National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for lightweight direct drive

  1. DRIVING DIRECTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    South Alamo Street San Antonio, Texas 78205 (210) 222-1400 San Antonio International Airport DIRECTIONS Take Interstate 281 south to Commerce Street. Continue west on Commerce...

  2. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  3. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  4. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  5. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  6. Clover: Compiler directed lightweight soft error resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Qingrui; Lee, Dongyoon; Jung, Changhee; Tiwari, Devesh

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents Clover, a compiler directed soft error detection and recovery scheme for lightweight soft error resilience. The compiler carefully generates soft error tolerant code based on idem-potent processing without explicit checkpoint. During program execution, Clover relies on a small number of acoustic wave detectors deployed in the processor to identify soft errors by sensing the wave made by a particle strike. To cope with DUE (detected unrecoverable errors) caused by the sensing latency of error detection, Clover leverages a novel selective instruction duplication technique called tail-DMR (dual modular redundancy). Once a soft error is detected by either the sensor or the tail-DMR, Clover takes care of the error as in the case of exception handling. To recover from the error, Clover simply redirects program control to the beginning of the code region where the error is detected. Lastly, the experiment results demonstrate that the average runtime overhead is only 26%, which is a 75% reduction compared to that of the state-of-the-art soft error resilience technique.

  7. Clover: Compiler directed lightweight soft error resilience

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Qingrui; Lee, Dongyoon; Jung, Changhee; Tiwari, Devesh

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents Clover, a compiler directed soft error detection and recovery scheme for lightweight soft error resilience. The compiler carefully generates soft error tolerant code based on idem-potent processing without explicit checkpoint. During program execution, Clover relies on a small number of acoustic wave detectors deployed in the processor to identify soft errors by sensing the wave made by a particle strike. To cope with DUE (detected unrecoverable errors) caused by the sensing latency of error detection, Clover leverages a novel selective instruction duplication technique called tail-DMR (dual modular redundancy). Once a soft error is detected by either themore » sensor or the tail-DMR, Clover takes care of the error as in the case of exception handling. To recover from the error, Clover simply redirects program control to the beginning of the code region where the error is detected. Lastly, the experiment results demonstrate that the average runtime overhead is only 26%, which is a 75% reduction compared to that of the state-of-the-art soft error resilience technique.« less

  8. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakland, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  9. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  10. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  11. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  12. Quasi-spherical direct drive fusion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDevender, J. Pace; Abbott, Lucas M.; Langston, William L.; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Nash, Thomas J.; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Silva, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present designs of quasi-spherical direction drive z-pinch loads for machines such as ZR at 28 MA load current with a 150 ns implosion time (QSDDI). A double shell system for ZR has produced a 2D simulated yield of 12 MJ, but the drive for this system on ZR has essentially no margin. A double shell system for a 56 MA driver at 150 ns implosion has produced a simulated yield of 130 MJ with considerable margin in attaining the necessary temperature and density-radius product for ignition. They also represent designs for a magnetically insulated current amplifier, (MICA), that modify the attainable ZR load current to 36 MA with a 28 ns rise time. The faster pulse provided by a MICA makes it possible to drive quasi-spherical single shell implosions (QSDD2). They present results from 1D LASNEX and 2D MACH2 simulations of promising low-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules and 1D LASNEX results of high-adiabat cryogenic QSDD2 capsules.

  13. Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy Columbia Power Technologies, Inc. Deploys its Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy April 9, 2013 - 12:00am ...

  14. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1995-01-01

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  15. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1995-07-11

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor is disclosed including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 37 figs.

  16. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy 15direcolumbiapowerrhinefrank.ppt (1.58 MB) More Documents & Publications Wave Tank WEC Array Analysis Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 7 8 System) - ...

  17. 10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SEMICONDUCTOR; 20MW CLASS DIRECT DRIVE HTS WIND TURBINE; Commercialization and Technology Transfer Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text ...

  18. Shell trajectory measurements from direct-drive implosion experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A technique to measure the shell trajectory in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion ... Subject: 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ABLATION; EMISSION; ...

  19. MHK Technologies/Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    license agreement with Columbia Power Technologies to jointly develop a direct drive wave energy conversion device Designed to be anchored 2 5 miles off the Oregon coast in 130...

  20. Configuring the National Ignition Facility for direct-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eimerl, D.

    1995-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a project whose primary mission is to provide an above-ground experimental capability for maintaining nuclear competence and weapons effects simulation, and to pursue the achievement of fusion ignition utilizing solid state lasers as the energy driver. In this facility a large number of laser beams are focused onto a small target located at the center of a spherical target chamber. The laser energy is delivered in a few billionths of a second, raising the temperature and density of the nuclear materials in the target to levels where significant thermonuclear energy is released. The thermonuclear reaction proceeds very rapidly, so that the target materials remain confined by their own inertia during the thermonuclear reaction. This type of approach is called inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The proposed project is described in a conceptual design report (CDR) that was released in May 1994. Early in FY95, a collaboration between the University of Rochester and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established to study reconfiguring the NIF to accommodate direct-drive experiments. The present paper is a report to the scientific community, primarily the scientists and engineers working on the design of the NIF. It represents results from work in progress, specifically work completed by the end of the second quarter FY95. This report has two main sections. The first describes the target requirements on the laser drive, and the second part describes how the NIF laser can be configured to accommodate both indirect and direct drive. The report includes a description of the scientific basis for these conclusions. Though a complete picture does not exist, the present understanding is sufficient to conclude that the primary target requirements and laser functional requirements for indirect and direct drive are quite compatible. It is evidently straightforward to reconfigure the NIF to accommodate direct and indirect drive.

  1. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; and others

    2015-05-15

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drivespecific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D{sub 2} gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ?500 to 750?kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8??10{sup 14} to 1.2??10{sup 15?}W/cm{sup 2}. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  2. Direct Fusion Drive for a Human Mars Orbital Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluszek, Michael; Pajer, Gary; Razin, Yosef; Slonaker, James; Cohen, Samuel; Feder, Russ; Griffin, Kevin; Walsh, Matthew

    2014-08-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) is a nuclear fusion engine that produces both thrust and electric power. It employs a field reversed configuration with an odd-parity rotating magnetic field heating system to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. The engine uses deuterium and helium-3 as fuel and additional deuterium that is heated in the scrape-off layer for thrust augmentation. In this way variable exhaust velocity and thrust is obtained.

  3. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; et al

    2015-05-11

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beammore » geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D₂ gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 10¹⁴ to 1.2 10¹⁵W/cm². Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.« less

  4. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Bates, J. W.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Karasik, M.; Kessler, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J. P.; Kurz, C.; Lafon, M.; LaFortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meeker, J. F.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Obenschain, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmayer, C.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-05-11

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D₂ gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 10¹⁴ to 1.2 10¹⁵W/cm². Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  5. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Bates, J. W.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Karasik, M.; Kessler, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J. P.; Kurz, C.; Lafon, M.; LaFortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meeker, J. F.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Obenschain, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, J.; Widmayer, C.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D2 gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500-750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 x 1014 to 1.2 x 1015 W/cm2. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  6. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; and others

    2015-11-15

    The direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 μm—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 μm (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline

  7. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; et al

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. Themore » problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser

  8. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Schmitt, A. J.; Sethian, J. D.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Kruer, W. L.; Tanaka, K.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for

  9. Electric vehicle drive train with direct coupling transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tankersley, Jerome B.; Boothe, Richard W.; Konrad, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    An electric vehicle drive train includes an electric motor and an associated speed sensor, a transmission operable in a speed reduction mode or a direct coupled mode, and a controller responsive to the speed sensor for operating the transmission in the speed reduction mode when the motor is below a predetermined value, and for operating the motor in the direct coupled mode when the motor speed is above a predetermined value. The controller reduces the speed of the motor, such as by regeneratively braking the motor, when changing from the speed reduction mode to the direct coupled mode. The motor speed may be increased when changing from the direct coupled mode to the speed reduction mode. The transmission is preferably a single stage planetary gearbox.

  10. Electric vehicle drive train with direct coupling transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tankersley, J.B.; Boothe, R.W.; Konrad, C.E.

    1995-04-04

    An electric vehicle drive train includes an electric motor and an associated speed sensor, a transmission operable in a speed reduction mode or a direct coupled mode, and a controller responsive to the speed sensor for operating the transmission in the speed reduction mode when the motor is below a predetermined value, and for operating the motor in the direct coupled mode when the motor speed is above a predetermined value. The controller reduces the speed of the motor, such as by regeneratively braking the motor, when changing from the speed reduction mode to the direct coupled mode. The motor speed may be increased when changing from the direct coupled mode to the speed reduction mode. The transmission is preferably a single stage planetary gearbox. 6 figures.

