Sample records for lighting occupancy sensors

  1. A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

  2. Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Rubinstein, Nesrin Colak, Judith Jennings, and Danielle Neils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The lighting energy usage in each zone was recorded automatically every 15 minutes. Using this data, we were of the occupancy sensor to reduce lighting energy usage. In selecting data for analysis, we chose to examine only-4], only one US study [5] examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow

  3. A Model for Evaluation of Life-Cycle Energy Savings of Occupancy Sensors for Control of Lighting and Ventilation in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degelman, L. O.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used...

  4. Forecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network James Howard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    of the forecasting algorithm for the different conditions. 1. INTRODUCTION According to the U.S. Department of Energy could take advantage of times when electricity cost is lower, to chill a cold water storage tankForecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network Data James Howard Colorado School of Mines

  5. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  6. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  7. Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging Abhijit Sarkar dynamic range CMOS video camera to integrate daylight harvesting and occupancy sensing functionalities by these sensors. The prototype involves three algorithms, daylight estimation, occupancy detection and lighting

  8. The Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    in 8 homes and comparing the expected energy usage of our algorithm against existing approaches. We Design, Experimentation, Economics, Human Factors Keywords Building Energy, Home Monitoring, ProgrammableThe Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes Jiakang Lu, Tamim Sookoor

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - active site occupancy Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to concerns of accidental... -specific luminaire that integrates a low-wattage light-emitting diode (LED) nightlight and an occupancy sensor... that saves energy while improving...

  10. Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Measured Lighting-Switch Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Wen-Kuei; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy profile is one of the driving factors behind discrepancies between the measured and simulated energy consumption of buildings. The frequencies of occupants leaving their offices and the corresponding durations of absences have significant impact on energy use and the operational controls of buildings. This study used statistical methods to analyze the occupancy status, based on measured lighting-switch data in five-minute intervals, for a total of 200 open-plan (cubicle) offices. Five typical occupancy patterns were identified based on the average daily 24-hour profiles of the presence of occupants in their cubicles. These statistical patterns were represented by a one-square curve, a one-valley curve, a two-valley curve, a variable curve, and a flat curve. The key parameters that define the occupancy model are the average occupancy profile together with probability distributions of absence duration, and the number of times an occupant is absent from the cubicle. The statistical results also reveal that the number of absence occurrences decreases as total daily presence hours decrease, and the duration of absence from the cubicle decreases as the frequency of absence increases. The developed occupancy model captures the stochastic nature of occupants moving in and out of cubicles, and can be used to generate a more realistic occupancy schedule. This is crucial for improving the evaluation of the energy saving potential of occupancy based technologies and controls using building simulations. Finally, to demonstrate the use of the occupancy model, weekday occupant schedules were generated and discussed.

  11. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paradiso, Joseph A.

    Motivated by opportunities in smart lighting, energy efficiency, and ubiquitous sensing, we present the design of polychromatic solid-state lighting controlled using a sensor network. We developed both a spectrally tunable ...

  12. Using Simple Light Sensors to Achieve Smart Daylight Harvesting Jiakang Lu, Dagnachew Birru, Kamin Whitehouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Using Simple Light Sensors to Achieve Smart Daylight Harvesting Jiakang Lu, Dagnachew Birru, Kamin demonstrate how to improve the effectiveness of daylight harvesting with a sin- gle light sensor on each sky to predict the incoming daylight and set window transparency accordingly. We evaluate our system

  13. Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used in the US and most developed economies tends to be consumed in homes and buildings,1 energy and environments using sensors and actuators to mitigate energy usage. Lighting, in particular, accounts for 22Energy efficient control of polychromatic solid-state lighting using a sensor network Matthew

  14. SPEED LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE AT UC SANTA BARBARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and WattStopper Occupancy Sensor · Lagoon Road NETWORKED RAODWAY LED Cree XSP Luminaire with LumewaveSwap with Lumewave Controls & WattStopper Occupancy Sensor ROADWAY LIGHTING Lagoon Road Initial pilot utilized Luminaire with Lumewave Controls Photo:zeronetenergy.blogspot.com ABOUT THE STATE PARTNERSHIP FOR ENERGY

  15. Congestion Avoidance based on Light-Weight Buffer Management in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shigang

    , congestion may occur as data packets converge toward a sink. Congestion causes energy waste, throughput1 Congestion Avoidance based on Light-Weight Buffer Management in Sensor Networks Shigang Chen, and above all, energy supply. When a critical event triggers a surge of data generated by the sensors

  16. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  17. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

  18. Daylighting: Measuring the Performance of Light Shelves and Occupant-Controlled Blinds on a Dimmed Lighting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a day lighted space is both an art and a science. The biggest challenge facing the lighting designer is to admit only as much light as necessary and distribute it evenly throughout the space without introducing glare or heat. In warm...

