the results of a new development undertaken to meet the often conflicting requireme...

Barnes, M J; Ducimetire, L; Garrel, N; Kroyer, T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Application of neural networks to waste site screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste site screening requires knowledge of the actual concentrations of hazardous materials and rates of flow around and below the site with time. The present approach consists primarily of drilling boreholes near contaminated sites and chemically analyzing the extracted physical samples and processing the data. This is expensive and time consuming. The feasibility of using neural network techniques to reduce the cost of waste site screening was investigated. Two neural network techniques, gradient descent back propagation and fully recurrent back propagation were utilized. The networks were trained with data received from Westinghouse Hanford Corporation. The results indicate that the network trained with the fully recurrent technique shows satisfactory generalization capability. The predicted results are close to the results obtained from a mathematical flow prediction model. It is possible to develop a new tool to predict the waste plume, thus substantially reducing the number of the bore sites and samplings. There are a variety of applications for this technique in environmental site screening and remediation. One of the obvious applications would be for optimum well siting. A neural network trained from the existing sampling data could be utilized to decide where would be the best position for the next bore site. Other applications are discussed in the report.

Dabiri, A.E.; Garrett, M.; Kraft, T.; Hilton, J.; VanHammersveld, M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Summary of Services Available to Former Workers, February 1, 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 1, 2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Summary of Services Available to Former Workers (Sites listed below are primary sites served, but multiple small sites are also served by the Building Trades National Medical Screening Program for construction workers and by the National Supplemental Screening Program for production workers) State DOE Site Worker Population/Medical Screening Program Provider Local Office Location and Phone Number Alaska Amchitka Island All workers, primarily construction CPWR - The Center for Construction Research & Training (CPWR)/Building Trades National Medical Screening Program (BTMed) 1-800-866-9663 California Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory All workers Queens College (QC)/Worker Health Protection

360

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Summary of Services Available to Former Workers, February 1, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 1, 2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Summary of Services Available to Former Workers (Sites listed below are primary sites served, but multiple small sites are also served by the Building Trades National Medical Screening Program for construction workers and by the National Supplemental Screening Program for production workers) State DOE Site Worker Population/Medical Screening Program Provider Local Office Location and Phone Number Alaska Amchitka Island All workers, primarily construction CPWR - The Center for Construction Research & Training (CPWR)/Building Trades National Medical Screening Program (BTMed) 1-800-866-9663 California Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory All workers Queens College (QC)/Worker Health Protection

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bioprospecting metagenomes: Glycosyl hydrolases for converting biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout immeasurable time, microorganisms evolved and accumulated remarkable physiological and functional heterogeneity, and now constitute the major reserve for genetic diversity on earth. Using metagenomics, namely genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples, this biogenetic diversification can be accessed without the need to cultivate cells. Accordingly, microbial communities and their metagenomes, isolated from biotopes with high turnover rates of recalcitrant biomass, such as lignocellulosic plant cell walls, have become a major resource for bioprospecting; furthermore, this material is a major asset in the search for new biocatalytics (enzymes) for various industrial processes, including the production of biofuels from plant feedstocks. However, despite the contributions from metagenomics technologies consequent upon the discovery of novel enzymes, this relatively new enterprise requires major improvements. In this review, we compare function-based metagenome screening and sequence-based metagenome data mining, discussing the advantages and limitations of both methods. We also describe the unusual enzymes discovered via metagenomics approaches, and discuss the future prospects for metagenome technologies.

Li, L.; van der Lelie, D.; McCorkle, S. R.; Monchy, S.; Taghavi, S.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

A whole genome screen for HIV restriction factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. gag/pol/tat and rev, HIV-2 MCR Env). The negative... replication, we developed a single round infectious HIV pseudotype assay to siRNA screen HeLa-CD4 cells. The HIV pseudotype HIV89.6R, has an HIV-2 Env MCR (derived from the primary isolate prCBL-23). HeLa-CD4 cells contain ectopically expressed CD4...

Liu, Li; Oliveira, Nidia MM; Cheney, Kelly M; Pade, Corinna; Dreja, Hanna; Bergin, Ann Marie H; Borgdorff, Viola; Beach, David H; Bishop, Cleo L; Dittmar, Matthias T; McKnight, Aine

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Characterization Report for the David Witherspoon Screen Art Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) of Environmental Management (EM) requested the technical assistance of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to characterize a tract of land associated with the David Witherspoon, Incorporated (DWI) Volunteer Equipment and Supply Company (VESC). This tract of land (hereinafter referred to as Screen Arts) is located in the Vestal Community in the 2000-block of Maryville Pike in south Knoxville, Tennessee, as shown in Figure A-1. This tract of land has been used primarily to store salvaged equipment and materials for resale, recycle, or for disposal in the former landfill once operated by DWI. The DWI Site industrial landfill and metal recycling business had been permitted by the Tennessee Division of Radiological Health to accept low-level radiologically contaminated metals. DWI received materials and equipment associated with operations from DOE sites, including those in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. It is likely that items stored at Screen Arts may have contained some residual radiological materials.

Phyllis C. Weaver

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Screening criteria for enhanced recovery of Saudi crude oils  

SciTech Connect

This investigation studies and analyzes the screening guides that can be used to select the applicable enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method under Saudi oil field conditions. Based on the analysis of data obtained from 186 Saudi formations, the crude oils are produced from low to intermediate permeability formations in the range of 1-1500 millidarcies. The original reservoirs' pressure and temperature range from 2000 to 5500 psi and from 140 to 240{degrees}F, respectively. The porosity of the formations varies from 10 to 30% and the formations thickness ranges from 10 to 300 feet. The reservoirs of Saudi Arabia are characterized by high formation water salinity, which can be as high as 30% by weight. Saudi oil formations are characterized by connate water in the range of 10-50%. Thus residual oil saturation is expected to be high. The viscosity of most Saudi crude oils ranges from 0.10 to 10 centipoise. The API gravity ranges from 15 to 45. The basic parameters studied include formation permeability, porosity, and thickness; reservoir pressure and temperature; crude oil viscosity and API gravity, formation connate water saturation and its salinity, and formation type and heterogeneity. Based on the screening analysis the most suitable technical methods applicable to Saudi oil fields are the miscible processes using gases.

Sayyouh, M.H.; Al-Blehed (Petroleum Engineering Dept., King Saud Univ., Riyadh (SA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Screenings and vertex operators of quantum superalgebra U{sub q}(sl-caret(N|1))  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We construct the screening currents of the quantum superalgebra U{sub q}(sl-caret(N|1)) for an arbitrary level k{ne}-N+ 1. We show that these screening currents commute with the superalgebra modulo total difference. We propose bosonizations of the vertex operators by using the screening currents. We check that these vertex operators are the intertwiners among the Fock-Wakimoto representation and the typical representation for rank N Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 4.

Kojima, Takeo [Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata University, Jonan 4-3-16, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ashok K. Gadgil. 1989. Conservation Screening Curves forof Utility Experience with Conservation and Load ManagementSupport Document: Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Veiled Sustainability: The Screen in the Work of Fumihiko Maki [Speaking of Places  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Veiled Sustainability: The Screen in the Work of Fumihikohave applauded the sustainability of Fumihiko Makisof their buildings sustainability. But Makis buildings

Levitt, Brendon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Development of a large scale flexible LED display matrix for the screen industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project addresses the viability of lightweight, low power consumption, flexible, large format LED screens. The investigation encompasses all aspects of the electrical and mechanical (more)

Xavier, Dominic Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Construction and phenotypic screening of mid-size insert marine microbial environmental genomic libraries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional screening of environmental genomic libraries permits the identification of clones expressing activities of interest without requiring prior knowledge of the genes responsible. In this study, protocols were ...

