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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Steam Heat: Winter Fountains in the City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joan Brigham Steam Heat: Winter Fountains int h e City Steam is a phenomenon of the winter city. Iteven when the surging steam temporarily blinds them. When I

Brigham, Joan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

3

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs of the process plant, cogeneration or combined cycle plant. There is no need to design the HRSG per se and hence simulation is a valuable tool for anyone interested in evaluating the HRSG performance even before it is designed. It can also save a lot of time for specification writers as they need not guess how the steam side performance will vary with different gas/steam parameters. A few examples are given to show how simulation methods can be applied to real life problems.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Optimized Control Of Steam Heating Coils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam has been widely used as the source of heating in commercial buildings and industries throughout the twentieth century. Even though contemporary designers have moved to hot water as the primary choice for heating, a large number of facilities still use steam for heating. Medical campuses with on-site steam generation and extensive distribution systems often serve a number of buildings designed prior to the mid-1980s. The steam is typically used for preheat as its high thermal content helps in heating the air faster and prevents coils from freezing in locations with extreme weather conditions during winter. The present work provides a comprehensive description of the various types of steam heating systems, steam coils, and valves to facilitate the engineer's understanding of these steam systems. A large percentage of the steam coils used in buildings are provided with medium pressure steam. Veterans Integrated Service Network and Army Medical Command Medical Facilities are examples which use medium pressure steam for heating. The current design manual for these medical facilities recommends steam at 30psig be provided to these coils. In certain cases although the steam heating coil is designed for a 5psig steam pressure, it is observed that higher pressure steam is supplied at the coil. A higher steam pressure may lead to excessive heating, system inefficiency due to increased heat loss, simultaneous heating and cooling, and increased maintenance cost. Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of lowering steam pressure on the system performance. A 16% reduction in temperature rise across the coil was found when the steam pressure in the coil was reduced from 15psig to 5psig. The rise in temperature with lower pressure steam was sufficient to prevent coil freeze-up even in the most severe weather conditions. Additional benefits of reduced steam pressure are reduced flash steam losses (flash steam is vapor or secondary steam formed when hot condensate from the coil is discharged into a lower pressure area, i.e., the condensate return line) and radiation losses, increased flow of air through the coil thereby reducing air stratification and reduced energy losses in the event of actuator failure. The work also involved evaluating the existing control strategies for the steam heating system. New control strategies were developed and tested to address the short comings of existing sequences. Improved temperature control and occupant comfort; elimination of valve hunting and reduced energy consumption were benefits realized by implementing these measures.

Ali, Mir Muddassir

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Simplify heat recovery steam generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in process and power plants, refineries and in several cogeneration/combined cycle systems. They are usually designed for a set of gas and steam conditions but often operate under different parameters due to plant constraints, steam demand, different ambient conditions (which affect the gas flow and exhaust gas temperature in a gas turbine plant), etc. As a result, the gas and steam temperature profiles in the HRSG, steam production and the steam temperature differ from the design conditions, affecting the entire plant performance and economics. Also, consultants and process engineers who are involved in evaluating the performance of the steam system as a whole, often would like to simulate the performance of an HRSG under different gas flows, inlet gas temperature and analysis, steam pressure and feed water temperature to optimize the entire steam system and select proper auxiliaries such as steam turbines, condensers, deaerators, etc.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Waste heat steams ahead with injection technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of Commercial-Industrial-Institutional buildings whose thermal usage is too variable to implement cogeneration are looking to a gasturbine steam-injection technology, called the Cheng Cycle, to reduce their energy costs. The Cheng Cycle uses industrial components-a gas-turbine generating set, a waste-heat recovery steam generator and system controls-in a thermodynamically optimized mode. In the process, steam produced from waste heat can be used for space or process heating or to increase the electrical output of a gas turbine. The process was patented in 1974 by Dr. Dah Yu Cheng, of the University of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, Calif. When a plant's thermal needs fall because of production or temperature changes, unused steam is directed back to the turbine to increase electrical output. As thermal requirements rise, the process is reversed and needed steam is channeled to plant uses.

Shepherd, S.; Koloseus, C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Control system for fluid heated steam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

Boland, James F. (Bonneville County, ID); Koenig, John F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Control system for fluid heated steam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Materials Selection Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A considerable number of failures have occurred over the past decade in heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). Many of these failures are attributed to poor design, improper operation, poor fabrication, or poor installation practices, but a number of them are attributed directly to improper material selection. In March 2004, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published the first heat recovery steam generator materials selection and repair guidelines (HRSG Material Selection and Repair Guidelin...

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

Design with Constructal Theory: Steam Generators, Turbines and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation shows that the architecture of steam generators, steam turbines and heat exchangers for power plants can be predicted on the basis of… (more)

Kim, Yong Sung

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Condensing Heat Exchangers Optimize Steam Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of fluorocarbon resin covered tubes has advanced to the point where full scale marketing in connection with condensing heat exchangers has begun. Field installations show simple paybacks of one to one and a half years with resulting steam boiler fuel to steam efficiencies in excess of 90%. The studies and evaluations done to date indicate that units of this type will be cost effective in sizes ranging from 10,000 to 300,0000 steam per hour as long as cold makeup water is available for preheating with the waste flue gases.

Sullivan, B.; Sullivan, P. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Cycle Chemistry Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective monitoring of the purity of water and steam is an integral part of any productive cycle chemistry monitoring program. The Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry guidelines identified a group of core monitoring parameters that are considered the minimum requirements. Meeting these requirements is part of EPRI's cycle chemistry benchmarking criteria for HRSGs. In addition to the core parameters, many chemistry parameters might need to be ...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Monitoring and Controlling Carryover in Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the cycle chemistry in the steam generating system of combined-cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plants is vital to ensuring the efficient and reliable operation of the equipment. Monitoring of steam purity and drum carryover are core parameters for HRSG chemistry programs. Carryover is any solid, liquid, or vaporous contaminant that leaves the HRSG steam drum along with the steam. Carryover might be the result of the limited separation of the steam/water mixture in the steam dru...

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

Design of a heat recovery steam generator  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine in the size range of 20,000 hp (14.9 MW) was retrofitted with a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The HRSG produces high pressure superheated steam for use in a steam turbine. Supplementary firing is used to more than double the steam production over the unfired case. Because of many unusual constraints, an innovative design of the HRSG was formulated. These design constraints included: a wide range of operating conditions was to be accommodated; very limited space in the existing plant; and a desire to limit the field construction work necessary in order to provide a short turnaround time. This paper discusses the design used to satisfy these conditions.

Logeais, D.R.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Industrial Heat Pumps for Steam and Fuel Savings: A BestPractices Steam Technical Brief  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Steam Techcial Brief is to introduce heat-pump technology and its applicaiton in industrial processes.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Efficiency of Steam and Hot Water Heat Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency of Steam and Hot Water Heat Distribution Systems Gary Phetteplace September 1995- tion medium (steam or hot water) and temperature for heat distribution systems. The report discusses the efficiency of both steam and hot water heat distribution systems in more detail. The results of several field

18

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Deposits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under-deposit corrosion represents the second leading mechanism of chemistry-influenced heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures (HTFs) and third leading cause of major availability losses. This report was prepared, in recognition of the lack of information, to assemble the state of knowledge on deposition in HRSG high-pressure (HP) evaporator tubing and to identify the major deficiencies in that knowledge. Findings of this effort can be used to establish immediate remediation and correction of...

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Remote Inspection Device - Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) have become more complex over the last 15 years, operating with multiple pressures and temperatures, operators have experienced more types of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report provides information on how nondestructive evaluation (NDE) can be combined with newly developed HRSG repair tooling so that operators can detect damaged tubes and verify that repaired tubes do not contain welding defects that might be detrimental to the life of the component.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

20

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Procurement Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with advanced gas turbines that are subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures resulting from excessive thermal mechanical fatigue damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in the lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs. The procurement of engineer, procure, and construct ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Chemical Cleaning Guidelines Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A considerable number of combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) were installed over the past two decades worldwide, and the design complexity and operating pressures of these units increased significantly during this period. One of the goals of EPRI's Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Dependability Program 88 is to minimize availability losses associated with HRSG tube failures. To support its members operating combined cycle units, EPRI published Heat Recovery Steam Generato...

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous EPRI reports have documented problems associated with operation and maintenance of complex heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). The EPRI report Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure Manual (1004503) provides information about known HRSG tube failures and necessary steps that can be taken to diagnose and prevent similar problems. The EPRI report Delivering High Reliability Heat Recovery Steam Generators (1004240) provides guidance for continued and reliable operation of HRSGs from initial...

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy Efficient Steam Trapping of Trace Heating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since as many as 40-60% of a plant's steam traps may be used on steam tracer lines, it is essential to select the correct, properly sized 'traps'; to optimize the efficient removal of condensate while providing maximum heat transfer to maintain desired product temperatures and greatly reduce steam losses. Factors related to achieving uniform product temperatures and maximum heat transfer rates and energy efficiency are: 1.Types and Methods used for Steam Tracing; 2. Systematic heat balance required to achieve economic tracer lengths; 3. Maximum allowable trapping distance for specific applications 4.Data important to determine condensate loads; 5. Trap selection, sizing, good installation practices, and proper maintenance. Using an engineered approach to steam trapping of trace heating systems have resulted in stable tracer line temperatures while reducing steam consumption 10-50% with minimum maintenance.

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Guidelines on Optimizing Heat Recovery Steam Generator Drains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe thermal-mechanical fatigue damage to the superheaters (SHs), reheaters (RHs), and steam piping of horizontal-gas-path heat recovery steam generators due primarily to ineffective drainage of the condensate that is generated in superheaters and reheaters at every startup continues to be a significant industry problem that results in avoidable deterioration of unit reliability and significant unnecessary maintenance costs. This report will assist operators in guiding heat recovery steam generator (HR...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Development of Raman Spectroscopy for a Steam Generator Heated Crevice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crevice formed by the tube / tube support plate (tube/TSP) intersection in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator (SG) is a concentration site for nonvolatile impurities from steam generator water (referred to as hideout). This report describes development of a Raman spectroscopy device to investigate this chemical concentration process in situ in a simulated heated crevice.

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Economics of Steam Vs. Electric Pipe Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To properly design a pipe heating system, the basic principles of heat transfer from an insulated pipe must be understood. The three methods of heat flow are conduction, convection (both forced and natural) and radiation. The total heat loss from a pipe must be determined first, since this is the heat which must be replaced to maintain a pipe at a given temperature. A steam heating system requires an analysis of the heat loss from the pipe as well as an analysis of the capacity of the heating system. The economics of steam heat include the accessories as well as the inefficiencies of steam heat. The design of an electric heating system normally involves far fewer components and engineering complexities than does a comparable steam system. The basic system is comprised of the heater, controls and connection accessories. Today there are several economic trade-offs to be made in selecting a pipe heating system. These involve engineering and design costs, maintenance costs, installation costs and energy costs. The economic trade-offs to be made in selecting a pipe heating system do not universally favor one system over another for all cases.

Schilling, R. E.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Chemical Cleaning Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) represent a substantial fraction of the new fossil generating capacity installed around the world since the 1990s. One of the goals of the EPRI HRSG Dependability Program is to make availability losses due to tube failures very low, no more than one per year. An earlier guideline, "Interim Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generators" (EPRI Report TR-110051), shows organizations how to set up chemistry progra...

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional and combined-cycle plants, boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the main availability problem for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. The three volumes of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice (1012757) present an in-depth description of the various HRSG and degradation mechanisms, providing plant owners and operators with the t...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Outage Inspection Pocket Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) pose a unique set of operational challenges, due in part to their rapid startup capabilities and high operating efficiencies. Among these challenges are the difficulty of inspection and repair, which are complicated by limited access as well as the complexity of the equipment. To help members address these challenges, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Heat Recovery Steam Generator Dependability program has added this field guide to its comprehensive s...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

SODIUM-HEATED STEAM GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT. Interim Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Design and development of a once -through sodiumheated steam generator are discussed. Research proposals are discussed for evaluating: carbon transfer and mass transfer effects in the steam generator, effect on heat transfer and two- phase flow of coiling tubes, corrosion of Croloy 21/4 in products of sodium-water reactions, procedure for welding tube to back side of the tube sheet, radiographic inspection of back side tube welds, and chemical simulation of sodium environment for leak testing. (N.W.R.)

1964-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flows and stream conditions in steam power cycle. Table 4.1in the low-temperature reactor system. Steam power cycle 8.1Heat Storage System for a Solar Steam Power Plant." 12th

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Guidelines for the Nondestructive Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) have become more complex over the last 15 years, operating with multiple pressures and temperatures, operators have experienced an increasing suite of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report provides guidance on the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of HRSGs so that operators will know what types of NDE to perform and where to perform them.

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown...

35

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exchanger 1 . 3. The Condensers . Reboiler . . . . BoilerNet Power Waste Heat Trimmer Dist. Condenser Turbine SteamLeaks LP Turbine Condenser Misc. Heat Losses Total Waste

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Heat-recovery steam generators: Understand the basics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbines with heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs) can be found in virtually every chemical process industries (CPI) plant. They can be operated in either the cogeneration mode or the combined-cycle mode. In the cogeneration mode, steam produced from the HRSG is mainly used for process applications, whereas in the combined-cycle mode, power is generated via a steam turbine generator. Recent trends in HRSG design include multiple-pressure units for maximum energy recovery, the use of high-temperature superheaters or reheaters in combined-cycle plants, and auxiliary firing for efficient steam generation. In addition, furnace firing is often employed in small capacity units when the exhaust gas is raised to temperatures of 2,400--3,000 F to maximize steam generation and thus improve fuel utilization. This article highlights some of the basic facts about gas turbine HRSGs. This information can help plant engineers, consultants, and those planning cogeneration projects make important decisions about the system and performance related aspects.

Ganapathy, V.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Materials Selection Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials selection is both an art and a science. There is no single material that is the optimal choice for a given application. For example, subtle changes such as the design, fabrication, and quality control specification for a high-pressure superheater (HPSH) tube-to-header connection can alter the choice of the optimal tube material. Minor changes to the component's operating environment can also alter the materials selection choice. What was an ideal tube material in a baseloaded heat recovery stea...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

Compilation of EPRI Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined-cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) represent a substantial portion of new installed generation worldwide since the 1990s. Despite being relative new, these units have experienced a significant loss of availability and reliability due to tubing failures. Many of these failures are attributed to poor design, improper operation, weaknesses in fabrication, and poor installation practices. This product is a compilation of nine (9) key individual guidelines developed to address re...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

Repair Welding Technologies For Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tube failures that occur in heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are often caused by thermal stress or thermal shock associated with cyclic plant operation or by flow-accelerated corrosion. Many premature failures occur along the length of finned tubes or at attachment locations where tubes are joined to the upper or lower header. Because of current tube repair practices and limited access for welding, reoccurring failures are common.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

Delivering High Reliability in Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite being relatively new, the worldwide fleet of combined-cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) has exhibited a disappointing record with respect to reliability and availability in terms of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report identifies actions that—if implemented prior to commercial operation—should greatly improve the operational HRSG reliability.BackgroundWhen contemplating new combined-cycle units, the choices that can ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

COMMIX analysis of the sodium heated helical coil steam generator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the COMMIX-HCSG computer program and compares predictions to data obtained from performance tests on a 76 MWt Helical Coil Steam Generator (HCSG) test unit. COMMIX-HCSG is a multi-dimensional thermal/hydraulic code that models both steady state and transient operation of an HCSG. The code solves a system of Navier-Stokes continuum equations that have been modified with a combination of volume and directional surface porosities and distributed resistances. This formulation properly accounts for the presence of tube bundle, supports, and baffles on the shell side of the steam generator. Turbulence models and heat transfer and pressure drop equations are used as applicable for the different regions including the upper plenum, the tube bundle, and the lower plenum of the HCSG. The data was obtained from performance tests conducted in early 1987 on the 76 MWt HCSG test unit at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). The test unit contains over 700 instruments. HCSG development and tests are carried out as part of the Department of Energy program to develop reliable and economical liquid metal heated steam generators.

Kakarala, C.R.; Burge, S.W.; Sha, W.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Lighting system with heat distribution face plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

Clean Firetube Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet #7 (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

A steam energy tip sheet for the Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO). The prevention of scale formation in firetube boilers can result in substantial energy savings. Scale deposits occur when calcium, magnesium, and silica, commonly found in most water supplies, react to form a continuous layer of material on the waterside of the boiler heat exchange tubes. Scale creates a problem because it typically possesses a thermal conductivity, an order of magnitude less than the corresponding value for bare steel. Even thin layers of scale serve as an effective insulator and retard heat transfer. The result is overheating of boiler tube metal, tube failures, and loss of energy efficiency. Fuel consumption may increase by up to 5% in firetube boilers because of scale. The boilers steam production may be reduced if the firing rate cannot be increased to compensate for the decrease in combustion efficiency. Energy losses as a function of scale thickness and composition are given. Any scale in a boiler is undesirable. The best way to deal with scale is not to let it form in the first place. Prevent scale formation by: (1) Pretreating of boiler makeup water (using water softeners, demineralizers, and reverse osmosis to remove scale-forming minerals); (2) Injecting chemicals into the boiler feedwater; and (3) Adopting proper boiler blowdown practices.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Bond Graph Model of a Vertical U-Tube Steam Condenser Coupled with a Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bond Graph Model of a Vertical U-Tube Steam Condenser Coupled with a Heat Exchanger K. Medjaher1+ A and thus the bottom well acts as a heat exchanger. The storage of hydraulic and thermal energies steam condenser; Heat exchanger; Bond graph 1. Introduction Modern process engineering plants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

Combined cycle electric power plant and heat recovery steam generator having improved multi-loop temperature control of the steam generated  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube and a steam drum from which heated steam is directed through the superheater to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner serves to further heat the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube and a bypass conduit is disposed about the superheater tube whereby a variable steam flow determined by a bypass valve disposed in the bypass conduit may be directed about the superheater tube to be mixed with the superheated steam therefrom, whereby the temperature of the superheated steam supplied to the steam turbine may be accurately controlled. Steam temperature control means includes a first control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for regulating the position of the bypass valve with respect to a first setpoint, and a second control loop responsive to the superheated steam temperature for controlling the fuel supply to the afterburner with respect to a second setpoint varying in accordance with the bypass valve position. In particular, as the bypass valve position increases, the second setpoint, originally higher, is lowered toward a value substantially equal to that of the first setpoint.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

REACTOR PRODUCING 3000 F STEAM FOR PROCESS HEAT  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design is presented for a reactor producing 3000 deg F, 400 psi steam to supply process heat for high temperature endothermic chemical reactions. Specifically, the supplying of heat to a coal hydrogenation plant is studied but other applications are possible. Such a market for nuclear heat is economically interesting because the competition is with the relatively expensive oxygen combustion of coal. It was assumed that in the present state of the art a ceramic heat source could not contain nuclear fuel in an open cycle due to the hazard of fission product leakage into the process stream. This assumption limited the high temperature heat source to the order of 10% of the total reactor power. The particular design studied was found to be not economically feasible due 10 the unusually large inventory of enriched uranium required. However, it is felt that with the suggested changes, nuclear process heat from this type of reactor oould be competitive if the excess power produced could be sold economically. (auth)

Roberts, J.T.; Lagarias, J.S.; Remick, F.J.; Ritzmann, R.W.f Roberts, J.O.; Roberts, W.J.; Schmidt, J.E.; Kasten, P.R.

1956-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Mixed-Dimensionality Modeling Approach for Interaction of Heterogeneous Steam Reforming Reactions and Heat Transfer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen is most often produced on an industrial scale by catalytic steam methane reforming, an equilibrium-limited, highly endothermic process requiring the substantial addition of heat… (more)

Valensa, Jeroen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Repowering Fossil Steam Plants with Gas Turbines and Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Design Considerations, Economics, and Lessons L earned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes repowering fossil steam plants using gas turbines (GTs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) in combined-cycle mode. Design considerations and guidance, comparative economics, and lessons learned in the development of such projects are included. Various other methods of fossil plant repowering with GTs are also briefly discussed. The detailed results and comparisons that are provided relate specifically to a generic GT/HRSG repowering. Design parameters, limitations, schedulin...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

Induced draft fan innovation for heat recovery steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A first of its kind, induced draft (ID) heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) have been in service at a cogeneration facility since 1991. A preliminary engineering study considered a forced draft (FD) fan to supply combustion air to the HRSG duct burners (when the combustion turbine (CT) is out of service) as a traditional design; however, the study indicated that the FD fan may require the HRSG duct burner to be shut off following a CT trip and re-ignited after the FD fan was in service. Although the induced draft HRSG design cost more than the FD fan design, the induced draft design has improved the cogeneration facility's steam generation reliability by enabling the HRSG to remain in service following a CT trip. This paper briefly summarizes the preliminary engineering study that supported the decision to select the ID fan design. The paper also discusses the control system that operates the fresh-air louvers, duct burners, HRSG, and ID fan during a CT trip. Startup and operating experiences are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the design. Lessons learned are also summarized for input into future induced draft HRSG designs.

Beasley, O.W.; Hutchins, E.C. (Oklahoma Gas and Electric Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)); Predick, P.R.; Vavrek, J.M. (Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System Callaway Spring 2011 #12;Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar of analysis of Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power (DCS-CHP) systems is a design

California at Berkeley, University of

52

EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post 741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington EA-1741: Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide an American Recovery Act and Reinvestment Act of 2009 financial assistance grant to Seattle Steam Company to facilitate the installation of a combined heat and power plant in downtown Seattle, Washington. NOTE: This project has been cancelled. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 16, 2010 EA-1741: Draft Environmental Assessment Seattle Steam Company Combined Heat and Power at Post Street in Downtown Seattle, Washington (June 2010)

53

Littoral blasts: Pumice-water heat transfer and the conditions for steam explosions when pyroclastic flows enter the ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Littoral blasts: Pumice-water heat transfer and the conditions for steam explosions when June 2007; accepted 26 July 2007; published 16 November 2007. [1] Steam explosions, or littoral blasts, phenomena. The development of steam explosions rather than passive steam production is related to the rate

Manga, Michael

54

Heat Recovery Steam Generators for Combined Cycle Applications: HRSG Procurement, Design, Construction, and Operation Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design alternatives and procurement approaches for heat recovery steam generators, supplemental firing duct burners, and ancillary steam systems are addressed in this report. Power engineers and project developers will find an up-to-date, comprehensive resource for planning, specification and preliminary design in support of combined cycle plant development.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Pleasanton, CA); Udell, Kent (Berkeley, CA); Buetnner, Harley M. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Dictionary.png Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

57

Dynamic underground stripping: steam and electric heating for in situ decontamination of soils and groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dynamic underground stripping process removes localized underground volatile organic compounds from heterogeneous soils and rock in a relatively short time. This method uses steam injection and electrical resistance heating to heat the contaminated underground area to increase the vapor pressure of the contaminants, thus speeding the process of contaminant removal and making the removal more complete. The injected steam passes through the more permeable sediments, distilling the organic contaminants, which are pumped to the surface. Large electrical currents are also applied to the contaminated area, which heat the impermeable subsurface layers that the steam has not penetrated. The condensed and vaporized contaminants are withdrawn by liquid pumping and vacuum extraction. The steam injection and electrical heating steps are repeated as necessary. Geophysical imaging methods can be used to map the boundary between the hot, dry, contamination-free underground zone and the cool, damp surrounding areas to help monitor the dynamic stripping process. 4 figs.

Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.; Buetnner, H.M.; Aines, R.D.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

Experimental study of oil yields and properties of light and medium Venezuelan crude oils under steam and steam-propane distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six experimental runs were carried out to study the yields for a light crude oil (34.2°API) and an intermediate crude oil (25.1°API) under steam distillation and steam-propane distillation. Yields, were measured at five temperatures, 110, 150, 200, 250, and 300°C at slightly superheated conditions. A propane:steam mass ratio of 5:100 was used for the steam-propane distillation runs. For the 34.2°API crude oil, weight yields are very similar for steam and steam-propane distillation, about 54% weight of original oil. However for the 25.1°API crude oil, weight yield for steam-propane distillation, 63%, is significantly higher than for steam distillation, 42% weight of original oil. The results indicate that propane has a stronger distillation effect on the intermediate oil than on the light oil. This is possibly due to the following reasons: (1) lesser amount of light fractions in the intermediate oil that enhance the separation of components in the oil caused by the concentration gradient, (2) the solvent effect of the propane on paraffinic fractions, these being more abundant in the intermediate than in the light oil, and (3) the propane is inducing a cracking of the oil at the higher temperatures and pressure. The positive effect of propane on distillation of the intermediate oil is also evident from the fact that the residual oil is highly viscous (due most likely to asphaltene precipitation), while lighter fractions have been distilled off.

Plazas Garcia, Joyce Vivia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Comprehensive Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plant component availability and reliability. These guidelines for combined cycle/HRSG plants provide information on the application of all-volatile treatment (AVT), oxygenated treatment (OT), phosphate treatment (PT), caustic treatment (CT), and amine treatment. The guidelines will help operators reduce corrosion and deposition and thereby achieve significant operation and maintenance cost ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

Boiler Blowdown Heat Recovery Project Reduces Steam System Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

produced. Much of this heat can be recovered by routing the blown down liquid through a heat exchanger that preheats the boiler's makeup water. A boiler blowdown heat recovery...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Heavy Oil is abundant in California. It is a very viscous fluid, which must be thinned in order to flow from wells at economical rates. The best method of oil viscosity reduction is by cyclic steam injection into the oil-containing rock formations. Making steam in conventional generators fueled with Natural Gas is, however, a costly process. The main objective of this Project is to reduce the cost of the required steam, per Barrel of Oil produced. This is made possible by a combination of Patented new technologies with several known methods. The best known method for increasing the production rate from oil wells is to use horizontal drainholes, which provide a much greater flow area from the oil zone into the well. A recent statistic based on 344 horizontal wells in 21 Canadian Oil fields containing Heavy Oil shows that these are, on the average six times more prolific than vertical wells. The cost of horizontal wells, however, is generally two to three times that of a vertical well, in the same field, so our second goal is to reduce the net cost of horizontal wells by connecting two of them to the same vertical casing, well head and pumping system. With such a well configuration, it is possible to get two horizontal wells for the price of about one and a half times the price of a single vertical well.

Gondouin, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Steady-state heat transfer in an inverted U-tube steam generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental results are presented involving U-tube steam generator tube bundle local heat transfer and fluid conditions during stead-state, full-power operations performed at high temperatures and pressures with conditions typical of a pressurized water reactor (15.0 MPa primary pressure, 600 K steam generator inlet plenum fluid temperatures, 6.2 MPa secondary pressure). The Semiscale (MOD-2C facility represents the state-of-the-art in measurement of tube local heat transfer data and average tube bundle secondary fluid density at several elevations, which allows an estimate of the axial heat transfer and void distributions during steady-state and transient operations. The method of heat transfer data reduction is presented and the heat flux, secondary convective heat transfer coefficient, and void fraction distributions are quantified for steady-state, full-power operations.

Boucher, T.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Experimental studies of steam-propane and enriched gas injection for the Minas light crude oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental studies were carried out to compare the benefits of propane as an additive in steam injection and in lean gas injection to enhance production for the Minas light crude oil (34?API). The studies on steam-propane were specifically conducted to better understand production mechanisms involved in steam-propane injection and to investigate effects of expected field pressure and temperature conditions on steam-propane injection for the light Minas crude oil. The steam-propane experiments involved injecting steam or a mixture of steam and propane into a cell in which was tamped a mixture of sand, oil and water. The cell was placed inside a vacuum jacket set at a reservoir temperature of 200?F. Superheated steam at 490?F was injected at 4.5 ml/min (cold-water equivalent) while the cell outlet pressure was maintained at 450 psig. A total of four runs were successfully performed with two different propane:steam mass ratios, namely, 0:100 (pure steam) and 5:100 (steam-propane). Produced liquids were collected from the bottom of the cell and analyzed to determined oil and water volumes as well as oil density and viscosity after being treated to break the emulsion. The gas injection experiments involved injecting reconstituted Minas field production gas or Minas gas enriched with propane into a cell saturated with live Minas oil. The live oil was prepared in an oil-gas recombination apparatus, and closely replicated oil properties at current reservoir conditions (solution GOR of 134 SCF/STB, bubble-point pressure of 280 psig.) Minas gas was injected at 500 ml/min into the cell set at reservoir temperature of 200?F. A total of four runs were successfully performed with two different propane:gas mass ratios, namely, 0:100 (pure lean gas) and 5:100 (enriched gas). The main results of the study are as follows. First, with steam-propane injection, no improvement on production acceleration time, oil recovery or steam injectivity was observed compared with pure steam injection. Second, with enriched gas injection, oil recovery increased from 61% OOIP with lean gas injection up to 74% OOIP with enriched gas (5:100 propane:gas mass ratio). Analysis of produced oil gravity and viscosity indicate little change in values compared to that of the original oil. Of the processes investigated (pure steam, steam-propane, lean gas, and enriched gas injection), enriched gas injection appears to be technically the most feasible EOR method for Minas field. It is recommended therefore to conduct research on possible application of water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection with propane-enriched Minas gas to enhance production from the Minas field.