  11. Testing of a direct drive generator for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sondergaard, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    The normal drive train of a wind turbine consists a gearbox and a 4 to 8 poles asynchronous generator. The gearbox is an expensive and unreliable components and this paper deals with testing of a direct drive synchronous generator for a gearless wind turbine. The Danish company Belt Electric has constructed and manufactured a 27 kW prototype radial flux PM-generator (DD600). They have used cheap hard ferrite magnets in the rotor of this PM-generator. This generator has been tested at Riso and the test results are investigated and analyzed in this paper. The tests have been done with three different load types (1: resistance; 2: diode rectifier, DC-capacitor, resistance; 3: AC-capacitor, diode rectifier, DC-capacitor, resistance). 1 ref., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Effects of radiation on direct-drive laser fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombant, D. G.; Bodner, S. E.; Schmitt, A. J.; Klapisch, M.; Gardner, J. H.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Deniz, A. V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Pawley, C. J.; Serlin, V.

    2000-05-01

    The role played by radiation in the radiation-preheated direct-drive laser fusion target design is discussed. The soft x-rays emitted during the foot of the laser pulse--at a few 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}--preheat the low-opacity foam ablator which helps to control the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The foam opacity is, however, thick enough to stop that radiation, keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. Radiation effects are also important in the blow-off corona of the target because they establish a long scale-length plasma. This may help to shield the ablation region from the nonuniformities in the laser absorption. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Direct drive: Simulations and results from the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Boehly, T. R.; et al

    2016-04-19

    Here, the direct-drive implosion physics is being investigated at the National Ignition Facility. The primary goal of the experiments is twofold: to validate modeling related to implosion velocity and to estimate the magnitude of hot-electron preheat. Implosion experiments indicate that the energetics is well-modeled when cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is included in the simulation and an overall multiplier to the CBET gain factor is employed; time-resolved scattered light and scattered-light spectra display the correct trends. Trajectories from backlit images are well modeled, although those from measured self-emission images indicate increased shell thickness and reduced shell density relative to simulations. Sensitivitymore » analyses indicate that the most likely cause for the density reduction is nonuniformity growth seeded by laser imprint and not laser-energy coupling. Hot-electron preheat is at tolerable levels in the ongoing experiments, although it is expected to increase after the mitigation of CBET. Future work will include continued model validation, imprint measurements, and mitigation of CBET and hot-electron preheat.« less

  14. Time history prediction of direct-drive implosions on the Omega...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; CONFIGURATION; COUPLING; DIRECT DRIVE LASER IMPLOSION; LASERS; NEUTRONS; OMEGA FACILITY; ...

  15. Long Duration Directional Drives for Star Formation and Photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, J. O.; Martinez, D. A.; Pound, M. W.; Heeter, R. F.; Villette, B.; Casner, A.; Mancini, R. C.

    2015-06-18

    This research will; confirm the possibility of studying the structure and evolution of star-forming regions of molecular clouds in the laboratory; test the cometary model for the formation of the pillar structures in molecular clouds; assess the effect of magnetic fields on the evolution of structures in molecular clouds; and develop and demonstrate a new, long-duration (60-100 ns), directional source of x-ray radiation that can be used for the study of deeply nonlinear hydrodynamics, hydrodynamic instabilities that occur in the presence of directional radiation, shock-driven and radiatively-driven collapse of dense cores, and photoionization. Due to the iconic status of the pillars of the Eagle Nebula, this research will bring popular attention to plasma physics, HED laboratory physics, and fundamental science at NIF and other experimental facilities. The result will be to both to bring new perspectives to the studies of hydrodynamics in inertial confinement fusion and HED scenarios in general, and to promote interest in the STEM disciplines.

  16. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2011-02-22

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  17. Wind turbine having a direct-drive drivetrain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2008-10-07

    A wind turbine (100) comprising an electrical generator (108) that includes a rotor assembly (112). A wind rotor (104) that includes a wind rotor hub (124) is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle (160) via a bearing assembly (180). The wind rotor hub includes an opening (244) having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity (380) inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret (140) supported by a tower (136). Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity (172, 176, 368) that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system (276) for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  18. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, B. Grant; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2007-06-25

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry and Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX ICF target physics code shows the ion range increasing four-fold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16 to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  19. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casner, A. Masse, L.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Riazuelo, G.; Delorme, B.; Martinez, D.; Remington, B.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Igumenshchev, I.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Goncharov, V. N.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Fujioka, S.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  20. Development of a Direct Drive Permanent Magnet Generator for Small Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertok, Allan; Hablanian, David; McTaggart, Paul; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2004-11-16

    In this program, TIAX performed the conceptual design and analysis of an innovative, modular, direct-drive permanent magnet generator (PMG) for use in small wind turbines that range in power rating from 25 kW to 100 kW. TIAX adapted an approach that has been successfully demonstrated in high volume consumer products such as direct-drive washing machines and portable generators. An electromagnetic model was created and the modular PMG design was compared to an illustrative non-modular design. The resulting projections show that the modular design can achieve significant reductions in size, weight, and manufacturing cost without compromising efficiency. Reducing generator size and weight can also lower the size and weight of other wind turbine components and hence their manufacturing cost.

  1. Enhanced Direct-Drive Implosions with Thin High-Z Ablation Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostovych, Andrew N.; Colombant, Denis G.; Karasik, Max; Schmitt, Andrew J.; Weaver, James L.; Knauer, James P.

    2008-02-22

    New direct-drive spherical implosion experiments with deuterium filled plastic shells have demonstrated significant and absolute (2x) improvements in neutron yield when the shells are coated with a very thin layer ({approx}200-400 A) of high-Z material such as palladium. This improvement is interpreted as resulting from increased stability of the imploding shell. These results provide for a possible path to control laser imprint and stability in laser-fusion-energy target designs.

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  3. Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

  4. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; et al

    2016-07-07

    Here, it is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.more » 117, 025001 (2016)] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.« less

  5. Quasi-spherical direct drive fusion simulations for the Z machine and future accelerators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDevender, J. Pace; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Nash, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    We explored the potential of Quasi-Spherical Direct Drive (QSDD) to reduce the cost and risk of a future fusion driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and to produce megajoule thermonuclear yield on the renovated Z Machine with a pulse shortening Magnetically Insulated Current Amplifier (MICA). Analytic relationships for constant implosion velocity and constant pusher stability have been derived and show that the required current scales as the implosion time. Therefore, a MICA is necessary to drive QSDD capsules with hot-spot ignition on Z. We have optimized the LASNEX parameters for QSDD with realistic walls and mitigated many of the risks. Although the mix-degraded 1D yield is computed to be {approx}30 MJ on Z, unmitigated wall expansion under the > 100 gigabar pressure just before burn prevents ignition in the 2D simulations. A squeezer system of adjacent implosions may mitigate the wall expansion and permit the plasma to burn.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  7. Polar-direct-drive experiments with contoured-shell targets on OMEGA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, F. J.; Radha, P. B.; Bonino, M. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; et al

    2016-01-28

    Polar-driven direct-drive experiments recently performed on the OMEGA Laser System have demonstrated the efficacy of using a target with a contoured shell with varying thickness to improve the symmetry and fusion performance of the implosion. The polar-driven contoured-shell implosions have substantially reduced low mode perturbations compared to polar-driven spherical-shell implosions as diagnosed by x-ray radiographs up to shell stagnation. As a result, fusion yields were increased by more than a factor of ~2 without increasing the energy of the laser by the use of contoured shells.

  8. Lightweight PV Inverters: Dual Bi-Directional IGBTs Modules Enables Breakthrough PV Inverter Using Current Modulation Topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-30

    Solar ADEPT Project: PV inverters convert DC power generated by modules into usable AC power. IPCs initial 30kW 94lb. PV inverter reduces the weight of comparable 30kW PV inverters by 90%reducing the cost of materials, manufacturing, shipping, and installation. With ARPA-E support, new bi-directional silicon power switches will be developed, commercialized, and utilized in IPCs next-generation PV inverter. With these components, IPC will produce 100kW inverters that weight less than 100lb., reducing the weight of conventional 3,000lb. 100kW inverters by more than 95%. The new power switches will cut IPCs $/W manufacturing cost in half, as well as further reduce indirect shipping and installation costs.

  9. Preliminary results from direct-drive cryogenic target implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu-dong, Pu; Tian-Xuan, Huang; Ping, Li; Hai-le, Lei; Jun, Li; Shao-En, Jiang; Huang, Li; Zhi-Wen, Yang; Jian, Teng; Bo, Wu; Kai, Wang; Wei, Lin; Ming, Su; Xia-Yu, Zhan; Li, Chen; Xiao-Shi, Peng; Tang-Qi,; Zi-Feng, Song; Jia-Bin, Chen; Ming, Chen; and others

    2014-01-15

    Since ignition target design with layered deuterium and triterium ice had been proposed several decades ago, much effort was devoted to fabricate and implode cryogenic targets. Until recently, direct-drive cryogenic target implosion experiment was carried out on SGIII prototype laser facility. The target consisted of a plastic capsule supported by fill tube. Cryogenic helium gas was used to cool the capsule to a few degrees below the deuterium triple point. The resulting deuterium ice layer was characterized by optical shadowgraph and smoothed by applied temperature gradient. Eight laser beams with total energy of 7 kJ were used to directly drive the implosion. On the path of laser light to the capsule, there were 500 nm sealing film and helium gas of mm length. X-ray pinhole images were analyzed to confirm that the sealing film, and helium gas had little effect on aiming accuracy but caused some loss of laser energy especially when condensation on the sealing film was observed.