Braff, Jennifer C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Investigation of several critical issues in screen mesh heat pipe manufacturing and operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The PhD thesis with the title Investigation of several critical issues in screen mesh heat pipe manufacturing and operation presented hereafter describes work carried out (more)

Engelhardt, Andreas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mixed-Integer Linear Methods for Layout-Optimization of Screening ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work the screening process in a fixed installation is simulated ... They deal with the process of distillation, allowing for separators and dividers in the.

374

Cancer Screening in California: Findings from the 2001 California Health Interview Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Cancer Society, California Division, and PublicDiabetes in California: CancerScreening in California: Findings from the 2001 California

Ponce, Ninez A.; Babey, Susan H.; Etzioni, David; Spencer, Benjamin A.; Brown, E. Richard R; Chawla, Neetu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance Case Definitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/11 8/11 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance case definitions Asbestosis without pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular parenchymal opacities (shape and size: s,t,u) with profusion score of 1/0 or greater absence of a B-reader notation of findings of unilateral or bilateral pleural thickening consistent with pneumoconiosis not likely attributable to another agent known to cause pneumoconiosis Asbestosis with pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular

376

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening Process and Results Srinandini Parthasarathy, Thomas E. McKone, Michael G. Apte Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 29, 2111 Prepared for the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program Legal Notice The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a national laboratory of the DOE managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the Sponsor and pursuant to an M&O Contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Neither the

377

MEOR screening criteria fit 27% of U. S. oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Criteria developed by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (Niper) indicate that 27% of reservoirs in the major oil-producing states of the U.S. have potential for microbial-enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) processes. MEOR has been recognized as a potentially cost-effective method, particularly for recovering additional oil from stripper wells. Niper has conducted both laboratory research and field applications in microbial-enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) since 1983. One of the goals of this research is to maintain a data base of field projects using MEOR technology. The data base provides documentation of characteristics of reservoirs used for MEOR field projects and is used to revise published screening criteria for MEOR processes.

Bryant, R.S. (National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (US))

1991-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Land use suitability screening for power plant sites in Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Since 1974 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing an automated procedure for land use suitability screening. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has funded the project to aid in the selection of power plant sites in Maryland. Its purpose is to identify candidate areas from which specific candidate sites can be chosen for detailed analyses. The ORNL approach assures that certain key variables are examined empirically for every cell in the study region before candidate sites are selected. Each variable is assigned an importance weight and compatibility score based upon its effect on the economic, social, or ecologic costs associated with construction in a given cell. The weighted scores for each variable are aggregated and output as a suitability score for each cell. (auth)

Dobson, J.E.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Method for screening inhibitors of the toxicity of Bacillus anthracis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis is integral to the mechanism of anthrax poisoning. The cloning, expression and purification of a 32 kDa B. anthracis PA fragment (PA32) is described. This fragment has also been expressed as a fusion construct to stabilized green fluorescent protein (EGFP-PA32). Both proteins were capable of binding to specific cell surface receptors as determined by fluorescent microscopy and a flow cytometric assay. To confirm binding specificity in the flow cytometric assay, non-fluorescent PA83 or PA32 was used to competitively inhibit fluorescent EGFP-PA32 binding to cell receptors. This assay can be employed as a rapid screen for compounds which disrupts binding of PA to cells. Additionally, the high intracellular expression levels and ease of purification make this recombinant protein an attractive vaccine candidate or therapeutic treatment for anthrax poisoning.

Cirino, Nick M. (Los Alamos, NM); Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Lehnert, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance Case Definitions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/11 8/11 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance case definitions Asbestosis without pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular parenchymal opacities (shape and size: s,t,u) with profusion score of 1/0 or greater absence of a B-reader notation of findings of unilateral or bilateral pleural thickening consistent with pneumoconiosis not likely attributable to another agent known to cause pneumoconiosis Asbestosis with pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Inflation of the screening length induced by Bjerrum pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within a modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory we study the effect of Bjerrum pairs on the typical length scale $1/\\bar{\\kappa}$ over which electric fields are screened in electrolyte solutions, taking into account a simple association-dissociation equilibrium between free ions and Bjerrum pairs. At low densities of Bjerrum pairs, this length scale is well approximated by the Debye length $1/\\kappa\\propto 1/\\sqrt{\\rho_\\mathrm{s}}$, with $\\rho_\\mathrm{s}$ the free ion density. At high densities of Bjerrum pairs, however, we find $1/\\bar{\\kappa}\\propto \\sqrt{\\rho_\\mathrm{s}}$ which is significantly larger than $1/\\kappa$ due to the enhanced effective permittivity of the electrolyte, caused by the polarization of Bjerrum pairs. We argue that this mechanism may explain the recently observed anomalously large colloid-free zones between an oil-dispersed colloidal crystal and a colloidal monolayer at the oil-water interface.

Jos Zwanikken; Ren van Roij

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M., E-mail: Pucheu-Haston.Cherie@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, CB 7270, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7270 (United States); Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Coulomb Correction to the Screening Angle of the Moliere Multiple Scattering Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy Coulomb correction to the screening angular parameter of the Moliere multiple scattering theory is found. Numerical calculations are presented in the range of nuclear charge from Z=4 to Z=82. Comparison with the Moliere result for the screening angle reveals up to 30% deviation from it for sufficiently heavy elements of the target material.

E. A. Kuraev; O. O. Voskresenskaya; A. V. Tarasov

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

384

Finite element modeling of a vibrating touch screen actuated by piezo patches for haptic feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of our work is to design a touch screen for displaying vibrotactile haptic feedback to the user via piezo patches attached to its surface. One of the challenges in the design is the selection of appropriate boundary conditions and the piezo configurations ... Keywords: finite element modeling, piezo patch actuators, touch screen, vibrotactile haptic feedback

Buket Baylan; Ugur Aridogan; Cagatay Basdogan

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Materials Reliability Program: PWR Internals Material Aging Degradation Mechanism Screening and Threshold Values (MRP-175)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides screening criteria and their technical bases for age-related degradation evaluation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) internals component items. It is a key element in an overall strategy that uses knowledge of internals design, materials, and material properties and applies screening methodologies for known age-related degradation mechanisms to manage the effects of aging in PWR internals.

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River.

Blanton, S.L.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Neitzel, D.A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A fisheries evaluation of the Wapato, Sunnyside, and Toppenish Creek canal fish screening facilities, spring 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration, the United States Bureau of Reclamation, and the Washington State Department of Ecology are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage and protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The programs provide offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin and address natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. The Wapato, Sunnyside, and Toppenish Creek Screens are three of the facilities in the basin. This report evaluates the effectiveness of the screens in intercepting and returning juvenile salmonids unharmed to the river from which they were diverted. We evaluated the effectiveness of new screening facilities at the Toppenish Creek, Wapato, and Sunnyside canals in southcentral Washington State. Screen integrity tests indicated that fish released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. We conducted descaling tests at the Toppenish Creek Screens. We measured the time required for fish to move through the screen facilities. Methods used in 1988 were the same as those used at Sunnyside in 1985 and in subsequent years at Richland. Toppenish/Satus, and Wapato. 11 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S.; Lusty, E.W.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Gentle FUSI NiSi metal gate process for high-k dielectric screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a process flow well suited for screening of novel high-k dielectrics is presented. In vacuo silicon capping of the dielectrics excludes process and handling induced influences especially if hygroscopic materials are investigated. A gentle, ... Keywords: FUSI NiSi, High-k, Material screening, Ultrathin dielectric