Yudishtira, Wan Dedi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

PROBLEM 13.71 KNOWN: Steam producing still heated by radiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROBLEM 13.71 KNOWN: Steam producing still heated by radiation. FIND: (a) Factor by which the vapor ..... Excerpts from this work may be reproduced by instructors for distribution on a not-for-profit basis to calculate F12. Excerpts from this work may be reproduced by instructors for distribution on a not

Rothstein, Jonathan

65

Evaluating and Avoiding Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Damage Caused by Duct Burners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), supplemental firing in duct burners introduces the potential for serious HRSG tube failure and damage. Duct burners that are specified, designed, and operated properly can produce a number of significant benefits. This report will assist operators in accruing these benefits.

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development of Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contemporary heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) operate with multiple pressures and temperatures that can result in degradation and failure of key components such as HRSG drains. Periodic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of HRSGs can mitigate catastrophic component failure as well as facilitate effective maintenance planning through early detection of system damage. This technical update describes HRSG drain damage mechanisms and related NDE techniques.

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

67

Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the primary availability problem for operators of conventional and combined cycle plants for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. This book provides owners and operators with the technical basis to address tube failures and create permanent solutions.

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Development program for heat balance analysis fuel to steam efficiency boiler and data wireless transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aim to improve a combustion system of boiler within increase combustion efficiency and use all out of the energy. The large boilers were used in the industrial factories which consume a lot of energy for production. By oil and gas fuel ... Keywords: boiler, cogeneration energy, heat balance, steam efficiency, wireless data transfer

Nattapong Phanthuna; Warunee Srisongkram; Sunya Pasuk; Thaweesak Trongtirakul

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the heat recovery steam generator at a combustion gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance. BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Dynamic simulation model for non-supplementary firing triple-pressure heat recovery steam generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using the modular modeling method, a real-time dynamic simulation model for the non-supplementary tri-pressure reheat Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) is developed. On the basis of mass and energy conservation law, the paper discusses the model ... Keywords: HRSG, dynamic model, modular modelling, simulation

Ning Cui; Bing-Shu Wang; Xiang-Yang Gong; Jian-Qiang Gao

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Combined Cycle/Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSGs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cycle chemistry in combined cycle plants influences about 70 of the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failure mechanisms. These guidelines have been assembled to assist operators and chemists in developing an effective overall cycle chemistry program which will prevent HRSG tube failures (HTF).

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Second quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The Midway-Sunset Field (CA) is the largest Heavy Oil field in California and steam injection methods have been successfully used for more than 30 years to produce the Heavy Oil from many of its unconsolidated sand reservoirs. In partnership with another DOE/ERIP grantee, our Company has acquired an 80 ac. lease in the SE part of this field, in order to demonstrate our respective technologies in the Monarch sand, of Miocene Age, which is one of the reservoirs targeted by the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. This reservoir contains a 13 API oil, which has a much higher market value, as a Refinery Feedstock, than the 5 to 8 API Vaca Tar, used only as road paving material. This makes it easier to justify the required investment in a vertical well equipped with two horizontal drainholes. The economic viability of such a project is likely to be enhanced if Congress approves the export to Japan of a portion of the 27 API (1% Sulfur) AK North Slope oil, which currently is landed in California in preference to lighter and sweeter Far East imported crudes. This is a major cause of the depressed prices for California Heavy Oil in local refineries, which have reduced the economic viability of all EOR methods, including steam injection, in California. Two proposals, for a Near-Term (3 y.) and for a Mid-Term (6 y.) project respectively, were jointly submitted to the DOE for Field Demonstration of the Partners` new technologies under the DOE Class 3 Oil Program. The previous design of a special casing joint for the Oxnard field well was reviewed and adapted to the use of existing Downhole Hardware components from three suppliers, instead of one. The cost of drilling and completion of a well equipped with two horizontal drainholes was re-evaluated for the conditions prevailing in the Midway Sunset field, which are more favorable than in the Oxnard field, leading to considerable reductions in drilling rig time and cost.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Abstract: Isochoric Heat Capacity of Light and Heavy Water at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isochoric Heat Capacity of Light and Heavy Water at Subcritical and Supercritical Conditions. IM Abdulagatov, JW Magee ...

74

Experimental study on condensation heat transfer of steam on vertical titanium plates with different surface energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visual experiments were employed to investigate heat transfer characteristics of steam on vertical titanium plates with/without surface modifications for different surface energies. Stable dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation were achieved on two surface modification titanium plates, respectively. Dropwise and rivulet filmwise co-existing condensation form of steam was observed on unmodified titanium surfaces. With increase in the surface subcooling, the ratio of area ({eta}) covered by drops decreased and departure diameter of droplets increased, resulting in a decrease in condensation heat transfer coefficient. Condensation heat transfer coefficient decreased sharply with the values of {eta} decreasing when the fraction of the surface area covered by drops was greater than that covered by rivulets. Otherwise, the value of {eta} had little effect on the heat transfer performance. Based on the experimental phenomena observed, the heat flux through the surface was proposed to express as the sum of the heat flux through the dropwise region and rivulet filmwise region. The heat flux through the whole surface was the weighted mean value of the two regions mentioned above. The model presented explains the gradual change of heat transfer coefficient for transition condensation with the ratio of area covered by drops. The simulation results agreed well with the present experimental data when the subcooling temperature is lower than 10 C. (author)

Baojin, Qi; Li, Zhang; Hong, Xu; Yan, Sun [State-Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Combined cycle electric power plant and a heat recovery steam generator having improved boiler feed pump flow control  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant is described that includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes an economizer tube and a high pressure evaporator tube and a boiler feed pump for directing the heat exchange fluid serially through the aforementioned tubes. A condenser is associated with the steam turbine for converting the spent steam into condensate water to be supplied to a deaerator for removing undesired air and for preliminarily heating the water condensate before being pumped to the economizer tube. Condensate flow through the economizer tube is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the boiler feed pump at a predetermined, substantially constant rate. A bypass conduit is provided to feed back a portion of the flow heated in the economizer tube to the deaerator; the portion being equal to the difference between the constant flow through the economizer tube and the flow to be directed through the high pressure evaporator tube as required by the steam turbine for its present load.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1976-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

76

Steady-state heat transfer in an inverted U-tube steam generator  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results are presented involving U-tube steam generator tube bundle local heat transfer and fluid conditions during steady-state, full-power operations performed at high temperatures and pressures with conditions typical of a pressurized water reactor (15.0 MPa primary pressure, 600 K hot-leg fluid temperatures, 6.2 MPa secondary pressure). The MOD-2C facility represents the state-of-the-art in measurement of tube local heat transfer data and average tube bundle secondary fluid density at several elevations, which allows an estimate of the axial heat transfer and void distributions during steady-state and transient operations. The method of heat transfer data reduction is presented and the heat flux, secondary convective heat transfer coefficient, and void fraction distributions are quantified for steady-state, full-power operations.

Boucher, T.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Heat Transfer Limitations in Hydrogen Production Via Steam Reformation: The Effect of Reactor Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ratio Parameters in Steam-Reforming Hydrogen productionan Insufficient Parameter in the Steam-Reforming Process,”Impurities on the Methanol Steam-Reforming Process for Fuel

Vernon, David R.; Davieau, David D.; Dudgeon, Bryce A.; Erickson, Paul A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figures A typical wet steam Rankine cycle on a temperature-A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating2011 Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Guidelines for the Nondestructive Examination of Heat Recovery Steam Generators, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) have become more complex over the last 20 years, operating with multiple pressures and temperatures, operators have experienced an increasing suite of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report provides guidance on the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of HRSGs so that operators will know what types of NDE to perform and where to perform them.BackgroundModern HRSGs have numerous varieties available within the ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Study for Snake Robot Technology for Inspection of Headers and Tubes in Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tubing is especially difficult to inspect using conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques because: The tubing is tightly bundled, with interior bundle tubing typically inaccessible by conventional equipment without cutting and later repairing the exterior tubes. The tubing is finned and, since ultrasonic techniques require solid contact with the tube, cannot be accessed unless the tubing is cut away. Access to the inside of the tubes is difficult, requi...

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Procurement Guideline: HRSG Design Best Practices and Specification for Cyclic Duty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of best practices for designing a new heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) for cycling and rapid start duty, including typical performance requirements and suggestions for design improvements to improve the HRSGs ability to handle cyclic operation. This document also provides a generic procurement specification for the definition and purchase of an HRSG for installation downstream of a combustion turbine. It includes both horizontal and vertical configuration options. The...

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluation of Thermal-, Creep-, and Corrosion-Fatigue of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Pressure Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide fleet of combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) has exhibited a disappointing track record with respect to reliability and availability in terms of fatigue HRSG tube failures (HTF) which are thermal transient driven. This report, which forms part of a series, will assist designer, owners, and operators with the technical basis to facilitate specifying, designing, and operating HRSG in a manner to minimize fatigue damage.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Procurement Specification for Horizontal Gas Path Heat Recovery Steam Generator: Avoiding Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with F-class gas turbines that are also subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures because of excessive thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

HRSG Startup and Shutdown Guidelines for Avoiding Heat Recovery Steam Generator Pressure Part Failures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the damage to heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) pressure parts is caused by transiently high thermal-mechanical stresses that occur during shutdown and startup, along with cycle chemistry changes imposed by cyclic operation. Unit shutdown and startup impose considerably more potential for cumulative pressure part damage than stable on-load operation does. Essentially every HRSG damage mechanism is exacerbated by cyclic operationeither directly, through transiently high localized stresses appli...

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

Troubleshooting Guide for Thermal Transients in Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the period 2000-2009 EPRI developed ten reports and guidance documents on Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) thermal transients. Collectively, these documents provide the information required to identify, address, and minimize thermal transients in HRSG superheaters, reheaters, economizers, and evaporators. This summary report offers an overview of this EPRI work on HRSG transients organized to guide the reader to pertinent sections in the original reports and facilitate troubleshooting.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Start Date 11/30/2009 Expiration Date 03/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $286/system Provider Duquesne Light Company Duquesne Light provides rebates to its residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a flat rebate of $286 per qualifying system. Various equipment, installation, contractor, and warranty requirements apply, as summarized above and described in more detail in program documents. Customers must

87

Development of Technologies on Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Using High-Efficiency Steam Injectors (12) Evaluations of Spatial Distributions of Flow and Heat Transfer in Steam Injector  

SciTech Connect

Next-generation nuclear reactor systems have been under development aiming at simplified system and improvement of safety and credibility. One of the innovative technologies is the supersonic steam injector, which has been investigated as one of the most important component of the next-generation nuclear reactor. The steam injector has functions of a passive pump without large motor or turbo-machinery and a high efficiency heat exchanger. The performances of the supersonic steam injector as a pump and a heat exchanger are dependent on direct contact condensation phenomena between a supersonic steam and a sub-cooled water jet. In previous studies of the steam injector, there are studies about the operating characteristics of steam injector and about the direct contact condensation between static water pool and steam in atmosphere. However, there is a little study about the turbulent heat transfer and flow behavior under the great shear stress. In order to examine the heat transfer and flow behavior in supersonic steam injector, it is necessary to measure the spatial temperature distribution and velocity in detail. The present study, visible transparent supersonic steam injector is used to obtain the axial pressure distributions in the supersonic steam injector, as well as high speed visual observation of water jet and steam interface. The experiments are conducted with and without non-condensable gas. The experimental results of the interfacial flow behavior between steam and water jet are obtained. It is experimentally clarified that an entrainment exists on the water jet surface. It is also clarified that discharge pressure is depended on the steam supply pressure, the inlet water flow rate, the throat diameter and non-condensable flow rate. Finally a heat flux is estimated about 19 MW/m{sup 2} without non-condensable gas condition in steam. (authors)

Yutaka Abe; Yujiro Kawamoto [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Chikako Iwaki [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Tadashi Narabayashi [Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo (Japan); Michitsugu Mori; Shuichi Ohmori [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Dynamic Underground Stripping: In situ steam sweeping and electrical heating to remediate a deep hydrocarbon spill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic Underground Stripping is a combination of in situ steam injection, electrical resistance heating, and fluid extraction for rapid removal and recovery of subsurface contaminants such as solvents or fuels. Underground imaging and other measurement techniques monitor the system in situ for process control. Field tests at a deep gasoline spill at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recovered over 7000 gallons of gasoline during several months of field operations. Preliminary analysis of system cost and performance indicate that Dynamic Underground Stripping compares favorably with conventional pump-and-treat and vacuum extraction schemes for removing non-aqueous phase liquids such as gasoline from deep subsurface plumes.

Yow, J.L. Jr.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.; Udell, K.S.; Ziagos, J.P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IOUT *MEBP *STC(QAAN. R )-STEAM TURBINE CALC. ~ETFQMIN~5 ST~KJ/S) 1JC. /(GROSS STEAM TURBINE POWER PRODUCTION) STEA~ GENprogram then prints the steam turbine results. All flows in

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON VAP,+DIST. STEAM lP TOTAL FLOW TOTAL CONDENSATE 29731U 1+DIST. STEAM LP TOTAL FLOW TOTAL CONDENSATE POWER GENERATED

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

HRE-3 BLANKET HEAT EXCHANGER AS A FEEDWATER REACTOR RATHER THAN AS A STEAM GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

There may be an advantage to designing the HRE-3 vertical shell and tube slurry heat exchanger as a feedwater heater rather than as a steam generator from the standpoint of space requirement and blowdown problems. This study of the effect of this arrangement on the thermal efficiency of the heat-power cycle indicates that the gross electrical generating capacity of HRE-3 would be reduced by about 500-kw, or about 3 to 4% of the output. It is concluded that, (a) there is sufficient merit in using the exchanger as a feedwater heater to warrant continued study of the concept, and (b) the effect on the thermal efficiency is so small as to not be a major deciding influence. (auth)

Robertson, R.C.

1958-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

92

Characterization of Elevated Temperature Properties of Heat Exchanger and Steam Generator Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800°C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950°C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600°C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. In general dynamic strain aging is observed to begin at higher temperatures and serrated flow persists to higher temperatures in Alloy 617 compared to Alloy 800H. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. The role of dynamic strain aging in the creep-fatigue behavior of Alloy 617 at temperatures of 800°C and above has also been examined in detail. Serrated flow is found to persist in cyclic stress-strain curves up to nearly the cycle to failure in some temperature and strain regimes. Results of those experiments and implications for creep-fatigue testing protocols will be described.

J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; R.N. Wright; W.R. Lloyd; J.A. Chapman

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

CHARACTERIZATION OF ELEVATED TEMPERATURE PROPERTIES OF HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR ALLOYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is considering Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 for steam generator and intermediate heat exchangers. It is envisioned that a steam generator would operate with reactor outlet temperatures from 750 to 800 C, while an intermediate heat exchanger for primary to secondary helium would operate up to an outlet temperature of 950 C. Although both alloys are of interest due in part to their technical maturity, a number of specific properties require further characterization for design of nuclear components. Strain rate sensitivity of both alloys has been characterized and is found to be significant above 600 C. Both alloys also exhibit dynamic strain aging, characterized by serrated flow, over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. High temperature tensile testing of Alloy 617 has been conducted over a range of temperatures. Dynamic strain aging is a concern for these materials since it is observed to result in reduced ductility for many solid solution alloys. Creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue properties of Alloy 617 have been measured as well, with the goal of determining the influence of the temperature, strain rate and atmosphere on the creep fatigue life of Alloy 617. Elevated temperature properties and implications for codification of the alloys will be described.

J.K. Wright; L.J. Carroll; C.J. Cabet; T. Lillo; J.K. Benz; J.A. Simpson; A. Chapman; R.N. Wright

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

ORCENT2. Nuclear Steam Turbine Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect

ORCENT2 performs heat and mass balance calculations at valves-wide-open design conditions, maximum guaranteed rating conditions, and an approximation of part-load conditions for steam turbine cycles supplied with throttle steam, characteristic of contemporary light-water reactors. The program handles both condensing and back-pressure turbine exhaust arrangements. Turbine performance calculations are based on the General Electric Company method for 1800-rpm large steam turbine-generators operating with light-water-cooled nuclear reactors. Output includes all information normally shown on a turbine-cycle heat balance diagram.

Fuller, L.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab, TN (United States)

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibration in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers. In the nuclear industry, steam generators are often affected by this problem. However, flow-induced vibration is not limited to nuclear power plants, but to any type of heat exchanger used in many industrial applications such as chemical processing, refrigeration and air conditioning. Specifically, shell and tube type heat exchangers experience flow-induced vibration due to the high velocity flow over the tube banks. Flow-induced vibration in these heat exchangers leads to equipment breakdown and hence expensive repair and process shutdown. The goal of this research is to provide accurate measurements that can help modelers to validate their models using the measured experimental parameters and thereby develop better design criteria for avoiding fluid-elastic instability in heat exchangers. The research is divided between two primary experimental efforts, the first conducted using water alone (single phase) and the second using a mixture of air or steam and water as the working fluid (two phase). The outline of this report is as follows: After the introduction to fluid-elastic instability, the experimental apparatus constructed to conduct the experiments is described in Chapter 2 along with the measurement procedures. Chapter 3 presents results obtained on the tube array and the flow loop, as well as techniques used in data processing. The project performance is described and evaluated in Chapter 4 followed by a discussion of publications and presentations relevant to the project in Chapter 5, while the conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented in Chapter 6.

Catton, Ivan; Dhir, Vijay K.; Alquaddoomi, O.S.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Adinolfi, Pierangelo

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Downward two-phase flow effects in heat-loss and pressure-drop modeling of steam injection wells  

SciTech Connect

Modelling of the pressure drop and heat loss in steam injection wells has undergone a gradual evolution since the heavy interest in enhanced oil recovery by steam injection in the mid-60's. After briefly reviewing the evolution of steam models this paper presents a model which advances the state-of-the-art of steam modelling. The main advance presented in this paper is modelling the effects of the various flow regimens that occur during steam injection. The paper describes the formulation of a two-phase downward vertical flow pressure drop model which is not limited by the ''no-slip'' homogeneous flow assumptions in most previously published models. By using different correlations for mist, bubble, and slug flow, improved pressure drop calculations result, which in turn improve temperature predictions. The paper describes how the model handles temperature predictions differently in the single and two-phase steam flow situations. The paper also describes special features in the model to account for layered soil properties, soil dry out, cyclic injection, coupling heat losses, and reflux boiling in wet annuli. Two examples problems are presented which illustrate some of these features.

Galate, J.W.; Mitchell, R.F.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Union Light, Heat & Power Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Union Light, Heat & Power Co Union Light, Heat & Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Union Light, Heat & Power Co Place Kentucky Utility Id 19446 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Union Light, Heat & Power Co (Kentucky). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

98

Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting August 14, 2013 - 1:39pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy bills for American families and businesses and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the Energy Department today announced 12 projects to develop innovative heating, cooling and insulation technologies as well as open source energy efficiency software to help homes and commercial buildings save energy and money. These projects will receive an approximately $11 million Energy Department investment, matched by about $1 million in private sector funding. "Energy efficient technologies - from improved heating and cooling

99

Evaluation of a once-through heat recovery steam generator concept: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) evaluation of a once-through concept for a combined-cycle heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The project included a review of differences in reliability and maintainability characteristics of the once-through concept and a typical drum-type HRSG design. A special effort was placed on an investigation of the expected performance of the thin-wall alloy 800 boiler tubing used in the once-through HRSG. An analysis was performed by using the UNIRAM computer modeling methodology to compare the predicted availability of the once-through HRSG design with that of a drum-type system. The results of this project provide a basis for understanding the RAM characteristics of the once-through HRSG concept and identify areas where additional research may be beneficial in evaluating this new design for application within the utility industry. 28 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Babione, R.A.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Proceedings: International Conference on Boiler Tube Failures and Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) Tube Failures and Inspections  

SciTech Connect

Tube failures remain the leading cause of availability loss in conventional fossil plants and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) plants. These conference proceedings address state-of-the-art practices and techniques worldwide for understanding and reducing tube failures.

None

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Diagnostic/Troubleshooting Monitoring to Identify Damaging Cycle Chemistry or Thermal Transients in Heat Recovery Steam Generator Pressure Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide fleet of combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) has exhibited a disappointing track record with respect to reliability and availability in terms of HRSG tube failures (HTFs). This report will assist operators in identifying the harmful chemical and thermal transient excursions that lead to failure.

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Steam Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is used in many plants to furnish both heat and mechanical energy. It is typically produced in several fired boilers which may operate at different pressures and with different efficiencies. It is then distributed throughout the plant to the various users in steam distribution systems, each one operating at a different pressure and temperature. This paper examines various ways to cost steam and discusses the importance of proper costing. Specifically it addresses three types of steam costs; Marginal Costs, Project Evaluation Costs and Financial Costs.

Jones, K. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluation of a sulfur oxide chemical heat storage process for a steam solar electric plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate technically feasible process configurations for the use of the sulfur oxide system, 2 SO/sub 3/ reversible 2 SO/sub 2/ + O/sub 2/, in energy storage. The storage system is coupled with a conventional steam-cycle power plant. Heat for both the power plant and the storage system is supplied during sunlit hours by a field of heliostats focussed on a central solar receiver. When sunlight is not available, the storage system supplies the heat to operate the power plant. A technically feasible, relatively efficient configuration is proposed for incorporating this type of energy storage system into a solar power plant. Complete material and energy balances are presented for a base case that represents a middle range of expected operating conditions. Equipment sizes and costs were estimated for the base case to obtain an approximate value for the cost of the electricity that would be produced from such an installation. In addition, the sensitivity of the efficiency of the system to variations in design and operating conditions was determined for the most important parameters and design details. In the base case the solar tower receives heat at a net rate of 230 MW(t) for a period of eight hours. Daytime electricity is about 30 MW(e). Nighttime generation is at a rate of about 15 MW(e) for a period of sixteen hours. The overall efficiency of converting heat into electricity is about 26%. The total capital cost for the base case is estimated at about $68 million, of which about 67% is for the tower and heliostats, 11% is for the daytime power plant, and 22% is for the storage system. The average cost of the electricity produced for the base case is estimated to be about 11 cents/kW(e)-hr.

Dayan, J.; Lynn, S.; Foss, A.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Experimental Investigation on Thermal Properties of a Steel-jacketed Steam Heating Pipeline with Vacuum Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steel-jacketed steam heating pipeline employs vacuum insulation to improve the insulating effect and reduce the corrosion, and hence increases the heat transfer efficiency of the heating network and building energy efficiency. It is important in improving the thermal insulation to investigate the impact of factors that insulate the effects and thermal properties of the pipeline. The thermal insulation of this pipeline comprises the vacuum layer and the insulating material layer. Experiments were performed to measure the combined heat transfer and equivalent thermal conductivities of the insulating material in the vacuum and rarefied air employed in the pipeline's insulation. The thermal properties of this type of insulation at vacuum pressures of 0.5~1013mbar, employing thermal media temperatures of 343~573K and with different thicknesses of vacuum layer, are discussed for this pipeline, for which diameters of inner steel pipe/steel jacket are DN50/DN250, DN100/DN300, DN200/DN500 and DN500/DN850, respectively. The results show that reduction in vacuum pressure reduces the heat loss in the pipeline. The equivalent thermal conductivity of the insulating material layer is distinctively lower than the vacuum layer, but decreasing the vacuum pressure improves the insulating effect of vacuum layer substantially more than insulating the material layer. As the vacuum pressure decreases from 1013mbar (atmospheric pressure) to 10mbar at the thermal media temperature of 523K e.g., the reduction of equivalent thermal conductivities of vacuum layer is approximately three times greater than that of insulating material layer. The equivalent thermal conductivities of the vacuum layer are lower and decease faster as the vacuum pressure is lower than 100mbar, but the equivalent thermal conductivities of insulating material layer are lower and decease faster as the vacuum pressure is lower than 50mbar. The pressure in vacuum insulation should be controlled lower than 20mbar to achieve desirable insulating effects. Every 10mm addition of thickness of insulating material layer (every 10mm reduction of thickness of vacuum layer) decreases the heat loss of approximately 6.8 percent at the vacuum pressure of 0.5mbar.

Na, W.; Zou, P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Steam driven markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for steam equipment has been relatively level. Looking ahead, manufacturers anticipate steady market growth worldwide. Steam equipment manufacturers share a similar view of the market for next few years - upward. The steady upward climb is being attributed to a number of factors that will benefit steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) makers.

Anderson, J.L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Performance Calculations and Optimization of a Fresnel Direct Steam Generation CSP Plant with Heat Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This master thesis deals with the performance calculations of a 9MW linear Fresnel CSP plant withdirect steam generation built by the Solar Division of… (more)

Schlaifer, Perrine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Boiler steam engine with steam recovery and recompression  

SciTech Connect

A boiler type of steam engine is described which uses a conventional boiler with an external combustion chamber which heats water in a pressure chamber to produce steam. A mixing chamber is used to mix the steam from the boiler with recovered recompressed steam. Steam from the mixing chamber actuates a piston in a cylinder, thereafter the steam going to a reservoir in a heat exchanger where recovered steam is held and heated by exhaust gases from the combustion chamber. Recovered steam is then recompressed while being held saturated by a spray of water. Recovered steam from a steam accumulator is then used again in the mixing chamber. Thus, the steam is prevented from condensing and is recovered to be used again. The heat of the recovered steam is saved by this process.

Vincent, O.W.

1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) to make additionalAuxiliary Power Block Steam turbine generator using steam

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

110

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fast Heating of Cylindrically Imploded Plasmas by Petawatt Laser Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We produced cylindrically imploded plasmas, which have the same density-radius product of the imploded plasma {rho}R with the compressed core in the fast ignition experiment and demonstrated efficient fast heating of cylindrically imploded plasmas with an ultraintense laser light. The coupling efficiency from the laser to the imploded column was 14%-21%, implying strong collimation of energetic electrons over a distance of 300 {mu}m of the plasma. Particle-in-cell simulation shows confinement of the energetic electrons by self-generated magnetic and electrostatic fields excited along the imploded plasmas, and the efficient fast heating in the compressed region.

Nakamura, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Yabuuchi, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Sentoku, Y. [Nevada Terawatt Facility, Department of Physics, MS-220, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Matsuoka, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Shiraga, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kondo, K.; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kodama, R. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-1, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Yamada-oka 2-6, Suita, Osaka (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 5-Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

112

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

storage is essential if solar power plants are ever tostorage system into a solar power plant. Complete materialdaytime-only steam-cycle solar power plant, then about two-

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Solar heat gain through a skylight in a light well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed heat flow measurements on a skylight mounted on a light well of significant depth are presented. It is shown that during the day much of the solar energy that strikes the walls of the well does not reach the space below. Instead, this energy is trapped in the stratified air of the light well and eventually either conducted through the walls of the well or back out through the skylight. The standard model for predicting fenestration heat transfer does not agree with the measurements when it is applied to the skylight/well combination as a whole (the usual practice), but does agree reasonably well when it is applied to the skylight alone, using the well air temperature near the skylight. A more detailed model gives good agreement. Design implications and future research directions are discussed.

Klems, J.H.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Heat Transfer Limitations in Hydrogen Production Via Steam Reformation: The Effect of Reactor Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ohsawa, Katsuyuki, “Heat Transfer Enhancement in Methanolsin the Catalyst Bed”, Heat Transfer-Asian Research, Vol.CA FUELCELL2006-97109 HEAT TRANSFER LIMITATIONS IN HYDROGEN

Vernon, David R.; Davieau, David D.; Dudgeon, Bryce A.; Erickson, Paul A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

SteamMaster: Steam System Analysis Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As director of Oregon's Industrial Assessment Center, I have encountered many industrial steam systems during plant visits. We analyze steam systems and make recommendations to improve system efficiency. In nearly 400 industrial assessments, we have recommended 210 steam system improvements, excluding heat recovery, that would save $1.5 million/year with a 0.4-year payback. 75% of those recommendations have been implemented for $1.1 million annual savings with 0.3-year payback. Recently I have developed a tool to facilitate the process. SteamMaster is based on an Excel spreadsheet with a Visual Basic interface to simplify system modeling and analysis. SteamMaster has many features and capabilities, including energy and cost savings calculations for five steam recommendations. This presentation will demonstrate SteamMaster software applied to one or more industrial steam systems. Software will be made available on a national web site at no cost.