  19. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  20. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

  1. Evaluation of White Light Sources For an Absolute Fiber Optic Sensor Readout System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConaghy, C F

    2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work done in pursuit of an absolute readout system for Fabry-Perot optics sensors such as those built both by FISO and LLNL. The use of white light results in a short coherence length reducing the ambiguity of the Fabry-Perot gap measurement which is required to readout the sensor. The light source coherence length is the critical parameter in determining the ability to build a relative or an absolute system. Optical sources such as lasers and LEDs are rather narrow in optical spectral bandwidth and have long coherence length. Thus, when used in interferometric sensor measurements, one fringe looks much like another and it is difficult to make an absolute measurement. In contrast, white light sources are much broader in spectral bandwidth and have very short coherence lengths making interferometry possible only over the coherence length, which can be 1 or 2 microns. The small number of fringes in the interferogram make it easier to calculate the centroid and to unambiguously determine the sensor gap. However, unlike LEDs and Lasers, white light sources have very low optical power when coupled into optical fibers. Although, the overall light output of a white light source can be hundreds of milliwatts to watts, it is difficult to couple more than microwatts into a 50-micron core optical fiber. In addition, white light sources have a large amount of optical power in spectrum that is not necessarily useful in terms of sensor measurements. The reflectivity of a quarter wave of Titanium Oxide is depicted in Figure 2. This coating of Titanium Oxide is used in the fabrication of the sensor. This figure shows that any light emitted at wavelengths shorter than 600 nm is not too useful for the readout system. A white light LED spectrum is depicted in Figure 3 and shows much of the spectrum below 600 nm. In addition Silicon photodiodes are usually used in the readout system limiting the longest wavelength to about 1100 nm. Tungsten filament sources may have much of their optical power at wavelengths longer than 1100 nm, which is outside the wavelength range of interest. An incandescent spectrum from a tungsten filament is depicted in Figure 4. None of this is to say that other types of readout systems couldn't be built with IR detectors and broadband coatings for the sensors. However, without reengineering the sensors, the wavelength restrictions must be tolerated.

  2. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

  3. List of Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList of Geothermal IncentivesControls/Sensors

  4. Many exterior entry and walkway lights in residential and commercial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Many exterior entry and walkway lights in residential and commercial applications use incandescent combines cutting-edge LED technology with an occupancy sensor and incandescent lighting to reduce operating costs below those of incandescent lamps and CFL fixtures. The low wattage LED light turns on at dusk

  5. Moisture sensor based on evanescent wave light scattering by porous sol-gel silica coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Shiquan; Singh, Jagdish P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical fiber moisture sensor that can be used to sense moisture present in gas phase in a wide range of concentrations is provided, as well techniques for making the same. The present invention includes a method that utilizes the light scattering phenomenon which occurs in a porous sol-gel silica by coating an optical fiber core with such silica. Thus, a porous sol-gel silica polymer coated on an optical fiber core forms the transducer of an optical fiber moisture sensor according to an embodiment. The resulting optical fiber sensor of the present invention can be used in various applications, including to sense moisture content in indoor/outdoor air, soil, concrete, and low/high temperature gas streams.

  6. Realt-Time Building Occupancy Sensing for Supporting Demand Driven HVAC Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekwevugbe, T.; Brown, N.; Pakka, V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regarding energy use. These all constitute drivers for the adoption of more sustainable ways of securing our energy needs (Shuai et al., 2011). Approximately about 40% of the world?s energy is consumed by buildings (ASHRAE, 2007), of which roughly about... short-comings; Passive infrared (PIR) sensor is the most commonly used technology for occupancy sensing in non-domestic buildings especially for lighting control (Delaney et al., 2009), however it fails to detect stationary occupants, thus switching...