H. D. B. Gottlob; M. C. Lemme; M. Schmidt; T. J. Echtermeyer; T. Mollenhauer; H. Kurz; K. Cherkaoui; P. K. Hurley; S. B. Newcomb

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Former Worker Program Reaches 100,000 Screening Milestone | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Worker Program Reaches 100,000 Screening Milestone Former Worker Program Reaches 100,000 Screening Milestone Former Worker Program Reaches 100,000 Screening Milestone August 29, 2013 - 8:51am Addthis Former Worker Program Reaches 100,000 Screening Milestone A major milestone was reached in June of this year - over 100,000 exams have now been provided to former workers since the inception of the program. Since 1996, the program has made great strides in addressing the occupational health legacy of the Department's 70-plus years of nuclear weapons design and production. We at the Office of Health, Safety and Security are especially proud of the emphasis we place on the importance of serving our workers. The Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) is a prime example of DOE's commitment to its workforce and demonstrates the

390

Tank safety screening data quality objective. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) will be used to classify 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks containing high-level radioactive waste into safety categories for safety issues dealing with the presence of ferrocyanide, organics, flammable gases, and criticality. Decision rules used to classify a tank as ``safe`` or ``not safe`` are presented. Primary and secondary decision variables used for safety status classification are discussed. The number and type of samples required are presented. A tabular identification of each analyte to be measured to support the safety classification, the analytical method to be used, the type of sample, the decision threshold for each analyte that would, if violated, place the tank on the safety issue watch list, and the assumed (desired) analytical uncertainty are provided. This is a living document that should be evaluated for updates on a semiannual basis. Evaluation areas consist of: identification of tanks that have been added or deleted from the specific safety issue watch lists, changes in primary and secondary decision variables, changes in decision rules used for the safety status classification, and changes in analytical requirements. This document directly supports all safety issue specific DQOs and additional characterization DQO efforts associated with pretreatment and retrieval. Additionally, information obtained during implementation can assist in resolving assumptions for revised safety strategies, and in addition, obtaining information which will support the determination of error tolerances, confidence levels, and optimization schemes for later revised safety strategy documentation.

Hunt, J.W.

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency  

SciTech Connect

A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period.

Athas, W.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin at least three times each between April 30 and August 22, 1997. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the river. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypass met current NMFS criteria and promoted timely fish bypass, if fish were protected from injury due to impingement, entrainment, and predation, and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. A bi-directional flow meter and underwater video system were essential in completing the investigation. In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites were acceptable by NMFS standards. High approach velocities and slow bypass flow were the most common problems noted. Although velocities often fluctuated from one sampling location to the next, average sweep and approach velocities were very good. In general, fish should not be impinged or experience delays in returning to the river under normal operating conditions. Most screens were properly sealed to prevent fish entrainment and injury, although potential problems were identified at several screen sites. Three sites had gap openings from the forebay to the aftbay, allowing fish to be entrained. Other sites had spaces larger than 3/32 inch where small fish could become trapped. Some drum screens had flat spots but these were not been confirmed as underwater gaps, primarily because of siltation. On rare occasions, seals were intact, but cracked or turned under. Submergence levels at the drum screen sites exceeded 85% for one third of our evaluations. Eight of 12 drum screen sites experienced high water levels during at least one evaluation. Only one operating site's submergence was measured at less than 65% submergence. Two flat plate screen sites were completely overtopped with water during one evaluation each. Although 1997 was an extreme high-water year, these overtopping events point out that some screens do not completely protect fish under the full range of potential operating conditions. Water depths at the outfall pipe were acceptable at all but four sites. Generally, water depths were low near the end of the irrigation season due to low river flows. Rock removal around the outfall pipe or pipe extension would improve the situation. We gauged the potential for predation by qualitatively measuring the types and amount of cover provided for predators in front of the screens and by recording random observations of fish large enough to be considered predators in the forebay. Predation was more likely to occur at drum screen sites than at flat plate screen sites. Drum sites provide more predator hiding places because greater amounts of woody debris accumulate under the drums and against the concrete walls that divide one screen bay from the next. Four sites had both woody debris and large fish present. These four sites were considered most likely to experience juvenile salmonid loss to predation. Periodic removal of woody debris from underneath the curvature of drum screens would decrease the likelihood of predation at these sites. Screens were generally well maintained. Automated cleaning brushes functioned properly, chains and other moving parts were well greased, and inoperative and algae-covered drum screens were eventually repaired and cleaned. However, removal of sediment build-up and accumulated woody debris are areas where improvement should be considered. Maintenance checks should include observation of bypass outfalls on a regular basis, as conditions at the end of the bypass pipe are likely to change seasonally, especially in streams with high gradients or unstable gravel. Post-season evaluations were conducted at 11 sites in November to try and confirm seal and drum screen defects, and locations of excessive sedimentation. This proved effective in several cases, but the winterization process eliminated some of the evidence. Severa

Blanton, S.; Neitzel, C.; Abernethy, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

New mammography screen/film combinations: Imaging characteristics and radiation dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five types of film (Kodak OM, Kodak OM-SO177, Konica CM, Dupont Microvision, and Fuji MiMa) exposed in combination with seven different intensifying screens (Min R, Min R Medium, Siemens Orthox MA, Kyokka HR Mammo Fine, Agfa Gevaert Detail S (old and new), and Konica Monarch) were processed for either 90 sec (at 33.3{degrees}C) or 3 min (at 35.0 degrees C). The films imaged a Computerized Imaging Reference System phantom with additional detail test objects placed on its surface to produce four groups of objects with which to evaluate resolution and contrast. For objects that tested resolution, the Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was statistically significantly superior; for objects that tested contrast, the Konica Monarch screen was statistically significantly superior. Extended processing did not affect Dupont and Kodak OM film as much as it affected the other films. It did affect contrast for the other films tested. The mean glandular doses from gridless exposures ranged from 32 to 80 mrad (0.32-0.80 mGy) over all film/screen/processing combinations for a 4.5-cm-thick test object. Several new film/screen combinations can provide images superior to the Kodak Min R/OM combination at a reduced radiation dose. The Kyokka HR Mammo Fine (Fuji) screen was found statistically superior in radiographic resolution of mammographic test objects and the Konica Monarch screen was found to be superior in defining contrast.

Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Zheutlin, J.; Gornbein, J.A. (Iris Cantor Center for Breast Imaging, CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries  

SciTech Connect

These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magneticactivated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks, resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

398

Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries  

SciTech Connect

These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Community-based Risk Screening Tool - Adaptation & Livelihoods (CRiSTAL) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community-based Risk Screening Tool - Adaptation & Livelihoods (CRiSTAL) Community-based Risk Screening Tool - Adaptation & Livelihoods (CRiSTAL) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Community-based Risk Screening Tool - Adaptation & Livelihoods (CRiSTAL) Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation Sector: Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply, Forestry, Goods and Materials, Land Use, Water Conservation Topics: Low emission development planning Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ UN Region: Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America

400

A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 11 A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Screen Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options 1 Introduction The Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) invests in research and development (R&D) to ensure that the United States will maintain its domestic nuclear energy capability and scientific and technical leadership in the international community of nuclear power nations in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group  

SciTech Connect

Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirements Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Programs/Projects Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

Ronald R. Barden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Lighting Technology Screening Matrix  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed the Lighting Technology Screening Matrix (LTSM), a software tool to evaluate alternative lighting retrofit technologies according to life-cycle cost. The LTSM can be used to evaluate retrofits for most configurations of fluorescent, incandescent, high- and low-pressure sodium, metal halide, mercury vapor, and exit lighting systems for any level of operation, electricity price, discount rate, and utility rebate. This tool was developed, in support of the Federal Relighting Initiative as part of the Department of Energy`s Office of Federal Energy Management Program (DOE/FEMP) to assist federal government facilities in their efforts to comply with the 10 CFR 436 mandated life-cycle costing for energy equipment investments. The LTSM has been used in the course of seven site modernization projects. These projects consisted of determining the cost-effective, energy-efficiency potential at military installations. Each project treated the entire military installation as an integrated system, proposed a large number of potential efficiency projects affecting all end-uses and fuel types, and analyzed the cost-effectiveness of each project. The LTSM was used for the lighting portion of these projects. Lighting was, overall, one of the major areas of potential efficiency improvements, accounting for over 30% of the cost-effective resource. Altogether over $43 million worth of cost-effective efficiency investments were identified, worth an estimated $6 million annually in energy, demand, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings. This paper describes the LTSM and demonstrates its application in a case study at one of the federal installations analyzed.