Wheeler, G.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Utilities Sell Lighting, Cooling and Heating to Large Customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry is entering an era of unprecedented competition. Competition from traditional sources such as natural gas companies, customer cogeneration, and independent power producers are being joined by new sources of competition, namely, other electric utilities. Compounding this situation are two recent occurrences: 1) the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 which encourages wheeling, and 2) the trend toward institutional and industrial customers outsourcing energy generation and production facilities to third-parties. The electric utility industry is searching for ways to combat this competition, develop more value-added services for their customers, and establish long-term contractual relationships with their important customers. Many utilities are considering selling customers not just electrical energy but the more usable forms of energy like lumens of light, chilled water, hot water, and steam. This paper and presentation will outline the recent and near future electric utility operating environment, introduce the numerous benefits that electric utilities derive from selling end-use output, and outline a number of utility efforts to develop end-use products and services.

Horne, M. L.; Zien, H. B.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. [43] WHOembody a stand-alone solar heating system. It is assumedrecent growth in solar-thermal heating (Weiss et al. [42]),

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. The Receiver .. Heat Exchanger 1 . 3. The Condensers .Reactors. LTR Heat Exchangers Electricity Generating Systemu.rJO u .. OU t. :ovO DoD HEAT EXCHANGERS LOAD (KW'? RECUP =

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the waste heat, a condenser is much preferable, inheat rejection in a condenser. Making a few approximationspressure heat rejection in a condenser across a temperature

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power Systemfor Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Powerin parabolic trough solar power technology. Journal of Solar

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat Recoveryi.e. combustion turbine, steam turbine (if applicable), heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Steam in Distribution and Use: Steam Quality Redefined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam quality is an important measurement in steam generation. It's a measurement of steam to moisture ratio. In use, steam quality takes on a different meaning- steam which maximizes energy transfer. To do this, the steam must be clean, dry, of desired pressure and free of air and non-condensible gases. Objectives in these areas should be set and an action plan implemented. Typical objectives could be to specify steam pressure delivery of maximum pressure and to use steam at the lowest pressure possible. Steam velocity ranges and maximum system pressure drops should be set. Cleaning steam and protecting control devices is an important means of maintaining quality. Draining condensate and venting air and other gases preserves the steam quality at the point of use. Poor pressure control yields poor operation and efficiency. Dirty steam causes valve leaks and maintenance problems. Improper drainage and venting can cause premature corrosion and poor heat transfer.

Deacon, W. T.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Steam in Distribution and Use: Steam Quality Redefined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Steam quality is an important measurement in steam generation. It's a measurement of steam to moisture ratio. In use, steam quality takes on a different meaning - steam which maximizes energy transfer. To do this, the steam must be clean, dry, of desired pressure and free of air and non-condensable gases. Objectives in these areas should be set and an action plan implemented. Typical objectives could be to specify steam pressure delivery of maximum pressure and to use steam at the lowest pressure possible. Steam velocity ranges and maximum system pressure drops should be set. Cleaning steam and protecting control devices is an important means of maintaining quality. Draining condensate and venting air and other gases preserves the steam quality at the point of use. Poor pressure control yields poor operation and efficiency. Dirty steam causes valve leaks and maintenance problems. Improper drainage and venting can cause premature corrosion and poor heat transfer."

Deacon, W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Performance comparison between partial oxidation and methane steam reforming processes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro combined heat and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance comparison between partial oxidation and methane steam reforming processes for solid recirculation are used along with steam methane reforming. Further Steam Methane Reforming process produces Cell fueled by natural gas with two different types of pre-reforming systems, namely Steam Reforming

Liso, Vincenzo

125

Heat transfer characteristics of porous sludge deposits and their impact on the performance of commercial steam generators  

SciTech Connect

Steam generator (SG) fouling, in the form of corrosion deposits on the secondary sides of SG tubes, has been known to occur in almost all commercial US nuclear PWR (pressurized water reactor) plants. The level of fouling, as measured by the quantity of corrosion products that form, varies widely from plant to plant. In addition, the effect of SG fouling, as measured by a decrease in effective heat-transfer coefficient, has also varied substantially among commercial US plants. While some have observed large decreases in heat transfer, others have noted little change in performance despite the presence of significant quantities of secondary corrosion layers on their SG tubes. This observation has led to considerable confusion about what role secondary deposits play in causing heat-transfer degradation in SGs. As will become clear later in this report, secondary deposits can have a wide range of effects on heat transfer, from highly resistive to slightly enhancing (reflected by negative fouling). These different behaviors are the result of differences in deposit thickness, composition, and morphology. The main focus of this report is an investigation of the effects of secondary deposits on SG thermal performance. This investigation includes compilation of detailed information on the properties of tube scale at five commercial US nuclear plants and corresponding information characterizing SG thermal performance at these plants.

Kreider, M.A.; White, G.A.; Varrin, R.D.; Ouzts, P.J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Nuclear steam turbines for power production in combination with district heating and desalination  

SciTech Connect

The optimization of the turbine plant of a nuclear power station in combination with heat production is dependent upon many factors, the most important being the heat requirements, full-load equivalent operating time, and the heat transport distance, i.e., the trunk mains' costs. With hot-water-based heat transport, this usually results in a large temperature difference between supply and return water and heating in two or three stages. The turbine can consist of a back-pressure turbine, a back-pressure turbine with condensing tail, or a condensing turbine with heat extractions. The most attractive solution from technical as well as economic points of view is the condensing turbine with extraction for district heating or desalination as appropriate. The turbines can be of conventional design, with only minor modifications needed to adapt them to the operating conditions concerned.

Frilund, B.; Knudsen, K.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Steam System Balancing and Tuning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing and Steam System Balancing and Tuning Building America Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX Jayne Choi, Energy Analyst, CNT Energy March 2, 2012 PARR Current collaboration with GTI as a part of the PARR Building America team - Steam Systems Balancing and Tuning Study - Heating season 2011-2012 Background In Chicago, heating is the focus of residential energy use Of the 470,000 multifamily units in the Chicago region, at least 70,000 of those are steam heated Old steam systems invariably suffer from imbalance - Tenants must use supplemental heat or open their windows to cool their apartments during the heating season Buildings are often overheated Problem Statement (CNT Energy) Steam Heating Steam heat was the best option for buildings constructed between 1900 and 1930

128

Steam Turbine Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam turbines are widely used in most industrial facilities because steam is readily available and steam turbine is easy to operate and maintain. If designed properly, a steam turbine co-generation (producing heat and power simultaneously) system can increase energy efficiency, reduce air emissions and qualify the equipment for a Capital Cost tax Allowance. As a result, such a system benefits the stakeholders, the society and the environment. This paper describes briefly the types of steam turbine classified by their conditions of exhaust and review quickly the fundamentals related to steam and steam turbine. Then the authors will analyze a typical steam turbine co-generation system and give examples to illustrate the benefits of the System.

Quach, K.; Robb, A. G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power (CSP) troughs in the central valley of California (Pricesolar combined heat and power with desalination Figure 2.7: Comparison of desalination plants; price

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shaded regions represent power generation costs . . 11 Heat-against conventional power generation technologies when thephotovoltaic and wind power generation have recently seen

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of Design Criteria for Fluid Induced Structural Vibrations in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Flow-induced vibration in heat exchangers has been a major cause of concern in the nuclear industry for several decades. Many incidents of failure of heat exchangers due to apparent flow-induced vibration have been reported through the USNRC incident reporting system. Almost all heat exchangers have to deal with this problem during their operation. The phenomenon has been studied since the 1970s and the database of experimental studies on flow-induced vibration is constantly updated with new findings and improved design criteria for heat exchangers.

Uvan Catton; Vijay K. Dhir; Deepanjan Mitra; Omar Alquaddoomi; Pierangelo Adinolfi

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum tube liquid-vapor (heat-pipe) collectors. Proceedingsheat rejection in a condenser across a temperature gradient. This cycle ignores pressure losses in the pipes,

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BestPractices Steam tip sheet regarding ways to assess steam system efficiency. To determine the effective cost of steam, use a combined heat and power simulation model that includes all the significant effects.

Papar, R. [U.S. Department of Energy (US)

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

134

Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six  

SciTech Connect

Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make.), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries).

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of Technologies on Innovative Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Using High-Efficiency Steam Injectors (10) Application to a Small District-Heating Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to use as a passive ECCS pump and also as a direct-contact feedwater heater that heats up feedwater by using extracted steam from the turbine. In order to develop a high reliability passive ECCS pump and a compact feedwater heater, it is necessary to quantify the characteristics between physical properties of the flow field. We carried out experiments to observe the internal behavior of the water jet as well as measure the velocity of steam jet using a laser Doppler velocimetry. Its performance depends on the phenomena of steam condensation onto the water jet surface and heat transfer in the water jet due to turbulence on to the phase-interface. The analysis was also conducted by using a CFD code with the separate two-phase flow models. With regard to the simplified feed-water system, size of four-stage SI system is almost the same as the model SI that had done the steam and water test that pressures were same as that of current ABWR. The authors also conducted the hot water supply system test in the snow for a district heating. With regard to the SI core cooling system, the performance tests results showed that the low-pressure SI core cooling system will decrease the PCT to almost the same as the saturation temperature of the steam pressure in a pressure vessel. As it is compact equipment, SI is expected to bring about great simplification and materials-saving effects, while its simple structure ensures high reliability of its operation, thereby greatly contributing to the simplification of the power plant for not only an ABWR power plant but also a small PWR/ BWR for district heating system. (authors)

Tadashi Narabayashi; Yoichiro Shimadu; Toshiiro Murase; Masatoshi Nagai [Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo (Japan); Michitsugu Mori; Shuichi Ohmori [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

" "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," " " "," " ," " "NAICS Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","Establishments with Any Cogeneration Technology in Use(c)","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

137

Creation of Light and/or Surface Plasmons with Heated Metallic ...  

Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; ... Solar Thermal Creation of Light and/or Surface Plasmons with Heated Metallic Films

138

Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices tip sheet on improving efficiency of industrial steam systems by recovery latent heat from low-pressure steam.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices tip sheet on improving efficiency of industrial steam systems by recovery latent heat from low-pressure steam.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling, and Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Center (750,000 DOE investment): This project will help demonstrate a rotating heat exchanger technology for residential HVAC systems. The heat pump will improve HVAC...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Department Invests to Save on Heating, Cooling and Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Center (750,000 DOE investment): This project will help demonstrate a rotating heat exchanger technology for residential HVAC systems. The heat pump will improve HVAC...

142

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by CHP heat output P e Electrical power output of system Qratio of thermal to electrical power output R d Desiredratio of thermal to electrical power output T a Ambient

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

EVALUATION OF A SULFUR OXIDE CHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE PROCESS FOR A STEAM SOLAR ELECTRIC PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat available at night) Gas Turbine Work Table 3.2. StreamTurbine (small turbine) Gas Turbine Parasitic Power BFW PumpHours) Generator Terminals Gas Turbine Parasitic Power BFW

Dayan, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decreased cost of heat and electricity grid (Casten andgrid. Chapter 1 begins with analysis of the relative demand for electricity and heatheat can be cost-effectively stored with available technologies. (c) DCS-CHP thus can ameliorate grid-

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. (6) Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform. (7) Implementation of a moving-window technique in the time domain for detecting and quantifying flaw types in tubular structures. A window zooming technique was also developed for flaw location in tubes. (8) Theoretical study of elastic wave propagation (longitudinal and shear waves) in metallic flat plates and tubing with and without flaws. (9) Simulation of the Lamb wave propagation using the finite-element code ABAQUS. This enabled the verification of the experimental results. The research tasks included both analytical research and experimental studies. The experimental results helped to enhance the robustness of fault monitoring methods and to provide a systematic verification of the analytical results. The results of this research were disseminated in scientific meetings. A journal manuscript was submitted for publication. The new findings of this research have potential applications in aerospace and civil structures. The report contains a complete bibliography that was developed during the course of the project.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

146

Retrofitted feedwater heat storage for steam electric power stations peaking power engineering study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting existing nuclear or fossil-fueled steam power plants with feedwater thermal energy storage (TES) systems for peaking power applications was investigated. A major objective of the study was to determine if retrofitted thermal energy storage (RTES) systems could result in significant fuel savings in oil- and gas-fired peaking plants. From this study it was concluded that RTES require high capital expenditure, excessive plant downtime for installation (16 mo for fossil-fuel; 24 mo for nuclear), that retrofitting 17,000 MWe of coal and nuclear plants would result in only about 2 percent annual savings in oil consumed by the U.S. utility industry in 1974, and that the technical questions which remain could best be answered by retrofitting a relatively new reliable plant as a test facility. The utility industry is receptive to the TES concept but not to the RTES concept. It is recommended that no further effort be expended on RTES, that TES studies should concentrate on coal and nuclear plants, and that a TES Proof-of-Concept Facility should be designed and constructed. (LCL)

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Interaction of lighting, heating, and cooling systems in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of building lighting and HVAC systems, and the effects on cooling load and lighting system performance, are being evaluated using a full-scale test facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from a number of test configurations are described, including lighting system efficiency and cooling load due to lighting. The effect of lighting and HVAC system design and operation on performance is evaluated. Design considerations are discussed.

Treado, S.J.; Bean, J.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Steam assisted gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine is disclosed which has an integral steam power system consisting of heat absorbing boilers which convert an unpressurized liquid into an expanded and heated steam by utilizing heat normally lost through component cooling systems and the exhaust system. Upon completion of the steam power cycle, the steam is condensed back to a liquid state through a condensing system located within the compressor and other functional components of the gas turbine engine. A system of high pressure air and friction seals restrict steam or liquid condensate within designed flow bounds. The gas turbine engine disclosed is designed to give improved fuel efficiency and economy for aircraft and land use applications.

Coronel, P.D.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) to make additional steam foras electricity through HRSG and steam cycle in the steamof FT liquids distribution HRSG CO 2 capture Heat exchanger

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Building America Expert Meeting Final Report: Multifamily Hydronic and Steam Heating Controls and Distribution Retrofits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydronic Hydronic Heating in Multifamily Buildings Jordan Dentz The ARIES Collaborative October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

151

Downhole steam injector  

SciTech Connect

An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

Donaldson, A. Burl (Albuquerque, NM); Hoke, Donald E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Options for Generating Steam Efficiently  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes how plant engineers can efficiently generate steam when there are steam generators and Heat Recovery Steam Generators in their plant. The process consists of understanding the performance characteristics of the various equipment as a function of load and operating them close to the maximum efficiency point.

Ganapathy, V.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Air-Source Heat Pumps for Residential and Light Commercial Space Conditioning Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology brief provides the latest information on current and emerging air-source heat pump technologies for space heating and space cooling of residential and light commercial buildings. Air-source heat pumps provide important options that can reduce ownership costs while reducing noise and enhancing reliability and customer comfort. The tech brief also describes new air-source heat pumps with an important load shaping and demand response option.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cycle Chemistry Guidelines for Shutdown, Layup, and Startup of Combined Cycle Units with Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete optimization of cycle chemistry in a combined-cycle unit requires more than proper selection and optimization of operating chemistry. Protection of the steam-water cycle also is essential during shutdown, layup, and startup phases. These guidelines consider protection of steam- and water-touched components at these times, consistent with the operating cycle chemistries in use.

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO STEAM GENERATING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear power plant is designed using a heavy-watermoderated, steam- cooled reactor. In this plant, feed water is heated by the moderator and reactor steam to form feed steam, which is then superheated by superheated reactor steam and expanded through a nozzle. The feed steam issuing from the nozzie has added to it the superheated reactor steam, and the resulting steam is compressed, heated further in the reactor, and part of it passed to the turbine. (D.L.C.)

Bauer, S.G.; Jubb, D.H.

1962-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

Combined gas turbine and steam turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a power plant arrangement having a gas turbine, a heat recovery steam generator, a steam turbine and means for controlling steam flow from the heat recovery steam generator to the steam turbine. Steam conditions are maintained generally constant and variations in power plant loading are carried by the steam turbine while operating the gas turbine at a generally constant fuel flow.

Baker, J.M.; Clark, G.W.; Harper, D.M.; Tomlinson, L.O.

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

IMPROVEMENTS IN STEAM GENERATING PLANT AND AN IMPROVED METHOD OF GENERATING STEAM  

SciTech Connect

A steam generating plant, designed for heat transfer from a liquid metal (potassium, sodium, or their alloy) with reduced danger of explosion, is based on the fact that, if steam (especially superheated) rather than water contacts the liquid metal, the risk of explosion is much reduced. In this plant steam is superheated by heat transfer from liquid metal, the steam bsing generated by heat transfer between the superheated steam and water. Diagrams are given for the plant, which comprises a series of heat exchangers in which steam is superheated; part of the superheated steam is recycled to convert water into steam. Apart from the danger of a steam--liquid metal contact, the main danger is that the superheated steam might cool, coming to the saturated condition; this danger can be averted by setting up mceans for detecting low steam temperatures. (D.L.C.)

Zoller, R.E.

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

List of Steam-system upgrades Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

upgrades Incentives upgrades Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 100 Steam-system upgrades Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 100) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Steam-system upgrades Water Heaters Windows Biodiesel Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Ethanol Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Photovoltaics Renewable Fuels Solar Water Heat Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Natural Gas Yes Ameren Missouri (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Program (Missouri) Utility Rebate Program Missouri Commercial

159

Life cycle assessment of an energy-system with a superheated steam dryer integrated in a local district heat and power plant  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a method for analyzing and assessing the environmental impact of a material, product or service throughout the entire life cycle. In this study 100 GWh heat is to be demanded by a local heat district. A mixture of coal and wet biofuel is frequently used as fuel for steam generation (Case 1). A conversion of the mixed fuel to dried biofuel is proposed. In the district it is also estimated that it is possible for 4000 private houses to convert from oil to wood pellets. It is proposed that sustainable solution to the actual problem is to combine heat and power production together with an improvement in the quality of wood residues and manufacture of pellets. It is also proposed that a steam dryer is integrated to the system (Case 2). Most of the heat from the drying process is used by the municipal heating networks. In this study the environmental impact of the two cases is examined with LCA. Different valuation methods shows the Case 2 is an improvement over Case 1, but there is diversity in the magnitudes of environmental impact in the comparison of the cases. The differences depend particularly on how the emissions of CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and hydrocarbons are estimated. The impact of the organic compounds from the exhaust gas during the drying is estimated as low in all of the three used methods.

Bjoerk, H.; Rasmuson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Turbocompressor downhole steam-generating system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a downhole steam-generating system comprising: an air compressor; a steam generating unit, including: a combustor for combusting fuel with the compressed air from the compressor producing combustor exhaust products; and steam conversion means, in indirect heat-exchange relationship with the combustor, for converting water which is fed into the steam-conversion means into steam; a turbine which is rotated by the combustor exhaust products and steam from the steam-generating unit, the rotational motion of the turbine is mechanically coupled to the air compressor to drive the air compressor; and control bypass means associated with the steam generating unit and turbine for regulating the relative amounts of the combustor exhaust product and steam delivered to the turbine from the steam generating unit. The air compressor and turbine form an integral turbocompressor unit. The turbocompressor unit, steam-generating unit and control bypass means are located downhole during operation of the steam-generating system.

Wagner, W.R.

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

More Heat than Light? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

More Heat than Light? More Heat than Light? Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 09.19.11 More Heat than Light? Breakthrough solar cell harvests electricity from the sun's thermal energy. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Schematic of thermoelectric solar cell. Schematic of thermoelectric solar cell. Interest in the field of solar energy has centered until recently mainly on photovoltaic devices, which convert the sun's light into electricity. Now a team of researchers at a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) is opening an alternative path to transforming the sun's radiation directly

162

Steam generator designs  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle is any one of combinations of gas turbines, steam generators or heat recovery equipment, and steam turbines assembled for the reduction in plant cost or improvement of cycle efficiency in the utility power generation process. The variety of combined cycles discussed for the possibilities for industrial applications include gas turbine plus unfired steam generator; gas turbine plus supplementary fired steam generator; gas turbine plus furnace-fired steam generator; and supercharged furnace-fired system generator plus gas turbine. These units are large enough to meet the demands for the utility applications and with the advent of economical coal gasification processes to provide clean fuel, the combined-cycle applications are solicited. (MCW)

Clayton, W.H.; Singer, J.G.

1973-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Temperature profiles determine HRSG steam production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examine how temperature profiles affect steam production in heat recovery steam generators(HRSG). A typical gas/steam temperature profile for a HRSG is shown. Heat balance equations for the superheater, evaporator, and the complete HRSG are given along with examples for calculating the HRSG temperature profiles after assuming the pinch and approach point temperatures.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Woven graphite fiber structures for use in ultra-light weigth heat exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of U.S. Department of Energy efforts to find novel approaches for thermal management and heat recovery, work was undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate the use of graphite-based materials for heat exchanger and thermal management devices. From this effort, lightweight, robust woven graphite-fiber structures were developed which provide high conductivity paths along the direction of the graphite fibers. These structures were produced and characterized for air permeability/pressure drop and thermal (heat transfer) performance. Results have been shown to be favorable for using such structures in ultra-light weight heat exchanger applications such as vehicle radiators or other areas where light weight, compact, conformable heat transfer devices are needed.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Loveland, Erick R [ORNL; Sharp, Keith W [ORNL; Schartow, Robert [3TEX Incorporated

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally applicable to other sources of steam. The interaction of the recovery system with the plant's steam/power system has been included. Typical operating economics have been prepared. It was found that the profitability of most recovery schemes is generally dependent on the techniques used, the existing steam/power system, and the relative costs of steam and power. However, there will always be site-specific factors to consider. It is shown that direct heat exchange and thermocompression will always yield an energy profit when interacting with PRVs in the powerhouse. A set of typical comparisons between the three recovery techniques, interacting with various powerhouse and plant steam system configurations, is presented. A brief outline of the analysis techniques needed to prepare the comparison is also shown. Only operating costs are examined; capital costs are so size - and site-specific as to be impossible to generalize. The operating cost savings may be used to give an indication of investment potential.

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

FEMP-FTA--Steam Trap Performance Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam Trap Function Steam Trap Function Steam traps are automatic valves used in every steam system to remove conden- sate, air, and other non-condensable gases while preventing or minimizing the passing of steam. If condensate is allowed to collect, it reduces the flow capacity of steam lines and the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. In addition, excess condensate can lead to "water hammer," with potentially destructive and dangerous results. Air that remains after system startup reduces steam pressure and temperature and may also reduce the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. Non-condensable gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, cause corrosion. Steam that passes through the trap provides no heating ser- vice. This effectively reduces the heating capacity

167

Steam Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"STEAM QUALITY has been generally defined as the amount of moisture/vapor (or lack thereof) contained within steam produced from some form of boiler. It has long been used as the standard term for the measurement of ""wet or dry"" steam and as a means of measuring enthalpy. Totally dry steam is said to be ""saturated"" steam. It is sometimes defined as the ""dryness faction"". The term in its historical denotation refers to a physical attribute of the steam. That attribute being ""what is the percentage water vapor content of the steam"" as compared to the amount of steam. Dry saturated steam is steam which carries no water vapor with it and is defined as having a quality of 1.00 (100%). Since water vapor is always present at the interface between the water level and the steam in a boiler, some water vapor will always tend to pass through the system with the steam. Hence, a continuing problem. If steam does carry water vapor past the separators it will tend to coalesce as a liquid, and in doing so it also will carry boiler chemicals with it."

Johnston, W.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

169

FM12 & rus Steam - Steam Users' Forums  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

STORE COMMUNITY ABOUT SUPPORT Steam Users' Forums > Steam Game Discussions > D - G > Football Manager series

170

Steam compression with inner evaporative spray cooling: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adiabatic dry saturated steam compression process with inner evaporative spray cooling in screw compressors for steam heat pump systems is studied. Thermodynamic model and simulation of this variable-mass compression process are devised. Differential ... Keywords: inner evaporative spray cooling, screw compressors, simulation, steam compression, steam heat pumps, thermodynamic modelling, variable-mass compression, water injection

Jian Qui; Zhaolin Gu; Guoguang Cai

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Steam Generators Water Treatment System Electricalapplicable), heat recovery steam generators, water treatmentMW Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Optical wet steam monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Steam Power Partnership: Improving Steam System Efficiency Through Marketplace Partnerships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alliance to Save Energy, a national nonprofit organization based in Washington DC, and the U.S. Department of Energy are working with energy efficiency suppliers to promote the comprehensive upgrade of industrial steam systems. Like EPA's Green Lights and DOE's Motor Challenge, the Steam Power Partnership program will encourage industrial energy consumers to retrofit their steam plants wherever profitable. The Alliance has organized a "Steam Team" of trade associations, consulting engineering firms, and energy efficiency companies to help develop this public- private initiative.

Jones, T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Downhole steam injector. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

Donaldson, A.B.; Hoke, E.

1981-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

Change steam tapping to save energy  

SciTech Connect

Induction turbines are common in large plants. They use both high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) steam and exhaust into a surface condenser operating under vacuum. Induction turbines are especially useful since they use maximum available LP steam with a balanced amount of HP steam and thus, achieve the best overall thermodynamic efficiency. LP steam is generally available as flash steam for boiler blow down, exhausts from back pressure turbines, process waste-heat recovery, etc. Typically, an LP steam header is routed around the plant with several connections to receive and supply steam. Therefore, it is common to connect each steam user/supplier to the nearest point on the main header. The portion of the header where steam turbine exhausts are connected has superheated LP steam and the header portion which receives steam from waste heat recovery, boiler blow down, etc., has saturated LP steam. Some portion of the header has mixed steam. Thus, the temperature of LP steam in the header varies over its length.

Antony, S.M.; Joshi, G.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO STEAM-OPERATED POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear power plant is designed in which the reactor is steam-cooled and radioactivity is removed from the steam before entering the turbine. The plant has a steam circuit in which the steam from the reactor is passed through one flow path of a heat exchanger and then part of this steam is passed through contact washing equipment before being reheated in a second flow path of the heat exchanger and being led to the turbine. (D.L.C.)

Bauer, S.G.; Kendon, M.H.

1962-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

Reduced heat flow in light water (H2O) due to heavy water (D2O)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flow of heat, from top to bottom, in a column of light water can be decreased by over 1000% with the addition of heavy water. A column of light water cools from 25 C to 0 C in 11 hours, however, with the addition of heavy water it takes more than 100 hours. There is a concentration dependence where the cooling time increases as the concentration of added (D2O) increases, with a near maximum being reached with as little as 2% of (D2O) added. This phenomenon will not occur if the water is mixed after the heavy water is added.

William R. Gorman; James D. Brownridge

2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fast fluidized bed steam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam generator in which a high-velocity, combustion-supporting gas is passed through a bed of particulate material to provide a fluidized bed having a dense-phase portion and an entrained-phase portion for the combustion of fuel material. A first set of heat transfer elements connected to a steam drum is vertically disposed above the dense-phase fluidized bed to form a first flow circuit for heat transfer fluid which is heated primarily by the entrained-phase fluidized bed. A second set of heat transfer elements connected to the steam drum and forming the wall structure of the furnace provides a second flow circuit for the heat transfer fluid, the lower portion of which is heated by the dense-phase fluidized bed and the upper portion by the entrained-phase fluidized bed.

Bryers, Richard W. (Flemington, NJ); Taylor, Thomas E. (Bergenfield, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Steam reformer with catalytic combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

Voecks, Gerald E. (La Crescenta, CA)

1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reduced energy consumption by massive thermoelectric waste heat recovery in light duty trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of the EC funded HEATRECAR project is to reduce the energy consumption and curb CO2 emissions of vehicles by massively harvesting electrical energy from the exhaust system and re-use this energy to supply electrical components within the vehicle or to feed the power train of hybrid electrical vehicles. HEATRECAR is targeting light duty trucks and focuses on the development and the optimization of a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) including heat exchanger

D. Magnetto; G. Vidiella

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Thomas Reddinger Director, Steam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Distribution) Deborah Moorhead Office Coordinator III Martin Bower Steam Plant Operator Richard Redfield SteamThomas Reddinger Director, Steam Operations Steven Richards Assistant Manager of Maintenance Plant Operator Bohdan Sawa Steam Plant Operator Robert Tedesco Steam Plant Operator James Bradley

Raina, Ramesh

185

Combined plant having steam turbine and gas turbine connected by single shaft  

SciTech Connect

A combined plant including a gas turbine, a steam turbine and a waste heat recovery boiler using exhaust gases of the gas turbine as a heat source for producing steam serving as a drive source of the steam turbine further includes an ancillary steam source separate from and independent of the waste heat recovery boiler. At the time of startup of the plant, steam from the ancillary steam source is introduced into the steam turbine until the conditions for feeding air to the waste heat recovery boiler are set, to thereby avoid overheating of the steam turbine due to a windage loss.