  10. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-15

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ∼10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ∼10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ∼10{sup 7} V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ∼3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇T{sub e} × ∇n{sub e} source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  11. High-Areal-Density Fuel Assembly in Direct-Drive Cryogenic Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangster, T.C.; Goncharov, V.N.; Radha, P.B.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Harding, D.R.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Seka, W.; Short, R.W.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.

    2008-05-27

    The first observation of ignition-relevant areal-density deuterium from implosions of capsules with cryogenic fuel layers at ignition-relevant adiabats is reported. The experiments were performed on the 60-beam, 30-kJUV OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Neutron-averaged areal densities of 202+-7 mg/cm^2 and 182+-7 mg/cm^2 (corresponding to estimated peak fuel densities in excess of 100 g/cm^3) were inferred using an 18-kJ direct-drive pulse designed to put the converging fuel on an adiabat of 2.5. These areal densities are in good agreement with the predictions of hydrodynamic simulations indicating that the fuel adiabat can be accurately controlled under ignition-relevant conditions.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Thin GDP Shells Used as Cryogenic Direct Drive Targets at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikroo, A.; Czechowicz, D.G.; Chen, K.C.; Dicken, M.; Morris, C.; Andrews, R.; Greenwood, A.; Castillo, E.

    2004-03-15

    Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, we present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters ('standard GDP') using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters ('strong GDP') of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

  13. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN GDP SHELLS USED AS CRYOGENIC DIRECT DRIVE TARGETS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,D; CHEN,K.C; DICKEN,M; MORRIS,C; ANDREWS,R; GREENWOOD,A.L; CASTILLO,E

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Thin glow discharge polymer (GDP) shells are currently used as the targets for cryogenic direct drive laser fusion experiments. These shells need to be filled with nearly 1000 atm of D{sub 2} and cooled to cryogenic temperatures without failing due to buckling and bursting pressures they experience in this process. Therefore, the mechanical and permeation properties of these shells are of utmost importance in successful and rapid filling with D{sub 2}. In this paper, they present an overview of buckle and burst pressures of several different types of GDP shells. These include those made using traditional GDP deposition parameters (standard GDP) using a high deposition pressure and using modified parameters (strong GDP) of low deposition pressure that leads to more robust shells.

  14. Laser irradiance scaling in polar direct drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T. J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Obrey, K. A. D.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kanzleiter, R. J.; Batha, S. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Hoppe, M. L.; Nikroo, A.; Hohenberger, M.; McKenty, P. W.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-09-17

    Polar-direct-drive experiments conducted at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, Fusion Sci. Technol. 54, 361 (2008)] performed at laser irradiance between 1 and 2×1015 W/cm2 exhibit increased hard x-ray emission, decreased neutron yield, and reduced areal density as the irradiance is increased. Experimental x-ray images at the higher irradiances show x-ray emission at the equator, as well as degraded symmetry, that is not predicted in hydrodynamic simulations using flux-limited energy transport, but that appear when non-local electron transport together with a model to account for cross beam energy transfer (CBET) is utilized. The reduction in laser power for equatorial beams required in the simulations to reproduce the effects of CBET on the observed symmetry also reproduces the yield degradation consistent with experimental data.

  15. Laser irradiance scaling in polar direct drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murphy, T. J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; et al

    2015-09-17

    Polar-direct-drive experiments conducted at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, Fusion Sci. Technol. 54, 361 (2008)] performed at laser irradiance between 1 and 2×1015 W/cm2 exhibit increased hard x-ray emission, decreased neutron yield, and reduced areal density as the irradiance is increased. Experimental x-ray images at the higher irradiances show x-ray emission at the equator, as well as degraded symmetry, that is not predicted in hydrodynamic simulations using flux-limited energy transport, but that appear when non-local electron transport together with a model to account for cross beam energy transfer (CBET) is utilized. The reduction in laser power for equatorialmore » beams required in the simulations to reproduce the effects of CBET on the observed symmetry also reproduces the yield degradation consistent with experimental data.« less

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  18. Effects of local defect growth in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Shmayda, W. T.; Harding, D. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 ; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623

    2013-08-15

    Spherically symmetric, low-adiabat (adiabat ? ? 3) cryogenic direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1995)] yield less than 10% of the neutrons predicted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations suggest that this performance degradation can be explained assuming perturbations from isolated defects of submicron to tens-of-micron scale on the outer surface or inside the shell of implosion targets. These defects develop during the cryogenic filling process and typically number from several tens up to hundreds for each target covering from about 0.2% to 1% of its surface. The simulations predict that such defects can significantly perturb the implosion and result in the injection of about 1 to 2 ?g of the hot ablator (carbon-deuterium) and fuel (deuterium-tritium) materials from the ablation surface into the targets. Both the hot mass injection and perturbations of the shell reduce the final shell convergence ratio and implosion performance. The injected carbon ions radiatively cool the hot spot, reducing the fuel temperature, and further reducing the neutron yield. The negative effect of local defects can be minimized by decreasing the number and size of these defects and/or using more hydrodynamically stable implosion designs with higher shell adiabat.

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Igumenshchev, Igor V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; et al

    2016-05-04

    In this study, the effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) laser-imposed nonuniformities in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA Laser System are investigated using three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations performed using the newly developed code ASTER. Sources of these nonuniformities include an illumination pattern produced by 60 OMEGA laser beams; capsule offsets (~10 to 20 μm); and imperfect pointing, power balance, and timing of the beams (with typical σrms ~10 microns, 10%, and 5 ps, respectively). Two implosion designs using 26-kJ triple-picket laser pulses were studied: a nominal design, in which an 874-μm-diameter capsule is illuminated by about the same-diameter beams,more » and a more hydrodynamically efficient ''R75" design using a 900-μm-diameter capsule and beams of 75% of this diameter. Simulations show that nonuniformities caused by capsule offsets and beam imbalance have the largest effect on implosion performance. These nonuniformities lead to significant distortions of implosion cores, resulting in an increased residual kinetic energy and incomplete stagnation. The shape of distorted cores can be well characterized using neutron images, but is less represented by 4-8 keV x-ray images. Simulated neutron spectra from perturbed implosions show large directional variations because of bulk motion effects and up to an ~2 keV variation of the hot-spot temperature inferred from these spectra. The R75 design suffers more from illumination nonuniformities. Simulations show an advantage of this design over the nominal design when the target offset and beam power imbalance σrms are reduced to less than 5 μm and 5%, respectively.« less

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  5. Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight...

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project.

  8. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marozas, J. A.; et al

    2016-04-20

    The angularly-resolved mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration was used, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped from a symmetric direct-drive configuration to suppress CBET at the pole, while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions in the same implosion allowed the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be decoupled from the other physics effects that influence laser-coupling. Hydrodynamic simulationsmore » performed without CBET reproduced the measured ablation rate and ablation front trajectory at the pole of the target, verifying that the other laser-coupling physics effects are well-modeled when CBET effects are negligible. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall’s equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with an optimized multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. Furthermore, the presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations due to diffraction, shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, or polarization effects, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.« less

  9. Directions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions Directions Call Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder at (505) 455-5555 for shuttle information from the airport and downtown Santa Fe. Driving Directions to Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder Hilton Santa Fe Buffalo Thunder is located 15 minutes north of Santa Fe. Directions from Albuquerque (bypassing downtown Santa Fe) Take Interstate 25 north towards Santa Fe for approximately 50 miles. From Interstate 25, exit right onto the 599 Northbound Bypass for approximately 14 miles and continue to

  10. Three-dimensional symmetry analysis of a direct-drive irradiation scheme for the laser megajoule facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramis, R., E-mail: rafael.ramis@upm.es [E.T.S.I. Aeronuticos, Universidad Politcnica de Madrid, P. Cardenal Cisneros 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Temporal, M. [Centre de Mathmatiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan and CNRS, 61 Av. du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Canaud, B.; Brandon, V. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-08-15

    The symmetry of a Direct-Drive (DD) irradiation scheme has been analyzed by means of three-dimensional (3D) simulations carried out by the code MULTI (R. Ramis et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 475 (1988)) that includes hydrodynamics, heat transport, and 3D laser ray-tracing. The implosion phase of a target irradiated by the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility in the context of the Shock Ignition scheme has been considered. The LMJ facility has been designed for Indirect-Drive, and by this reason that the irradiation scheme must be modified when used for DD. Thus, to improve the implosion uniformity to acceptable levels, the beam centerlines should be realigned and the beam power balance should be adjusted. Several alternatives with different levels of complexity are presented and discussed.