  7. Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    buildings. Keywords--Energy, daylighting, occupancy sensors, controls, tuning. 1 INTRODUCTION Lighting buildings in the United States have daylighting sensors and only 1 percent have energy management, such as those by the National Research Council Canada and Florida Solar Energy Center, present results from lab

  8. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

  9. Bathroom lights generally operate between five to eight hours per occupied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    people leave the bathroom light on at night as a guide. Additionally, people often don't turn off A BATTERY BACKUP TO ENSURE EMERGENCY LIGHTING DURING POWER OUTAGES. LED light Occupancy sensor CLTC staff into the bathroom at night. · Safety-mode feature automatically runs LED nightlight on backup battery during power

  10. Zone Level Occupant-Responsive Building Energy Systems at the GSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Alastair

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Services Administration (GSA) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement building energy system retrofits, aiming to reduce energy consumption of at least two building systems by a total of 30 percent or more, as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program, working with the GSA and a team of consultants. This case study reports expected energy savings from appropriate energy efficient design and operations modifications to lighting and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at the selected study sites. These retrofits comprised installation of new lighting systems with dimming capability and occupancy-sensor control at the individual light fixture level, and utilized lighting system occupancy sensor signals to continually readjust zone-level ventilation airflow according to the number of people present, down to minimum rates when vacant.

  11. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and controlled using sun sensors with solar calculations tousing outdoor sensors, calculating solar position, andsolar radiation, both incident on the shielded temperature sensor and

  12. RealTime SpatioTemporal Query Processing in Mobile AdHoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo­ tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes,

  13. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.3 W/ft 2 and scheduling and occupancy controls implementedcompared to scheduling and occupancy based control weredimming (d) No controls (a) Scheduling (b) – ASHRAE 90.1-

  14. X-RAY ACTIVE MATRIX PIXEL SENSORS BASEDON J-FET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARINI,G.A.; CHEN, W.; LI, Z.; REHAK, P.; SIDDONS, D.P.

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) is being developed for recording data for the X-ray Pump Probe experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Special attention has to be paid to some technological challenges that this design presents. New processes were developed and refined to address problems encountered during previous productions of XAMPS. The development of these critical steps and corresponding tests results are reported here.

  15. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Halo Occupation Number, Mass-to-Light Ratios and Omega(M)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters we examine the near-infrared properties of moderate-redshift (0.19 < z < 0.55) galaxy clusters. We find that the number of K-band selected cluster galaxies within R{sub 500} (the Halo Occupation Number, HON) is well-correlated with the cluster dynamical mass (M{sub 500}) and X-ray Temperature (T{sub x}); however, the intrinsic scatter in these scaling relations is 37% and 46% respectively. Comparison with clusters in the local universe shows that the HON-M{sub 500} relation does not evolve significantly between z = 0 and z {approx} 0.3. This suggests that if dark matter halos are disrupted or undergo significant tidal-stripping in high-density regions as seen in numerical simulations, the stellar mass within the halos is tightly bound, and not removed during the process. The total K-band cluster light (L{sub 200},K) and K-band selected richness (parameterized by B{sub gc,K}) are also correlated with both the cluster T{sub x} and M{sub 200}. The total (intrinsic) scatter in the L{sub 200,K}-M{sub 200} and B{sub gc,K}-M{sub 200} relations are 43%(31%) and 35%(18%) respectively and indicates that for massive clusters both L{sub 200,K} and B{sub gc,K} can predict M{sub 200} with similar accuracy as T{sub x}, L{sub x} or optical richness (B{sub gc}). Examination of the mass-to-light ratios of the clusters shows that similar to local clusters, the K-band mass-to-light ratio is an increasing function of halo mass. Using the K-band mass-to-light ratios of the clusters, we apply the Oort technique and find {Omega}{sub m,0} = 0.22 {+-} 0.02, which agrees well with recent combined concordance cosmology parameters, but, similar to previous cluster studies, is on the low-density end of preferred values.