Okabe, A.; Kashiwahara, K.; Urushidani, H.

1985-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Steam Conservation and Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines several cost-effective steam conservation and boiler plant efficiency advancements that were implemented during a recently completed central steam boiler plant replacement project at a very large semiconductor manufacturing complex. The measures include: 1) Reheating of dehumidified cleanroom make-up air with heat extracted during precooling. 2) Preheating of deionization feedwater with refrigerant heat of condensation. 3) Preheating of boiler combustion air with heat extracted from boiler flue gas. 4) Preheating of boiler feedwater with heat extracted from gas turbine exhaust. 5) Variable speed operation of boiler feedwater pumps and forced-draft fans. 6) Preheating of boiler make-up water with heat extracted from boiler surface blow-down. The first two advancements (steam conservation measures) reduced the amount of steam produced by about 25% and saved about $1,010,000/yr by using recovered waste heat rather than steam-derived heat at selected heating loads. The last four advancements (boiler plant efficiency measures) reduced the unit cost of steam produced by about 13% and saved about $293,500/yr by reducing natural gas and electricity usage at the steam boiler plant. The combined result was a 35% reduction in annual steam costs (fuel and power).

Fiorino, D. P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warm or Steaming Ground Warm or Steaming Ground Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Warm or Steaming Ground Dictionary.png Warm or Steaming Ground: An area where geothermal heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Modern Geothermal Features Typical list of modern geothermal features Hot Springs Fumaroles Warm or Steaming Ground Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes Geysers Blind Geothermal System Steam rising from the ground at Eldvorp, a 10 km row of craters, in Southwestern Iceland. http://www.visiticeland.com/SearchResults/Attraction/eldvorp Warm or steaming ground is often an indicator of a geothermal system beneath the surface. In some cases a geothermal system may not show any

189

Further experimental studies of steam-propane injection to enhance recovery of Morichal oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1998-1999, experimental research was conducted by Goite at Texas A&M University into steam-propane injection to enhance oil recovery from the Morichal field, Venezuela. Goite's results showed that, compared with steam injection alone, steam-propane injection accelerated oil production by as much as 23 % pore volume of steam injected (cold-water equivalent). The apparatus and procedure used in this study have been improved. Steam injection rate was kept constant at 5 cc/min (cold-water equivalent) for all runs. Four thermocouples were placed along the longitudinal axis of the cell to measure temperature profiles during injection. A new, more efficient method was developed to break emulsion in the produced sample. For four of the eight runs, consistent operating conditions were obtained by use of superheated steam, cell pressure of 50 psig, and identical insulation. Eight experimental runs were made in which the propane:steam mass ratios used were 0:100 (steam only), 1:100, 2.5:100, and 5:100. A run using 5:100 nitrogen: steam mass ratio was also made. The main findings of this research (derived from four runs with consistent operating conditions) are as follows. First, the propane:steam mass ratio of 5:100 accelerated the start and peak of oil production by 20 % and 13 % pore volume steam injected (cold-water equivalent), compared to steam injection alone. Second, oil recoveries for practical purposes are similar in all cases, 63 % - 70 % OOIP if average high and low values are taken. Third, the start of production is practically the same for 0:100 and 1:100 propane:steam ratio and for 5:100 nitrogen: steam ratio. In the latter case, the production peak is higher due to additional drive from nitrogen injection. Fourth, oil production acceleration in the 5:100 propane:steam case is probably caused by dry distillation in which light fractions of the oil partition into and are carried by the injected propane to lower the viscosity of the oil ahead of the steam front. Last, convective heat transfer at any of these low (5:100) ratios appears to be of secondary importance.

Ferguson,Mark Anthony

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

syngas in the Steam Methane Reformer (SMR) for syntheticabove 280?C. Steam methane reformer and heat recovery (AreaRecovery DSRP Steam Methane Reformer ZnO Sulfur polisher;

Lu, Xiaoming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

GCFR steam generator conceptual design  

SciTech Connect

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) steam generators are large once-through heat exchangers with helically coiled tube bundles. In the GCFR demonstration plant, hot helium from the reactor core is passed through these units to produce superheated steam, which is used by the turbine generators to produce electrical power. The paper describes the conceptual design of the steam generator. The major components and functions of the design are addressed. The topics discussed are the configuration, operating conditions, design criteria, and the design verification and support programs.

Holm, R.A.; Elliott, J.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between the high and low steam pressures. The discussion below shows how the savings in using low pressure steam can be above 25%! The key to the savings is not in the heat exchanger equipment or the steam trap, but is back at the powerhouse - the sensible heat requirement of the boiler feed water. Chart III shows potential steam energy savings and will be useful in estimating the steam energy savings of high pressure processes.

Vallery, S. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Adaptive temperature control system for the supply of steam to a steam turbine  

SciTech Connect

A combined-cycle steam turbine power generating plant is described including a heat recovery steam generator for outputting steam at an instantaneous temperature and pressure, and a steam turbine having rotor expanding steam therethrough from the steam generator; means providing a signal representative of the temperature of the rotor of the turbine; and means for controlling the generation of steam by the steam generator to control the temperature of steam in accordance with a predetermined temperature gradient, the combination of: function generator means responsive to a signal representative of steam turbine throttle pressure for providing a throttle pressure related steam limit temperature according to a constant enthalpy characteristic; bias means responsive to the rotor temperature representative signal for providing a bias signal in excess of the rotor temperature signal by a predetermined amount; means responsive to the larger of the limit temperature signal and the bias signal for controlling the generation of steam by the steam generator to control the temperature of steam to iteratively raise the temperature of the rotor in accordance with the constant enthalpy characteristic and the bias signal during soaking.

Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.

1986-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Evaluation of the Pulsed Eddy Current Inspection Technique Known as the Through-Fin Inspection System for Heat Recovery Steam Genera tors (T-FISH) as Applicable to Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is a continuation of previous work Intertek APTECH did in support of the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI report 1008093, Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation NDE for Heat Recovery Steam Generators HRSGs, 2005. EPRI report 1008093 was an NDE overview report that reviewed different commercially available electromagnetic NDE techniques suitable for HRSG applications involving both finned and nonfinned tubing. The pulsed eddy current PEC methodology demonstrated an ability to detect ...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO STEAM GENERATING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A steam generating plant for marine vessels includes a steam superheater (nuclear reactor, perhaps) from which steam is ducted to the point of use (heat exchanger, etc.). A steam generator receiving the condensed steam from the point of use uses steam from the superheater to evaporate the condensate. The superheated steam used in the evaporation is compressed by a turbo-compressor and directed into the superheater. The condensate evaporated in the generator is used to drive the turbo-compressor. (D.C.W.)

Kendon, M.H.

1963-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

IMPROVEMENTS IN STEAM GENERATING AND SUPERHEATING PLANT AND AN IMPROVED METHOD OF PRODUCING LOW PRESSURE SUPERHEATED STEAM  

SciTech Connect

A steam supply arrangement is described which generates high-pressure steam and superheats steam from a low-pressure source. Inus, in operations cteam at 350 to 600 psi from a nuciear reactor is superheated in a heat exehanger anu later in gas-heated equipment to 1100 F and passed to a stage of a pluralstage steam turbine. When the reactor ls shut downs steam generated in the steam generator section may be passed directly to the gas-fired superheater. (T.R.H.)

1959-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

198

The economics of repowering steam turbines  

SciTech Connect

Repowering is defined as displacing steam presently generated in an existing fossil fuel fired boiler with a gas turbine-heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) system. The steam generated in the HRSG is expanded in the existing steam turbine generator. Repowering advantages include a significant increase in power output at an improved heat rate relative to the base value for the existing steam turbine cycle being repowered. In addition, the reduction in emissions can be advantageous in most locations. This paper discusses application and economic considerations associated with repowering. In addition, an illustration will show how repowering coal fired steam turbine systems may prove economic relative to retrofit scrubbers and/or low sulfur coal fuel substitution that may be part of the forthcoming acid rain legislation.

Kovacik, J.M.; Stoll, H.G. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Steam-flooding  

SciTech Connect

Steam-flooding has become an established recovery technique within the last 20 years. This overview discusses its evolution, methods for selecting and designing steam-floods, constraints, and possible improvements. The term steam-flooding is used here in a general sense. The discussion includes steam soak (cyclic steam injection) and steam drive.

Matthews, C.S.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Steam distillation effect and oil quality change during steam injection  

SciTech Connect

Steam distillation is an important mechanism which reduces residual oil saturation during steam injection. It may be the main recovery mechanism in steamflooding of light oil reservoirs. As light components are distilled the residual (initial) oil, the residuum becomes heavier. Mixing the distilled components with the initial oil results in a lighter produced oil. A general method has been developed to compute steam distillation yield and to quantify oil quality changes during steam injection. The quantitative results are specific because the California crude data bank was used. But general principles were followed and calculations were based on information extracted from the DOE crude oil assay data bank. It was found that steam distillation data from the literature can be correlated with the steam distillation yield obtained from the DOE crude oil assays. The common basis for comparison was the equivalent normal boiling point. Blending of distilled components with the initial oil results in API gravity changes similar to those observed in several laboratory and field operations.

Lim, K.T.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Combined gas turbine and steam turbine power station  

SciTech Connect

In order to operate a gas turbine and steam turbine plant with a high temperature at the inlet to the gas turbine plant, the parts located in the hot-gas stream of the gas turbine being steam-cooled, and the cooling steam, thereby raised to a higher temperature, being fed to the steam turbine for further expansion, it is proposed that the waste heat from the gas turbine be led through a two-pressure waste heat boiler, and that the steam, generated in this boiler, be slightly superheated in a cooling-steam superheater, and fed to the hollow inlet vanes and to the rotor blades, which are likewise hollow, the steam, strongly superheated during this cooling process, then being admixed to the steam coming from the intermediate superheater, and being fed to the low-pressure section of the steam turbine.

Mukherjee, D.

1984-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include:

203

Steam-channel-expanding steam form drive  

SciTech Connect

In a viscous oil reservoir in which the stratification of the rock permeability is insufficient to confine steam within the most permeable strata, oil can be produced by forming and expanding a steam channel through which steam is flowed and oil is produced. Steam is injected and fluid is produced at rates causing a steam channel to be extended between locations that are horizontally separated. A foam-forming mixture of steam, noncondensable gas and surfactant is then injected into the steam channel to provide foam and a relatively high pressure gradient within the channel, without plugging the channel. A flow of steam-containing fluid through the steam channel is continued in a manner such that the magnitudes of the pressure gradient, the rate of oil production, and the rate of steam channel expansion exceed those which could be provided by steam alone. 10 claims, 6 figures.

Dilgren, R.E.; Hirasaki, G.J.; Hill, H.J.; Whitten, D.G.

1978-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

204

Experimental comparison of hot water/propane injection to steam/propane injection for recovery of heavy oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Generating enough heat to convert water into steam is a major expense for projects that inject steam into reservoirs to enhance hydrocarbon recovery. If the… (more)

Nesse, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Lighting a building with a single bulb : toward a system for illumination in the 21st c.; or, A centralized illumination system for the efficient decoupling and recovery of lighting related heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piping light represents the first tenable method for recovery and reutilization of lighting related heat. It can do this by preserving the energy generated at the lamp as radiative, departing from precedent and avoiding ...

Levens, Kurt Antony, 1961-

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cover Heated, Open Vessels  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP steam tip sheet on covering heated, open vessels provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Steam condensate leakage  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is a multi-program research and development center owned by the United States Department of Energy and operated by the University of Chicago. The majority of the buildings on site use steam for heating and other purposes. Steam is generated from liquid water at the site`s central boiler house and distributed around the site by means of large pipes both above and below the ground. Steam comes into each building where it is converted to liquid condensate, giving off heat which can be used by the building. The condensate is then pumped back to the boiler house where it will be reheated to steam again. The process is continual but is not perfectly efficient. A substantial amount of condensate is being lost somewhere on site. The lost condensate has both economic and environmental significance. To compensate for lost condensate, makeup water must be added to the returned condensate at the boiler house. The water cost itself will become significant in the future when ANL begins purchasing Lake Michigan water. In addition to the water cost, there is also the cost of chemically treating the water to remove impurities, and there is the cost of energy required to heat the water, as it enters the boiler house 1000 F colder than the condensate return. It has been estimated that only approximately 60% of ANL`s steam is being returned as condensate, thus 40% is being wasted. This is quite costly to ANL and will become significantly more costly in the future when ANL begins purchasing water from Lake Michigan. This study locates where condensate loss is occurring and shows how much money would be saved by repairing the areas of loss. Shortly after completion of the study, one of the major areas of loss was repaired. This paper discusses the basis for the study, the areas where losses are occurring, the potential savings of repairing the losses, and a hypothesis as to where the unaccounted for loss is occurring.

Midlock, E.B.; Thuot, J.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Improving steam turbine-gas turbine plants  

SciTech Connect

Leningrad Polytechnic Institute investigated the main characteristics of combined plants according to their structure, determined by very important parameters. The following parameters were selected: utilization factor (ratio of heat added to the steam-water working medium from the heat of the exhaust gases to the entire amount of heat added to the steam-water working medium) and fuel consumption factor (ratio of heat from fuel added to the steam-water working medium to the entire consumption of heat in the combined plant). It is concluded that steam turbine-gas turbine plants working at comparatively low gas temperatures (about 800/sup 0/C) must be constructed as plants of maximum capacity, i.e., with large steam flows. Gas turbine-steam turbine plants with high-temperature gas turbines operating at a high utilization factor (approaching binary plants) ensure a qualitative rise in efficiency and have high flexibility characteristics. They are the most promising power plants. A long-term plan for development of combined plants on the basis of standard steam turbine and gas turbine equipment, the production of which is planned in the USSR and in Comecon countries, is required. This plan must be closely connected with solution of the problem of using coals for gas turbine plants.

Kirillov, I.I.; Arsen' ev, L.V.; Khodak, E.A.; Romakhova, G.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Method and apparatus for powering engine with exhaust generated steam  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for installation in an automobile to generate steam with heat from the exhaust of an engine is provided. The steam is generated at a sufficient pressure for entry into the combustion chambers of the engine to increase the power output of the engine. The apparatus includes a water storage unit and a steam generator for generating steam with the water from the unit through transfer of heat from combusted gases in the exhaust system. The steam travels through steam inlet manifolds for entry into the combustion chambers. The entry is controlled by a cylinder injection timing valve assembly timed to the operation of the engine to enter the steam during the power stroke. A steam throttling control valve assembly is provided to throttle the steam input to the combustion chambers. A throttle proportioning control unit proportions the carburetor throttle and steam throttle assembly to the operator throttle input to provide the greatest efficiency in engine operation. The throttle proportioning control unit operates in response to the steam temperature and pressure within the steam generator. The apparatus may be adapted for use on an engine design for solely air fuel combustion with the cylinder adapter. A throttle linkage interchange unit may be provided to initiate operation of steam input only upon reaching a minimum engine temperature. An intake manifold vacuum control valve may be provided for selectively entering exhaust gases into the intake manifold of the engine to compensate for the vacuum variation due to the steam input to the combustion chamber.

Gill, P.A.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thomas Reddinger Director, Steam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supervisor (Distribution) Deborah Moorhead Office Coordinator III Martin Bower Steam Plant Operator RichardThomas Reddinger Director, Steam Operations Steven Richards Assistant Manager of Maintenance Redfield Steam Plant Operator SU Steam Station/Chilled Water Plant Bohdan Sawa Steam Plant Operator Robert

McConnell, Terry

213

Improvement of Heat Dissipation in High-Power Light-Emitting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat generated by LED chip must be dissipated to the environment ... solder paste (~ 20 W/mk) can promote greatly the heat conductive capacity of the die ...

214

Consider Steam Turbine Drives for Rotating Equipment: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Tip Fact Sheet No.21  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines are well suited as prime movers for driving boiler feedwater pumps, forced or induced-draft fans, blowers, air compressors, and other rotating equipment. This service generally calls for a backpressure non-condensing steam turbine. The low-pressure steam turbine exhaust is available for feedwater heating, preheating of deaerator makeup water, and/or process requirements.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Method for recovering light hydrocarbons from coal agglomerates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing light hydrocarbons, such as heptane, from coal agglomerates includes an enclosed chamber having a substantially horizontal perforate surface therein. The coal agglomerates are introduced into a water bath within the chamber. The agglomerates are advanced over the surface while steam is substantially continuously introduced through the surface into the water bath. Steam heats the water and causes volatilization of the light hydrocarbons, which may be collected from the overhead of the chamber. The resulting agglomerates may be collected at the opposite end from the surface and subjected to final draining processes prior to transportation or use.

Huettenhain, Horst (Benicia, CA); Benz, August D. (Hillsborough, CA); Getsoian, John (Ann Arbor, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

State-of-the-art gas turbine and steam turbine power plant  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art power plant in which the heat from solid or low quality fuels is utilized to heat indirectly a motive stream composition of a mixture of steam and gases to drive a gas turbine. The thermal energy from the burning of the solid or low quality fuels is also utilized to generate steam which powers a steam turbine. Excess steam may be generated to be utilized as process steam.

Willyoung, D. M.; Anand, A. K.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Steam Tracing...New Technologies for the 21st Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For decades, steam tracing has been an accepted practice in the heating of piping, vessels, and equipment. This paper presents recent product innovations such as "burn-safe" and "energy efficient" steam tracing products. For the many applications where steam tracing is applied for simple freeze protection, recently developed products which reduce the heat transfer rate and thus the energy consumption of steam tracers will be discussed. This paper will provide several steam tracing examples that will exhibit the use of experimental data, mathematical analysis, and FEA/CFD numerical simulation techniques.

Pitzer, R. K.; Barth, R. E.; Bonorden, C.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ADVANCED STEAM GENERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for ultra-low or ''zero''-emissions power generation systems. In some proposed concepts, nitrogen is removed from the combustion air and replaced with another diluent such as carbon dioxide or steam. In this way, formation of nitrogen oxides is prevented, and the exhaust stream can be separated into concentrated CO{sub 2} and steam or water streams. The concentrated CO{sub 2} stream could then serve as input to a CO{sub 2} sequestration process or utilized in some other way. Some of these concepts are illustrated in Figure 1. This project is an investigation of one approach to ''zero'' emission power generation. Oxy-fuel combustion is used with steam as diluent in a power cycle proposed by Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) [1,2]. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to produce nearly pure oxygen for combustion. In this particular concept, the combustion temperatures are moderated by steam as a diluent. An advantage of this technique is that water in the product stream can be condensed with relative ease, leaving a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Because most of the atmospheric nitrogen has been separated from the oxidant, the potential to form any NOx pollutant is very small. Trace quantities of any minor pollutants species that do form are captured with the CO{sub 2} or can be readily removed from the condensate. The result is a nearly zero-emission power plant. A sketch of the turbine system proposed by CES is shown in Figure 2. NETL is working with CES to develop a reheat combustor for this application. The reheat combustion application is unusual even among oxy-fuel combustion applications. Most often, oxy-fuel combustion is carried out with the intent of producing very high temperatures for heat transfer to a product. In the reheat case, incoming steam is mixed with the oxygen and natural gas fuel to control the temperature of the output stream to about 1480 K. A potential concern is the possibility of quenching non-equilibrium levels of CO or unburned fuel in the mixing process. Inadequate residence times in the combustor and/or slow kinetics could possibly result in unacceptably high emissions. Thus, the reheat combustor design must balance the need for minimal excess oxygen with the need to oxidize the CO. This paper will describe the progress made to date in the design, fabrication, and simulation of a reheat combustor for an advanced steam generator system, and discuss planned experimental testing to be conducted in conjunction with NASA Glenn Research Center-Plumb Brook Station.

Richards, Geo. A.; Casleton, Kent H.; Lewis, Robie E.; Rogers, William A. (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory); Woike, Mark R.; Willis; Brian P. (NASA Glenn Research Center)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

POWER PLANT USING A STEAM-COOLED NUCLEAR REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A method of providing efficient and economic means for obtaining reheat from nuclear heat is described. A steamcooled steam-moderated reactor produces high-pressure, high-temperature steam. A multi-stage steam turbine partially expands the high-pressure steam, which is then withdrawn and reheated, and then further expanded for producing useful power. The saturated steam is superheated by leading it through tubular passages provided in the fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor, leading the useful part of the superheated steam into a steam turbine in which it expands to a predetermined intermediate pressure, leading the steam at that reduced pressure from the turbine back into the reactor where it is reheated by flowing through other tubular passages in the fuel assemblies, and returning the reheated steam to the turbine for further expansion. (M.C.G.)

Nettel, F.; Nakanishi, T.

1963-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

Best Management Practice: Boiler/Steam Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Boiler/Steam Systems Best Management Practice: Boiler/Steam Systems Best Management Practice: Boiler/Steam Systems October 7, 2013 - 3:17pm Addthis Boilers and steam generators are commonly used in large heating systems, institutional kitchens, or in facilities where large amounts of process steam are used. This equipment consumes varying amounts of water depending on system size, the amount of steam used, and the amount of condensate returned. Operation and Maintenance Options To maintain water efficiency in operations and maintenance, Federal agencies should: Develop and implement a routine inspection and maintenance program to check steam traps and steam lines for leaks. Repair leaks and replace faulty steam traps as soon as possible. Develop and implement a boiler tuning program to be completed a minimum of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

EVALUATION OF KANIGEN, ELECTROLESS NICKEL PLATING FOR STEAM SIDE OF A SODIUM COMPONENT STEAM GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of Kanigen electroless nickel plating for surfaces in contact with water and steam in a sodium-heated Type 316 stainless steel steam generator is reported. The purpose of the coating is to afford protection from stress corrosion cracking originating on the water-steam side of the unit. It is concluded that the Kanigen coating does not afford adequate protection for the service conditions. (D.L.C.)

1961-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine system is described in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas. 4 figs.

Viscovich, P.W.; Bannister, R.L.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine system in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas.

Viscovich, Paul W. (Longwood, FL); Bannister, Ronald L. (Winter Springs, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping, dilution, a reaction ingredient, etc. These classifications are termed 'Btu' loads or 'Pound' loads. Some final end uses of steam are actually a combination of the two. The classification of steam loads is extremely important to the overall economics of the industrial plant steam system. These economic effects are explained in detail as they impact on both the thermal efficiency and the heat power cycle efficiency of an industrial system. The use of a powerful steam system mass and energy modeling program called MESA (Modular Energy System Analyzer, The MESA Company) in identifying and accurately evaluating these effects is described.

Waterland, A. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Feasibility Study of Using Ground Source Heat Pumps in Two Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The building is located near the end of the central steam distribution system. Steam from the central steam and Mt. Olympus BOQ) presently heated by steam from the central steam plant. Ground source heat pump, it was assumed that natural gas-fired water heaters would replace the steam converters that presently provide hot

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

226

Materials for Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical for Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Steam Power Plants Background The first ultra-supercritical (USC) steam plants in the U.S. were designed, constructed, and operated in the late 1950s. The higher operating temperatures and pressures in USC plants were designed to increase the efficiency of steam plants. However, materials performance problems forced the reduction of steam temperatures in these plants, and discouraged further developmental efforts on low heat-rate units.

227

Steam System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most plant steam systems are complex systems. Usually the fuel required to produce the steam represents a major expense for manufacturing facilities. By properly operating and maintaining the steam system and making minor improvements, significant savings can be realized.

Aegerter, R. A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Combined cycle electric power plant with coordinated steam load distribution control  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube through which a fluid, e.g., water, is directed to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner further heats the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube. The temperature of the gas turbine exhaust gases is sensed for varying the fuel flow to the afterburner by a fuel valve, whereby the temperatures of the gas turbine exhaust gases and therefore of the superheated steam, are controlled. Loading and unloading of the steam turbine is accomplished automatically in coordinated plant control as a function of steam throttle pressure.

Uram, R.

1979-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Simulation of terrace wall methane-steam reforming reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrace wall arrangement is one of the most common arrangements for methane-steam reforming reactor furnaces. In this work, a mathematical model of heat transfer in terrace wall furnaces has been developed. The model has been coupled with a reliable ... Keywords: heat transfer modeling, methane-steam reforming, reformer simulation, terrace wall furnace

J. S. Soltan Mohammadzadeh; A. Zamaniyan

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg{sub evap} to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg[sub evap] to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Apparatus and methods for supplying auxiliary steam in a combined cycle system  

SciTech Connect

To provide auxiliary steam, a low pressure valve is opened in a combined cycle system to divert low pressure steam from the heat recovery steam generator to a header for supplying steam to a second combined cycle's steam turbine seals, sparging devices and cooling steam for the steam turbine if the steam turbine and gas turbine lie on a common shaft with the generator. Cooling steam is supplied the gas turbine in the combined cycle system from the high pressure steam turbine. Spent gas turbine cooling steam may augment the low pressure steam supplied to the header by opening a high pressure valve whereby high and low pressure steam flows are combined. An attemperator is used to reduce the temperature of the combined steam in response to auxiliary steam flows above a predetermined flow and a steam header temperature above a predetermined temperature. The auxiliary steam may be used to start additional combined cycle units or to provide a host unit with steam turbine cooling and sealing steam during full-speed no-load operation after a load rejection.

Gorman, William G. (Ballston Spa, NY); Carberg, William George (Ballston Spa, NY); Jones, Charles Michael (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Method for improving the steam splits in a multiple steam injection process using multiple steam headers  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for enhancing the uniformity of steam distribution in a multiple steam injection system comprising a steam generator, a primary steam header, at least one secondary steam header, a primary steam line connecting the generator to the primary header, at lease one secondary steam line connecting the primary header to the secondary steam header, and a plurality of tertiary steam lines connecting the secondary steam header to a plurality of stem injection wells. It comprises injecting a surfactant into the primary steam line, mixing the surfactant and steam in the primary steam line sufficiently so that the surfactant and the steam enter the primary steam header as a foam, and mixing the surfactant and steam in the secondary steam lines sufficiently so that the surfactant and the steam enter the secondary steam header as a foam.

Stowe, G.R.

1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

237

Comparative evaluation of surface and downhole steam-generation techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that the application of heat to reservoirs containing high API gravity oils can substantially improve recovery. Although steam injection is currently the principal thermal recovery method, heat transmission losses associated with delivery of the steam from the surface generators to the oil-bearing formation has limited conventional steam injection to shallow reservoirs. The objective of the Department of Energy's Project DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology required to economically produce heavy oil from deep reservoirs. The tasks included in this effort are the development and evaluation of thermally efficient delivery systems and downhole steam generation systems. This paper compares the technical and economic performance of conventional surface steam drives, which are strongly influenced by heat losses, with (a) thermally efficient delivery (through insulated strings) of surface generated steam, (b) low pressure combustion downhole steam generation, (c) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation using air as the oxygen source, and (d) high pressure combustion downhole steam generation substituting pure oxygen for air. The selection of a preferred technology based upon either total efficiency or cost is found to be strongly influenced by reservoir depth, steam mass flow rate, and sandface steam quality. Therefore, a parametric analysis has been performed which examines varying depths, injection rates and steam qualities. Results indicate that the technologies are not readily distinguishable for low injectivity reservoirs in which conventional steam drives are feasible. However, high injection rates produce a notable cost difference between high pressure combustion systems and the other technologies. Issues that must be addressed before gaining further insight into the economic viability of downhole steam generation are discussed.

Hart, C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Heat pipe methanator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

Ranken, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Passive residual heat removal systems for current and future light water reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main problem with nuclear power during a shutdown is that decay heat is still present and needs to be removed to prevent a number… (more)

Treleaven, Ian James

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Water Vapor and Mechanical Work: A Comparison of Carnot and Steam Cycles OLIVIER PAULUIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Vapor and Mechanical Work: A Comparison of Carnot and Steam Cycles OLIVIER PAULUIS Center in the atmosphere is discussed here by comparing two idealized heat engines: the Carnot cycle and the steam cycle. A steam cycle transports water from a warm moist source to a colder dryer sink. It acts as a heat engine

Pauluis, Olivier M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Apparatus for removing noncondensable gases from cogenerated process steam in dual fluid cheng cycle engines  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is described for removing noncondensable gases from process steam cogenerated in a steam-injected gas turbine engine. The engine consists of: (a) a chamber; (b) compressor means for introducing air into the chamber; (c) means for introducing steam within the chamber, the steam introducing means including an automatically controlled steam injector valve and steam injection line, (d) means for heating the air and steam in the chamber, including means for combustion; (e) turbine means responsive to a mixture of air, combustion products and steam for converting the energy associated with the mixture to mechanical energy; (f) counterflow heat exchanger means, including at least superheater and evaporator sections, for transferring residual thermal energy from a mixture of air, combustion products and steam exhausted from the turbine means to incoming water and steam.