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  12. Laser energy deposition and its dynamic uniformity for direct-drive capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The total laser energy deposition of multi-laser-beam irradiation is not only associated with the dynamic behavior of capsule but also the time-dependent angular distribution of the energy deposition of each beam around its axis. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition does not linearly respond to the dynamic behavior of laser irradiation. The laser energy deposition uniformity determines the symmetry of implosion. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition non-uniformity in OMEGA for laser with square beam shape intensity profile is investigated. In the case of smaller laser spot, the initial non-uniformity caused by laser beam overlap is very high. The shell asymmetry caused by the high initial laser irradiation non-uniformity is estimated by the extent of distortion of shock front which is not as severe as expected before the shock driven by main pulse arrives. This suggests that the large initial non-uniformity due to smaller laser spot is one of the elements that seed disturbance before the main pulse. The rms of laser energy deposition during the main pulse remains above 2%. Since the intensity of main driving pulse usually is several times higher than that of picket pulses, the non-uniformity in main pulse period may jeopardize the symmetrical implosion. When dynamic behavior of capsule is considered, the influence of beam pointing error, the target positioning error, and beam-to-beam power unbalance is quite different for the case of static capsule.

  13. The effect of laser spot shapes on polar-direct-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weilacher, F.; Radha, P. B. Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl and E. I. Moses, Phys. Plasmas 18, 050901 (2011)] use existing NIF hardware, including indirect-drive phase plates. This limits the performance achievable in these implosions. Spot shapes are identified that significantly improve the uniformity of PDD NIF implosions; outer surface deviation is reduced by a factor of 7 at the end of the laser pulse and hot-spot distortion is reduced by a factor of 2 when the shell has converged by a factor of ?10. As a result, the neutron yield increases by approximately a factor of 2. This set of laser spot shapes is a combination of circular and elliptical spots, along with elliptical spot shapes modulated by an additional higher-intensity ellipse offset from the center of the beam. This combination is motivated in this paper. It is also found that this improved implosion uniformity is obtained independent of the heat conduction model. This work indicates that significant improvement in performance can be obtained robustly with the proposed spot shapes.

  14. Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program ...

  15. Two-plasmon decay mitigation in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments using multilayer targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Solodov, A. A.; et al

    2016-04-15

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon-decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor of five reduction in hot-electron generation (> 50 keV) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (LPSE) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show excellent agreement with the measurements. As a result, the simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron productionmore » observed in the multilayer targets is primarily due to increased electron-ion collisional damping.« less

  16. Thermonuclear targets for direct-drive ignition by a megajoule laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bel’kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V.; Vergunova, G. A.; Garanin, S. G.; Gus’kov, S. Yu. Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A.

    2015-10-15

    Central ignition of a thin two-layer-shell fusion target that is directly driven by a 2-MJ profiled pulse of Nd laser second-harmonic radiation has been studied. The parameters of the target were selected so as to provide effective acceleration of the shell toward the center, which was sufficient for the onset of ignition under conditions of increased hydrodynamic stability of the ablator acceleration and compression. The aspect ratio of the inner deuterium-tritium layer of the shell does not exceed 15, provided that a major part (above 75%) of the outer layer (plastic ablator) is evaporated by the instant of maximum compression. The investigation is based on two series of numerical calculations that were performed using one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic codes. The first 1D code was used to calculate the absorption of the profiled laser-radiation pulse (including calculation of the total absorption coefficient with allowance for the inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance mechanisms) and the spatial distribution of target heating for a real geometry of irradiation using 192 laser beams in a scheme of focusing with a cubo-octahedral symmetry. The second 1D code was used for simulating the total cycle of target evolution under the action of absorbed laser radiation and for determining the thermonuclear gain that was achieved with a given target.

  17. Direct-drive cryogenic-target implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pu, Yudong; Huang, Tianxuan; Lei, Haile; Li, Ping; Zhang, Xin; Zheng, Jiahua; Yang, Zhiwen; Tang, Qi; Song, Zifeng; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun

    2015-04-15

    Directly driven cryogenic target implosion experiments are performed on the SGIII prototype laser facility. X-ray pinhole images reveal frozen condensation on the sealing film. The influence of the condensation on the delivery of laser energy to the capsule surface is then quantified experimentally. It is found that, with a carefully chosen pre-pulse duration, the influence can be reduced, and the neutron yield is increased by an order of magnitude. Subsequently, the cryogenic layered capsule and cryogenic gas-filled capsule are imploded using 6.5-kJ laser energy. The implosion performance is characterized by the neutron yield, the 2D self-emission images of the in-flight shell, and the primary proton spectrum. The neutron yield is 2 × 10{sup 7} for the gas-filled capsule and 2.8 × 10{sup 7} for the layered capsule. The 2D self-emission images of the in-flight shell exhibit significant implosion asymmetry. The energy downshift of the proton spectrum is used to infer the areal density. For the gas-filled capsule, the spectrum is downshifted by 0.1 MeV, yielding an areal density of 1–3 mg/cm{sup 2}. For the layered capsule, the spectrum is downshifted by 0.5 MeV, yielding an areal density of 4–6 mg/cm{sup 2}. Improving the implosion symmetry would help to further increase the areal density.

  18. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R.

    2004-06-29

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  19. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  20. Demonstration of fuel hot-spot pressure in excess of 50 Gbar for direct-drive, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; et al

    2016-07-07

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs = 56±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium–tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ~60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E (in press)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is ~40%more » lower. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.« less

  1. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vas Choudhry; Stephen Kwan; Steven R. Hadley

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the project entitled ''Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasification Slags'' was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of manufacturing low-unit-weight products from coal gasification slags which can be used as substitutes for conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates. In Phase I, the technology developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates from slag (termed SLA) was applied to produce a large batch (10 tons) of expanded slag using pilot direct-fired rotary kilns and a fluidized bed calciner. The expanded products were characterized using basic characterization and application-oriented tests. Phase II involved the demonstration and evaluation of the use of expanded slag aggregates to produce a number of end-use applications including lightweight roof tiles, lightweight precast products (e.g., masonry blocks), structural concrete, insulating concrete, loose fill insulation, and as a substitute for expanded perlite and vermiculite in horticultural applications. Prototypes of these end-use applications were made and tested with the assistance of commercial manufacturers. Finally, the economics of expanded slag production was determined and compared with the alternative of slag disposal. Production of value-added products from SLA has a significant potential to enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are considered.

  2. Observation of early shell-dopant mix in OMEGA direct-drive implosions and comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Tregillis, I. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S.; Johns, H.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.

    2014-05-15

    Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved x-ray image data from direct-drive implosions on OMEGA were interpreted with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Neither clean calculations nor those using a turbulent mix model can explain fully the observed migration of shell-dopant material (titanium) into the core. Shell-dopant migration was observed via time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, and spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray images of capsule implosions and resultant dopant emissions. The titanium emission was centrally peaked in narrowband x-ray images. In post-processed clean simulations, the peak titanium emission forms in a ring in self-emission images as the capsule implodes. Post-processed simulations with mix reproduce trends in time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, as well having centrally peaked Ti emission in synthetic multiple monochromatic imager. However, mix simulations still do not transport Ti to the core as is observed in the experiment. This suggests that phenomena in addition to the turbulent mix must be responsible for the transport of Ti. Simple diffusion estimates are unable to explain the early Ti mix into the core. Mechanisms suggested for further study are capsule surface roughness, illumination non-uniformity, and shock entrainment.

  3. Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweighting Video Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Motorweek video segment Materials Technology / Vehicle Lightweighting, which aired on April 21, 2014. The full video is on the Lightweight Materials for Cars and...

  5. Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  6. Light-Weight, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  7. Lightweight Aluminum/Nano composites for Automotive Drive Train Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelluri, Bhanumathi; Knoth, Edward A.; Schumaker, Edward J.

    2012-12-14

    During Phase I, we successfully processed air atomized aluminum powders via Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) pressing and subsequent sintering to produce parts with properties similar to wrought aluminum. We have also showed for the first time that aluminum powders can be processed without lubes via press and sintering to 100 % density. This will preclude a delube cycle in sintering and promote environmentally friendly P/M processing. Processing aluminum powders via press and sintering with minimum shrinkage will enable net shape fabrication. Aluminum powders processed via a conventional powder metallurgy process produce too large a shrinkage. Because of this, sinter parts have to be machined into specific net shape. This results in increased scrap and cost. Fully sintered aluminum alloy under this Phase I project has shown good particle-to-particle bonding and mechanical properties. We have also shown the feasibility of preparing nano composite powders and processing via pressing and sintering. This was accomplished by dispersing nano silicon carbide (SiC) powders into aluminum matrix comprising micron-sized powders (<100 microns) using a proprietary process. These composite powders of Al with nano SiC were processed using DMC press and sinter process to sinter density of 85-90%. The process optimization along with sintering needs to be carried out to produce full density composites.