Harris, L.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Stucky, D.J.; Dirks, J.A.; Schultz, R.W.; Shankle, S.A.; Richman, E.E.; Purcell, C.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hydroprocessing of solvent-refined coal: catalyst-screening results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of screening four catalysts for hydroprocessing a 50 wt% mixture of SRC-I in a prehydrogenated creosote oil using a continuous flow unit. All catalysts employed were nickel-molybdates with varying properties. Reaction conditions were 2000 psi, 8 SCFH of hydrogen, volume hourly space velocity of 0.6 to 1.0 cc of SRC-I/hr/cc of catalyst, and 48 hours at 750/sup 0/F followed by 72 hours at 780/sup 0/F. The results indicate that the Shell 324 catalyst is best for hydrogenation of the feedstock but only marginally better than CB 81-44 for denitrogenation. The CB 81-44 catalyst may be slightly better than Shell 324 for the conversion of the +850/sup 0/F fraction of the feedstock. Desulfurization was uniformly high for all catalysts. Catalysts with a bimodal pore size distribution (i.e., SMR7-6137(1)) appear to be better for denitrogenation than unimodal catalysts (i.e., SMR7-6137(4)) containing the same metals loading. Unimodal catalysts (i.e., Shell 324) with higher metals loadings are comparable to bimodal catalysts (i.e., CB 81-44) containing less metals. The results indicate that pore size distribution and metals loading are important parameters for high activity. Catalysts with a unimodal pore volume distribution are capable of being restored to their original state, while bimodal ones experience a loss in surface area and pore volume and an increase in pellet density. This is attributed to the more efficient use of the interior surface area of the catalyst, which results in higher accumulation of coke and metals. Since coke can be removed via controlled oxidation, the irreversible loss is due to the higher concentrations of metals in the catalyst.

Stiegel, G.J.; Tischer, R.E.; Polinski, L.M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electric and magnetic screenings of gluons in a model with dimension-2 gluon condensate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric and magnetic screenings of the thermal gluons are studied by using the background expansion method in a gluodynamic model with dimension-2 gluon condensate. At low temperature, the electric and magnetic gluons are degenerate. With the increasing of temperature, it is found that the electric and magnetic gluons start to split at certain temperature $T_0$. The electric screening mass changes rapidly with temperature when $T>T_0$, and the Polyakov loop expectation value rises sharply around $T_0$ from zero in the vacuum to a value around 0.8 at high temperature. This suggests that the color electric deconfinement phase transition is driven by electric gluons. It is also observed that the magnetic screening mass keeps almost the same as its vacuum value, which manifests that the magnetic gluons remains confined. Both the screening masses and the Polyakov loop results are qualitatively in agreement with the Lattice calculations.

Fukun Xu; Mei Huang

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electric field screening by a proton counterflow in the pulsar polar cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new mechanism to screen the electric field in the pulsar polar cap. Previous studies have shown that if an electron beam from the stellar surface is accelerated to energies high enough to create electron-positron pairs, the required electric field parallel to the magnetic field lines is too strong to be screened out by the produced pairs. We argue here that if non-relativistic protons are supplied from the magnetosphere to flow towards the stellar surface, they can provide an anode to screen out such a strong electric field. Injected electron-positron pairs yield an asymmetry of the electrostatic potential around the screening point. The required pair creation rate in this model is consistent with the conventional models.

Katsuaki Asano; Fumio Takahara

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Reduction of Surface Flashover of the Beam Screen of the LHC Injection Kickers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHC injection kicker magnets include beam screens to shield the ferrite yokes against wake fields resulting from the high intensity beam. The screening is provided by conductors lodged in the inner wall of a ceramic support tube. LHC operation with increasingly higher bunch intensity and short bunch lengths, requires improved ferrite screening. This will be implemented by additional conductors; however these must not compromise the good high-voltage behaviour of the kicker magnets. Extensive studies have been carried out to better satisfy the often conflicting requirements for low beam coupling impedance, fast magnetic field rise-time, ultra-high vacuum and good high voltage behaviour. A new design is proposed which significantly reduces the electric field associated with the screen conductors. Results of high voltage tests are also presented.

Barnes, M J; Calatroni, S; Caspers, F; Ducimetire, L; Gomes Namora, V; Mertens, V; Noulibos, R; Taborelli, M; Teissandier, B; Uythoven, J; Weterings, W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ab initio screening of lithium diffusion rates in transition metal oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A screening metric for diffusion limitations in lithium ion battery cathodes is derived using transition state theory and common materials properties. The metric relies on net activation barrier for lithium diffusion. ...

Moore, Charles J. (Charles Jacob)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

New Product Development, Screening and Evaluation for Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned to assist Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation (AECC) in the screening and evaluation of new technology products to promote to its cooperatives and end-use customers.

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of InitiatorEGO signed NRSF to DOE NCO for information only. DOE NCO Page 1 of2 RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM (continued) DOECX-00126, Rev 0 V....

410

RL-721 REV3 I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and complete Sitewide Categorical Exclusion Criteria: Page 1 of 2 YES NO NO gJ RL-721 Document ID Number: REV3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM (continued) DOECX-00057 Sitewide...

411

RL-721 REV4 Document ID Number: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9405630, HCRC2003-200-044, & DOERL-97-56 R1 Additional Attachments: Page 1 of 2 RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM (continued) DOECX-00094 Rev 0 IV....

412

Methods and technologies for high-throughput and high-content small animal screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-throughput and high-content screening (HTS and HCS) of whole animals requires their immobilization for high-resolution imaging and manipulation. Here we present methods to enable HTS and HCS of the nematode Caenorhabditis ...

Rohde, Christopher, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Technique to Detect Microclimatic Inhomogeneities in Historical Records of Screen-Level Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to detect errors or biases in screen-level air temperature records at standard climate stations is developed and applied. It differs from other methods by being able to detect microclimatic inhomogeneities in time series. Such ...

K. E. Runnalls; T. R. Oke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

FREE FILM SCREENING AND DISCUSSION Sponsored by the Liberal Studies Department at CSUF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FREE FILM SCREENING AND DISCUSSION Sponsored by the Liberal Studies Department at CSUF In Kitale by an audience discussion with film director Philip Hamer. No admission charge: Free and open to the public

de Lijser, Peter

415

Revolutionizing the Touch Screen? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revolutionizing the Touch Screen? Revolutionizing the Touch Screen? Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 05.29.13 Revolutionizing the Touch Screen? Using nanotechnology, EFRC researchers fashion a new kind of transparent electrode for flat-panel displays. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo An image of a hand over a touchscreen. Photo courtesy of iStockphoto Today's touch screen and flat-panel displays require ultrathin sheets made from an unusual compound containing the element indium. Researchers have developed a replacement fabricated from common, earth-abundant materials

416

A test protocol to screen capacitors for radiation-induced charge loss.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a test protocol for screening capacitors dielectrics for charge loss due to ionizing radiation. The test protocol minimizes experimental error and provides a test method that allows comparisons of different dielectric types if exposed to the same environment and if the same experimental technique is used. The test acceptance or screening method is fully described in this report. A discussion of technical issues and possible errors and uncertainties is included in this report also.

Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Hartman, E. Frederick

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Beaudrey Water Intake Protection (WIP) Screen Pilot-Scale Impingement Survival Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Beaudrey Water Intake Protection (WIP) Screen Pilot-scale Impingement Survival Study is a fish protection technology evaluation project designed to support Omaha Public Power District's (OPPD) Clean Water Act 316(b) permitting needs. The report gives the results of a one-year study that consisted of impingement monitoring and impingement survival monitoring conducted on fish removed by the Beaudrey WIP screen. The studies were conducted during 2008 at Intake No. 3 of OPPD's North Omaha Station (NOS) ...

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Environmentally Assisted Fatigue (EAF) Screening: Process and Technical Basis for Identifying EAF Limiting Locations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the technical basis and process for a screening evaluation of a nuclear power plant. This screening will identify appropriate limiting locations for systematic monitoring of the environmentally assisted fatigue (EAF) effects in a Class 1 reactor on the reactor coolant pressure boundary components that are wetted with primary coolant. Use of this process will ensure that the most limiting locations for EAF are determined on a consistent basis.The process developed in ...

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Havrilla, George J. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, Thomasin C. (Bartlesville, OK); Lewis, Cris (Los Alamos, NM); Mahan, Cynthia A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wells, Cyndi A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst support that is either physically mixed or used in series with the promoted Rh-based catalyst.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of rotary drum screens used to protect juvenile salmonids in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to assess the design and operation of rotary drum screens. Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss are the potentially affected fish. Cold-branded fish are released upstream of the screen facilities. For descaling tests, the fish are captured as they exit the facility and are examined for injuries, descaling, and post-test mortalities. For screen passage tests, nets are placed in the irrigation ditch, downstream of the screen facilities, to determine if fish can pass through or over the screens. More than 100 tests have been conducted with almost 35,000 fish. Additionally, nearly 2000 native fish have been evaluated. Usually less than 2% of the test fish are injured or dead, and the condition of test fish does not differ from the controls. Less than 2% of the fish pass through or over the screens when the screen seals are properly installed and maintained.

Neitzel, D.A.; Abernethy, C.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Clune, T.J. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Yakima, WA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments topower plants: Applications to commercial sector conservationprograms  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a simplified methodology to compare supply and demand-side resources. The screening curve approach supplements with load shape information the data contained in a supply curve of conserved energy. In addition, a screening curve contains information on competing supply technologies, such as annualized capital costs, variable costs, and cost per delivered kWh. The information in the screening curve allows policymakers to promptly and conveniently compare the relevant parameters affecting supply and demand-side investment decisions. While many sophisticated computer models have evolved to account for the load shape impacts of energy efficiency investments, this sophistication has, by and large, not trickled down to spreadsheet-level or 'back-of-the-envelope' analyses. Our methodology allows a simple summary of load shape characteristics based on the output of the more complicated models. It offers many advantages, principal of which is clarity in analyzing supply and demand-side investment choices. This paper first describes how supply-side screening curves have been used in the past, and develops the conceptual tools needed to apply integrated supply/demand screening curves in the least-cost utility planning process. It then presents examples of supply-side technologies and commercial sector demand-side management programs, and plots them on representative screening curves.

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

High Throughput Screening for the Discovery of More Efficient Catalysts for Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-throughput synthesis and screening methods have been developed for the discovery of highly active catalysts for the control of emissions from stationary and mobile sources. Low temperature CO oxidation, CO methanation, NOx abatement and the destruction of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) will be discussed. The discovery libraries for primary screening consisted of both 11x11 and 16x16 catalyst arrays on 3 inch and 4 inch quartz wafers, respectively. Catalysts were prepared by robotic liquid dispensing techniques and screened for catalytic activity in Symyx's Scanning Mass Spectrometer. The screening protocols encompassed mixed metal oxides, perovskites and supported base and noble metals. Active hits were further optimized in focus libraries using shallower compositional gradients. The ScanMS is a fast serial screening tool that uses flat wafer catalyst surfaces, local laser heating, a scanning/sniffing nozzle and a quadrupolar mass spectrometer to compare relative catalytic activities. The temperature range from 200C to 600C is accessible. Typically, 256 catalysts can be screened per day and about 100,000 experiments conducted annually.

Yaccato, Karin; Hagemeyer, Alfred; Volpe, Anthony; Weinberg, Henry

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measurement of the solar heat gain coefficient and U value of windows with insect screens  

SciTech Connect

Energy ratings are currently being used in a number of countries to assist in the selection of windows and doors based on energy performance. Developed for simple comparison purposes, these rating numbers do not take into account window removable attachments such as insect screens that are, nevertheless, widely used. Research was carried out to assess the effect of insect screens on the heat gains and losses of windows. The work reported in this paper deals with the effect of one screen type on the performance of a base-case, double-glazed window. Using an indoor solar simulator facility, measurements of the window solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) and U value were made for different screen attachment configurations and climatic conditions. Results with the sample window tested indicate that insect screens placed on the outdoor side can reduce its SHGC by 46% with only a 7% reduction in its U value (0.19 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C), and that insect screens placed on the indoor side can reduce its SHGC by 15% while reducing its U value by 14% (0.38 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C).

Brunger, A.; Dubrous, F.M.; Harrison, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report serves as the final technical report and users manual for the 'Rigorous Screening Technology for Identifying Suitable CO2 Storage Sites II SBIR project. Advanced Resources International has developed a screening tool by which users can technically screen, assess the storage capacity and quantify the costs of CO2 storage in four types of CO2 storage reservoirs. These include CO2-enhanced oil recovery reservoirs, depleted oil and gas fields (non-enhanced oil recovery candidates), deep coal seems that are amenable to CO2-enhanced methane recovery, and saline reservoirs. The screening function assessed whether the reservoir could likely serve as a safe, long-term CO2 storage reservoir. The storage capacity assessment uses rigorous reservoir simulation models to determine the timing, ultimate storage capacity, and potential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Finally, the economic assessment function determines both the field-level and pipeline (transportation) costs for CO2 sequestration in a given reservoir. The screening tool has been peer reviewed at an Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) technical meeting in March 2009. A number of useful observations and recommendations emerged from the Workshop on the costs of CO2 transport and storage that could be readily incorporated into a commercial version of the Screening Tool in a Phase III SBIR.

George J. Koperna Jr.; Vello A. Kuuskraa; David E. Riestenberg; Aiysha Sultana; Tyler Van Leeuwen

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening high-level waste tanks for flammable gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at Hanford have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop an improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. AR models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. The authors performed a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening. They found that the effort to implement such a model was acceptable and that computational requirements were reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts.

Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

High-Throughput Thin Film Approach for Screening of Temperature-Pressure-Composition Phase Space  

SciTech Connect

Many solar energy technologies, for example CIGS and CdTe photovoltaics, utilize materials in thin film form. The equilibrium phase diagrams for these and other more novel solar energy materials are not known or are irrelevant because of the non-equilibrium character of the thin film growth processes. We demonstrate a high-throughput thin film approach for screening of temperature-pressure-composition phase diagrams and phase spaces. The examples in focus are novel solar absorbers Cu-N, Cu-O and p-type transparent conductors in the Cr2O3-MnO system. The composition axis of the Cr2O3-MnO phase diagram was screened using a composition spread method. The temperature axis of the Mn-O phase diagram was screened using a temperature spread method. The pressure axes of the Cu-N and Cu-O phase diagrams were screened using rate spread method with the aid of non-equilibrium growth phenomena. Overall these three methods constitute an approach to high-throughput screening of inorganic thin film phase diagrams. This research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy as a part of two NextGen Sunshot projects and an Energy Frontier Research Center.