Cheng, D.Y.

1987-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

242

A study of steam injection in fractured media  

SciTech Connect

Steam injection is the most widely used thermal recovery technique for unfractured reservoirs containing heavy oil. There have been numerous studies on theoretical and experimental aspects of steam injection for such systems. Fractured reservoirs contain a large fraction of the world supply of oil, and field tests indicate that steam injection is feasible for such reservoirs. Unfortunately there has been little laboratory work done on steam injection in such systems. The experimental system in this work was designed to understand the mechanisms involved in the transfer of fluids and heat between matrix rocks and fractures under steam injection.

Dindoruk, M.D.S.; Aziz, K.; Brigham, W.; Castanier, L.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set in accordance with quantitative results from the steam path audit. As a result of optimized repair decisions, turbine efficiency increases, emissions decrease, and maintenance expenses decrease. These benefits can be achieved by using a computer program Encotech, Inc. developed for the utility industry to perform steam path audits. With the increased emphasis on industrial turbine efficiency, and as a result of the experience with the Destec Operating Company, Encotech is adapting the computer program to respond to the needs of the industrial steam turbine community. This paper describes the results of using the STPE computer program to conduct a steam path audit at Destec Energy's Lyondell Cogeneration power plant.

Mitchell, D. R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Solid fuel fired oil field steam generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased shortages being experienced in the domestic crude oil supply have forced attention on the production of heavy crude oils from proven reserves to supplement requirements for petroleum products. Since most heavy crudes require heat to facilitate their extraction, oil field steam generators appear to represent a key component in any heavy crude oil production program. Typical oil field steam generator experience in California indicates that approx. one out of every 3 bbl of crude oil produced by steam stimulation must be consumed as fuel in the steam generators to produce the injection steam. The scarcity and price of crude oil makes it desirable to substitute more readily available and less expensive solid fuels for the crude oil which is presently serving as the primary steam generator fuel. Solid fuel firing capability also is of importance because of the substantial amounts of high heating value and low cost petroleum coke available from the processing of heavy crude oil and suitable for use as a steam generator fuel.

Young, W.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Steam System Optimization: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper highlights the study findings in a steam system in a plant from a multinational Petrochemical giant in an European country. The steam system operates with an annual budget of $8.9 million (local currency was converted to US Dollars). Normal steam demand ranges from 500,000 to 600,000 lbs/hr. 380,000 lbs/hr is imported from an outside power plant and 170,000 lbs/hr is internally generated as waste heat recovery. The steam system analysis identified energy savings worth of $2,400,000 per year. The optimization measures were in two categories: • no cost / low cost that can be done through better maintenance and improvement of operating conditions. • major improvement that requires a significant amount of investment, that includes the modification of process and major equipment. Though the findings are specific to a single site, the basics of steam system analysis are applicable to any steam system. A critical review on any steam system always identifies controllable wastes. Improvements in steam system efficiency equal reduced energy consumption and saved environment.

Iordanova, N.; Venkatesan, V. V.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Future of Steam: A Preliminary Discussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam production represents a significant proportion of today's industrial energy demand. But the evolution of process technologies, as well as turbulence in energy markets, suggests that steam's role may be subject to change in the next decade. Questions as to the ways those changes will manifest are addressed by this paper. Specifically, the text presents an outline of parameters that (in the authors' opinions) will ultimately shape the dimensions of industrial steam use in the next 10 to 20 years. Technical, business, institutional, and labor developments are the forces in question. This paper provides a systematic review of these forces, and suggests how they may influence industrial asset purchasing decisions. The coming decade will witness opportunities for maintaining and growing steam markets, but there are also reasons to believe that steam will be supplanted by alternative technologies in certain industries and applications. Combined heat and power applications are the wildcard in this formula, since they may facilitate the replacement of some traditional steam applications. But at the same time, CHP may ensure that steam indirectly serves industry by powering generators that serve newer electric applications. The trends discussed in this paper suggest the components for an industrial steam policy agenda.

Russell, C.; Harrell, G.; Moore, J.; French, S.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

High performance steam development  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a program to make a step change in power plant to 1500 F steam, since the highest possible performance gains can be achieved in a 1500 F steam system when using a topping turbine in a back pressure steam turbine for cogeneration. A 500-hour proof-of-concept steam generator test module was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. It has four once-through steam generator circuits. The complete HPSS (high performance steam system) was tested above 1500 F and 1500 psig for over 102 hours at full power.

Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

High Temperature Steam Corrosion of Cladding for Nuclear Applications: Experimental  

SciTech Connect

Stability of cladding materials under off-normal conditions is an important issue for the safe operation of light water nuclear reactors. Metals, ceramics, and metal/ceramic composites are being investigated as substitutes for traditional zirconium-based cladding. To support down-selection of these advanced materials and designs, a test apparatus was constructed to study the onset and evolution of cladding oxidation, and deformation behavior of cladding materials, under loss-of-coolant accident scenarios. Preliminary oxidation tests were conducted in dry oxygen and in saturated steam/air environments at 1000OC. Tube samples of Zr-702, Zr-702 reinforced with 1 ply of a ß-SiC CMC overbraid, and sintered a-SiC were tested. Samples were induction heated by coupling to a molybdenum susceptor inside the tubes. The deformation behavior of He-pressurized tubes of Zr-702 and SiC CMC-reinforced Zr-702, heated to rupture, was also examined.

McHugh, Kevin M; Garnier, John E; Sergey Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff; George W. Griffith; Shannong M. Bragg-Sitton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1985, EPRI has published the Steam Generator Progress Report (SGPR), which provides historical information on worldwide steam generator activities.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

250

Measurements of electron and proton heating temperatures from extreme-ultraviolet light images at 68 eV in petawatt laser experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 68 eV extreme-ultraviolet light imaging diagnostic measures short pulse isochoric heating by electrons and protons in petawatt laser experiments. Temperatures are deduced from the absolute intensities and comparison with modeling using a radiation hydrodynamics code.

Gu Peimin; Zhang, B.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J. A.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R. B. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States); Department of Applied Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States); Department of Applied Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Energy Basics: Lighting and Daylighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lighting Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Water Heating Lighting and Daylighting Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by...

253

Section D: SPACE HEATING  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Central warm-air furnace with ducts to individual rooms other than a heat pump ..... 03 Steam/Hot water ... REVERSE Heat pump ... Don't have a separate water heater ...

254

Downhole steam quality measurement  

SciTech Connect

An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Muir, James F. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Steam Digest 2001  

SciTech Connect

Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Downhole steam quality measurement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an empirical electrical method for remote sensing of steam quality utilizing flow-through grids which allow measurement of the electrical properties of a flowing two-phase mixture. The measurement of steam quality in the oil field is important to the efficient application of steam assisted recovery of oil. Because of the increased energy content in higher quality steam it is important to maintain the highest possible steam quality at the injection sandface. The effectiveness of a steaming operation without a measure of steam quality downhole close to the point of injection would be difficult to determine. Therefore, a need exists for the remote sensing of steam quality.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Muir, J.F.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Steam Champions in Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally, industrial steam system management has focused on operations and maintenance. Competitive pressures, technology evolution, and increasingly complex regulations provide additional management challenges. The practice of operating a steam system demands the managerial expertise of a "Steam Champion," which will be described in this paper. Briefly, the steam champion is a facility professional who embodies the skills, leadership, and vision needed to maximize the effectiveness of a plant's steam system. Perhaps more importantly, the steam champion's definitive role is that of liaison between the manufacturer's boardroom and the plant floor. As such, the champion is able to translate the functional impacts of steam optimization into equivalent corporate rewards, such as increased profitability, reliability, workplace safety, and other benefits. The prerequisites for becoming a true steam champion will include engineering, business, and management skills.

Russell, C.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Steam Digest 2001  

SciTech Connect

Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Performance characterization of a pilot-scale oxygen enriched-air and steam blown gasification and combustion system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of air as biomass gasifying agent yields low heating value product gas and is only suitable for heat and power applications. Steam and… (more)

Huynh, Cuong Van

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Materials Performance in USC Steam  

SciTech Connect

The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Steam generation in compound parabolic concentrator collectors  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the advantages of generating steam directly in a nonimaging compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) collector rather than using a heat-transfer fluid and a secondary heat exchanger. The predicted performance advantages from generating steam directly in CPC collectors are significant, and that performance has ben verified using a collector built and tested at Argonne National Laboratory. The collector and the method used to test its operation in a steam-generating mode are described. Test results are included for a 6.4-m/sup 2/ array of evacuated tube collectors with an advanced absorber coating, silver reflectors, and tubes oriented in a north-south configuration. Also described are the test methods and results for indoor testing for heat loss by the collectors and outdoor testing of their instantaneous optical efficiency.

Allen, J.W.; Schertz, W.W.; Wantroba, A.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO STEAM RAISING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A scheme is given for a dual pressure steam raising plant for reactor power plants, especially those of the Calder Hall type in which heat transfer fluid (CO/sub 2/) can be circulated by steam. In the scheme, the gaseous coolant is passed through the steam raising unit and then is passed back into the reactor via a gas blower. The unit employs a dual pressure cycle in which water is passed into two steel drums connected to evaporators and superheaters in the unit; steam from one drum is high-pressure steam (HP). while steam from the other is low-pressure steam (LP). HP drives the gas blower by means of a back pressure turbine and then is discharged into the LP cycle in the unit. HP and LP from the superheaters are fed into a distant turbo-alternator which comprises two turbines, a small one for HP and a large one for LP. (D.L.C.)

Mitchell, J.M.

1960-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Steam Trap Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effective application of steam traps encompasses three primary areas which are the selection and sizing, the installation, and the monitoring of the steam trapping system. Proper application of steam traps will improve production rates, product quality, and reduce energy and maintenance costs.

Murphy, J. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Steam System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery and chemical plant steam systems are complex and the fuel required to produce the steam represents a major expense. The incremental cost for generating a 1,000 lb./hr. of steam is typically $45,000 - $60,000/year. Most plants have numerous low/

Aegerter, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Calculation of heat capacities of light and heavy water by path-integral molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in hydro- gen bonding would make a large shift in the fluctuation of energy, the heat capacity. This is one Motoyuki Shigaa Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Japan Atomic Energy Research property defined as the temperature derivative of the internal energy. However, it is not so simple

Nielsen, Steven O.

266

Combined cycle electric power plant with a steam turbine having a sliding pressure main bypass and control valve system  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant includes two gas turbines, a steam turbine, and a digital control system with an operator analog or manual backup. Each of the gas turbines has an exhaust heat recovery steam generator connected to a common header from which the steam is supplied by one or both of the steam generators for operating the steam turbine. The control system is of the sliding pressure type and maintains a predetermined steam pressure as a function of steam flow according to a predetermined characterization depending on the number of steam generators in service to limit the maximum steam velocity through the steam generators, and reduce the probability of water carryover into the steam turbine. Such control is always maintained by the bypass valve. The turbine control valve responds to the speed/load demand only, except when the bypass valve is closed and the rate of steam generation is insufficient to maintain a predetermined pressure flow relationship.

Uram, R.

1980-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

267

Control system for single shaft combined cycle gas and steam turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for starting and controlling a combined cycle turbine of the type having a gas turbine with a fuel flow control valve and a steam turbine with at least one steam control valve both disposed on a single shaft and having a heat recovery steam generator heated by the gas turbine and connected to supply steam to the steam control valve, the combined cycle turbine having a unified control system and driving a load, and also having an auxiliary steam source connected to the steam control valve. It comprises controlling of steam from the auxiliary steam source with the steam control valve to crank the combined cycle turbine for starting, initiating and controlling fuel flow to the gas turbine with the fuel flow control valve and initiating combustion, controlling initial acceleration of the combined cycle turbine with the steam control valve on auxiliary steam, coordinating control of the combined cycle turbine by the steam control valve and the fuel control valve with the unified control system, transferring acceleration control during a smooth acceleration phase of the combined cycle turbine by the steam control valve and the fuel control valve with the unified control system, transferring acceleration control during a smooth acceleration phase of the combined cycle turbine to the fuel flow control valve and gradually reducing the opening of the steam control valve to a minimum value when the turbine reaches rated speed.

Moore, J.H.; Kure-Jensen, J.; Rowen, W.I.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Overspeed protection for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an improved combined cycle power plant and overspeed protection system of the type having a reheat steam turbine. It comprises: a high pressure steam turbine section with at least one control valve, and a lower pressure steam turbine section; a gas turbine including a turbine section, a combustor, a fuel valve supplying the combustor, and an air compressor with a discharge end leading to the combustor; a load riven by the reheat steam turbine and the gas turbine; the reheat steam turbine, the gas turbine and the load all having rotating members; a heat recovery steam generator heated by the gas turbine, including a high pressure steam generating section supplying steam to the high pressure steam turbine section through the control valve, and a steam reheater section receiving steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine section. The improvement comprises: a valveless steam conduit connected between the outlet of the steam reheater section and the inlet of the lower pressure steam turbine section, and solid couplings serving to solidify couple the rotating members together as a single rotor, the rotor having a single thrust bearing.

Moore, J.H.

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

Ryan, M.J.

1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

270

Steam turbine control  

SciTech Connect

In a power plant which includes a steam turbine with main control valves for admitting steam into the steam turbine and a steam bypass with bypass control valves for diverting steam around the steam turbine directly into a condenser, it is necessary to coordinate the operation of the respective valves so that the steam turbine can be started, brought up to speed, synchronized with a generator and then loaded as smoothly and efficiently as possible. The present invention provides for such operation and, in addition, allows for the transfer of power plant operation from the so-called turbine following mode to the boiler following mode through the use of the sliding pressure concept. The invention described is particularly applicable to combined cycle power plants.

Priluck, D.M.; Wagner, J.B.

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info Start Date 06/09/2011 State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $75 - $300 Furnaces: $250 - $400 Boilers: $150 - $400 Setback Thermostat: $25 - $50 Convection Oven: $100 High Efficiency Range/Oven: $500 Conveyor Oven: $500 Fryer: $500 Broiler: $100 Steam Cooker: $500 Vent Dampers for Boilers: $125 Custom: Two year buy down or 50% of project cost, whichever is less

272

Overspeed protection for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an improved combined cycle power plant and overspeed protection system of the type having a reheat steam turbine including a high pressure steam turbine section with at least one control valve, and a lower pressure steam turbine section. The improvement comprises: a valveless steam conduit connected between the outlet of the steam reheater section and the inlet of the lower pressure steam turbine section, a plurality of solid couplings serving to solidly couple the rotating members together as a single rotor, the rotor having a single thrust bearing, and control means for sensing a potential overspeed condition operatively connected to the control valves to prevent overspeed, whereby the steam in the steam reheater and in the valveless steam conduit may freely expand through the lower pressure steam turbine and potential overspeed of the rotor is resisted by the combined inertia of the coupled rotating members and by the braking torque of the air compressor, wherein the heat recovery steam generator includes a low pressure steam generating section connected to supply low pressure steam to the steam reheater section along with the steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine section.

Moore, J.H.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Case history of industrial plant steam system layup for direct-fired gas operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the facts of an industrial plant steam system layup for direct fired gas operations. Fuel price savings indicated that gas firing a paper dryer, the largest steam user in the plant, would pay for itself in one year. Conversion work is detailed. Primary gas distribution was achieved by using one line of the steam loop. Machine water heating, power venting, space heating, and air makeup heating, among other conversions, are also specified.

Stacy, G.N.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Heat and mass transfer in a gas in a capillary induced by light with nonuniform intensity distribution over the beam cross section  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of the heat and drift fluxes induced by velocity-selective light absorption in a single-component gas in a capillary tube. The light intensity distribution across the beam is assumed to have a Gaussian profile. Kinetic equations are solved numerically to calculate flux profiles and kinetic coefficients quantifying the contributions of surface and collisional mechanisms to light-induced transfer as functions of the Knudsen number, the ratio of the rate of radiative decay of the exited level and intermolecular collision frequency, accommodation coefficient, and the ratio of the tube radius to the light beam radius.

Chernyak, V. G., E-mail: vladimir.chernyak@usu.ru; Polikarpov, A. P., E-mail: alexey.polikarpov@usu.ru [Ural State University (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Heat Recovery from Coal Gasifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with heat recovery from pressurized entrained and fixed bed coal gasifiers for steam generation. High temperature waste heat, from slagging entrained flow coal gasifier, can be recovered effectively in a series of radiant and convection waste heat boilers. Medium level waste heat leaving fixed bed type gasifiers can be recovered more economically by convection type boilers or shell and tube heat exchangers. An economic analysis for the steam generation and process heat exchanger is presented. Steam generated from the waste heat boiler is used to drive steam turbines for power generation or air compressors for the oxygen plant. Low level heat recovered by process heat exchangers is used to heat product gas or support the energy requirement of the gasification plant. The mechanical design for pressure vessel shell and boiler tubes is discussed. The design considers metallurgical requirements associated with hydrogen rich, high temperature, and high pressure atmosphere.

Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Case Study of Steam System Evaluation in a Petroleum Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASI conducted a steam system evaluation study at a multinational petroleum Refinery located in the Eastern UK during June-July, 1999. At this refinery, Steam, Fuel and Electricity systems are inter-connected. Steam is generated from direct fuel fired boilers as well from Furnace and Kiln waste heat. Steam is also supplied from the CHP waste heat boilers. Steam generation averages 1,500,000 lbs/hr and does not change significantly between winter and summer since steam needs for process and power generation dominates way above comfort heating. To generate steam, the refinery spends about £28 million per year ($46 million). The system evaluation study identified 31 Energy & steam system cost savings measures (ECM) to save fuel, steam and condensate in the areas of: Steam generation, Steam distribution, Steam Utilization, Condensate recovery, and Combustion optimization in kilns. By implementing all the above 31 ECMs, the refinery is estimated to save $3.5 million annually. Based on our preliminary investment estimate the average payback would be within 2 years. The refinery also would reduce 5600 metric tons Carbon emission to environment. Some of the opportunities address the installation defects of the steam system components that would improve the system reliability and longevity.

Venkatesan, V. V.; Iordanova, N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hot Steam Corrosion Behavior of Ni-based Superalloys at High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the operation of the HTSE-VHTR system, structural material such as intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) are exposed to high temperature steam condition.

278

DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF MONO-TUBE CAVITY RECEIVERS FOR DIRECT STEAM GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-tracing study of the heat flux distribution inside the steam receiver is used to spatially refine the modelDYNAMIC SIMULATION OF MONO-TUBE CAVITY RECEIVERS FOR DIRECT STEAM GENERATION José Zapata 1 , John dish has been in operation since 2010 with a mono-tube steam cavity receiver, the SG4 system

279

Combined Steam Reforming and Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas under Electrical Discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Steam Reforming and Partial Oxidation of Methane to Synthesis Gas under Electrical production from simultaneous steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane using an ac corona discharge and steam reforming has a benefit in terms of balancing the heat load. Methane conversions can be achieved

Mallinson, Richard

280

A Comparison of Mass Rate and Steam Quality Reductions to Optimize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i A Comparison of Mass Rate and Steam Quality Reductions to Optimize Steamflood Performance Topical and steam quality cuts for equivalent heat injection rates, one-eighth five-spot model 31 4. Comparison 32 5. Comparison of tapering injection mass rates with tapering injected steam qualities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Steam generator support system  

SciTech Connect

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

A system for regulating the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve of a steam turbine plant is disclosed. A steam turbine is supplied from a steam generator through a turbine intake valve. A branch line conducts the steam to a bypass valve which is normally closed. In the event of conditions making it necessary to close the turbine intake valve rapidly, a regulator is provided to control the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve and the opening of the bypass valve so that the pressure conditions in the steam generator do not exceed the limits established by the manufacturer. Pressure measuring instruments are placed in the system to sense the pressure immediately upstream from the turbine intake valve and the bypass valve as well as the initial steam supply pressure. These pressure signals are transmitted to a computer which produces a control signal in accordance with predetermined conditions.

Skala, K.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

283

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

Moldenhauer, J.E.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

Flash Steam Recovery Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the goals of Vulcan's cost reduction effort is to reduce energy consumption in production facilities through energy optimization. As part of this program, the chloromethanes production unit, which produces a wide variety of chlorinated organic compounds, was targeted for improvement. This unit uses a portion of the high-pressure steam available from the plant's cogeneration facility. Continuous expansions within the unit had exceeded the optimum design capacity of the unit's steam/condensate recovery system, resulting in condensate flash steam losses to the atmosphere. Using computer simulation models and pinch analysis techniques, the Operational Excellence Group (Six Sigma) was able to identify a project to recover the flash steam losses as a supplemental low-pressure steam supply. The project was designed and implemented at no capital cost using existing instrumentation and controls. On an annualized basis steam usage per ton of product fell by about three percent. Absolute savings were about 15,800 million Btu.

Bronhold, C. J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Definition: Warm or Steaming Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

heat is conducted to the earth's surface, warming the ground and sometimes causing steam to form when water is present. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see...

286

Steam Generator Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 24th EPRI Steam Generator NDE Workshop took place in San Diego, California, July 1113, 2005. It covered one full day and two half days of presentations. Attendees included representatives from domestic and overseas nuclear utilities, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) service and equipment organizations, research laboratories, and regulatory bodies. This annual workshop serves as a forum for NDE specialists to gather and discuss current steam generator NDE iss...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Modification of the lower ionosphere in lighting-induced electron precipitation events and through VLF heating  

SciTech Connect

Different mechanisms by which VLF waves from ground-based sources modify the nighttime lower ionosphere (D-region) are discussed. One process by which the ionosphere is regularly disturbed involves the precipitation of short (<2s) bursts of energetic (>40 keV) electrons out of the radiation belts in gyroresonant interactions with whistler waves launched by lightning discharges. A second process involves direct upward coupling of lightning electric fields to the lower ionosphere leading to intense electric fields and ionization enhancements. A third process is the heating of the lower ionosphere by upgoing VLF waves from ground-based transmitters and lightning, leading to up to 100% increase in electron temperature at 80-90 km altitudes 1.

Inan, U.S.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Progress in understanding of direct containment heating phenomena in pressurized light water reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is described in development of a mechanistic understanding of direct containment heating phemonena arising during high-pressure melt ejection accidents in pressurized water reactor systems. The experimental data base is discussed which forms the basis for current assessments of containment pressure response using current lumped-parameter containment analysis methods. The deficiencies in available methods and supporting data base required to describe major phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments and containment dome are highlighted. Code calculation results presented in the literature are cited which demonstrate that the progress in understanding of DCH phenomena has also resulted in current predictions of containment pressure loadings which are significantly lower than are predicted by idealized, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Current methods are, nonetheless, still predicting containment-threatening loadings for large participating melt masses under high-pressure ejection conditions. Recommendations for future research are discussed. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Plant View On Reducing Steam Trap Energy Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy will continue to be an ever increasingly important factor in the cost of doing business in the decade of the 80' s. In many petrochemical industries, energy is the second most costly item in producing a product. About 36% of our nation's total energy consumption is used by industry in producing the goods which are consumed around the world. Steam is the most commonly used energy source for the petrochemical industry. Most of this steam is used for heating and evaporating the many petrochemical liquids. This steam is then condensed and is removed from the system at the same rate as it is being formed or the loss of heat transfer will result. From a cost standpoint only condensate should be allowed through the trap. But at many plants half of the steam traps are passing excess steam. This is caused by neglect of aged steam traps which have worn out and misapplication of steam traps by oversizing or using the 'wrong' type trap. Elimination of steam wastes by an effective well engineered steam trap program is what is covered by this article.

Vallery, S. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Steam Turbine Developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...O. Jonas, Corrosion of Steam Turbines, Corrosion: Environments and Industries, Vol 13C, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2006, p 469â??476...

291

Steam and Condensate Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the late 60's and early 70's oil was plentiful and steam was relatively inexpensive. The switch to low sulphur fuel oil and the oil embargo suddenly changed the picture. The cost of steam rose from about $0.50 per 1,000# to $3.00 or more. Many see costs of $5.00 per 1,000# by 1980. These tremendous increases have caused steam systems, steam traps and condensate systems to become a major factor in overall plant efficiency and profit.

Yates, W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Steam and Condensate Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the late 60's and early 70's oil was plentiful and steam was relatively inexpensive. The switch to low sulphur fuel oil and the oil embargo suddenly changed the picture. The cost of steam rose from $0.50 per 1,000# to today's cost of $4.00 or more. Many see costs of $6.00/$7.00 in the near future. These tremendous increases have caused steam systems, steam traps and condensate systems to become a major factor in overall plant efficiency and profit.

Yates, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Type (sales unit) Type (sales unit) Energy Content Combustion (Btu/sales unit) Efficiency (%) Natural Gas (therm) 100,000 81.7 Natural Gas (cubic foot) 1,030 81.7 Distillate/No. 2 Oil (gallon) 138,700 84.6 Residual/No. 6 Oil (gallon) 149,700 86.1 Coal (ton) 27,000,000 87.6 Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Benchmarking the fuel cost of steam generation ($/1000 lbs of steam) is an effective way to assess the efficiency of your steam system. This cost is dependent upon fuel type, unit fuel cost, boiler efficiency, feedwater temperature, and steam pressure. This calculation provides a good first approximation for the cost of generating steam and serves as a tracking device to allow for boiler performance monitoring. Table 1 shows the heat input required to produce one pound of saturated

294

Steam turbines for cogeneration power plants  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of one of the largest cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. Problems associated with the retrofitting of existing condensing type turbines for cogeneration applications are identified. 4 refs.

Oliker, I.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Generating Electricity with your Steam System: Keys to Long Term Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of combined heat and power principals to existing plant steam systems can help produce electricity at more than twice efficiency of grid generated electricity. In this way, steam plant managers can realize substantial savings with relatively quick payback of capital. Carefully planned and executed projects are the key to unlocking the maximum value of generating electricity from an existing steam system. This paper illustrates the key concepts of generating onsite power with backpressure steam turbine generators along with practical considerations.

Bullock, B.; Downing, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

STEAM GENERATOR FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The steam generator described for use in reactor powergenerating systems employs a series of concentric tubes providing annular passage of steam and water and includes a unique arrangement for separating the steam from the water. (AEC)

Kinyon, B.W.; Whitman, G.D.

1963-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dupont's Marshall Laboratory is an automotive paint research and development facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The campus is comprised of several buildings that are served by Trigen-Philadelphia Energy Corporation's district steam loop. In 1996 Dupont management announced that it was considering moving the facility out of Philadelphia primarily due to the high operating cost compared to where they were considering relocating. The city officials responded by bringing the local electric and gas utilities to the table to negotiate better rates for Dupont. Trigen also requested the opportunity to propose energy savings opportunities, and dedicated a team of engineers to review Dupont's steam system to determine if energy savings could be realized within the steam system infrastructure. As part of a proposal to help Dupont reduce energy costs while continuing to use Trigen's steam, Trigen recommended modifications to increase energy efficiency, reduce steam system maintenance costs and implement small scale cogeneration. These recommendations included reducing the medium pressure steam distribution to low pressure, eliminating the medium pressure to low pressure reducing stations, installing a back pressure steam turbine generator, and preheating the domestic hot water with the condensate. Dupont engineers evaluated these recommended modifications and chose to implement most of them. An analysis of Dupont's past steam consumption revealed that the steam distribution system sizing was acceptable if the steam pressure was reduced from medium to low. After a test of the system and a few modifications, Dupont reduced the steam distribution system to low pressure. Energy efficiency is improved since the heat transfer losses at the low pressure are less than at the medium pressure distribution. Additionally, steam system maintenance will be significantly reduced since 12 pressure reducing stations are eliminated. With the steam pressure reduction now occurring at one location, the opportunity existed to install a backpressure turbine generator adjacent to the primary pressure reducing station. The analysis of Dupont's steam and electric load profiles demonstrated that cost savings could be realized with the installation of 150 kW of self-generation. There were a few obstacles, including meeting the utility's parallel operation requirements, that made this installation challenging. Over two years have passed since the modifications were implemented, and although cost savings are difficult to quantify since process steam use has increased, the comparison of steam consumption to heating degree days shows a reducing trend. Dupont's willingness to tackle energy conservation projects without adversely affecting their process conditions can be an example to other industrial steam users.