  8. Manufacturing of Profiles for Lightweight Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatti, Sami; Kleiner, Matthias

    2007-04-07

    The paper shows some investigation results about the production of straight and curved lightweight profiles for lightweight structures and presents their benefits as well as their manufacturing potential for present and future lightweight construction. A strong emphasis is placed on the manufacturing of straight and bent profiles by means of sheet metal bending of innovative products, such as tailor rolled blanks and tailored tubes, and the manufacturing of straight and curved profiles by the innovative procedures curved profile extrusion and composite extrusion, developed at the Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL) of the University of Dortmund.

  9. Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials and Manufacturing Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

  10. Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 16. Technology Integration and Education GATE Center of Excellence in ...

  11. Pulse Pressure Forming of Lightweight Materials, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forming of Lightweight Materials, Development of High Strength Superplastic Al Sheet, Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels Pulse Pressure Forming of...

  12. Lightweight Materials Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Overview Lightweight Materials Overview 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington ...

  13. Aerodynamic Lightweight Cab Structure Components | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm060smith2012o.pdf (2.09 MB) More Documents & Publications Aerodynamic Lightweight Cab ...

  14. W4E HYDROPOWER DIRECT DRIVE IN-LINE HYDROTURBINE GENERATOR FULL SCALE PROTOTYPE VALIDATION TESTING REPORT MAY 2013 ALDEN LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Chad W

    2013-09-24

    The W4E is a patent-pending, direct-drive, variable force turbine/generator. The equipment generates electricity through the water dependent engagement of a ring of rotating magnets with coils mounted on a stator ring. Validation testing of the W4e was performed at Alden Laboratories in the Spring of 2013. The testing was independently observed and validated by GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. The observations made during testing and the results of the testing are included in the Test Summary Report

  15. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1_introduction.pdf (278.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lightweight Materials Overview Overview of Lightweight Materials FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents

  16. High-flexibility, noncollapsing lightweight hose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, D.A.

    1993-04-20

    A high-flexibility, noncollapsing, lightweight, large-bore, wire-reinforced hose is inside fiber-reinforced PVC tubing that is flexible, lightweight, and abrasion resistant. It provides a strong, kink- and collapse-free conduit for moving large quantities of dangerous fluids, e.g., removing radioactive waste water or processing chemicals.

  17. High-flexibility, noncollapsing lightweight hose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A high-flexibility, noncollapsing, lightweight, large-bore, wire-reinforced hose is inside fiber-reinforced PVC tubing that is flexible, lightweight, and abrasion resistant. It provides a strong, kink- and collapse-free conduit for moving large quantities of dangerous fluids, e.g., removing radioactive waste water or processing chemicals.

  18. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8. Polymer Composites Research and Development FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer Composites Research and Development The primary Lightweight ...

  19. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8. Polymer Composites Research and Development FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer Composites Research and Development Lightweighting Materials ...

  20. Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report This report outlines the final ...

  1. MITEE: A new nuclear engine concept for ultra fast, lightweight...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lightweight solar system exploration missions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MITEE: A new nuclear engine concept for ultra fast, lightweight solar system ...

  2. Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report This report outlines the final...

  3. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cover, Title Page, and Contents FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page, and Contents Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and ...

  4. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 11. Lightweight Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Lightweight Materials 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 11. Lightweight Materials DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review 2008meritreview11.pdf (3.67 MB) More ...

  5. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction ...

  6. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and ...

  7. Friction Stir Welding Aluminum for Lightweight Vehicles | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction Stir Welding Aluminum for Lightweight Vehicles Friction Stir Welding Aluminum for Lightweight Vehicles Addthis Description In this video, a researcher from Pacific ...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report The Lightweight Materials research and development (R&D) area within the ...

  9. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4. Automotive Metals-Titanium FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive Metals-Titanium Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and ...

  10. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. Automotive Metals-Wrought FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive Metals-Wrought Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation ...

  11. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3. Automotive Metals - Cast FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals - Cast The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a ...

  12. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5. Automotive Metals-Steel FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive Metals-Steel Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of ...

  13. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. Automotive Metals - Wrought FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive Metals - Wrought The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate ...

  14. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5. Automotive Metals - Steel FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive Metals - Steel The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a ...

  15. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6. Automotive Metals - Crosscutting FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals - Crosscutting The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to ...

  16. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4. Automotive Metals - Titanium FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive Metals - Titanium The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to ...

  17. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6. Automotive Metals-Crosscutting FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals-Crosscutting Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and ...

  18. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3. Automotive Metals-Cast FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals-Cast Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of ...

  19. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and ...

  20. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 1. Introduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 1. Introduction Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing ...

  1. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Disclaimer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Disclaimer Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing ...

  2. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestructive Evaluation Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and ...

  3. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrator Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator This fact sheet describes a low-cost, lightweight solar conductor project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating ...

  4. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page, and Contents WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and ...

  5. Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit ...

  6. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving stylesmore » in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.« less

  7. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Lightweight Materials Lightweight materials research and development merit review results 2010_amr_06.pdf (1.36 MB) More Documents & Publications 2012 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Materials Technologies DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Lightweight Materials 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Materials Technologies

  8. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  9. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  10. Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm000_schutte_2012_o.pdf (4.74 MB) More Documents & Publications Overview of Propulsion Materials Overview of Propulsion Materials Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO Propulsion

  11. Directions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions Directions to HAZMAT Challenge LANL's HAZMAT Reesponse Ready Room and Training Facility are ready to welcome this year's Challengers Technical Area 64 - HAZMAT Response...

  12. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, John L.; Brandt, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

  13. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

  14. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  15. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  16. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-07-29

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  17. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Ken

    2011-11-02

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progress and results for this project which will be used to inform the utility-scale design process, improve cost estimates, accurately forecast energy production and to observe system operation and survivability.

  18. Hierarchical resilience with lightweight threads.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Kyle Bruce

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes methodology for providing robustness and resilience for a highly threaded distributed- and shared-memory environment based on well-defined inputs and outputs to lightweight tasks. These inputs and outputs form a failure 'barrier', allowing tasks to be restarted or duplicated as necessary. These barriers must be expanded based on task behavior, such as communication between tasks, but do not prohibit any given behavior. One of the trends in high-performance computing codes seems to be a trend toward self-contained functions that mimic functional programming. Software designers are trending toward a model of software design where their core functions are specified in side-effect free or low-side-effect ways, wherein the inputs and outputs of the functions are well-defined. This provides the ability to copy the inputs to wherever they need to be - whether that's the other side of the PCI bus or the other side of the network - do work on that input using local memory, and then copy the outputs back (as needed). This design pattern is popular among new distributed threading environment designs. Such designs include the Barcelona STARS system, distributed OpenMP systems, the Habanero-C and Habanero-Java systems from Vivek Sarkar at Rice University, the HPX/ParalleX model from LSU, as well as our own Scalable Parallel Runtime effort (SPR) and the Trilinos stateless kernels. This design pattern is also shared by CUDA and several OpenMP extensions for GPU-type accelerators (e.g. the PGI OpenMP extensions).

  19. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  20. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Wang, Paul

    2011-12-27

    The three major objectives of this Phase III project are: To develop experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation tools to optimize automotive and truck components for lightweighting materials (aluminum, steel, and Mg alloys and polymer-based composites) with consideration of uncertainty to decrease weight and cost, yet increase the performance and safety in impact scenarios; To develop multiscale computational models that quantify microstructure-property relations by evaluating various length scales, from the atomic through component levels, for each step of the manufacturing process for vehicles; and To develop an integrated K-12 educational program to educate students on lightweighting designs and impact scenarios.

  1. LightWeight KerneL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catamount n-Way LightWeight KerneL 1 R&D 100 Entry Catamount n-Way LightWeight KerneL 2 R&D 100 Entry Submitting organization Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1319 USA Ron Brightwell Phone: (505) 844-2099 Fax: (505) 845-7442 rbbrigh@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this product. _____________________________ Ron Brightwell Joint entry

  2. Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's ...