  16. "Designing equipment and buildings to more quickly respond to occupant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    GRANTS · NSF ­ Occupant Oriented Heating and Cooling · NSF ­ Body Area Sensor Networks: A Holistic building technology to improve building efficiency by using information about occupant locations energy with only $25 in sensors. As an extension of this work, we propose installing servers into homes

  17. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15 4.1. LightingEvaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, andcomparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heating Cooling Pumps/C

  18. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy use comparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heating Coolinguse comparison Annual EUI, kBtu/sf-yr Lighting Heating

  19. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Query Processing in Mobile Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo- tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes, and pa

  20. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ed. The Fairmont Press, Inc. EPRI. 1994. Occupancy sensors:Institute, Palo Alto, CA. EPRI BR-100323. Ekahau. Real TimePower Research Institute (EPRI) identified approximately 30%

  1. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    MARYLAND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH ACT safety and health protection on the job STATE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE REGULATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM Complaints about State Program administration may be made to Regional Administrator, Occupational Safety

  2. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Department of Occupational Health and Safety Revised December 2009 #12;Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management System 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Management of Health and Safety

  3. Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building Manuel Yguel, Olivier Aycard for multi-resolution map building based on wavelets, which we call the wavelet occupancy grid (WavOG). Pai representation and data storage for large maps, under the constraints of multi-sensor real-time updates

  4. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  5. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  6. Using an Occupant Energy Index for Achieving Zero Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, B.; Gamble, D.; Kaiser, D.; Meisegeier, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the occupants from the house, turn off all of the HVAC systems, flip off the lights and unplug all the appliances. Is the result a zero energy home? Most would think not, because once the occupants return the odds are good that consumption...-conservative occupants, an ENERGY STAR refrigerator and a best-available efficiency refrigerator were modeled, as well as no refrigerator at all. These modifications impacted the appliances, heating and cooling energy consumption of the baseline home...

  7. Image Processing Occupancy Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasicsScience atIanIgorIlyaBuilding Energy

  8. IMAGE PROCESSING OCCUPANCY SENSOR - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure link to2,/ W m8 m InI

  9. NREL: Continuum Magazine - Smart Occupancy Sensor Debuts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements of WomenEvents BelowAbout ShareCloser

  10. Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers incentives for non-residential customers to install energy efficient lights and sensors in existing facilities. In addition to rebates for the...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient light hikari Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Summary: cooling accounts for 29% and lighting accounts for 27% of building energy consumption Continuous efforts have been... . Occupant Satisfaction Occupant...

  12. Occupational Health Nurse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

  13. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

  14. Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of Occupancy-Based Lighting Control Systems: AReview. ” Lighting Residential Technology 42:415-431. Itron,Information Template – Indoor Lighting Controls. Pacific Gas

  15. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s “ambient” and “task” lighting components, 2) occupancy

  16. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  17. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  18. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  19. Towards Building Occupants Positioning: Track and Trace for Optimal Process Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Labeodan, T.; Bozem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -time occupancy detection systems comprising multiple sensors within a wireless network (WSN) using technologies such as radio frequency identification (RFID) and WIFI enabled devices have been proposed for use in large commercial office buildings. However due...

  20. J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382391 Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391 Journal of Occupational Health Relationships of Job and Some National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm), U 420, IFR25-RFRH, Réseau Fédératif de disorders. (J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391) Key words: Occupational injury, Job, Sex, Age, Overweight

  1. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 4 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each

  2. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 3 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: "Dimmability." Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light

  3. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 5 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each area 3. Shut

  4. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. Occupational Health Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnderOccupational Health Services Part IIIIServices

  6. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  7. CX-006573: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and conservation strategy (completed); 2) buildings retrofits to City Hall with occupancy sensors, day-lighting controls, bi-level stairway lighting occupancy sensors, and a...