Larkin, A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

LMFBR steam generator development: duplex bayonet tube steam generator. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This report represents the culmination of work performed in fulfillment of ERDA Contract AT(11-1)-2426, Task Agreement 2, in which alternate steam generator designs were developed and studied. The basic bayonet tube generator design previously developed by C-E under AEC Contract AT(11-1)-3031 was expanded by incorporating duplex heat transfer tubes to enhance the unit's overall safety and reliability. The effort consisted of providing and evaluating conceptual designs of the evaporator, superheater and reheater components for a large plant LMFBR steam generator (950 MWt per heat transport loop). (auth)

DeFur, D.D.

1975-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Heat Distribution Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distribution Systems Distribution Systems Heat Distribution Systems May 16, 2013 - 5:26pm Addthis Radiators are used in steam and hot water heating. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/Jot Radiators are used in steam and hot water heating. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/Jot Heat is distributed through your home in a variety of ways. Forced-air systems use ducts that can also be used for central air conditioning and heat pump systems. Radiant heating systems also have unique heat distribution systems. That leaves two heat distribution systems -- steam radiators and hot water radiators. Steam Radiators Steam heating is one of the oldest heating technologies, but the process of boiling and condensing water is inherently less efficient than more modern systems, plus it typically suffers from significant lag times between the

300

Waste heat boiler with feed mixing nozzle  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat boiler of the type which is particularly suited for use in marine applications and which incorporates a feed mixing nozzle that is operative for purposes of effecting, by utilizing steam taken from the steam generating bank, a preheating of the feedwater that is fed to the steam drum. In addition to the aforesaid feed mixing nozzle, the subject waste heat boiler includes a feedwater control valve, a steam drum, a circulation pump, a steam generating bank and a centrifugal water separator. The feedwater control valve is employed to modulate the flow rate of the incoming feedwater in order to maintain the desired level of water in the steam drum. In turn the latter steam drum is intended to function in the manner of a reservoir for the circulating water that through the operation of the circulating pump is supplied to the steam generating bank. The circulating water which is supplied to the steam generating bank is heated therein to saturation temperature, and steam is generated thus. A water-steam mixture is returned from the steam generating bank to the steam drum and is directed into the centrifugal water separator that is suitably located within the steam drum. It is in the centrifugal water separator that the separation of the water-steam mixture is effected such that water is returned to the lower portion of the steam drum and the steam is supplied to the upper portion of the steam drum. The preheating of the feedwater is accomplished by directing the incoming feedwater through an internal feed pipe to the mixing nozzle, the latter being positioned in the line through which the water-steam mixture is returned to the steam drum.

Mastronarde, Th.P.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Experimental and analytical studies of hydrocarbon yields under dry-, steam-, and steam-with-propane distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation study has shown oil production is accelerated when propane is used as an additive during steam injection. To better understand this phenomenon, distillation experiments were performed using San Ardo crude oil (12oAPI). For comparison purposes, three distillation processes were investigated: dry-, steam-, and steam-propanedistillation, the latter at the propane-to-steam mass ratio of 0.05 at steam injection rate 0.5 g/min. Two sets of the distillation experiments were carried out. In the first set of experiments, the distillation temperatures ranged from 115ºC to 300ºC. Distillation pressures ranged from 0 psig to 998 psig for steam- and steam-propane distillation. The temperature-pressure combination used represented 15ºC superheated steam conditions. In the second set of experiments, the distillation temperatures ranged from 220oC to 300oC at 260 psig. The temperature pressure combination used represented field conditions for crude oil. For both conditions, the cell was kept at each temperature plateau (cut) until no increase occurs in distillation yields. Distillation yields were collected at each cut, and the volume and weight of water and hydrocarbon measured. Based on these experiments, a thermodynamic modeling framework was developed that describes distillation effect and oil production for steam distillation experiments. The model is based on composition of crude oil, molecular weight of heavy fraction. The analytical model results are compared against the experimental data for synthetic crude and crude oil to verify the validity of the model. Main results of the study may be summarized as follows. The yields for steam distillation for saturated conditions of Tsat+15 o C and Psat is 10 % and with addition of 5% of propane to steam no significant increase occurs in distillation yields. The yields for steam distillation for field conditions of 260 psig and temperature range (220 ~300oC) is 18 % and with addition of 5% of propane to steam no significant increase in distillation yields. The results indicate that propane has minimal distillation effect on the heavy oil. This occurs possibly because of lesser amount of light fractions in the heavy oil that enhance the separation of components in the oil caused by the concentration gradient.

Jaiswal, Namit

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Property Libraries for Working Fluids for Calculating Heat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... properties of working fluids can be used for the daily work of an engineer who calculates heat cycles, steam or gas turbines, boilers, heat pumps or ...

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

303

Single pressure steam bottoming cycle for gas turbines combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for recapturing waste heat from the exhaust of a gas turbine to drive a high pressure-high temperature steam turbine and a low pressure steam turbine. It comprises: delivering the exhaust of the gas turbine to the hot side of an economizer-reheater apparatus; delivering a heated stream of feedwater and recycled condensate through the cold side of the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus to elevate the temperature below the pinch point of the boiler; delivering the discharge from the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine through the economizer-reheater apparatus in an indirect heat exchange relationship with the gas turbine exhaust on the hot side of the economizer-reheater apparatus; driving the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine with the discharge stream of feedwater and recycled condensate which is heated to a temperature below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus; and driving the low pressure steam turbine with the discharged stream of the high pressure-high temperature steam turbine reheated below the pinch point of the boiler by the economizer-reheater apparatus.

Zervos, N.

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Downhole steam generator using low pressure fuel and air supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a spiral, tubular heat exchanger is used in the combustion chamber to isolate the combustion process from the water being superheated for conversion into steam. The isolation allows combustion of a relatively low pressure oxidant and fuel mixture for generating high enthalpy steam. The fuel is preheated by feedback of combustion gases from the top of the combustion chamber through a fuel preheater chamber. The hot exhaust gases of combustion at the bottom of the combustion chamber, after flowing over the heat exchanger enter an exhaust passage and pipe. The exhaust pipe is mounted inside the water supply line heating the water flowing into the heat exchanger. After being superheated in the heat exchanger, the water is ejected through an expansion nozzle and converts into steam prior to penetration into the earth formation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at a steam outlet downstream of the nozzle and close when the steam pressure is lost due to flameout.

Fox, Ronald L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Apparatus and method for controlling steam turbine operating conditions during starting and loading  

SciTech Connect

A steam turbine-generator system is described which consists of: a high-pressure steam turbine; a reheat turbine; a boiler including means for heating stem for delivery to the high-pressure steam turbine and a boiler reheat portion for reheating an exhaust steam from the high-pressure steam turbine for delivery to the reheat turbine; main valve means for admitting steam from the boiler to the high-pressure steam turbine; an intercept control valve for admitting steam from the boiler reheat portion to the reheat turbine; means for maintaining at least a selectable predetermined pressure in the boiler reheat portion; a reheater bypass assembly connected between a high-pressure turbine exhaust line of the high-pressure steam turbine and a reheat turbine inlet line of the reheat turbine, the reheater bypass assembly bypassing the reheat portion and the intercept control valve; a check valve in the high-pressure turbine exhaust line downstream of the reheater bypass assembly; and the check valve including means for preventing a flow of steam from the high-pressure turbine exhaust line to the reheat portion while an exhaust pressure of steam from the high-pressure steam turbine is less than the selectable predetermined pressure, whereby exhaust steam from the high pressure steam turbine passes through the reheater bypass assembly directly to the reheat turbine without passing through and reheat portion during at least a portion of a startup cycle.

Dimitroff, V.T. Jr.; Wagner, J.B.

1986-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effects of Soiling and Cleaning on the Reflectance and Solar HeatGain of a Light-Colored Roofing Membrane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A roof with high solar reflectance and high thermalemittance (e.g., a white roof) stays coolin the sun, reducing coolingpower demand in a conditioned building and increasing comfort in anunconditioned building. The high initial solar reflectance of a whitemembrane roof (circa 0.8) can be degraded by deposition of soot, dust,and/or algae to about 0.6 (range 0.3 to 0.8, depending on exposure) Weinvestigate the effects of soiling and cleaning on the solar spectralreflectance and solar absorptance of 15 initially white or light-graymembrane samples taken from roofs across the United States. Soot andorganic carbon were the two identifiable strongly absorbing contaminantson the membranes. Wiping was effective at removing soot, and less so atremoving organic carbon. Rinsing and/or washing removed nearly all of theremaining soil layer, with the exceptions of (a) thin layers of organiccarbon and (b) isolated dark spots of algae. Bleach was required toremove the last two features. The ratio of solar reflectance to unsoiledsolar reflectance (a measure of cleanliness) ranged from 0.41 to 0.89 forthe soiled samples; 0.53to 0.95 for the wiped samples; 0.74 to 0.98 forthe rinsed samples; 0.79 to 1.00 for the washed samples; and 0.94 to 1.02for the bleached samples. However, the influence of membrane soiling andcleaning on roof heat gain is better gauged by variations in solarabsorptance. Relative solar absorptances (indicating solar heat gainrelative to that of the unsoiled membrane) ranged from 1.4 to 3.5 for thesoiled samples; 1.1 to 3.1 for the wiped samples; 1.0 to 2.0 for therinsed samples; 1.0 to 1.9 for the washed samples; and 0.9 to 1.3 for thebleached samples.

Levinson, Ronnen; Berdahl, Paul; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Akbari,Hashem

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Streams of Steam The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Streams of Steam ­ The Steam Boiler Specification Case Study Manfred Broy, Franz Regensburger-tuned con- cepts of FOCUS by its application of the requirements specification of a steam boiler, see [Abr96-studies. In this context, applying FOCUS to the steam boiler case study ([Abr96]) led us to a couple of questions re- #12

Cengarle, María Victoria

308

RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Steam generator replacement overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since nuclear power began to be widely used for commercial purposes in the 1960s, unit operators have experienced a variety of problems with major components. Although many of the problems have diminished considerably, those associated with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators persist. Steam generator problems rank second, behind refueling outages, as the most significant contributor to lost electricity generation. As of December 31, 1995, 38 steam generators had been replaced in 13 of the 72 operating PWRs, and three units had been shut down prematurely, due primarily (or partially) to degradation of their steam generators: Portland General Electric`s Trojan unit, located in Prescott, OR, in 1992; Southern California Edison`s San Onofre 1, located in San Clemente, CA, in 1992; and Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s Rancho Seco unit in 1989. In the coming years, operators of PWRs in the US with degraded steam generators will have to decide whether to make annual repairs (with eventual derating likely), replace the generators or shut the plants down prematurely. To understand the issues and decisions utility managers face, this article examines problems encountered at steam generators over the past few decades and identifies some of the remedies that utility operators and the nuclear community have employed, including operational changes, maintenance, repairs and steam generator replacement.

Chernoff, H. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Wade, K.C. [USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ukraine Steam Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Ukraine Steam Partnership program is designed to implement energy efficiency improvements in industrial steam systems. These improvements are to be made by the private plants and local government departments responsible for generation and delivery of energy to end-users. One of the activities planned under this program was to provide a two-day training workshop on industrial steam systems focusing on energy efficiency issues related to the generation, distribution, and consumption of steam. The workshop was geared towards plant managers, who are not only technically oriented, but are also key decision makers in their respective companies. The Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology (ARENA-ECO), a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization founded to promote energy efficiency and environmental protection in Ukraine, in conjunction with the Alliance staff in Kiev sent out invitations to potential participants in all the regions of Ukraine. The purpose of this report is the describe the proceedings from the workshop and provide recommendations from the workshop's roundtable discussion. The workshop was broken down into two main areas: (1) Energy efficient boiler house steam generation; and Energy efficient steam distribution and consumption. The workshop also covered the following topics: (1) Ukrainian boilers; (2) Water treatment systems; (3) A profile of UKRESCO (Ukrainian Energy Services Company); (4) Turbine expanders and electricity generation; (5) Enterprise energy audit basics; and (6) Experience of steam use in Donetsk oblast.

Gurvinder Singh

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect

Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

SOME SPECIAL APPLICATIONS OF WELDING IN STEAM, GAS TURBINE, AND NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Six special applications of welding in steam, gasturbine, and nuclear power plants are described. Experiences are quoted of: the welding of austenittc steel gas-turbine rotors; the butt welding of heat-exchanger tubes in dissimilar metals; the welding of steam pipes for advanced steam conditions; welding in relation to feedwater heaters; the construction of expansion bellows in alloy steels; and the attachment of fins to heat-exchanger tubes. (auth)

Robertson, J.M.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Steam deflector assembly for a steam injected gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A steam injected gas turbine engine is described having a combustor, a casing for the combustor and an annular manifold comprising a part of the casing, the annular manifold having an exterior port formed therein and a plurality of holes formed in the manifold leading to the interior of the combustor, the improvement comprising a steam carrying line connected to the port and a steam deflector means for protecting the casing from direct impingement by the steam from the steam line and for distributing the steam about the annular manifold, the steam deflector means being mounted adjacent the port and within the manifold.

Holt, G.A. III.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Analysis and Development of Large Industrial Steam Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemicals, petroleum, pulp and paper, and many other industries depend heavily on extensive complex steam systems for thermal and mechanical energy delivery. Steam's versatility and desirable characteristics as both a heat transfer medium and a working fluid has fostered and perpetuated this dependency throughout industrial history. Many large process operations, however, have not developed their steam systems to keep pace with rapidly changing energy economics. As a result, the use of steam on industrial plants seldom approaches the optimum levels of first or second law efficiency. At each of many industrial complexes today, tens of millions of energy dollars per year are literally wasted. This paper describes some case histories comparing actual and optimum steam system configurations, and operational concepts. Highly effective steam system analytical techniques developed and used by the author are discussed. These include "energy level" mass balancing; the "three-branch" thermodynamic system; and powerful sophisticated digital computer steam system models. These latter are really "working models" on which development options can be tried and actively evaluated for economic and technical feasibility. The principal of steam as a plant-wide integrating energy system is explained and demonstrated with examples. These show how a properly structured and effectively operated steam system can increase operational flexibility and facilitate the practical implementation of many energy conservation opportunities in process and plant service areas.

Waterland, A. F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Steam generator tube failures  

SciTech Connect

A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Initial steam flow regulator for steam turbine start-up  

SciTech Connect

In a combined steam generator-turbine system, a drain type is provided in front of the stop valve to drain the first steam supply with the stop valve closed until the temperature of the valve and/or the temperature of the steam exceeds the temperature of saturation by a predetermined amount, and logic circuitry is provided to generate permissive signals which combine to allow successive admission of steam to the gland seal and to the steam turbine.

Martens, A.; Hobbs, M. M.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Detonation cell size measurements and predictions in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at elevated temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present research reports on the effect of initial mixture temperature on the experimentally measured detonation cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures. Experimental and theoretical research related to combustion phenomena in hydrogen-air-steam mixtures has been ongoing for many years. However, detonation cell size data currently exists or hydrogen-air-steam mixtures up to a temperature of only 400K. Sever accident scenarios have been identified for light water reactors (LWRs) where hydrogen-air mixture temperatures in excess of 400K could be generated within containment. The experiments in this report focus on extending the cell size data base for initial mixture temperatures in excess of 400K. The experiments were carried out in a 10-cm inner-diameter, 6.1-m long heated detonation tube with a maximum operating temperature of 700K and spatial temperature uniformity of {plus_minus}14K. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air initial gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K--650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The hydrogen-air detonability limits for the 10-cm inside-diameter test vessel, based upon the onset of single-head spin, decreased from 15 percent by hydrogen at 300K down to about 9 percent hydrogen at 650K. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments.

Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Economos, C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Materials Performance in USC Steam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials Performance in USC Steam: (1) pressure effects on steam oxidation - unique capability coming on-line; (2) hydrogen evolution - hydrogen permeability apparatus to determine where hydrogen goes during steam oxidation; and (3) NETL materials development - steam oxidation resource for NETL developed materials.

G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; N. M. Yanar

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

CYCLIC STEAM STIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CYCLIC STEAM STIMULATION ("Huff-and-Puff') (A well-stimulation method) This method is sometimes applied to heavy-oil reservoirs to boost recovery during the primary production...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Steam purity in PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impurities enter the secondary loop of the PWR through both makeup water from lake or well and cooling-water leaks in the condenser. These impurities can be carried to the steam generator, where they cause corrosion deposits to form. Corrosion products in steam are swept further through the system and become concentrated at the point in the low-pressure turbine where steam begins to condense. Several plants have effectively reduced impurities, and therefore corrosion, by installing a demineralizer for the makeup water, a resin-bed system to clean condensed steam from the condenser, and a deaerator to remove oxygen from the water and so lower the risk of system metal oxidation. 5 references, 1 figure.

Hopkinson, J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper will address the following. 1. Factors that determine the feasibility of reducing the plant steam operating pressure. 2. The operating advantages and disadvantages associated with the decreased steam pressure. 3. The economics of steam pressure reduction. Appropriate visual aids will be utilized as part of the discussion.

Sylva, D. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Compressor & Steam Turbine Efficiency Improvements & Revamping Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fossil fuels remain the dominant source for primary energy production worldwide. In relation to this trend, energy consumption in turbomachinery has been increasing due to the scale up of both the machinery itself as well as the processing plants in which they operate. This energy growth requires high efficiency improvements for machine design and operation to minimize life cycle cost. This paper will focus on the mechanical drive steam turbines which power the main process equipment in the heart of the plant and introduce the history of efficiency improvements for compressors and steam turbines in the Petrochemical Industry. Since heat balance configurations affect the plant's steam consumption, the authors will explain several cases of heat balance configurations and applications / selections of steam turbines. According to the change in output demand, in some cases the original plants are modified by increasing capacity and consequently the turbines and compressors are revamped internally or replaced totally. The authors will introduce several case studies on revamping to increase efficiency and reliability as per the following cases: a) Replacement of High Pressure Section Internals b) Replacement of Low Pressure Section Internals c) Replacement of All Internals d) Internals and Casing Replacement e) Efficiency Recovery Technique Modification Finally, life cycle cost (LCC) evaluation and sensitivity due to turbomachinery performance are explained as a case study of a mega ethylene plant.

Hata, S.; Horiba, J.; Sicker, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Surgut steam power plant: Block 1, unit 1 reconstruction feasibility study. Volume 2. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Description; Work Tasks: Review Plant Data; Power Cycle, Heat Balance Study; Heat Cycle Screening and Selection; Selected Heat Cycle Discussion; Heat Balance Summary Data and Diagram; Plant Conceptual Engineering; Major Mechanical System Descriptions; Main, Reheat, District Heating Steam Systems; Feedwater and Condensate System; HRSG Blowdown System; Chemical Feed System; Auxiliary Cooling System; Natural Gas Fuel System; Piping System; and Flue Gas System.

Not Available

1993-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluating Steam Trap Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data from these tests, which determined their relative efficiencies, were used in performing economic analyses to determine their equivalent uniform annual cost (EUAC). The comparison was made using a computer program written for the Apple II computer to evaluate overall steam trap economics. This program calculates the EUAC for any steam trap based on 12 input variables including capital, maintenance and steam costs, interest rate and trap life. After determinIng the EUAC, the program will perform sensitivity analyses on any of the twelve variables. (This computer program is available from the author.) This study shows that inverted bucket traps have lower EUAC's under more conditions than other types of traps. Also, this study shows that live steam loss is the heaviest contributor to the annual operating cost of any steam trap and that maintenance frequency and repair cost are also more important than a trap's first cost.

Fuller, N. Y.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cheng Cycle Brings Flexibility to Steam Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1983 Frito-Lay embarked on building a new 160,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in Kern County California. Based upon an estimated steam load between 5,000 and 50,000 lb/hr and an electrical load of approximately 1500 KW, the Engineering Department examined several energy optimization systems for this site. It was determined that a modified gas turbine cogeneration system was the best overall option. This system is unique in that it injects superheated steam from the waste heat boiler back into the gas turbine. When steam is injected into the turbine combustor, electrical output increases due to the increased mass flow and specific heat of the steam/air mixture. Electrical output ranges from 3.5 KW without injection to a theoretical 6.0 KW at maximum injection. Despite the volatility of nuclear power in California, project risk was low because the implementation of nuclear power would increase retail rates whereas the avoidance of nuclear power would increase avoided costs (buyback rates). When Frito-Lay decided, in 1983, to build a new snack food plant in Kern County, Calif., its main concern was to minimize the plant's total energy costs. The company therefore evaluated the various cogeneration options available and, for each option, conducted an energy-cost analysis. However, plant performance was not to be sacrificed in order to reduce the overall energy costs. After technical and economic analysis had been completed, Frito-Lay chose a cogeneration system using the Cheng Cycle---a gas-turbine system using steam injection that allows for efficient thermal tracking and simultaneous electrical generation. The company began construction of the Kern County plant to produce corn, tortilla, and potato chips in October 1984. Preliminary operation began in April 1986. The plant encompasses 160,000 ft, and is located just outside the city of Bakersfield. Steam is used for space heating as well as process applications. Total steam demand is expected to vary between 5000 and 55,000 lb/hr, depending on production and seasonal variations. The electrical usage of the plant is anticipated to fall between 1000 and 2500 kW, again depending on plant operations. Current utility energy costs are on the order of 50¢/therm for natural gas and 9¢/kWh for electricity. Cogeneration technology involves the simultaneous production of thermal and electrical energy. In Frito-Lay's case, the cogeneration system supplies steam for plant process needs and generates electricity for plant consumption and sale to the local utility. The modified gas turbine used in the plant is a Cheng Cycle Series Seven, Figure 1. It is a product of International Power Technology (IPT) of Palo Alto, Calif., which has patented the steam injection and control systems. The system is unique in that it injects superheated steam from the waste heat boiler back into the gas turbine. This steam injection process increases the electrical output of the turbine and improves cycle performance compared to traditional gas turbine systems.

Keller, D. C.; Bynum, D.; Kosla, L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Issues in the selection of the LMFBR steam cycle  

SciTech Connect

Unlike the light-water reactor, the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) allows the designer considerable latitude in the selection of the steam cycle. This latitude in selection has been exercised by both foreign and domestic designers, and thus, despite the fact that over 25 LMFBR's have been built or are under construction, a consensus steam cycle has not yet evolved. This paper discusses the LMFBR steam cycles of interest to the LMFBR designer, reviews which of these cycles have been employed to date, discusses steam-cycle selection factors, discusses why a consensus has not evolved, and finally, concludes that the LMFBR steam-cycle selection is primarily one of technical philosophy with several options available.

Buschman, H.W.; McConnell, R.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Deaerator heat exchanger for combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combined cycle power plant. It comprises a steam turbine including an inlet portion for receiving motive steam and an exhaust portion for exhausting the motive steam that is spent by the steam turbine; a condenser connected to the exhaust portion of the steam turbine for receiving the spent motive steam and for condensing the spent motive steam to a supply of condensate; a gas turbine including an exhaust portion for exhausting waste heat that is produced by the gas turbine in the form of exhaust gases; a heat recovery steam generator connected between the exhaust portion of the gas turbine and the steam turbine, for receiving the waste heat exhausted by the gas turbine, for generating the motive steam from a supply of feedwater heated by the waste heat, and for supplying the motive steam to the steam turbine; a deaerator connected to the condenser for receiving the supply of condensate and for deaerating the condensate to provide the supply of feedwater to the heat recovery steam generator; and a heat exchanger.

Pavel, J.; Richardson, B.L.

1990-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

Modeling Satellite District Heating and Cooling Networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Satellite District Heating and Cooling (DHC) systems offer an alternative structure to conventional, centralized DHC networks. Both use a piping network carrying steam or water… (more)

Rulff, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

2009-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

332

A better steam engine: Designing a distributed concentrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A better steam engine: Designing a distributed concentrating solar combined heat and power (DCS collector costs dominate. 2 #12;Distributed generation optionsg p · Biomass - methane, alcohol, dung, syngas transmission, etc. · Decreased cost of heat and electricity compared to other distributed renewables (

Kammen, Daniel M.

333

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program [Corrosion and Mechanics of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steam Generator Tube Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Capabilities Materials Testing Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) of Reactor Materials Corrosion Performance/Metal Dusting Overview Light Water Reactors Fatigue Testing of Carbon Steels and Low-Alloy Steels Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Ni-Base Alloys Irradiation-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program Air Oxidation Kinetics for Zr-based Alloys Fossil Energy Fusion Energy Metal Dusting Publications List Irradiated Materials Steam Generator Tube Integrity Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Corrosion and Mechanics of Materials Light Water Reactors Bookmark and Share

334

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Steam Distribution Losses Module 1 June 29, 2010 Steam EndUser Training Steam Distribution System Losses Module Slide 1 Steam Distribution System Losses Module The steam distribution system typically consists of main steam

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

335

A demonstration experiment of steam-driven, high-pressure melt ejection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A steam blowdown test was performed at the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility to test the steam supply system and burst diaphragm arrangement that will be used in subsequent Surtsey Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments. Following successful completion of the steam blowdown test, the HIPS-10S (High-Pressure Melt Streaming) experiment was conducted to demonstrate that the technology to perform steam-driven, high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) experiments has been successfully developed. In addition, the HIPS-10S experiment was used to assess techniques and instrumentation design to create the proper timing of events in HPME experiments. This document discusses the results of this test.

Allen, M.D.; Pitch, M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Nichols, R.T. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 50% of cost...

337

Method for improving the steam splits in a multiple steam injection process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for enhancing the uniformity of steam distribution in a multiple steam injection system comprising a steam generator, a steam header, a primary steam line connecting the generator to the header, and secondary steam lines connecting the header to steam injection wells. It comprises: injecting a surfactant into the primary steam line, and mixing the surfactant and steam sufficiently so that the surfactant and the steam enter the header as a foam.

Stowe, G.R. III.

1990-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Engineering Training Course 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides training material that was prepared for the first of three Steam Generator Engineer Training Program courses. The Steam Generator Engineer Training Program is a comprehensive training program of the Steam Generator Management Program. The content of this course is based on an industry-developed job analysis for a steam generator engineer. The job analysis resulted in eight high-level tasks; therefore, eight training modules will be developed over a three-year period beginni...

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Combined cycle electric power plant having a control system which enables dry steam generator operation during gas turbine operation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for a combined cycle electric power plant is described. It contains: at least one gas turbine including an exit through which heated exhaust gases pass; means for generating steam coupled to said gas turbine exit for transferring heat from the exhaust gases to a fluid passing through the steam generator; a steam turbine coupled to the steam generator and driven by the steam supplied thereby; means for generating electric power by the driving power of the turbines; condenser means for receiving and converting the spent steam from the steam turbine into condensate; and steam generating means comprising a low pressure storage tank, a first heat exchange tube, a boiler feedwater pump for directing fluid from a low pressure storage tank through the first heat exchange tube, a main storage drum, a second heat exchange tube, and a high pressure recirculation pump for directing fluid from the main storage pump through the second heat exchange tube. The control system monitors the temperature of the exhaust gas turbine gases as directed to the steam generator and deactuates the steam turbine when a predetermined temperature is exceeded.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1974-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Development and Transient Analysis of a Helical-coil Steam Generator for High Temperature Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is under development by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its design emphasizes electrical power production which may potentially be coupled with process heat for hydrogen production and other industrial applications. NGNP is considering a helical-coil steam generator for the primary heat transport loop heat exchanger based on its increased heat transfer and compactness when compared to other steam generators. The safety and reliability of the helical-coil steam generator is currently under evaluation as part of the development of NGNP. Transients, such as loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), are of interest in evaluating the safety of steam generators. In this study, a complete steam generator inlet pipe break (double ended pipe break) LOCA was simulated by an exponential loss of primary side pressure. For this analysis, a model of the helical-coil steam generator was developed using RELAP5-3D, an INL inhouse systems analysis code. The steam generator model behaved normally during the transient simulating the complete steam generator inlet pipe break LOCA. Further analysis is required to comprehensively evaluate the safety and reliability of the helical-coil steam generator design in the NGNP setting.

Nathan V. Hoffer; Nolan A. Anderson; Piyush Sabharwall

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Scaled-physical-model studies of the steam-drive process. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project was to gain an understanding of the influence of controllable, operating practices and of reservoir parameters on the steam drive. The steam drive, because the chief phenomena of fluid flow and heat flow obey the same laws of diffusion, can be physically scaled. The validity of the results of the scaled models is evidenced by the correspondence of the results with those reported in field operations. In order to conserve on resources, this report is limited to a summary statement of the findings and conclusions of the overall project with separate chapters devoted to an account of specific tasks which came to fruition during the latter part of the project. Summary of results are presented for the following projects: gravitational instability of a steam drive; roles of oil viscosity and steam temperature on the production of crude oil when the steam flow is stratified; extension of the steam drive to tars and bitumens; occurrence of the optimum steam injection rate; emulsification and oil productivity; role of reservoir thickness; cyclic injection of steam in a steam drive; high gravity crudes; partial substitution of inert gas for steam. Two projects completed and described in detail are: effect of oil viscosity on reservoir thickness on the steam drive; and anticipated effect of diurnal injection on steam efficiency.