  4. Shell stability and conditions analyzed using a new method of extracting shell areal density maps from spectrally resolved images of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Mayes, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2016-01-25

    In warm target direct-drive ICF implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility, plastic microballoons doped with a titanium tracer layer in the shell and filled with deuterium gas were imploded using a low-adiabat shaped laser pulse. Continuum radiation emitted in the core is transmitted through the tracer layer and the resulting spectrum recorded with a gated multi-monochromatic x-ray imager (MMI). Titanium K-shell line absorption spectra observed in the data are due to transitions in L-shell titanium ions driven by the backlighting continuum. The MMI data consist of an array of spectrally resolved images of the implosion. These 2-D space-resolvedmore » titanium spectral features constrain the plasma conditions and areal density of the titanium doped region of the shell. The MMI data were processed to obtain narrow-band images and space resolved spectra of titanium spectral features. Shell areal density maps, ρL(x,y), extracted using a new method using both narrow-band images and space resolved spectra are confirmed to be consistent within uncertainties. We report plasma conditions in the titanium-doped region of electron temperature (Te) = 400±28eV, electron number density (Ne) = 8.5x1024±2.5x1024 cm-3, and average areal density <ρR> = 86±7mg/cm2. Fourier analysis of areal density maps reveals shell modulations caused by hydrodynamic instability growth near the fuel-shell interface in the deceleration phase. We observe significant structure in modes l = 2-9, dominated by l = 2. We extract a target breakup fraction of 7.1±1.5% from our Fourier analysis. A new method for estimating mix width is evaluated against existing literature and our target breakup fraction. We estimate a mix width of 10.5±1μm.« less

  5. EERE Success Story-Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Helps Bring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies to Market | Department of Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Helps Bring Technologies to Market EERE Success Story-Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Helps Bring Technologies to Market July 26, 2016 - 11:26am Addthis Although the Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) is never going to appear on a dealership lot, this project demonstrated the feasibility of integrating lightweight materials and joining technologies into current production vehicles. Built by Vehma

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles | Department of Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-material lightweight vehicles. lm072_skszek_2014_o.pdf (1.89 MB) More Documents & Publications Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Vehicle Technologies Office Merit

  7. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy cover_toc.pdf (307.9 KB) More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials

  8. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy f-l.pdf (17.79 MB) More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals - Crosscutting Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals-Crosscutting

  9. FY 2012 Lightweight Materials Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, David C.

    2013-04-15

    The FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Lightweight Materials provides a detailed description of the activities and technical accomplishments which focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  10. The Light-Weight Group Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-02

    The Light-Weight Group (LWGRP) bibrary provides data structures and collective routines to define and operate on groups of MPI processes. Groups can be created and freed efficiently in O(log N) time space requiring less overhead that constructing full MPI communicators. This facilitates faster development of applications and libraries that need to rapidly create, use, and destroy process groups.

  11. Vehicle Lightweighting: 40% and 45% Weight Savings Analysis: Technical Cost Modeling for Vehicle Lightweighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascarin, Anthony; Hannibal, Ted; Raghunathan, Anand; Ivanic, Ziga; Francfort, James

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office, Materials area commissioned a study to model and assess manufacturing economics of alternative design and production strategies for a series of lightweight vehicle concepts. The strategic targets were a 40% and a 45% mass reduction relative to a standard North American midsize passenger sedan at an effective cost of $3.42 per pound (lb) saved. The baseline vehicle was an average of several available vehicles in this class. Mass and cost breakdowns from several sources were used, including original equipment manufacturers’ (OEMs’) input through U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office programs and public presentations, A2Mac1 LLC’s teardown information, Lotus Engineering Limited and FEV, Inc. breakdowns in their respective lightweighting studies, and IBIS Associates, Inc.’s decades of experience in automotive lightweighting and materials substitution analyses. Information on lightweighting strategies in this analysis came from these same sources and the ongoing U.S. Department of Energy-funded Vehma International of America, Inc. /Ford Motor Company Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Demonstration Project, the Aluminum Association Transportation Group, and many United States Council for Automotive Research’s/United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC lightweight materials programs.

  12. Direct

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct removal of edge-localized pollutant emission in a near-infrared bremsstrahlung measurement J. K. Anderson, a) P. L. Andrew, b) B. E. Chapman, D. Craig, and D. J. Den Hartog Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Presented on 10 July 2002͒ Visible and near-infrared electron-ion bremsstrahlung measurements in fusion research devices, used to determine the effective ionic charge (Z eff ), are often plagued by pollutant emission

  13. Lightweight Materials R&D Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Lightweight Materials R&D Program VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 2013 This document highlights work sponsored by agencies of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

  14. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-24

    The Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) has developed an experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation effort to optimize automotive components in order to decrease weight and cost, yet increase performance and safety in crash scenarios. In summary, the three major objectives of this project are accomplished: To develop experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation tools to optimize automotive and truck components for lightweighting materials (aluminum, steel, and Mg alloys and polymer-based composites) with consideration of uncertainty to decrease weight and cost, yet increase the performance and safety in impact scenarios; To develop multiscale computational models that quantify microstructure-property relations by evaluating various length scales, from the atomic through component levels, for each step of the manufacturing process for vehicles; and To develop an integrated K-12 educational program to educate students on lightweighting designs and impact scenarios. In this final report, we divided the content into two parts: the first part contains the development of building blocks for the project, including materials and process models, process-structure-property (PSP) relationship, and experimental validation capabilities; the second part presents the demonstration task for Mg front-end work associated with USAMP projects.

  15. Lightweight File System (LWFS) v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-11-19

    The Lightweight File System (LWFS) is a storage system that provides a minimal set of I/O-system functionality required by file system and/or I/O library implementations for massively parallel machines. In particular, the LWFS-core consists of a scalable security model, an efficient data-movement protocol, and a direct interface to object-based storage devices. Higher-level services such as namespace management, consistency semantics, reliability, and so forth are layered on top of the core services to provide application-specific functionalitymore » as needed. The LWFS code contains implementations of the core services and reference implementations of a number of supplemental services for namespace management and transaction support.« less

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles: Mach II Design | Department of Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-material lightweight vehicles: Mach II design. lm088_skszek_2014_o.pdf (2.33 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lightweight Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials Overview Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lightweight Materials Overview Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about lightweight materials overview. lm999_joost_2015_o.pdf (3.16 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO Material

  18. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials The FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies, to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. Cover, Title Page, and Contents (PDF 1.3 MB) 1. Introduction (PDF 818 KB) 2. Automotive

  19. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials The FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies, to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. The document is very large; it has been divided into sections for easier use. Cover and

  20. FY 2011 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweighting Materials FY 2011 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials The FY 2011 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. The document is very large; it has been divided into sections for easier use. Cover and Contents Acronyms 1.

  1. GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials and Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies | Department of Energy 6_vaidya_2012_p.pdf (4.01 MB) More Documents & Publications GATE Center of Excellence at UAB in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials and Manufacturing Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: GATE Center of Excellence at UAB for Lightweight Materials and Manufacturing for Automotive, Truck and Mass Transit

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials for Cars and Trucks |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lightweight Materials for Cars and Trucks Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials for Cars and Trucks PBS's Motorweek highlights the research and development on lightweight materials supported by the Vehicle Technologies Office at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Read the text version. Advanced materials are essential for boosting the fuel economy of modern automobiles while maintaining safety and performance. Because it takes less energy to accelerate a lighter

  3. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 11. Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  4. EERE Success Story-Lightweight Technology Resolved Challenge...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Facing the Chevy Spark EV Battery Tray and Enclosure EERE Success Story-Lightweight Technology Resolved Challenge Facing the Chevy Spark EV Battery Tray and Enclosure August 18, ...

  5. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. ...

  6. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 1. Introduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. ...

  7. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. ...

  8. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - disclaimer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. ...

  9. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - A. Acronyms...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. ...

  10. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. ...

  11. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their ...

  12. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- Cover and Contents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  13. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 9. Joining

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  14. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 1. Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  15. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 1. Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  16. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 11. Recycling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  17. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 9. Joining

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  18. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 10. Nondestructive Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  19. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other ...

  20. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- Disclaimer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  1. GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials and Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: GATE Center of Excellence at UAB for Lightweight Materials and Manufacturing for Automotive, Truck and Mass Transit...

  2. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 10. Nondestructive Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  3. Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling More Compact, Lightweight Thermoelectric Power Generation & Cooling Systems Micro- & Nano-Technologies Enabling ...