  8. Occupational Health and Safety Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Addressing Health and Safety Concerns and Resolution of Work RefusalsOccupational Health and Safety Manual #12;1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 York University Occupational Health and Safety Policy and Programs

  9. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  10. CONVERGING REDUNDANT SENSOR NETWORK INFORMATION FOR IMPROVED BUILDING CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing how many people occupy a building, and where they are located, is a key component of building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, however, current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of both energy management and security systems. This topical report describes results from the first phase of a project to design, implement, validate, and prototype new technologies to monitor occupancy, control indoor environment services, and promote security in buildings. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In this project phase a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Analysis tools based on Bayesian probability theory were applied to the occupancy data generated by the sensor network. The inference of primary importance is a probability distribution over the number of occupants and their locations in a building, given past and present sensor measurements. Inferences were computed for occupancy and its temporal persistence in individual offices as well as the persistence of sensor status. The raw sensor data were also used to calibrate the sensor belief network, including the occupancy transition matrix used in the Markov model, sensor sensitivity, and sensor failure models. This study shows that the belief network framework can be applied to the analysis of data streams from sensor networks, offering significant benefits to building operation compared to current practice.

  11. Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

  12. Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program Act (EEOICPA) Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

  13. Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees'...

  14. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION level of each multi-tier garage. · General lighting must have occupant sensing controls with at least one control step between 20% and 50% of design lighting power · No more than 500 watts of rated

  15. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  16. Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6080E Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Statistical Analysis statistical methods to analyze the occupancy status, based on measured lighting-switch data in five

  17. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  18. Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medicine -...

  19. Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medical...

  20. Beyond the Replacement Paradigm: Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Switches · Smart Building & Grid Interfaces · Efficient full spectrum LEDs without droop · Versatile, low - Visible Light Communications Integration of smart fixtures, networked sensors and control systemsBeyond the Replacement Paradigm: Smart Lighting Robert F. Karlicek, Jr. Director, Smart Lighting

  1. Occupational Medicine Variance Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnderOccupational Health Services PartDepartment

  2. Section 5 -Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Section 5 - Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy 1. Housing and Dining number of credits at UAA as stipulated in Section 2 - Eligibility, and for non-payment of Housing charges. 2. The University may terminate this agreement without cause with ten days written notice. 3

  3. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point would improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In Phase I, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. In phase II of the project, described in this report, we demonstrate that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. We also establish that analysis algorithms can be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications, and show that it may be possible to use sensor network pulse rate to distinguish the number of occupants in a space. Finally, in this phase of the project we also developed a prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy. This basic capability will be extended in the future by applying an algorithm-based inference to the sensor network data stream, so that the web page displays the likelihood that each monitored office or area is occupied, as a supplement to the actual status of each sensor.

  4. ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA,...

  5. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A...

  6. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    occupancy sensors in the Municipal Building, 6) lighting upgrades and install occupancy sensors in the Health Department Building, and 7) install monitoring system for the Public...

  7. CX-006343: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    occupancy sensors in the Municipal Building, 6) lighting upgrades and install occupancy sensors in the Health Department Building, and 7) install monitoring system for the Public...

  8. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  9. FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  10. Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

  11. Environmental Studies & Ecology Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Relations Specialist Recreation Leader Renewable Energy Consultant Safety Inspector Sales Representative. Programs Farms/Ranches FEDERAL AGENCIES Department of Defense (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) Environmental Conservationist Consultant Earth Scientist Ecologist Economic Analyst Energy Occupations Entomologist

  12. Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers’ compensation, and much more.

  13. SMART LIGHTING SYSTEMS ULTIMATE LIGHTING The Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    Integration (Holistic Integrated Design) · Sensors as important as LEDs · Interconnected systems (human, building, grid) · Artistic Design Freedom · Lighting is Health, Entertainment, Information and Illumination Cost at any brightness · Chip level integrated electronics THE ERC RESEARCH COVERS THE ENTIRE SUPPLY

  14. Controls for Solid-State Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    very high would replace incandescent and halogen A modernmotion sensor, the incandescent lamp switches on providing awork with fluorescent and incandescent lighting as well as

  15. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation #12;Sensor networks · A wirless network . · Set of sensors. · Static Mote #12;Mobile sensor networks

  16. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    A Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management Varick L. Erickson, University.Cerpa, University of California, Merced Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 35% energy usage in the United and Prediction for Building Energy Management and Auditing. ACM Trans. Sensor Netw. V, N, Article A (August 2012

  17. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  18. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  19. Stairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initial cost and publicize availability to lighting designers and contractors · Publicize energy savingsStairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells with high-wattage light fixtures (T12s or T8s), 24-hour use can lead to a significant and unnecessary waste of electricity

  20. Adaptive Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    * ...based on environmental conditions... - Occupancy Vacancy - Daylight Availability - Demand Response Signals - ... * ...to optimize space & building performance - Maximize...