Doscher, T.M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Overspeed protection method for a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for achieving overspeed protection in a combined cycle gas and steam turbine power plant. It comprises solidly coupling together to rotate at all times as a single rotor unit, including during sudden loss of load occurrences, the rotating members of a gas turbine with its associated combustor and air compressor, a high pressure steam turbine at least one lower pressure stream turbine and an electrical generator; transferring heat from the gas turbine exhaust to steam exhausted from the high pressure steam turbine in a steam reheater before it is input to the at least one lower pressure steam turbine; connecting an output of the steam reheater with an input of the lower pressure steam turbine via a valveless steam conduit; and using a single overspeed control to detect a sudden loss of load occurrence and, in response, simultaneously reducing steam input to the high pressure steam turbine and reducing fuel input to the gas turbine combustor while permitting residual reheater output to continue to expand freely through the at least one lower pressure steam turbine.

Moore, J.H.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

343

Combustion Air Preheat on Steam Cracker Furnaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning in 1978, Exxon has started up nine large new steam cracking furnaces with various levels of air preheat, and has seven more under construction. Sources of heat have included process streams, flue gas and gas turbine exhaust. Several aspects of the technology employed have been patented in the U.S. and elsewhere. This paper discusses the use of process heat and gas turbine exhaust for air preheat to provide plant fuel savings of about 8% over and above a modern, fuel efficient alternative furnace without air preheat.

Kenney, W. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Effects of phase transformation of steam-water relative permeabilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined theoretical and experimental study of steam-water relative permeabilities (RPs) was carried out. First, an experimental study of two-phase concurrent flow of steam and water was conducted and a set of RP curves was obtained. These curves were compared with semi-empirical and experimental results obtained by other investigators for two-phase, two-component flow (oil/gas; gas/water; gas/oil). It was found that while the wetting phase RPs were in good agreement, RPs for the steam phase were considerably higher than the non-wetting phase RPs in two-component systems. This enhancement of steam RP is attributed to phase transformation effects at the pore level in flow channels. The effects of phase transformation were studied theoretically. This study indicates that there are two separate mechanisms by which phase transformation affects RP curves: (1) Phase transformation is converging-diverging flow channels can cause an enhancement of steam phase RP. In a channel dominated by steam a fraction of the flowing steam condenses upstream from the constriction, depositing its latent heat of condensation. This heat is conducted through the solid grains around the pore throat, and evaporation takes place downstream from it. Therefore, for a given bulk flow quality; a smaller fraction of steam actually flows through the throat segments. This pore-level effect manifests itself as relative permeability enhancement on a macroscopic level; and (2) phase transformation along the interface of a stagnant phase and the phase flowing around it controls the irreducible phase saturation. Therefore, the irreducible phase saturation in steam-water flow will depend, among other factors, on the boundary conditions of the flow.

Verma, A.K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on deaerators in industrial steam systems provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Inspect and Repair Steam Traps  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provide how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Steam generator tube rupture study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes our investigation of steam generator behavior during a postulated tube rupture accident. Our study was performed using the steam generator, thermal-hydraulic analysis code THERMIT-UTSG. The purpose ...

Free, Scott Thomas

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

Thomas, Andrew

349

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

Thomas, Andrew

350

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Gym Lot Corbett Lot Greenhouse Patch Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam

Thomas, Andrew

351

Section 5.3.1 Heat-Recovery Water Heating: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat pumps, chillers, steam condensate lines, hot air associated with kitchen and laundry facilities, power-generation equipment (such as microturbines or fuel cells), and...

352

Deliberate ignition of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures in condensing steam environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of thermal glow plug igniters to burn hydrogen in a condensing steam environment due to the presence of water sprays. The experiments were designed to determine if a detonation or accelerated flame could occur in a hydrogen-air-steam mixture which was initially nonflammable due to steam dilution but was rendered flammable by rapid steam condensation due to water sprays. Eleven Hydrogen Igniter Tests were conducted in the test vessel. The vessel was instrumented with pressure transducers, thermocouple rakes, gas grab sample bottles, hydrogen microsensors, and cameras. The vessel contained two prototypic engineered systems: (1) a deliberate hydrogen ignition system and (2) a water spray system. Experiments were conducted under conditions scaled to be nearly prototypic of those expected in Advanced Light Water Reactors (such as the Combustion Engineering (CE) System 80+), with prototypic spray drop diameter, spray mass flux, steam condensation rates, hydrogen injection flow rates, and using the actual proposed plant igniters. The lack of any significant pressure increase during the majority of the burn and condensation events signified that localized, benign hydrogen deflagration(s) occurred with no significant pressure load on the containment vessel. Igniter location did not appear to be a factor in the open geometry. Initially stratified tests with a stoichiometric mixture in the top showed that the water spray effectively mixes the initially stratified atmosphere prior to the deflagration event. All tests demonstrated that thermal glow plugs ignite hydrogen-air-steam mixtures under conditions with water sprays near the flammability limits previously determined for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures under quiescent conditions. This report describes these experiments, gives experimental results, and provides interpretation of the results. 12 refs., 127 figs., 16 tabs.

Blanchat, T.K.; Stamps, D.W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Analytical steam injection model for layered systems  

SciTech Connect

Screening, evaluation and optimization of the steam flooding process in homogeneous reservoirs can be performed by using simple analytical predictive models. In the absence of any analytical model for layered reservoirs, at present, only numerical simulators can be used. And these are expensive. In this study, an analytical model has been developed considering two isolated layers of differing permeabilities. The principle of equal flow potential is applied across the two layers. Gajdica`s (1990) single layer linear steam drive model is extended for the layered system. The formulation accounts for variation of heat loss area in the higher permeability layer, and the development of a hot liquid zone in the lower permeability layer. These calculations also account for effects of viscosity, density, fractional flow curves and pressure drops in the hot liquid zone. Steam injection rate variations in the layers are represented by time weighted average rates. For steam zone calculations, Yortsos and Gavalas`s (1981) upper bound method is used with a correction factor. The results of the model are compared with a numerical simulator. Comparable oil and water flow rates, and breakthrough times were achieved for 100 cp oil. Results with 10 cp and 1000 cp oils indicate the need to improve the formulation to properly handle differing oil viscosities.

Abdual-Razzaq; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Gas turbine row #1 steam cooled vane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A design for a vane segment having a closed-loop steam cooling system is provided. The vane segment comprises an outer shroud, an inner shroud and an airfoil, each component having a target surface on the inside surface of its walls. A plurality of rectangular waffle structures are provided on the target surface to enhance heat transfer between each component and cooling steam. Channel systems are provided in the shrouds to improve the flow of steam through the shrouds. Insert legs located in cavities in the airfoil are also provided. Each insert leg comprises outer channels located on a perimeter of the leg, each outer channel having an outer wall and impingement holes on the outer wall for producing impingement jets of cooling steam to contact the airfoil's target surface. Each insert leg further comprises a plurality of substantially rectangular-shaped ribs located on the outer wall and a plurality of openings located between outer channels of the leg to minimize cross flow degradation.

Cunha, Frank J. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A SIMULATION OF THE EGCR STEAM GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

An analog model of the EGCR steam generator was developed and operated on the ORNL analog computer as part of a program to simulate the operation and control of the EGCR reactor plant. Equilibrium operation and the transient response of the steam generator unit to system perturbations were studied. A simultaneous solution of the basic heat transfer equations representing the performance of the unit was obtained. The model was operated initially at steady- state conditions, and then perturbations were made to gas flow, gas inlet temperature, and steam throttle valve position. The response characteristics of the model during the transients were recorded. The steam generator gas outlet temperature showed a marked degree of insensitivity to changes in gas inlet temperature. The effect of gas flow changes on gas exit temperature was slightly more pronounced. The transient behavio-r of the unit was reasonable, and the model developed indicated satisfactory operation within the design range of 20 to l00% of full power. (auth)

Yarosh, M.M.; Ball, S.J.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Task 1—Steam Oxidation (NETL-US)  

SciTech Connect

The proposed steam in let temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A·USC) steam turbine is high enough (760°C) Ihat traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferr;tic/manensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature lim itations of this class of materials. Cast versions of three traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys (Haynes 263. Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantia l: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 nun thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equi valem microslruclUre •. A multi_step homogenization heat treatment was d~ve loped to better disperse the al loy constituents. These castings were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (al 760 and 800 "C).

G. R. Holcomb

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fuzzy control of steam turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: PID control, comparison of PID and fuzzy control, fuzzy logic control, robustness, speed control, steam turbine control

N. Kiupel; P. M. Frank; O. Bux

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Steam Turbine Performance Engineer's Guide is meant to present the steam turbine performance engineer with the expected and important functions and responsibilities necessary to succeed in this position that are not necessarily taught in college. The instructions and recommendations in this guide, when properly executed, will improve the effectiveness of steam turbine performance engineers, positively affecting both the performance and reliability of the steam turbines under their care.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Microchannel Process Technology for Compact Methane Steam Reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of microchannel reaction engineering and applications to compact chemical reactors has expanded rapidly both academically and industrially in recent years. Velocys{reg_sign}, a spin-out company from Battelle Memorial Institute, is commercializing microchannel process technology for large-scale chemical processing. Hydrogen production at industrial rates in compact Velocys hardware is made possible through increases in both heat and mass transfer rates for highly active and novel catalysts. In one example, a microchannel methane steam reforming reactor is presented with integrated catalytic partial oxidation of methane prior to catalytic combustion with low excess air (25%) to generate the required energy for undothermic methane steam reforming in adjacent channels. Heat transfer rates from the exothermic reactions exceed 18 W/cm{sup 2} of interplanar heat transfer surface area and exceed 65 W/cm{sup 3} of total reaction volume for a methane steam reforming contact time near 4 milliseconds. The process intensity of the Velocys methane steam reformer well exceeds that of conventional steam reformers, which have a typical volumetric heat flux below 1 W/cm{sup 3}. The integration of multiple unit operations and improvements in process intensification result in significant capital and operating cost savings for commercial applications.

Tonkovich, A L.; Perry, Steve; Wang, Yong; Qiu, Dongming; LaPlante, Timothy J.; Rogers, William A.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

362

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

363

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

364

STEAM GENERATOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual study on design of sodium-cooled reactor steam generators was conducted. Included is a detailed description of the preliminary design and analysis, based on the use of known materials and existing methods of fabrication. (See also APAE-41 Vols. I and III.) (J.R.D.)

1959-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

Steam purity in PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports that 2 EPRI studies of PWRs prove that impure steam triggers decay of turbine metals. Reveals that EPRI is attempting to improve steam monitoring and analysis, which are key steps on the way to deciding the most cost-effective degree of steam purity, and to upgrade demineralizing systems, which can then reliably maintain that degree of purity. Points out that 90% of all cracks in turbine disks have occurred at the dry-to-wet transition zone, dubbed the Wilson line. Explains that because even very clean water contains traces of chemical impurities with concentrations in the parts-per-billion range, Crystal River-3's secondary loop was designed with even more purification capability; a deaerator to remove oxygen and prevent oxidation of system metals, and full-flow resin beds to demineralize 100% of the secondary-loop water from the condenser. Concludes that focusing attention on steam and water chemistry can ward off cracking and sludge problems caused by corrosion.

Hopkinson, J.; Passell, T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

4240 Carson Street, Suite 102 Denver, CO 80239 www.sre3.com SOLAR ELECTRIC SOLAR WATER HEATING ENERGY AUDITS A/C & HEATING INSULATION LIGHTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4240 Carson Street, Suite 102 Denver, CO 80239 www.sre3.com SOLAR ELECTRIC SOLAR WATER HEATING for homeowners, businesses, and government entities that assist them in lowering utility bills, reducing a unique solutions approach based on the RE3 concept, which includes: · Review ­ current energy usage

Colorado at Boulder, University of

367

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

368

Engineering Technical Training Module Water and Steam Properties (ETTM: WSP) Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this training module is to provide a foundational understanding on the engineering principals and properties of water and steam and how they apply in nuclear power plant applications. The topics that are included are steam tables, specific heat, the energy equation and how it applies to different plant systems, and example problems for analyzing different plant equipment to understand their water/steam properties. This computer-based training (CBT) module is intended for use by new engine...

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demands, and cogeneration. The Steam Distribution System Losses module will cover steam leaks, steam traps Analysis ­ (SSAT) Fuel selection Steam demands Cogeneration Steam Distribution System Losses - (3EDOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Welcome Module - 1 8

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

370

Chemical tailoring of steam to remediate underground mixed waste contaminents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously remediate mixed-waste underground contamination, such as organic liquids, metals, and radionuclides involves chemical tailoring of steam for underground injection. Gases or chemicals are injected into a high pressure steam flow being injected via one or more injection wells to contaminated soil located beyond a depth where excavation is possible. The injection of the steam with gases or chemicals mobilizes contaminants, such as metals and organics, as the steam pushes the waste through the ground toward an extraction well having subatmospheric pressure (vacuum). The steam and mobilized contaminants are drawn in a substantially horizontal direction to the extraction well and withdrawn to a treatment point above ground. The heat and boiling action of the front of the steam flow enhance the mobilizing effects of the chemical or gas additives. The method may also be utilized for immobilization of metals by using an additive in the steam which causes precipitation of the metals into clusters large enough to limit their future migration, while removing any organic contaminants.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Udell, Kent S. (Berkeley, CA); Bruton, Carol J. (Livermore, CA); Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Derwent cogeneration renews steam supply to Courtauld`s  

SciTech Connect

A 220 MW gas turbine CHP scheme replaces coal-fired boilers at Courtauld`s power station, near Derby, England. It provides steam both to processes and to drive the three existing back-pressure turbines. The scheme that has evolved comprises four MS6001B gas turbines, with fired dual-pressure heat recovery boilers and a 58 MW condensing steam turbine. The plant is of outdoor construction, sited next to the existing Spondon H. With the original coal-fired boilers now decommissioned, the three back-pressure turbines bridge across the HP and LP steam outputs of the new plant. The plant is designed for dual-fuel operation, but in practice will burn only gas. The plant was completed in March this year and was available as an emergency steam supply to cover outages in the coal-fired plant. 6 figs.

Jeffs, E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Open-Cycle Vapor Compression Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many industrial processes, large quantities of energy are often wasted in the form of low pressure steam and low-grade heat. Economical recovery of these waste energy sources is often difficult due to such factors as low temperature levels and contamination of the steam. In industrial processes that utilize steam directly or as a mode of energy transport, waste energy can be efficiently recovered and upgraded in the form of high-pressure steam by means of an open-cycle steam heat pump system. Recovery and upgrading of these waste steam or heat sources offer a great potential for energy conservation. Thermo Electron has developed, under sponsorship by the Gas Research Institute, Southern California Gas Company, and the Consolidated Natural Gas Service Company, an open-cycle steam heat pump to recover this waste energy in the form of high-pressure process steam. The system utilizes excess low-pressure steam (or that produced from an excess heat source with a waste heat boiler) and compresses this steam to the desired pressure level for process use. The compressor is driven by a gas turbine or gas engine prime mover. To enhance the system performance, the prime mover exhaust and/or cooling jacket heat is recovered to generate additional process steam or hot water. Utilizing the Thermo Electron system, fuel consumption can be 30 percent lower in comparison to a direct-fired boiler. Simple payback periods of 1 to 3 years are generally found for most applications.

Pasquinelli, D. M.; Becker, F. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Evaluation of Steam Generator Level Measurement Model for OPR1000 Using RETRAN-3D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator level measurement is important factor for plant transient analyses using best estimate thermal hydraulic computer codes since the value of steam generator level is used for steam generator level control system and plant protection system. Because steam generator is in the saturation condition which includes steam and liquid together and is the place that heat exchange occurs from primary side to secondary side, computer codes are hard to calculate steam generator level realistically without appropriate level measurement model. In this paper, we prepare the steam generator models using RETRAN-3D that include geometry models, full range feedwater control system and five types of steam generator level measurement model. Five types of steam generator level measurement model consist of level measurement model using elevation difference in downcomer, 1D level measurement model using fluid mass, 1D level measurement model using fluid volume, 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass, and 2D level measurement model using power and fluid volume. And we perform the evaluation of the capability of each steam generator level measurement model by simulating the real plant transient condition, the title is 'Reactor Trip by The Failure of The Deaerator Level Control Card of Ulchin Unit 3'. The comparison results between real plant data and RETRAN-3D analyses for each steam generator level measurement model show that 2D level measurement model using power and fluid mass or fluid volume has more realistic prediction capability compared with other level measurement models. (authors)

Doo Yong Lee; Soon Joon Hong; Byung Chul Lee [FNC Technology Co., SNU Research Park Innovation Center 516, San4-2, Bongchun-7 dong, Kwanak-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Heok Soon Lim [KHNP Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Munji-dong 103-16, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Crude oil steam distillation in steam flooding. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Steam distillation yields of sixteen crude oils from various parts of the United States have been determined at a saturated steam pressure of 200 psig. Study made to investigate the effect of steam pressure (200 to 500 psig) on steam distillation yields indicates that the maximum yields of a crude oil may be obtained at 200 psig. At a steam distillation correlation factor (V/sub w//V/sub oi/) of 15, the determined steam distillation yields range from 12 to 56% of initial oil volume for the sixteen crude oils with gravity ranging from 12 to 40/sup 0/API. Regression analysis of experimental steam distillation yields shows that the boiling temperature (simulated distillation temperature) at 20% simulated distillation yield can predict the steam distillation yields reasonably well: the standard error ranges from 2.8 to 3.5% (in yield) for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ < 5 and from 3.5 to 4.5% for V/sub w//V/sub oi/ > 5. The oil viscosity (cs) at 100/sup 0/F can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 3.1 to 4.3%. The API gravity can predict the steam distillation yields with standard error from 4.4 to 5.7%. Characterization factor is an unsatisfactory correlation independent variable for correlation purpose.

Wu, C.H.; Elder, R.B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Method and apparatus for improved start-up procedures in conventional steam power generators and dual fluid Cheng cycle engines  

SciTech Connect

In a start-up procedure for a steam injected gas turbine engine, a chamber; compressor means for introducing air into the chamber; means for introducing steam within the chamber, including at least a steam injection line; means for heating air and steam in the chamber, including at least a hydrocarbon fuel source and means for combustion; turbine means response to a mixture of air, combustion products and steam for converting the energy associated with the mixture to mechanical energy; counterflow heat exchanger means, including at least superheater and evaporator sections, for transferring residual thermal energy for the mixture exhausted from the turbine means, to incoming water and steam, wherein the evaporator section includes a water storage drum between, and connected with, the evaporator and superheat sections, the connection between the drum and superheater sections including a steam injector control valve, and means for providing incoming water at temperatures below the normal operating boiling temperature to the evaporator section.

Hamill, J.; Digumarth, R.; Conlon, W.; Cheng, D.Y.; Chang, C.N.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

377

Water Vapor and Mechanical Work: A Comparison of Carnot and Steam Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of water vapor on the production of kinetic energy in the atmosphere is discussed here by comparing two idealized heat engines: the Carnot cycle and the steam cycle. A steam cycle transports water from a warm moist source to a colder ...

Olivier Pauluis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. b. c. Pump Ap S(WDB) OK NT(NC) W(WDB) Steam generatorsuperheat Steam generator tube leaks D. Core thermaland radial models Steam generator tube leaks Critical heat

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

dist_steam.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Steam Usage Form District Steam Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may c

380

Steam separator latch assembly  

SciTech Connect

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Kobsa, Irvin R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Steam separator latch assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A latch assembly removably joins a steam separator assembly to a support flange disposed at a top end of a tubular shroud in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The assembly includes an annular head having a central portion for supporting the steam separator assembly thereon, and an annular head flange extending around a perimeter thereof for supporting the head to the support flange. A plurality of latches are circumferentially spaced apart around the head flange with each latch having a top end, a latch hook at a bottom end thereof, and a pivot support disposed at an intermediate portion therebetween and pivotally joined to the head flange. The latches are pivoted about the pivot supports for selectively engaging and disengaging the latch hooks with the support flange for fixedly joining the head to the shroud or for allowing removal thereof. 12 figures.

Challberg, R.C.; Kobsa, I.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Clothes Washers, Dehumidifiers, Dishwasher, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Pool Pumps, Programmable Thermostats,...

383

Recover Heat from Boiler Blowdown  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on recovering heat from boiler blowdown provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Method for supplying heat to an engine for external heat supply by intermittent combustion, and engine for carrying out the method  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a reheat steam power plant including a turbine bypass system. The power plant comprises a boiler having a superheater and a reheater therein, a high pressure stream turbine driven by steam generated in the superheater and supplied through a main steam pipe and a first control valve means for controlling a flow of the steam through the main steam pipe. It also consists of a reheat steam turbine driven by reheat heated up in the reheater and conducted through a hot reheat steam pipe, a second control valve means for controlling a flow of steam through the hot reheat steam pipe, a condenser for condensing the reheat steam exhausted from the reheat steam turbine, and a cold reheat steam pipe connecting an outlet of the high pressure steam turbine with an inlet of the reheater. Plus a check valve means is disposed in the cold reheat steam pipe, a condensate pipe means for connecting the condenser with an upstream side of the superheater, a high pressure turbine bypass pipe means for connecting the main steam pipe with the cold reheat steam pipe, a turbine bypass valve disposed in the high pressure turbine bypass pipe, and means for reducing the quantity of the reheat steam introduced into the reheater from the superheater through the high pressure turbine bypass pipe means and for discharging an excess steam from the high pressure turbine bypass pipe means and the cold reheat steam pipe when the high pressure turbine bypass means is operated.

Hoizumi, S.; Abe, N.; Ueno, T.; Arakawa, T.; Hodozuka, K.

1987-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Steam Condensation Induced Waterhammer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the type of waterhammer that kills people. It's initiating mechanism is much different than the image most engineers have of what causes waterhammer-- i.e. fast moving steam picking up a slug of condensate and hurling it downstream against an elbow or a valve. Condensation Induced Waterhammer can be 100 times more powerful than this type of waterhammer. Because it does not require flowing steam, it often occurs during relatively quiescent periods when operators least expect it. It's most often initiated by opening a valve, even a drain valve to remove condensate. The overpressure from an event can easily exceed 1000 psi. This is enough pressure to fracture a cast iron valve, blow out a steam gasket, or burst an accordion type expansion joint. And, in fact, failure of each of these components in separate condensation induced waterhammer accidents has resulted in operator fatalities. Operators and engineers need to understand this type of waterhammer so they can avoid procedures which can initiate it and designs which are susceptible to it.

Kirsner, W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

387

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, Paul R. (Western Springs, IL); McLennan, George A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Steam Generator Management Program: Alloy 800 Steam Generator Tubing Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear grade (NG) Alloy 800 has been used for steam generator tubing since 1972 in over 50 nuclear power plants worldwide. The operational performance of this alloy has been very good, although some degradation modes have recently been observed. This report describes worldwide operating experience for Alloy 800 steam generator tubing along with differences in tubing material, plant design, and operating conditions that can affect tube degradation. The various types of plants with Alloy 800 steam generat...

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dual turbine power plant and method of operating such plant, especially one having an HTGR steam supply  

SciTech Connect

A power plant including dual steam turbine-generators connected to pass superheat and reheat steam from a steam generator which derives heat from the coolant gas of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor is described. Associated with each turbine is a bypass line to conduct superheat steam in parallel with a high pressure turbine portion, and a bypass line to conduct superheat steam in parallel with a lower pressure turbine portion. Auxiliary steam turbines pass a portion of the steam flow to the reheater of the steam generator and drive gas blowers which circulate the coolant gas through the reactor and the steam source. Apparatus and method are disclosed for loading or unloading a turbine-generator while the other produces a steady power output. During such loading or unloading, the steam flows through the turbine portions are coordinated with the steam flows through the bypass lines for protection of the steam generator, and the pressure of reheated steam is regulated for improved performance of the gas blowers. 33 claims, 5 figures

Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

High performance steam cogeneration (proof-of-concept phases). Phase 2, HRSG 500-hour test report: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in small once-through Alloy 800 steam generators, improved materials technology, and application of small industrial gas turbine technology to steam turbine cogeneration offers the potential to make a step increase in steam temperature from around 1000{degree}F, where industry has been for almost fifty years, to 1500{degree}F. In small cogeneration systems, it is economically practical to introduce new technology and make a step change in temperature where it may not be possible (given the regulatory environment and economic risk) for a major change in steam temperature to be introduced in the hundreds of megawatt size of an electric utility. Increasing the peak steam temperature in a steam turbine cycle allows more work to be extracted or electrical power to be generated from a given quantity of heat input. Figure 1 plots steam efficiency as a function of superheat steam temperature and pressure for a turbine-back pressure of 166 psia. This figure clearly shows that increasing the steam conditions from the typical current practice of 900{degree}F and 900 psia to 1500{degree}F and 1500 psia will increase the steam cycle efficiency by 53%. The combination of higher cycle efficiency with an advanced high efficiency steam turbine design provides a substantial increase in turbine output power for a given steam flowrate. The output of this advanced high temperature steam turbine is approximately twice that of a current industrial practive turbine for the same turbine flowrate as seen in Figure 2.

Campbell, A.H.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

EA-1178: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

78: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, 78: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1178: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for a proposed energy conservation measure for a number of buildings in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The proposed action includes replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing new natural gas pipelines to provide a source for many of these units and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 12, 1997 EA-1178: Finding of No Significant Impact

395

Why Condensing Steam Turbines are More Efficient than Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider the following questions: 1. Which is bigger, a nickel or a dime? 2. Which weighs more? 3. Which is worth more? The answers are obvious: a nickel is bigger and it weighs more, but a dime is worth more. So size and weight are the wrong measurements of a coin's value. The real value of a coin is how much it will buy. In much the same way, enthalpy (Btu/lb) is the wrong measurement for the value of steam. It tells what the heat content of the steam is, but heat content is not the same as value. The real value of steam is how much work can be obtained from it. This paper deals with some of the interesting conclusions that can be drawn when ability to do work is substituted for enthalpy as the primary system efficiency measurement.

Nelson, K. E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Downhole pressure, temperature and flowrate measurements in steam wells at the Geysers field  

SciTech Connect

Recently developed pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) tools are used to collect reliable downhole measurements in geothermal systems, such as at The Geysers. PTS surveys in several flowing Geysers steam wells were used to quantify steam entry location and magnitude, wellbore heat loss, pressure drop due to friction, thermodynamic properties of the steam, and maximum rock temperature. Interwell cross flow/interference was identified in one well. Finally, a single-phase saturated steam wellbore model used to compare calculated to measured downhole values, was found to adequately predict the flowing pressure versus depth curves in vapor filled holes.

Enedy, Kathleen L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evaluation of rock/fracture interactions during steam injection through vertical hydraulic fractures  

SciTech Connect

The design, results, and analysis of a steamdrive pilot in the South Belridge diatomite, Kern County, California, are reviewed. Pilot results demonstrate that steam can be injected across a 1,000-ft-tall diatomite column using hydraulically fractured wells and that significant oil is produced in response to steaming. A computationally simple numerical model is proposed and used to analyze reservoir heating and volumetric sweep by steam. Results from the analysis show that hydraulic fractures undergoing steam injection can be dynamic and asymmetrical.

Kovscek, A.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Johnston, R.M. [CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Patzek, T.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Steam Generator Management Program: Empirical Model for Predicting Recirculating PWR Steam Generator Broached-Hole Blockage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since their initial use in commercial plants in the 1960s, the steam generators (SGs) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have exhibited a number of reliability problems. Even though many of these are related to the integrity of the heat-transfer tubing and other internal components or to decreases in heat-transfer efficiency, some SG designs have been subject to a different issue—deposit-induced blockage of the broached flow holes in the tube support plates (TSPs) located within the SG ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Steam Generator Management Program: Empirical Model for Predicting Recirculating PWR Steam Generator Broached-Hole Blockage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since their initial use in commercial plants in the 1960s, the steam generators (SGs) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have exhibited a number of reliability problems. Even though many of these are related to the integrity of the heat-transfer tubing and other internal components or to decreases in heat-transfer efficiency, some SG designs have been subject to a different issuedeposit-induced blockage of the broached flow holes in the tube support plates (TSPs) located within the SG shell. This study...