  4. Lightweight and Statistical Techniques for Petascale PetaScale Debugging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Barton

    2014-06-30

    This project investigated novel techniques for debugging scientific applications on petascale architectures. In particular, we developed lightweight tools that narrow the problem space when bugs are encountered. We also developed techniques that either limit the number of tasks and the code regions to which a developer must apply a traditional debugger or that apply statistical techniques to provide direct suggestions of the location and type of error. We extend previous work on the Stack Trace Analysis Tool (STAT), that has already demonstrated scalability to over one hundred thousand MPI tasks. We also extended statistical techniques developed to isolate programming errors in widely used sequential or threaded applications in the Cooperative Bug Isolation (CBI) project to large scale parallel applications. Overall, our research substantially improved productivity on petascale platforms through a tool set for debugging that complements existing commercial tools. Previously, Office Of Science application developers relied either on primitive manual debugging techniques based on printf or they use tools, such as TotalView, that do not scale beyond a few thousand processors. However, bugs often arise at scale and substantial effort and computation cycles are wasted in either reproducing the problem in a smaller run that can be analyzed with the traditional tools or in repeated runs at scale that use the primitive techniques. New techniques that work at scale and automate the process of identifying the root cause of errors were needed. These techniques significantly reduced the time spent debugging petascale applications, thus leading to a greater overall amount of time for application scientists to pursue the scientific objectives for which the systems are purchased. We developed a new paradigm for debugging at scale: techniques that reduced the debugging scenario to a scale suitable for traditional debuggers, e.g., by narrowing the search for the root-cause analysis

  5. FY2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    The Lightweight Materials research and development (R&D) area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing lightweight materials for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  6. Friction Stir Welding Aluminum for Lightweight Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Friction Stir Welding Aluminum for Lightweight Vehicles Friction Stir Welding Aluminum for Lightweight Vehicles Addthis Description In this video, a researcher from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory describes a new aluminum joining process and the industry partnership that enabled its use for mass auto production

  7. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy acronyms.pdf (98.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials Development of Corrosion Inhibiting E-Coat System for Body-in-White Assemblies

  8. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy a-e.pdf (13.87 MB) More Documents & Publications Ultra-Fine Grain Foils and Sheets by Large-Strain Extrusion Machining Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

  9. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 3_polymer_composites.pdf (9.86 MB) More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low-Cost Carbon Fiber FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 7. Low-Cost Carbon Fiber Lower Cost Carbon Fiber Precursors

  10. MULTIPLE DIFFERENTIAL ROTARY MECHANICAL DRIVE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smits, R.G.

    1964-01-28

    This patent relates to a mechanism suitable for such applications as driving two spaced-apart spools which carry a roll film strip under conditions where the film movement must be rapidly started, stopped, and reversed while maintaining a constant tension on the film. The basic drive is provided by a variable speed, reversible rnotor coupled to both spools through a first differential mechanism and driving both spools in the same direction. A second motor, providing a constant torque, is connected to the two spools through a second differential mechanism and is coupled to impart torque to one spool in a first direction anid to the other spool in the reverse direction thus applying a constant tension to the film passing over the two spools irrespective of the speed or direction of rotation thereof. (AEC)

  11. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Baker, Frederick S.; Armstrong, Beth L.

    2011-09-13

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  12. KITTEN Lightweight Kernel 0.1 Beta

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-12-12

    The Kitten Lightweight Kernel is a simplified OS (operating system) kernel that is intended to manage a compute node's hardware resources. It provides a set of mechanisms to user-level applications for utilizing hardware resources (e.g., allocating memory, creating processes, accessing the network). Kitten is much simpler than general-purpose OS kernels, such as Linux or Windows, but includes all of the esssential functionality needed to support HPC (high-performance computing) MPI, PGAS and OpenMP applications. Kitten providesmore » unique capabilities such as physically contiguous application memory, transparent large page support, and noise-free tick-less operation, which enable HPC applications to obtain greater efficiency and scalability than with general purpose OS kernels.« less

  13. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

    2013-05-21

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  14. Performance of a New Lightweight Reciprocating Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, J C

    2005-06-09

    A new four-chamber piston pump design has been fabricated and tested. The small-scale propellant pump is intended to be powered by gas at elevated temperatures, e.g. in a gas-generator cycle rocket propulsion system. Two key features are combined for the first time: leak-tight liquid-cooled seals, and a high throughput per unit hardware mass. Measured performance curves quantify flows, pressures, leakage, volumetric efficiency, and tank pressure requirements. A pair of 300-gram pumps operating with significant margin could deliver fuel and oxidizer at 5 MPa to a compact lightweight 1000-N engine, while tank pressure remains at 0.35 MPa. Pump weight is well below one percent of thrust, as is typical for launch vehicle engines. Applications include small upper stages, aggressive maneuvers in space, and miniature launch vehicles for Mars ascent.

  15. Rotary drive mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenderdine, E.W.

    1991-10-08

    This patent describes a rotary drive mechanism which includes a rotary solenoid having a stator and multi-poled rotor. A moving member rotates with the rotor and is biased by a biasing device. The biasing device causes a further rotational movement after rotation by the rotary solenoid. Thus, energization of the rotary solenoid moves the member in one direction to one position and biases the biasing device against the member. Subsequently, de- energization of the rotary solenoid causes the biasing device to move the member in the same direction to another position from where the moving member is again movable by energization and de-energization of the rotary solenoid. Preferably, the moving member is a multi-lobed cam having the same number of lobes as the rotor has poles. An anti- overdrive device is also preferably provided for preventing overdrive in the forward direction or a reverse rotation of the moving member and for precisely aligning the moving member.

  16. Rotary drive mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kenderdine, Eugene W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A rotary drive mechanism includes a rotary solenoid having a stator and multi-poled rotor. A moving member rotates with the rotor and is biased by a biasing device. The biasing device causes a further rotational movement after rotation by the rotary solenoid. Thus, energization of the rotary solenoid moves the member in one direction to one position and biases the biasing device against the member. Subsequently, de-energization of the rotary solenoid causes the biasing device to move the member in the same direction to another position from where the moving member is again movable by energization and de-energization of the rotary solenoid. Preferably, the moving member is a multi-lobed cam having the same number of lobes as the rotor has poles. An anti-overdrive device is also preferably provided for preventing overdrive in the forward direction or a reverse rotation of the moving member and for precisely aligning the moving member.

  17. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary June 21, 2013

  18. Project Profile: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Profile: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators JPL logo The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), with funding from the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D FOA, ...

  19. Improving the Performance of OpenMP Using Lightweight Threads...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving the Performance of OpenMP Using Lightweight Threads Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computing Science Seminar Start Date: Aug 28 2015 - 10:30am BuildingRoom: Building...

  20. FMC high power density electric drive technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    FMC has developed a unique capability in energy-efficient, high-performance AC induction electric drive systems for electric and hybrid vehicles. These drives will not only be important to future military ground combat vehicles, but will also provide significant competitive advantages to industrial and commercial machinery and vehicles. The product line under development includes drive motors and associated power converters directed at three power/vehicle weight classes. These drive systems cover a broad spectrum of potential vehicle applications, ranging from light pickup trucks to full-size transit buses. The drive motors and power converters are described.

  1. Holiday Food Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Food Drive Holiday Food Drive Laboratory employees helped donate 300 boxes of nonperishable food items and 360 frozen turkeys during the 2015 annual food drive. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Annual Food & Holiday Gift Drives Mike Martinez (505) 699-3388 Community Partnerships Office (505) 665-4400 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families During the Laboratory's 2015 Annual Food Drive, employees and subcontract workers once again

  2. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (more » $${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$), image-to-image timing ($${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$$ ps) and absolute timing ($${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of$${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$$and an error in velocity of$${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.« less

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) | Department of Energy Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) In the long term, advanced materials such as magnesium and carbon fiber reinforced composites could reduce the weight of some components by 50-75 percent. Magnesium Even though magnesium (Mg) can reduce component weight by more than 60 percent, its use is currently limited

  4. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Lightweight Materials Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program research efforts 2009_merit_review_6.pdf (757.07 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Propulsion Materials DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Vehicle Systems DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) | Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) In the short term, replacing heavy steel components with materials such as high-strength steel, aluminum, or glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites can decrease component weight by 10-60 percent.

  6. EERE Success Story-Lightweight Technology Resolved Challenge Facing the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chevy Spark EV Battery Tray and Enclosure | Department of Energy Lightweight Technology Resolved Challenge Facing the Chevy Spark EV Battery Tray and Enclosure EERE Success Story-Lightweight Technology Resolved Challenge Facing the Chevy Spark EV Battery Tray and Enclosure August 18, 2015 - 11:34am Addthis The Chevy Spark EV at the Washington Auto Show. The Chevy Spark EV at the Washington Auto Show. Technology innovation comes in many forms - sometimes, it's as simple as adapting a recent

  7. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 11. Lightweight Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1. Lightweight Materials 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 11. Lightweight Materials DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review 2008_merit_review_11.pdf (3.67 MB) More Documents & Publications 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 5. Advanced Power Electronics 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 14. Vehicle Systems and Simulation 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 6. Solid State Energy Conversion

  8. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Sorce, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  9. Light-weight radioisotope heater impact tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Rinehart, G.H.; Herrera, A.

    1998-12-31

    The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s.

  10. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2006-02-28

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  11. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  12. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, T.L.

    1998-05-05

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  13. Warm Hydroforming of Lightweight Metal Sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aginagalde, A.; Orus, A.; Esnaola, J. A.; Torca, I.; Galdos, L.; Garcia, C.