  1. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  2. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM); Lentine, Anthony L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  3. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  4. Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    European Union Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 Jobs Jobs Transition Just Department #12;Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;#12;InternatIonal labour offIce · Geneva european commIssIon Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;photocomposed

  5. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Laboratory Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

  6. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  7. Experiential lighting : development and validation of perception-based lighting controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, Matthew (Matthew Henry)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting, and its emergence as a digital and networked medium, represents an ideal platform for conducting research on both sensor and human-derived methods of control. Notably, solid-state lighting makes possible the ...

  8. RESEARCH INNOVATION PARTNERSHIP 633 Pena Drive, Davis, CA, 95618 | cltc.ucdavis.edu | PH: 530-747-3838, FAX:530-747-3812

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    · Photo sensor: both light sources off during daytime · Occupancy sensor: LED sensors can sense speed of motion · Can differentiate among automobiles, bicycles and pedestrians · Full

  9. AIAA-98-0401 BROADBAND INFRARED SENSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzman, Jerry M.

    uniformity in the exit plane of a high pressure gas turbine combustor is presented. The sensor, intended with a relatively broadband light source. Performance of the sensor was simulated using a computer model based For improved efficiency, aircraft turbine engine designs call for progressively higher compressor pressure

  10. Stochastic Modeling of Overtime Occupancy and Its Application in Building Energy Simulation and Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Kaiyu; Yan , Da; Hong , Tianzhen; Guo, Siyue

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Overtime is a common phenomenon around the world. Overtime drives both internal heat gains from occupants, lighting and plug-loads, and HVAC operation during overtime periods. Overtime leads to longer occupancy hours and extended operation of building services systems beyond normal working hours, thus overtime impacts total building energy use. Current literature lacks methods to model overtime occupancy because overtime is stochastic in nature and varies by individual occupants and by time. To address this gap in the literature, this study aims to develop a new stochastic model based on the statistical analysis of measured overtime occupancy data from an office building. A binomial distribution is used to represent the total number of occupants working overtime, while an exponential distribution is used to represent the duration of overtime periods. The overtime model is used to generate overtime occupancy schedules as an input to the energy model of a second office building. The measured and simulated cooling energy use during the overtime period is compared in order to validate the overtime model. A hybrid approach to energy model calibration is proposed and tested, which combines ASHRAE Guideline 14 for the calibration of the energy model during normal working hours, and a proposed KS test for the calibration of the energy model during overtime. The developed stochastic overtime model and the hybrid calibration approach can be used in building energy simulations to improve the accuracy of results, and better understand the characteristics of overtime in office buildings.

  11. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry...

  12. Many classroom lighting systems provide mediocre lighting quality and have high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , increased flexibility, daylighting, and energy efficiency into an affordable, easy to use, and easy to maintain single- source solution. The ICLS standard package includes: · Direct/indirect fixtures · Two rows rows for daylighting control · Automated dual-technology occupancy sensor · One source for layout

  13. Occupational Medicine | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access toSpeedingScientificASecurityObservationOccupant

  14. Z .Sensors and Actuators 86 2000 187196 www.elsevier.nlrlocatersna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Werner

    Z .Sensors and Actuators 86 2000 187­196 www.elsevier.nlrlocatersna Investigation of the spatial resolution of the light-addressable potentiometric sensor M. George a , W.J. Parak a,) , I. Gerhardt b , W; accepted 4 March 2000 Abstract Z .The spatial resolution of the light-addressable potentiometric sensor

  15. Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the program claimants to make sure that all available worker and DOE facility records and data are provided to DOL, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...

  16. Occupant Emergency Plans | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emergency Plans Occupant Emergency Plans On this page is the collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the Washington,...

  17. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  18. Chapter 3, Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    operating hours information usually require an external sensor, such as a current transformer (CT) or photocell. Data loggers with CTs can monitor amperage to a lighting...

  19. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  20. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  1. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  2. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  3. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  4. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  5. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  6. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  7. aggregated occupational cohorts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Occupation Caf Wednesday,November 2,2011 from 7:30 to 9:30 pm Handy, Todd C. 33 Newsletter of The Department of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy Engineering...