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Method and apparatus for fuel gas moisturization and heating  

SciTech Connect

Fuel gas is saturated with water heated with a heat recovery steam generator heat source. The heat source is preferably a water heating section downstream of the lower pressure evaporator to provide better temperature matching between the hot and cold heat exchange streams in that portion of the heat recovery steam generator. The increased gas mass flow due to the addition of moisture results in increased power output from the gas and steam turbines. Fuel gas saturation is followed by superheating the fuel, preferably with bottom cycle heat sources, resulting in a larger thermal efficiency gain compared to current fuel heating methods. There is a gain in power output compared to no fuel heating, even when heating the fuel to above the LP steam temperature.

Ranasinghe, Jatila (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Additional Steam Traps Increase Production of a Drum Oven at a Petroleum Jelly Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional steam traps were installed on the drum oven at a petroleum jelly production facility at an ExxonMobil plant in Nigeria. The installation improved heat transfer and saved energy.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Numerical simulation of micro/mini-channel based methane-steam reformer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Numerical modeling of methane-steam reforming is performed in a micro/mini-channel with heat input through catalytic channel walls. The low-Mach number, variable density Navier-Stokes equations together… (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Air-cooled vacuum steam condenser  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a steam powered system. It comprises: a turbine for converting steam energy into mechanical energy upon expansion of steam therein, a boiler for generating steam to be fed to the turbine, and a conduit arrangement coupling the boiler to the turbine and then recoupling the turbine exhaust to the boiler through steam condensing mechanisms.

Larinoff, M.W.

1990-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-169 Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam- Water Relative Permeability Peter A. O by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative

Stanford University

405

Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Steam pretreatment is the reaction of coal with steam at temperatures well below those usually used for solubilization. The objective of the proposed work is to test the application of steam pretreatment to coal liquefaction. This quarter, a 300 ml stirred autoclave for liquefaction tests were specified and ordered, procedures for extraction tests were reestablished, and the synthesis of four model compounds was completed. Two of these compounds remain to be purified.

Graff, R.A.; Balogh-Nair, V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Process for purifying geothermal steam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

Li, Charles T. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Steam Pressure Reduction: Opportunities and Issues; A BestPractices Steam Technical Brief  

SciTech Connect

A BestPractices Technical Brief describing industrial steam generation systems and opportunities for reducing steam system operating pressure.

Not Available

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase II. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wright-Malta gasification process is characterized by low-temperature, catalyzed steam gasification in a pressurized rotary kiln. Fresh biomass moves slowly and continuously through the kiln, where it is gradually heated to around 1200/sup 0/F in an atmosphere of 300 psi steam. During its traverse, pyrolysis and reaction of steam with the nascent char convert nearly all of the organic solids to the gaseous phase. The volatile pyrolysis products pass through the kiln co-currently with the solids and are similarly cracked and steam-reformed within the kiln to fixed gases. Heat for the gasification process is provided by sensible heat recovered from the product gas and the wood decomposition exotherm, making the process inherently very energy-efficient. This report summarizes the work done during the experimental, laboratory-scale phase of development of the W-M biomass gasification process. Two bench-scale experimental gasifiers were constructed and tested: the ''minikiln'', a batch-feed, rotating autoclave; and the ''biogasser'', a stationary, continuous-feed, tubular reactor with zone heating and auger transport. Studies were carried out in these reactors to determine the extent of conversion of biomass solids to gas, and the makeup of the product gas, over a wide range of process conditions. The process variables that were investigated included reactor pressure and temperature, catalyst type and concentration, moisture content and type of biomass feed.

Hooverman, R.H.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Degradation of Steam Generator Internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 1999 ... Regulatory Perspective on Industry's Response to Generic Letter 97-06, " Degradation of Steam Generator Internals" by S. Coffin, M. Subudhi, ...

410

DETERMINATION OF MAXIMUM PERMISSIBLE LEAKAGE FROM THE HRT PROCESS STEAM SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Calculations were made to determine the radiation hazard to HRT personnel as a result of leakage to the atmosphere from the process steam system in the event of a heat exchanger tube rupture. These calculations show that with the present four-minute delay before dumping approximately 1020 lb of fuel solution may be transferred to the steam system. The radiation hazard from fission products in the atomosphere will be negligble if the steam killer blower is operating. If this blower is not operatin. a natural convection loop will be set up in the steam killer which will have a condensing capacity of 4 lb/min of steam at atmospheric pressure. In this latter case. the inhalation hazard will be negligible when the leak rate through the steam stop valves is less than 4lb/ min. (auth)

Gift, E.H.

1959-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Financial Impact of Good Condenser Vacuum in Industrial Steam Turbines: Computer Modeling Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial turbine throttle conditions are fixed by plant designs - materials of construction, steam requirements, etc. Condensing turbine exhaust conditions are limited by the atmosphere to which residual heat is rejected; and are fixed by installed condenser surface area and the steam space characteristics. Since the steam rate and shaft power costs are dependent on the available enthalpy drop across the machine, the steam must condense at the lowest practical thermal state. Thus, air presence and cooling rate must be controlled. The condensing turbine is not an isolated system. It directly affects the use of boiler fuel and the purchase of power. Its condensate requires reheating to feedwater temperature: steam is used, backpressure power is made, for example. Its performance affects the entire steam system and must be monitored persistently. Because of the complexities (and advantages) of systems analyses, computer modeling is demonstrated in this paper to fully evaluated the network effects and the financial impact of good condenser vacuum.

Viar, W. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Waste Heat Utilization to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Metals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This system will produce electricity, and/or process steam. • Low grade: ... or Save Conflict]. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery Options for Metals Industry.

413

Gas turbine-steam power plant  

SciTech Connect

The pressure vessel of the gas turbine-steam power plant is provided with a recuperator and a heat exchanger in order to reduce the temperature of the hot flue gas before separating out gas-entrained particles. The dust separator is connected to the recuperator on a secondary side so that the hot gas can be reheated for delivery to the gas turbine. By cooling the flue gas before entering the separator, use can be made of electrostatic dust filters or cloth filters.

Aguet, E.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Underground coal gasification using oxygen and steam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, through model experiment of the underground coal gasification, the effects of pure oxygen gasification, oxygen-steam gasification, and moving-point gasification methods on the underground gasification process and gas quality were studied. Experiments showed that H{sub 2} and CO volume fraction in product gas during the pure oxygen gasification was 23.63-30.24% and 35.22-46.32%, respectively, with the gas heating value exceeding 11.00 MJ/m{sup 3}; under the oxygen-steam gasification, when the steam/oxygen ratio stood at 2: 1, gas compositions remained virtually stable and CO + H{sub 2} was basically between 61.66 and 71.29%. Moving-point gasification could effectively improve the changes in the cavity in the coal seams or the effects of roof inbreak on gas quality; the ratio of gas flowing quantity to oxygen supplying quantity was between 3.1:1 and 3.5:1 and took on the linear changes; on the basis of the test data, the reasons for gas quality changes under different gasification conditions were analyzed.

Yang, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, S. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for daylighting and solar heat-gain control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shade-screens are widely used in commercial buildings as a way to limit the amount of direct sunlight that can disturb people in the building. The shade screens also reduce the solar heat-gain through glazing the system. Modern energy and daylighting analysis software such as EnergyPlus and Radiance require complete scattering properties of the scattering materials in the system. In this paper a shade screen used in the LBNL daylighting testbed is characterized using a photogoniometer and a normal angle of incidence integrating sphere. The data is used to create a complete bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF) that can be used in simulation programs. The resulting BSDF is compared to a model BADFs, both directly and by calculating the solar heat-gain coefficient for a dual pane system using Window 6.

Jonsson, Jacob; Jonsson, Jacob C.; Lee, Eleanor S.; Rubin, Mike

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Reduced heat flow in light water (H2O) due to heavy water (D2O) William R. Gormana)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy in bulk water, producing a major impact on energy conservation.6 Heavy water was added to light, if it is produced, will be observed only as the water cools through 4°C. Fig. 2S. Here we show a graph (a) of the temperature gradient produced in the center of the bottle when it is filled with regular water with no added D

Suzuki, Masatsugu

417

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, Daniel J. (Export, PA); Schrader, Kenneth J. (Penn Hills, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of Steam Generator Tube Plugs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Steam Generator Management Program guidelines require that utilities perform integrity assessments of all steam generator (SG) components, including tube plugs. SG inspection outages should specifically include monitoring of degradation in tube hardware such as plugs. This report provides guidance for utility engineers to use in determining tube plug inspection requirements, including scope, technique, and periodicity.BackgroundGenerally, utilities perform ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

420

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Enbridge Consumers Gas "Steam Saver" Program ("As Found" Performance and Fuel Saving Projects from Audits of 30 Steam Plants)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Canada, medium and large sized steam plants consume approximately 442 Billion Cubic Feet (12.5 Billion Cubic Meters) of natural gas annually. This is 25% of all natural gas delivered to all customers. (Small steam plants and Hydronic heating boilers consume another 15%) Enbridge Consumers Gas, a local gas distribution company located in Toronto, has approximately 400 Industrial and Institutional customers who own medium or large sized steam plants. During the past three years, Enbridge has developed a comprehensive steam energy efficiency program called "Steam Saver". This program is aimed at these 400 customers. The heart of this program is the boiler plant audit and performance test. This paper describes the fuel saving results for more than 30 medium and large sized boiler plants where audits have been completed and projects have been implemented. The savings in cubic feet per year of natural gas are broken down according to project or technology type. The financial payback is indicated for each category. Eleven of the larger plants have been "benchmarked". Plant efficiency, fuel consumption, steam costs and other performance variables are tabulated for these plants.

Griffin, B.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

"Greening" Industrial Steam Generation via On-demand Steam Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both recent economic and environmental conditions in the U.S. have converged to bring about unprecedented attention to energy efficiency and sustainability in the country's industrial sector. Historically, energy costs in the U.S. have been low in comparison to global averages in some measure do to an extended tolerance for externalized costs related to environmental degradation. Consequently, awareness, innovation & implementation of technologies focused on energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact have not kept pace with other industrialized nations. The U.S. is confronted with looming tipping points with respect to energy supply and GHG emissions that represent very tangible constraints on future economic growth and quality of life. A recent 2008 article in Forbes Magazine highlights the top ten most energy efficient economies in the world. The U.S. is conspicuously absent from the list. The U.S. economy, with an estimated energy intensity of 9,000 Btu's/$GDP, is only half as energy efficient as Japan (holding the top spot on the list with an EI of 4,500 Btu's / US$ GDP). The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated the Save Energy Now program to address this by supporting reductions in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 25% by 2020. A recent 2005 survey conducted by Energy & Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the current U.S. inventory of commercial/industrial boilers stands at around 163,000 units and 2.7 million MMBtu/hr. total fuel input capacity. These boilers consume nearly 8,100 Tbtu per year, representing about 40% of all energy consumed in the commercial/industrial sectors. Moreover, this same survey indicates that 47% of all commercial/industrial boilers in the U.S. are 40+ years old while as many as 76% are 30+ years old. Boilers account for nearly half of commercial / industrial energy consumption and represent some of the most energy intensive systems comprising these sectors. Given the preponderance of aged, obsolete boiler technology currently in service in the U.S., it is critical to raise awareness and examine the role of emerging new technologies to address the energy and environmental challenges inherent with steam generation. In the same way that tank-less / instantaneous water heating systems are eschewing a new era in energy efficiency in the residential sector, compact modular on-demand steam generation systems are poised to support the same kind of transformation in the commercial / industrial sector. This paper will illustrate how emerging on-demand steam generation technologies will play a part in addressing the energy and environmental challenges facing the country's commercial/ industrial sectors and in doing so help to transform the U.S. economy.

Smith, J. P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

High Efficiency Steam Electrolyzer  

SciTech Connect

A novel steam electrolyzer has been developed. In conventional electrolyzers, oxygen produced from electrolysis is usually released in the air stream. In their novel design, natural gas is used to replace air in order to reduce the chemical potential difference across the electrolyzer, thus minimizing the electrical consumption. The oxygen from the electrolysis is consumed in either a total oxidation or a partial oxidation reaction with natural gas. Experiments performed on single cells shown a voltage reduction as much as 1 V when compared to conventional electrolyzers. Using thin film materials and high performance cathode and anode, electrolysis could be done at temperatures as low as 700 C with electrolytic current as high as 1 A/cm{sup 2} at a voltage of 0.5 V only. The 700 C operating temperature is favorable to the total oxidation of natural gas while minimizing the need for steam that is otherwise necessary to avoid carbon deposition. A novel tubular electrolyzer stack has been developed. The system was designed to produce hydrogen at high pressures, taking advantage of the simplicity and high efficiency of the electrochemical compressors. A complete fabrication process was developed for making electrolyzer tubes with thin film coatings. A 100 W stack is being built.

Pham, A.Q.

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

Reduction in Unit Steam Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001 the company's Arch-Brandenburg facility faced increased steam costs due to high natural gas prices and decreased production due to shutdown of a process. The facility was challenged to reduce unit steam consumption to minimize the effects of thes

Gombos, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Go Steam for Green Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Railroads are very fuel-efficient in moving freight by land. The history of rail begins with steam power, moving to eventual dieselization. Some components, advantages and disadvantages of internal combustion engines (gasoline, diesel) and external combustion ... Keywords: diesel engine, steam engine, biocoal, biofuel, computer control, internal combustion, external combustion

Paul Fred Frenger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Experimental study of Morichal heavy oil recovery using combined steam and propane injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable research and testing have been conducted for the improvement of basic thermal recovery processes and for the development and application of other methods of reservoir heating. Effects of various additives injected simultaneously with steam (for the purpose of increasing steam recovery efficiency) are being evaluated. An experimental study has been performed to investigate the effect of combined steam and propane injection on recovery of heavy oil from the Morichal field, Venezuela. The experiments were conducted using an injection cell packed with sandmix containing a mixture of sand, water, and Morichal oil. Experimental runs involved injection of steam, or propane, or a mixture of steam and propane into the cell at constant rate, temperature, and pressure. The injection was kept constant at 5 g/min for all runs. Five experiments were performed, namely, run 1 (50 wt.% steam and 50 wt.% propane), run 2 (100 wt.% steam), run 3 (75 wt.% steam and 25 wt.% propane), run 4 (100 wt.% propane), and run 5 (95 wt.% steam and 5 wt.% propane). Main findings for this study are as follows. First, it appears possible to accelerate recovery of Morichal oil using combined steam and propane injection. Oil recovery at 61% OOIP may be up to 0.23 pore volume faster than using steam injection alone, with gain in ultimate recovery of up to 5% OOIP. Second, with only propane injection, at temperature and pressure conditions tested, practically no oil is recovered. Steam is necessary to reduce interfacial tension and the oil viscosity, thus allowing propane to permeate through the oil. This increases propane miscibility with oil, further reducing the residual oil saturation, and enhances the displacement efficiency. It is recommended that further research be conducted to confirm the technical and economic feasibility of steam-propane injection, particularly for other crude oil types, and at pressure and temperature conditions encountered in the field.

Goite Marcano, Jose Gregorio

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hartford Steam Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Hartford Steam Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Steam Co Place Connecticut Utility Id...

428

Combustion gas turbine/steam generator plant  

SciTech Connect

A fired steam generator is described that is interconnected with a gas turbine/steam generator plant having at least one gas turbine group followed by an exhaust-gas steam generator. The exhaust-gas steam generator has a preheater and an evaporator. The inlet of the preheater is connected to a feedwater distribution line which also feeds a preheater in the fired steam generator. The outlet of the preheater is connected to the evaporator of the fired steam generator. The evaporator outlet of the exhaust-gas steam generator is connected to the input of a superheater in the fired steam generator.

Aguet, E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

Misage, Robert (Manchester, CT); Scheffler, Glenn W. (Tolland, CT); Setzer, Herbert J. (Ellington, CT); Margiott, Paul R. (Manchester, CT); Parenti, Jr., Edmund K. (Manchester, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Steam Basics: Use Available Data to Lower Steam System Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial steam users recognize the need to reduce system cost in order to remain internationally competitive. Steam systems are a key utility that influence cost significantly, and represent a high value opportunity target. However, the quality of steam is often taken for granted, even overlooked at times. When the recent global recession challenged companies to remain profitable as a first priority, the result was that maintenance budgets were cut and long term cost reduction initiatives for steam systems set aside due to more pressing issues. One of the regrettable results of such actions is that knowledgeable personnel are re-assigned, retired, or released when necessary steam system cost reduction programs are eliminated. When the time arrives to refocus on long term cost reduction by improving the steam system, some programs may have to start from the beginning and a clear path forward may not be evident. New personnel are often tasked with steam improvements when the programs restart, and they may experience difficulty in determining the true key factors that can help reduce system cost. The urgency for lowering long term fuel use and reducing the cost of producing steam is near for each plant. Population growth and resultant global demand are inevitable, so the global economy will expand, production will increase, more fossil fuel energy will be needed, and that fuel will become scarce and more costly. Although fuel prices are low now, energy costs can be expected to trend significantly upward as global production and demand increase. Now is the time for plants to make certain that they can deliver high quality steam to process equipment at lowest system cost. There are three stages to help optimize plant steam for best performance at a low system cost; Phase 1: Manage the condensate discharge locations (where the steam traps & valves are located), Phase 2: Optimize steam-using equipment, and Phase 3: Optimize the entire steam system. This presentation will focus primarily on management of the condensate discharge locations (CDLs) and show sites how to use readily available data to more efficiently achieve goals; but will also provide insight into how the three stages interact to reduce system cost and improve process performance.

Risko, J. R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Evaluate deaerator steam requirements quickly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam plant engineers frequently have to perform energy balance calculations around the deaerator to estimate the steam required to preheat and deaerate the make-up water and condensate returns. This calculation involves solving two sets of equations, one for mass and the other for energy balance. Reference to steam tables is also necessary. However, with the help of this program written in BASIC, one can arrive at the make-up water and steam requirements quickly, without referring to steam tables. This paper shows the mass and energy balance equations for the deaerator. This paper gives the program listing. An number of condensate returns can be handled. An example illustrates the use of the program.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

433

Dynamic computer simulation of the Fort St. Vrain steam turbines  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation is described for the dynamic response of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear reactor regenerative intermediate- and low-pressure steam turbines. The fundamental computer-modeling assumptions for the turbines and feedwater heaters are developed. A turbine heat balance specifying steam and feedwater conditions at a given generator load and the volumes of the feedwater heaters are all that are necessary as descriptive input parameters. Actual plant data for a generator load reduction from 100 to 50% power (which occurred as part of a plant transient on November 9, 1981) are compared with computer-generated predictions, with reasonably good agreement.

Conklin, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of...

436

Improved etch resistance of ZEP 520A in reactive ion etching through heat and ultraviolet light treatment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a treatment process to improve the etch resistance of an electron beam lithography resist (ZEP 520A) to allow direct pattern transfer from the resist into a hard mask using plasma etching without a metal lift-off process. When heated to 90 C and exposed for 17 min to a dose of approximately 8 mW/cm{sup 2} at 248 nm, changes occur in the resist that are observable using infrared spectroscopy. These changes increase the etch resistance of ZEP 520A to a CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} plasma. This article will document the observed changes in the improved etch resistance of the ZEP 520A electron beam resist.

Tallant, David Robert; Czaplewski, David A.; Montoya, Bertha Marie; Wendt, Joel Robert; Patrizi, Gary A.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SINGLE-WELL STEAM ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (SW-SAGD) PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is an effective method to produce heavy oil and bitumen which are important energy resources. In a typical SAGD approach, steam is injected into a horizontal well located directly above a horizontal producer helping to displace heated oil. Single-well (SW) SAGD attempts to create a similar process using only one horizontal well. To improve early-time response of SW-SAGD, it is necessary to heat the near-wellbore area to reduce oil viscosity and allow gravity drainage to begin. Ideally heating should occur with minimal circulation or bypassing of steam. We have investigated early-time processes to improve reservoir heating. A numerical simulation study was performed to gauge combinations of cyclic steam injection and steam circulation prior to SAGD in an effort to better understand and improve early-time performance. Results from this study, include cumulative recoveries, temperature distributions, and production rates. It is found that cyclic steaming of the reservoir offers the most favorable option for heating the near-wellbore area to create conditions that improve initial SAGD response. More favorable reservoir conditions such as low viscosity, thick oil zones, and solution gas, improved reservoir response. Under unfavorable conditions, response was limited.

K.T. Elliot; A.R. Kovscek

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ULTRA-SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CORROSION  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency increases in fossil energy boilers and steam turbines are being achieved by increasing the temperature and pressure at the turbine inlets well beyond the critical point of water. To allow these increases, advanced materials are needed that are able to withstand the higher temperatures and pressures in terms of strength, creep, and oxidation resistance. As part of a larger collaborative effort, the Albany Research Center (ARC) is examining the steam-side oxidation behavior for ultrasupercritical (USC) steam turbine applications. Initial tests are being done on six alloys identified as candidates for USC steam boiler applications: ferritic alloy SAVE12, austenitic alloy Super 304H, the high Cr-high Ni alloy HR6W, and the nickel-base superalloys Inconel 617, Haynes 230, and Inconel 740. Each of these alloys has very high strength for its alloy type. Three types of experiments are planned: cyclic oxidation in air plus steam at atmospheric pressure, thermogravimetric ana lysis (TGA) in steam at atmospheric pressure, and exposure tests in supercritical steam up to 650 C (1202 F) and 34.5 MPa (5000 psi). The atmospheric pressure tests, combined with supercritical exposures at 13.8, 20.7, 24.6, and 34.5 MPa (2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 psi) should allow the determination of the effect of pressure on the oxidation process.

Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Bullard, S.B.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

439

Steam Generator Management Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Generic Tube Degradation Predictions: Recirculating Steam Generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mill-annealed Alloy 600 heat transfer tubing in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators (SGs) has experienced numerous modes of degradation. This report describes predictive models for determining expected tube degradation in recirculating steam generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG tubing. Predictions are based on operating experience with similar designs and use improvement factors to characterize benefits resulting from SG design and material ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

From Basic Control to Optimized Systems-Applying Digital Control Systems to Steam Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation examines the application of Distributed Digital Controls in order to review the application of this recent control technology towards Steam Boilers in a step-by-step manner. The main purpose of a steam generating boiler is to supply enough steam to meet process demands. Steam conditions must remain as stable as possible, because variations in the steam system can affect downstream processes. Pressure variations in the steam supply header, for example, can have a severe effect on heat transferred to a process. If that process suffers an upset, unstable conditions can propagate from one process to another via the steam supply system. The closer the tolerance in the boiler control system, the smaller the steam header disturbances will be. This reduces the interaction, or 'coupling', of upsets between steam-consuming processes. Also, it may reduce the complexity of instrumentation needed for those processes. If the boiler control system can eliminate major upsets, the downstream processes won't need exotic schemes to compensate for such upsets.

Hockenbury, W. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting steam heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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441

Centrifugal exhauster driven by steam turbine achieves 55% energy savings  

SciTech Connect

A steam turbine/centrifugal exhauster system is being used in a felt dewatering operation in a Michigan pulp and papermill at a hp energy savings of 55%. The system operates at 170 bhp, replacing 375 hp used for conventional liquid ring vacuum pumps. The steam turbine utilizes 450 psig steam into the turbine with a 50 psig back pressure on the discharge side. The mill has also installed an additional felt dewatering box that was never employed before the exhauster system was installed. Since operation first began, the mill reports equal or improved dewatering compared to the previous liquid ring system. The hot air discharge is utilized to heat the machine room wet end area, replacing some space heater requirements.

Bonady, F.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Shedding Light on the Eccentricity Valley: Gap Heating and Eccentricity Excitation of Giant Planets in Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the first order (non co-orbital) corotation torques are significantly modified by entropy gradients in a non-barotropic protoplanetary disk. Such non-barotropic torques can dramatically alter the balance that, for barotropic cases, results in the net eccentricity damping for giant gap-clearing planets embedded in the disk. We demonstrate that stellar illumination can heat the gap enough for the planet's orbital eccentricity to instead be excited. We also discuss the "Eccentricity Valley" noted in the known exoplanet population, where low-metallicity stars have a deficit of eccentric planets between $\\sim 0.1$ and $\\sim 1$ AU compared to metal-rich systems (Dawson & Murray-Clay 2013). We show that this feature in the planet distribution may be due to the self-shadowing of the disk by a rim located at the dust sublimation radius $\\sim 0.1$ AU, which is known to exist for several T Tauri systems. In the shadowed region between $\\sim 0.1$ and $\\sim 1$ AU lack of gap insolation allows disk interac...

Tsang, David; Cumming, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

444

Energy Basics: Solar Liquid Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

445

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Integrity Assessment Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for evaluating the condition of steam generator (SG) tubes based on nondestructive examination (NDE) or in situ pressure testing. The integrity assessments are normally performed during a reactor refueling outage. Nuclear power plant licensees who follow the guidance in this report will have satisfied the requirements for degradation assessments, condition monitoring, and operational assessment as defined in the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Steam Generator Program Guidelin...

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts  

SciTech Connect

A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

Averkina, N. V. [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Zheleznyak, I. V. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation); Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G., E-mail: orlikvg@mail.ru [JSC 'NPO TsKTI' (Russian Federation); Shishkin, V. I. [Leningradskaya AES branch of JSC 'Kontsern Rosenergoatom' (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report: Revision 18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundSince 1985, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has published the Steam Generator Progress Report (SGPR), which provides historical information on worldwide steam generator activities. This document was published once a year and distributed via hardcopy. Until 1998, the method of acquiring data for this report had been to issue annual survey forms to all PWR and pressurized heavy water reactor nuclear utilities worldwide. The information included in ...

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Plant Conversion Eliminating Campus Coal Use at the Steam Plant #12;· Flagship campus region produce 14% of US coal (TN only 0.2%) Knoxville and the TN Valley #12;· UT is one of about 70 U.S. colleges and universities w/ steam plant that burns coal · Constructed in 1964, provides steam for

Dai, Pengcheng

449

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Introduction, Steam Generation Efficiency Resource Utilization Analysis, and Steam Distribution System Losses Stack Losses Resource Utilization Analysis Steam Distribution System Losses Conclusion Quiz If youDOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Navigational Tutorial - 1 8

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

450

DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizontal runs of steam distribution piping from a common header. Steam distribution piping is insulatedDOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Steam End User Training Introduction Module - 1 8/27/2010 Steam End User Training Introduction Module Slide 1 - Introduction Title Page Hello, and welcome

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

451

Constant-pressure measurement of steam-water relative permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of steady-state experiments have established relative permeability curves for two-phase flow of water in a porous medium. These experiments have minimized uncertainty in pressure, heat loss, and saturation. By attempting to maintain a constant pressure gradient, the experiments have provided a baseline from which to determine the effect of temperature on relative permeability. The use of a flexible heater with an automatic control system made it possible to assume negligible phase change for the mobile fluid. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954) for the simultaneous flow of nitrogen and water. Close agreement between the curves by Satik (1998), Mahiya (1999), and this study establishes the reliability of the experimental method and instrumentation adopted in these experiments, though some differences may bear further investigation. In particular, the steam phase relative permeability appears to vary much more linearly with saturation than does the water phase relative permeability.

O'Connor, Peter A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

STEAM GENERATORS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

An analytical approach and an IBM machine code were prepared for the design of gas-cooled reactor once-through steam generators for both axial-flow and cross-flow tube matrices. The codes were applied to investigate the effects of steam generator configuration, tube diameter, extended surface, type of cooling gas, steam and gas temperature and pressure conditions, and the pumping power-to-heat removal ratio on the size, weight, and cost of steam generators. The results indicate that the least expensive and most promising unit for high- temperature high-pressure gascooled reactor plants employs axial-gas flow over 0.5-in.dia bare U-tubes arranged with their axes parallel to that of the shell. The proposed design is readily adaptable to the installation of a reheater and is suited to conventional fabrication techniques. Charts are presented to facilitate tlie design of both axial-flow and cross-flow steam generators for gas- cooled reactor applications. (auth)

Fraas, A.P.; Ozisik, M.N.

1963-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

453

Steam turbine for geothermal power generation  

SciTech Connect

A steam turbine comprises a casing; turbine vanes rotatably set in the casing; a plurality of partition walls which extend along radial directions from the rotation center of the turbine vanes to define a plurality of steam valve chambers in the casing; steam supply pipes respectively connected to the corresponding steam valve chambers; and regulating valves which are fitted to the respective steam supply pipes to regulate respectively the flow rate of steam streams supplied to the respective steam valve chambers. At least one partition wall for dividing the interior space of the steam turbine into adjacent steam valve chambers is provided with at least one penetrating hole for causing the steam valve chambers to communicate with each other.

Tsujimura, K.; Hadano, Y.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

Talmud, Fred M. (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio (Morristown, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates Columbia Water and Light - HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Lighting