Zakutayev, A.; Subramaniyan, A.; Caskey, C. M.; Ndione, P. F.; Richards, R. M.; O'Hayre, R.; Ginley, D. S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for daylighting and solar heat-gain control Title Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for daylighting and solar heat-gain control Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-828E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Jonsson, Jacob C., Eleanor S. Lee, and Michael D. Rubin Conference Name SPIE Optics+Photonics Date Published 08/2008 Conference Location San Diego, CA Call Number LBNL-828E Abstract Shade-screens are widely used in commercial buildings as a way to limit the amount of direct sunlight that can disturb people in the building. The shade screens also reduce the solar heat-gain through glazing the system. Modern energy and daylighting analysis software such as EnergyPlus and Radiance require complete scattering properties of the scattering materials in the system.

430

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Screening Program Reduced Melanoma Mortality at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1984-1996  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma has increased substantially, and no screening program has yet demonstrated reduction in mortality. We evaluated the education, self examination and targeted screening campaign at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from its beginning in July 1984 through 1996. The thickness and crude incidence of melanoma from the years before the campaign were compared to those obtained during the 13 years of screening. Melanoma mortality during the 13-year period was based on a National Death Index search. Expected yearly deaths from melanoma among LLNL employees were calculated by using California mortality data matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity and adjusted to exclude deaths from melanoma diagnosed before the program began or before employment at LLNL. After the program began, crude incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm decreased from 18 to 4 cases per 100,000 person-years (p = 0.02), while melanoma less than 0.75mm remained stable and in situ melanoma increased substantially. No eligible melanoma deaths occurred among LLNL employees during the screening period compared with a calculated 3.39 expected deaths (p = 0.034). Education, self examination and selective screening for melanoma at LLNL significantly decreased incidence of melanoma thicker than 0.75 mm and reduced the melanoma-related mortality rate to zero. This significant decrease in mortality rate persisted for at least 3 yr after employees retired or otherwise left the laboratory.

Schneider, MD, J S; II, PhD, D; MD, PhD, M

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately}3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of {approximately}1 g/m{sup 2}/hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Souvenir of Kyoto's Entertainment: The Shiomi Rakuchu-Rakugaizu Screens in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art; Shiomi Rakuchu-Rakugaizu Screens in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines an unstudied pair of eight-paneled Japanese rakuchurakugaizu screens donated by Dr. Robert H. Shiomi to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA). (more)

Hanson, Heather, 1984-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) and Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) - Agency Roles/Programs for Assisting DOE Covered Workers, January 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FWP FWP FWP UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Department of Energy (DOE) - Former Worker Medical Screening Program and Responsibilities under EEOICPA * Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) FWP provides no-cost medical screenings to all former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees. The screening focuses on the early detection of health conditions that may be related to occupational exposures such as beryllium, asbestos, radiation, silica, etc. * Medical screenings include a physical exam, hearing test,

436

Field Evaluation of Wedgewire Screens for Protecting Early Life Stages of Fish at Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wedgewire screens are designed to minimize entrainment and impingement of aquatic organisms at power plant cooling water intake structures (CWIS). This report presents the results of a field study evaluating the effectiveness of cylindrical wedgewire screens for protecting the early life stages (eggs and larvae) of fish at cooling water intakes. The study examines multiple screen design parameters and hydraulic conditions in the Chesapeake Bay with a variety of estuarine species. Information in this repo...

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options The Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) invests in research and development (R&D) to ensure that the United States will maintain its domestic nuclear energy capability and scientific and technical leadership in the international community of nuclear power nations in the years ahead. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap presents a high-level vision and framework for R&D activities that are needed to keep the nuclear energy option viable in the near term and to expand its use in the decades ahead. The roadmap identifies the development of sustainable nuclear fuel cycles as a major

438

A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options A Screening Method for Guiding R&D Decisions: Pilot Application to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options The Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) invests in research and development (R&D) to ensure that the United States will maintain its domestic nuclear energy capability and scientific and technical leadership in the international community of nuclear power nations in the years ahead. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap presents a high-level vision and framework for R&D activities that are needed to keep the nuclear energy option viable in the near term and to expand its use in the decades ahead. The roadmap identifies the development of sustainable nuclear fuel cycles as a major

439

High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

Tani, Hidenori [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi [Radioisotope Center, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Miyata, Ryo [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Tsuneda, Satoshi [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Microbial Chemistry Research Center, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Yuji [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Noda, Naohiro [Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan)], E-mail: noda-naohiro@aist.go.jp

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Reevaluation of 1999 Health-Based Environmental Screening Levels (HBESLs) for Chemical Warfare Agents  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates whether new information and updated scientific models require that changes be made to previously published health-based environmental soil screening levels (HBESLs) and associated environmental fate/breakdown information for chemical warfare agents (USACHPPM 1999). Specifically, the present evaluation describes and compares changes that have been made since 1999 to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment models, EPA exposure assumptions, as well as to specific chemical warfare agent parameters (e.g., toxicity values). Comparison was made between screening value estimates recalculated with current assumptions and earlier health-based environmental screening levels presented in 1999. The chemical warfare agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents and the vesicants sulfur mustard (agent HD) and Lewisite (agent L). In addition, key degradation products of these agents were also evaluated. Study findings indicate that the combined effect of updates and/or changes to EPA risk models, EPA default exposure parameters, and certain chemical warfare agent toxicity criteria does not result in significant alteration to the USACHPPM (1999) health-based environmental screening level estimates for the G-series and VX nerve agents or the vesicant agents HD and L. Given that EPA's final position on separate Tier 1 screening levels for indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments has not yet been released as of May 2007, the study authors find that the 1999 screening level estimates (see Table ES.1) are still appropriate and protective for screening residential as well as nonresidential sites. As such, risk management decisions made on the basis of USACHPPM (1999) recommendations do not require reconsideration. While the 1999 HBESL values are appropriate for continued use as general screening criteria, the updated '2007' estimates (presented below) that follow the new EPA protocols currently under development are also protective. When EPA finalizes and documents a position on the matter of indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments, site-specific risk assessments should make use of modified models and criteria. Screening values such as those presented in this report may be used to assess soil or other porous media to determine whether chemical warfare agent contamination is present as part of initial site investigations (whether due to intentional or accidental releases) and to determine whether weather/decontamination has adequately mitigated the presence of agent residual to below levels of concern. However, despite the availability of scientifically supported health-based criteria, there are significant resources needs that should be considered during sample planning. In particular, few analytical laboratories are likely to be able to meet these screening levels. Analyses will take time and usually have limited confidence at these concentrations. Therefore, and particularly for the more volatile agents, soil/destructive samples of porous media should be limited and instead enhanced with headspace monitoring and presence-absence wipe sampling.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Fredrick G [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electric and Magnetic Screening Masses at Finite Temperature from Generalized Polyakov-Line Correlations in Two-flavor Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Screenings of the quark-gluon plasma in electric and magnetic sectors are studied on the basis of generalized Polyakov-line correlation functions in lattice QCD simulations with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks. Using the Euclidean-time reflection ($\\R$) and the charge conjugation ($\\Ca$), electric and magnetic screening masses are extracted in a gauge invariant manner. Long distance behavior of the standard Polyakov-line correlation in the quark-gluon plasma is found to be dictated by the magnetic screening. Also, ratio of the two screening masses agrees with that obtained from the dimensionally-reduced effective field theory and the ${\\cal N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

Y. Maezawa; S. Aoki; S. Ejiri; T. Hatsuda; N. Ishii; K. Kanaya; N. Ukita; T. Umeda

2010-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

The role of screening of the electron-phonon interaction in relaxation of photoexcited electron-hole plasma in semiconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of screening of the interaction of the electron-hole plasma with optical phonons is analytically evaluated by the example of gallium arsenide.