  8. Lighting Controls/Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(Monaster And Coolbaugh, 2007) JumpDesign Jump to: navigation,

  9. Occupancy change detection system and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  10. Image Recognition System for Automated Lighting Retrofit Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venable, K.; Bhatia, D.; Coverick, R.; Gutierrez, C.; Knight, J.; McGarry, D.; McGee, K.; Smith, Z.; Terrill, T. J.; Vanderford, B.; Weiser, R.; Wightman, K.; Rasmussen, B. P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and K. Baugh, ?Spectral Identification of Lighting Type and Character,? Sensors, vol. 10, pp. 3961-3988, 2010. (3) L. Halonen, E. Tetri, and P. Bhusal, ?Guidebook on Energy Efficient Electric Lighting for Buildings,? Espoo, Finland: Dept. Elect. Eng...

  11. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hall with occupancy sensors, day-lighting controls, bi-level stairway lighting occupancy sensors, and a Visqueen curtain for Server racks; and add 33 solar photovoltaic panels to...

  12. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Bruce R. (1985 Willis, Batesburg, SC 29006); Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  13. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  14. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  15. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &...

  16. A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (Advisory Board) are responsible for conducting occupational...

  17. Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Congress established Public Law...

  18. Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and...

  19. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

  20. A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Review of High Occupancy...

  1. DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services November 14, 2011 -...

  2. Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2006-001 Sanem Kabadayi Adam Pridgen Christine Julien © Copyright 2006 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors Sanem Kabadayi, Adam Pridgen, and Christine Julien The Center

  3. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Clarke, Jr., Willis L. (San Ramon, CA); Ciarlo, Dino R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  4. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  5. CX-002174: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Complex; 4) conduct a lighting audit and upgrade based on the audit to install occupancy sensors, upgrade covered walkway security lighting, and other lighting upgrades as needed;...

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Complex; 4) conduct a lighting audit and upgrade based on the audit to install occupancy sensors, upgrade covered walkway security lighting, and other lighting upgrades as needed;...

  7. Commercial PACE: Updates from the Field & New Resources for Design...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    efficient products * Enhance light quality and control * Install photocells and occupancy sensors to control lights * Install LED lighting in selected areas (ex: truss-mounted...

  8. CX-004779: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (i.e., install compact and linear fluorescent light bulbs and ballasts, light emitting diode emergency and exit signs lighting, occupancy sensors, andor appliances) and...

  9. U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    building retrofits to include lighting (i.e., install compact and linear fluorescent light bulbs and ballasts, LED emergency and exit signs lighting, occupancy sensors, andor...

  10. Proposal -Interactive City Lighting LED based lighting systems have enabled radically new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposal - Interactive City Lighting Abstract LED based lighting systems have also be integrated with sensors and smart environments. This has opened up a new world. The use of the LED as a potential means for providing interactive city lighting for social

  11. Thermal sensor with an improved coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

  12. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  13. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH GUIDELINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH GUIDELINE Subject: Training for the Safe prior to shipping hazardous chemicals. REFERENCE REGULATIONS: Federal Hazardous Materials Transportation disease in otherwise healthy humans or animals. Infectious substances meeting these criteria which cause

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  16. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  17. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  5. Identity work and control in occupational communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Maanen, John

    This chapter is about three highly intertwined concepts. The first concerns occupational communities and the work cultures they nourish. The second concerns the work identities that are valued (and devalued) in such ...

  6. Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

    Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising...

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  8. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  9. Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pollutants, using green materials, giving occupants personal control over operable windows, task air-

  10. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  11. Commercial Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial lighting accounts for more than 20 percent of total commercial building energy use. The Energy Department works to reduce lighting energy use through research and deployment.

  12. Localized Pipeline Encroachment Detector System Using Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Xiaoxi 1986-

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NOMENCLATURE WSN Wireless Sensor Network ROW Right of Way WIFI Wireless Fidelity PC Personal Computer LED Light Emitting Diode USB Universal Serial Bus IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers A/D Analog to Digital WPAN Wireless...