    2007-05-17

    Hydroforming is well known in steel applications for automotive industry, where complicated shapes can be get with high strength to weight ratios. Nevertheless, the poor formability of light alloys at room temperature has limited the application of hydroforming technology for aluminum and magnesium parts. Increasing the temperature of these materials allows substantially greater elongation without fracture. Warm forming strategy is applied in conventional processes, such as rolling and forging, in order to get complex shapes, but still rare in hydroforming technology. This is the technical base of this research project: the development of the hydroforming process at warm working temperatures. The main tasks of the initial phases of the research were the material characterization, and the heated fluid and tooling system design and set up for warm hydroforming of lightweight alloys. Once these goals were accomplished the present paper shows the obtained results. The uniaxial tensile deformation of 5754H111, 6082-T6, 6082-O and AZ31B at the temperature range of 25 deg. C - 250 deg. C is presented as the output of the material characterization task. Both the system features and the results obtained for a bulge test geometry carried out with a warm hydroforming system are also presented. The selected alloys show an improvement in formability at the studied temperature range under both uniaxial and biaxial state of stress.

  14. Passively cooled direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2008-03-18

    A wind turbine is provided that passively cools an electrical generator. The wind turbine includes a plurality of fins arranged peripherally around a generator house. Each of the fins being oriented at an angle greater than zero degrees to allow parallel flow of air over the fin. The fin is further tapered to allow a constant portion of the fin to extend beyond the air stream boundary layer. Turbulence initiators on the nose cone further enhance heat transfer at the fins.

  15. Direct Drive Systems DDS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    high speed, permanent magnet (PM), high-power motors, generators and power electronics. Coordinates: 33.868545, -118.063704 Show Map Loading map......

  16. Centerless-drive solar collector system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, B. L.

    1985-12-24

    A parabolic-trough solar collector system is disclosed, with each collector driven to track the sun using a ring driven in centerless fashion. The parabolic troughs are made of laminated plywood or molded or formed of plastics or metals. The drive motor moves a flexible belt, i.e., chain or cable, which is routed about the drive ring on each collector. The motion of the cable moves all drive rings together to track the sun. A photodetector senses the position of the sun and provides the signal needed to drive the collectors in the correct direction.

  17. Multi-Materials Vehicle R&D Initiative Lightweight 7+ Passenger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Vehicle R&D Initiative Lightweight 7+ Passenger Vehicle Multi-Materials Vehicle R&D Initiative Lightweight 7+ Passenger Vehicle 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, ...

  18. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators - FY13 Q1 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KB) More Documents & Publications Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report The Lightweight Materials activity (LM) focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance,recyclability, and cost. 2010_lightweighting_materials.pdf (9.04

  20. Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report This report outlines the final results and findings from the Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles Workshop, held in June 2013 and hosted by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. carbon_fiber_summary_report.pdf (737.02 KB) More Documents & Publications FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials

  1. Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Hurdles Into the Future | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Hurdles Into the Future Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Hurdles Into the Future October 28, 2014 - 3:26pm Addthis A team of vehicles experts was present during the crash test for Ford and Magna's Multimaterial Lightweight Vehicle. A team of vehicles experts was present during the crash test for Ford and Magna's Multimaterial Lightweight Vehicle. Reuben Sarkar Reuben Sarkar Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Most owners aren't itching to

  2. ORNL Lightweighting Research Featured on MotorWeek

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-03

    PBS MotorWeek, television's longest running automotive series, featured ORNL lightweighting research for vehicle applications in an episode that aired in early April 2014. The crew captured footage of research including development of new metal alloys, additive manufacturing, carbon fiber production, advanced batteries, power electronics components, and neutron imaging applications for materials evaluation.

  3. FY2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTO), the Lightweight Materials (LM) activity focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  4. Friction Stir Welding of Lightweight Vehicle Structures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanella, M L

    2008-08-31

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, LLC and Ford Motor Company was to establish friction stir welding (FSW) and friction stir processing as viable options for use in construction of lightweight substructures for trucks and cars, including engine cradles, suspension sub frames, instrument panel supports, and intake manifolds.

  5. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-01-15

    The Lightweight Materials activity (LM) within the Vehicle Technologies Program focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  6. ORNL Lightweighting Research Featured on MotorWeek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-15

    PBS MotorWeek, television's longest running automotive series, featured ORNL lightweighting research for vehicle applications in an episode that aired in early April 2014. The crew captured footage of research including development of new metal alloys, additive manufacturing, carbon fiber production, advanced batteries, power electronics components, and neutron imaging applications for materials evaluation.

  7. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm037_horstemeyer_2012_o.pdf (7.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) Magnesium Projects

  8. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation lm037_horstemeyer_2011_o.pdf (3.62 MB) More Documents & Publications Magnesium Projects Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID)

  9. Lightweight pressure vessels and unitized regenerative fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H.

    1996-12-31

    High specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) energy storage systems have been designed using lightweight pressure vessels in conjunction with unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). URFCs produce power and electrolytically regenerate their reactants using a single stack of reversible cells. Although a rechargeable energy storage system with such high specific energy has not yet been fabricated, we have made progress towards this goal. A primary fuel cell (FC) test rig with a single cell (0.05 ft{sup 2} active area) has been modified and operated reversibly as a URFC. This URFC uses bifunctional electrodes (oxidation and reduction electrodes reverse roles when switching from charge to discharge, as with a rechargeable battery) and cathode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the oxygen side of the cell). Lightweight pressure vessels with state-of-the-art performance factors (burst pressure * internal volume/tank weight = Pb V/W) have been designed and fabricated. These vessels provide a lightweight means of storing reactant gases required for fuel cells (FCs) or URFCs. The vessels use lightweight bladder liners that act as inflatable mandrels for composite overwrap and provide the permeation barrier for gas storage. The bladders are fabricated using materials that are compatible with humidified gases which may be created by the electrolysis of water and are compatible with elevated temperatures that occur during fast fills.

  10. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4_usamp_cooperative_research.pdf (13.84 MB) More Documents & Publications Development of Corrosion Inhibiting E-Coat System for Body-in-White Assemblies 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials Magnesium Front End Development (AMD 603/604/904)

  11. 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy back_cover.pdf (321.2 KB) More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - disclaimer and back cover FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - Disclaimer and Back Cover

  12. Drill drive mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dressel, Michael O.

    1979-01-01

    A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

  13. Electric Drive Status and Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leaf * 75 mile electric range * 80 kW electric drive * electric drive cost:1,600 Tesla Model S * 250 mile electric range * 270 kW electric drive * electric drive ...

  14. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

  15. Driving/Idling Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    While transportation efficiency policies are often implemented under local governments, national and state programs can play supportive roles in reducing vehicle miles traveled. Find driving/idling...

  16. Holiday Food Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Programs Office (505) 665-4400 Email Get Expertise Helping feed Northern New Mexico families During the Laboratory's 2015 Annual Food Drive, employees and subcontract...

  17. National Drive Electric Week

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Celebrate National Drive Electric Week with ways to make your all-electric or plug-in hybrid cars even greener!

  18. Variable Frequency Drives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marketing Toolkit The Benefits of Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) VFDs help adjust motor speeds to match loads and improve efficiency while conserving energy. The benefits...

  19. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  20. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treu, C.A. Jr.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

  1. Lightweight armor system and process for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S.; Bruck, H. Alan; Strempek, Gary C.; Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.

    2004-01-20

    A lightweight armor system may comprise a substrate having a graded metal matrix composite layer formed thereon by thermal spray deposition. The graded metal matrix composite layer comprises an increasing volume fraction of ceramic particles imbedded in a decreasing volume fraction of a metal matrix as a function of a thickness of the graded metal matrix composite layer. A ceramic impact layer is affixed to the graded metal matrix composite layer.

  2. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-15

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report As part of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), the Lightweight Materials activity (LM) focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTO), the Lightweight Materials (LM) activity focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Lightweight Materials research and development (R&D) area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing lightweight materials for passenger and commercial vehicles. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Lightweight Materials area. Past years' reports are listed on the Annual Progress Reports page.

  6. Control rod drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  7. Traction Drive Systems Breakout

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Traction Drive Systems Breakout John M. Miller, PhD, PE, F.IEEE, F.SAE Oak Ridge National Laboratory Facilitator July 24, 2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Vehicle Technologies ...

  8. Traction Drive Systems Breakout

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop on July 24, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL.

  9. US DRIVE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US DRIVE Fuel Pathway Integration Technical Team Roadmap Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress US DRIVE Hydrogen Production Technical Team Roadmap

  10. Holiday Gift Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gift Drive Holiday Gift Drive Every year, Laboratory employees help fulfill the holiday wishes of children and seniors in our communities. In 2015, our employees donated more than 1,200 gifts to 23 nonprofit organizations to help Northern New Mexico children, senior citizens, and families have a brighter holiday season. May 7, 2015 Every holiday season, employees of Los Alamos National Laboratory donate and distribute gifts to families in need throughout Northern New Mexico. Contacts Annual Food