Kumekov, S. E. [Kazakh National Technical University (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: skumekov@mail.ru

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for daylighting and solar heat-gain control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal and daylighting impacts of shading systems. Theseglazing the system. Modern energy and daylighting analysissystem. In this paper a shade screen used in the LBNL daylighting

Jonsson, Jacob C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Toward Joint Hypothesis-Tests Seismic Event Screening Analysis: Ms|mb and Event Depth  

SciTech Connect

Well established theory can be used to combine single-phenomenology hypothesis tests into a multi-phenomenology event screening hypothesis test (Fisher's and Tippett's tests). Commonly used standard error in Ms:mb event screening hypothesis test is not fully consistent with physical basis. Improved standard error - Better agreement with physical basis, and correctly partitions error to include Model Error as a component of variance, correctly reduces station noise variance through network averaging. For 2009 DPRK test - Commonly used standard error 'rejects' H0 even with better scaling slope ({beta} = 1, Selby et al.), improved standard error 'fails to rejects' H0.

Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Selby, Neil [AWE Blacknest

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

445

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Medical Screening Program, Phase I: Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Medical Screening Program Phase I: Needs Assessment Presented to the Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support, Office of Health, Safety, and Security U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by Queens College, City University of New York United Steelworkers Original Draft: August 22, 2011 Updated Version: May 1, 2012 Table of Contents Summary.............................................................................3 I. Background on the Former Worker Program................................4 II. History of the WIPP Facility......................................................4 III. Scope of this Report.................................................................7 IV. Exposure Characterization........................................................8

446

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricul- tural chemistry and bioenergy. J Ag Food Chem Parkmass as feedstock for a bioenergy and bioproducts industry:benefits of utilizing bioenergy crops and waste products

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overview of Microstructural Models Applied to Hot Rolling Mill for Long ... Study of Composite Materials Application for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Blades.

449

Phenol and phenolics from lignocellulosic biomass by catalytic microwave pyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic microwave pyrolysis of biomass using activated carbon was investigated to determine the effects of pyrolytic conditions on the yields of phenol and phenolics. The high concentrations of phenol (38.9%) and phenolics (66.9%) were obtained at the temperature of 589 K, catalyst-to-biomass ratio of 3:1 and retention time of 8 min. The increase of phenol and its derivatives compared to pyrolysis without catalysts has a close relationship with the decomposition of lignin under the performance of activated carbon. The concentration of esters was also increased using activated carbon as a catalyst. The high content of phenols obtained in this study can be used either directly as fuel after upgrading or as feedstock of biobased phenols for chemical industry.

Bu, Quan; Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Wang, Lu; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Zhang, Qin; Tang, Juming; Ruan, Roger

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Process Optimization of FT-Diesel Production from Lignocellulosic Switchgrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................. 20 Fischer-Tropsch Kerosene Global Biomass Fischer-Tropsch Fuel Chains...................................................... 39 Fisher Tropsch Quantitative Analysis ­ Parameters & Assumptions .................... 43 Fischer-Tropsch

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

451

Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production for Lignocellulosic Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns about oil dependency and the contributions of fossil fuel use to climatic change, the U.S. Department of Energy has begun a research initiative to make 20% of motor fuels biofuel based in 10 years, and make 30% of fuels bio-based by 2030. Fundamental to this objective is developing an understanding of feedstock dynamics of crops suitable for cellulosic ethanol production. This report focuses on switchgrass, reviewing the existing literature from field trials across the United States, and compiling it for the first time into a single database. Data available from the literature included cultivar and crop management information, and location of the field trial. For each location we determined latitude and longitude, and used this information to add temperature and precipitation records from the nearest weather station. Within this broad database we were able to identify the major sources of variation in biomass yield, and to characterize yield as a function of some of the more influential factors, e.g., stand age, ecotype, precipitation and temperature in the year of harvest, site latitude, and fertilization regime. We then used a modeling approach, based chiefly on climatic factors and ecotype, to predict potential yields for a given temperature and weather pattern (based on 95th percentile response curves), assuming the choice of optimal cultivars and harvest schedules. For upland ecotype varieties, potential yields were as high as 18 to 20 Mg/ha, given ideal growing conditions, whereas yields in lowland ecotype varieties could reach 23 to 27 Mg/ha. The predictive equations were used to produce maps of potential yield across the continental United States, based on precipitation and temperature in the long term climate record, using the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Potential yields calculated via this characterization were subsequently compared to the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County Level data base (ORECCL), which was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Graham et al. 1996) to predict biofuel crop yields at the county level within a limited geographic area. Mapped output using the model was relatively consistent with known switchgrass distribution. It correctly showed higher yields for lowland switchgrass when compared with upland varieties at most locations. Projections for the most northern parts of the range suggest comparable yields for the two ecotypes, but inadequate data for lowland ecotypes grown at high latitudes make it difficult to fully assess this projection. The final model is a predictor of optimal yields for a given climate scenario, but does not attempt to identify or account for other limiting or interacting factors. The statistical model is nevertheless an improvement over historical efforts, in that it is based on quantifiable climatic differences, and it can be used to extrapolate beyond the historic range of switchgrass. Additional refinement of the current statistical model, or the use of different empirical or process-based models, might improve the prediction of switchgrass yields with respect to climate and interactions with cultivar and management practices, assisting growers in choosing high-yielding cultivars within the context of local environmental growing conditions.

Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Davis, Ethan [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Integrating and Piloting Lignocellulose Biomass Conversion Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on NREL's integrated biomass conversion capabilities. Presented at the 2009 Advanced Biofuels Workshop in Denver, CO, Cellulosic Ethanol session.

Schell, D. J.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sugar yields for biofuel production. Nat Biotechnol 25(7):Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production fromA key strategy for biofuel produc- tion is making use of the

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How biotech can transform biofuels. Nat Biotechnol 26(2):J Somerville C. 2007. Biofuels. Curr Biol 17(4):R1159.biomass characteristics for biofuels. Curr Opin Biotechnol

Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Nanoporous Membranes for Pretreatment of Lignocellulose and Other ...  

the reactor for reuse, and the retentate, enriched in sugars, can be fractionated and fermented to produce ethanol. By using step-wise temperature increases in the

456

Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Design of a grid service-based platform for in silico protein-ligand screenings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid computing offers the powerful alternative of sharing resources on a worldwide scale, across different institutions to run computationally intensive, scientific applications without the need for a centralized supercomputer. Much effort has been put ... Keywords: DOCK, Grid computing, Molecular simulation, Opal OP, Virtual screening

Marshall J. Levesque; Kohei Ichikawa; Susumu Date; Jason H. Haga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Identification, Screening, and Evaluation of New Products and Services: Kansas City Power & Light Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned to assist Kansas City Power & Light Company (KCP&L) in the identification, screening, and evaluation of new products and services to promote or sell to its end-use customers across all market sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural).

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

459

Investigation of GOSAT TANSO-CAI Cloud Screening Ability through an Intersatellite Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal and Near-infrared Sensor for Carbon ObservationCloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) cloud screening results, which are necessary for the retrieval of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ...

Haruma Ishida; Takashi Y. Nakjima; Tatsuya Yokota; Nobuyuki Kikuchi; Hiroshi Watanabe

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

NMAC Circulating and Service Water Intake Screens and Debris Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants use many different types of equipment to remove trash, debris, and aquatic material at the intake structures for circulating and service water systems. Commonly used equipment includes rotating and stationary screens, trash racks, debris filters, service water strainers, and debris disposal systems.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lignocellulose recalcitrance screening" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Dynamic Policy Modeling for Chronic Diseases: Metaheuristic-Based Identification of Pareto-Optimal Screening Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a risk-group oriented chronic disease progression model embedded within a metaheuristic-based optimization of the policy variables. Policy-makers are provided with Pareto-optimal screening schedules for risk groups by considering cost and ... Keywords: chronic disease policy analysis, decision analysis, dynamic resource allocation, health care, metaheuristics, multicriteria optimization, prevention

Marion S. Rauner; Walter J. Gutjahr; Kurt Heidenberger; Joachim Wagner; Joseph Pasia

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

TouchLight: an imaging touch screen and display for gesture-based interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel touch screen technology is presented. TouchLight uses simple image processing techniques to combine the output of two video cameras placed behind a semi-transparent plane in front of the user. The resulting image shows objects that are on the ... Keywords: computer human interaction, computer vision, displays, gesture recognition, videoconferencing

Andrew D. Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Usage of Screen-Level Parameters and Microwave Brightness Temperature for Soil Moisture Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on testing two different soil moisture analysis systems based on screen-level parameters (2-m temperature T2m, 2-m relative humidity RH2m) and 1.4-GHz passive microwave brightness temperatures TB. First, a simplified extended ...

G. Seuffert; H. Wilker; P. Viterbo; M. Drusch; J-F. Mahfouf

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Kinetics of NF-kB nucleocytoplasmic transport probed by single-cell screening without imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of NF-kB nucleocytoplasmic transport probed by single-cell screening without imaging Jun of nucleocytoplasmic transport of an important transcription factor NF-kB. With data collected from single cells, we activation barrier for NF-kB transport. Our data demonstrate that NF-kB nucleocytoplasmic transport fits

Lu, Chang

465

Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide. Natural phenomena hazards at Department of Energy facilities: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines` development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term.

Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Salmon, M.W. [EQE Engineering Consultants, Irvine, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A screening model for simulating DNAPL flow and transport in porous media: theoretical development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last two decades there has been an increased awareness of the contamination of groundwater due to the presence of denser-than-water nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Numerous theoretical, experimental and numerical investigations have been conducted ... Keywords: Contaminant transport, Multiphase flow, Screening model

Clinton S. Willson; James W. Weaver; Randall J. Charbeneau

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A supplement to the european guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006 the fourth edition of the European Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis was published by the European Commission Due to the fast developments in the field of digital mammography and the experience with digital mammography systems ... Keywords: mammography, quality control

Ruben E van Engen; Kenneth C. Young; Hilde Bosmans; Barbara Lazzari; Stephan Schopphoven; Patrice Heid; Martin Thijssen

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Clutter or content?: how on-screen enhancements affect how TV viewers scan and what they learn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of "on-screen enhancements" such as headline bars and bottom-of-the-screen crawlers on viewing of TV was tested using television news stories. Eye-movement data were recorded for participants' viewings of three news stories in three design ... Keywords: design, eye tracking, eye-path comparison, recall, television, visual attention

Sheree Josephson; Michael E. Holmes

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Addressing colorectal cancer disparities: the identification of geographic targets for screening interventions in Miami-Dade County, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an analysis of spatial clustering of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The objective was to identify geographically based targets for colorectal cancer screening interventions for Blacks and Hispanic Whites, ... Keywords: SaTScan, colorectal cancer clusters, public health significance, screening disparities, stage at diagnosis

Recinda Sherman; Kevin Henry; David Lee

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Estimation of Thermal Resistance from Room Temperature Electrical Resistance Measurements for Different LHC Beam Screen Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note the thermal resistance between the LHC beam screen and cold bore is estimated from room temperature electrical resistance measurements. The results indicate that the beam screen without supports should have a comparable, if not better, thermal performance than the one with the existing spring supports. This prediction from electrical resistance measurements is confirmed by recent preliminary thermal measurements.

Jenninger, B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

ORAL PRESENTATION Open Access Virtual screening for plant PARP inhibitors what  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The functions of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzymes (PARPs) in general are best studied based on human PARP-1 (HsPARP-1). HsPARP-1 is well investigated because pharmacological modulation of its activity modulates DNA-binding of antitumor drugs [1]. In contrast to human PARP enzymes, the exact role of PARPs in plants remains to be elucidated. Different stresses activate plant PARP enzymes to mediate DNA repair and (programmed) cell death whereas the addition of PARP inhibitors decreases the degree of cell death [2]. Therefore, the development of plant PARP inhibitors might be a way to increase the tolerance against abiotic stress. Initial to searches in commercial databases for potential plant PARP inhibitors, a virtual screening route had to be established for human PARP-1 inhibitors. Simultaneously, every step in that procedure was applied on a plant PARP enzyme to investigate the differences of both active sites. All differences have been evaluated statistically, e.g. using receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) and power analyses. At the end of that parallel screening route, a docking threshold for Arabidopsis thaliana L. PARP-1 (AtPARP-1) could be derived by knowledge transfer from the corresponding human receptor and its inhibitors. Knowing the differences of the human and plant screening routes, predictions of the applicability of that multi-step process on a commercial database have been explored. Finally, the developed virtual screening route has been applied to screen a commercial database for AtPARP-1 inhibitors. From 20 compounds tested so far in vitro, 13 show inhibitory effects.

Peter-paul Heym; Wolfgang Br; Ludger A Wessjohann; Hans-joachim Niclas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

FEPs Screening of Processes and Issues in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to drip shield and waste package modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Thirty-three FEPs associated with the waste package and drip shield performance have been identified (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). A screening decision, either ''included'' or ''excluded,'' has been assigned to each FEP, with the technical bases for screening decisions, as required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs analyses in this report address issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the drip shield and waste package over the post closure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For included FEPs, this report summarizes the disposition of the FEP in TSPA-LA. For excluded FEPs, this report provides the technical bases for the screening arguments for exclusion from TSPA-LA. The analyses are for the TSPA-LA base-case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]), where a drip shield is placed over the waste package without backfill over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP includes one or more specific issues, collectively described by a FEP name and description. The FEP description encompasses a single feature, event, or process, or a few closely related or coupled processes, provided the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs were assigned to associated Project reports, so the screening decisions reside with the relevant subject-matter experts.

K. Mon

2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

473

SCREENING METHODS FOR SELECTION OF SURFACTANT FORMULATIONS FOR IOR FROM FRACTURED CARBONATE RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report presents details of the laboratory work performed to complete Task 1 of this project; developing rapid screening methods to assess surfactant performance for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) from fractured carbonate reservoirs. The desired outcome is to identify surfactant formulations that increase the rate and amount of aqueous phase imbibition into oil-rich, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. Changing the wettability from oil-wet to water-wet is one key to enhancing this water-phase imbibition process that in turn recovers additional oil from the matrix portion of a carbonate reservoir. The common laboratory test to evaluate candidate surfactant formulations is to measure directly the aqueous imbibition rate and oil recovery from small outcrop or reservoir cores, but this procedure typically requires several weeks. Two methods are presented here for the rapid screening of candidate surfactant formulations for their potential IOR performance in carbonate reservoirs. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than flo