  13. PHOTOSWITCHR Photoelectric Sensors General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Gale

    (Sensor) DC Micro Ę Ę Ę For NPN type tie the load to Brown (+). For PNP type tie the load to Blue Beam Load Load Load Load Load Load Light Source Unit Protection Supply Voltage Current Consumption Photoelectric Sensors 42CA General Purpose 18mm Cylindrical Style R1­46 Typical Response Curve 100 1 0.1 0 1 (3

  14. MEMS `SMART DUST MOTES' FOR DESIGNING, MONITORING AND ENABLING EFFICIENT LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    -based lighting system has the potential to achieve many environmental benefits in comparison to existing sensorMEMS `SMART DUST MOTES' FOR DESIGNING, MONITORING AND ENABLING EFFICIENT LIGHTING Alice M. Agogino focused on office lighting monitoring and control based on the new MEMS `smart dust mote' sensor

  15. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  16. Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2007-010 Sanem Kabadayi Christine Julien © Copyright 2007 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors Sanem Kabadayi that run on mobile client devices connect to the sensors of a multihop sensor network. For emerging

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment occupational health Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: assessment occupational health Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 UWO Occupational Health Care Policy The Occupational Health Care Policy is designed to ensure that all...

  18. Energy and lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in research for new types of lighting with increased efficacies (lumens/watt) are discussed in the following areas: (1) high-frequency, solid-state ballasts, (2) isotopic enhancement of mercury isotopes, (3) magnetic augmentation, (4) electrodeless, ultra-high frequency, (5) tuned phosphors, (6) two-photon phosphors, (7) heat mirrors, and (3) advanced control circuits to take advantage of daylight and occupancy. As of 1985, improvements in efficacy have been accomplished on an economic basis to save energy for (1) high-frequency ballasts (25%), (2) isotopic enhancement (5%), and (8) advanced control circuits (up to 50%). Most of these advances depend on a deeper understanding of the weakly ionized plasma as a radiating and diffusing medium. 3 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  20. Wireless sensor networks and environmental monitoring applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Borgne, Yann-AĂ«l

    by the Human Resources and Mobility program of the European community (MEST-CT-2004-505079) #12;ULB Machine Radio: 4kbps, 180m Sensors: Light and accelerometer Energy: Solar powered Golem and deputy dust 16mm3 ­ Remote or non invasive monitoring ·... #12;Solbosch greenhouses ·Greenhouses used by different research

  1. Tracking Dynamic Boundary Fronts using Range Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamritham, Krithi

    are being deployed for real-time monitoring applica- tions, such as detecting leakage of hazardous material location whereas in the latter approach a sensor finds approximate distance to a remote location where degrees and gather reflec- tivity and wind velocity information. Lidars (LIght Detection and Ranging

  2. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Anbo (Blacksburg, VA)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

  3. Occupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    of health and safety hazards with the work environment. For the safety professional, the environmentalOccupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management Certificate Program CorporateTraining extension.uci.edu/corporate #12;Safety and health professionals play an important role in maintaining

  4. Resident Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    Resident Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary The Resident Advisor (RA) is assigned and Residence Hall policies. The Resident Advisor provides programming based on an assessment of the community and individual needs. The responsibilities of the Resident Advisor position are implemented under the supervision

  5. Community Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    Community Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary The Community Advisor (CA) is a full success; personal growth; and responsible citizenship. Terms of Appointment The Community Advisor position Monday, May 12, 2014 (5:00pm). Eligibility The Community Advisor must be a full-time student

  6. Merger of Occupational Health & Safety Directorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    Manager, Mrs Melanie Phillips. As well as being a highly qualified and experienced occupational health as well as being an ex HSE specialist inspector. These attributes will be a strong addition to the new function should be addressed in the first instance to Melanie Phillips (OH Manager) on ext: 8701 (m

  7. Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling Kamin Whitehouse, Juhi Ranjan, Jiakang Lu, Tamim Burke Parabola Architects Galen Staengl Staengl Engineering h HEATING, VENTILATION, AND cooling (HVAC required for heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) by 20%­30% by tailoring the conditioning of buildings

  8. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, G.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controls 1 Introduction Indoor chemistry is now recognized as an important factor influencing occupant exposure to air pollutants,

  9. Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts March 2014 Issued by;#12;Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts Contents 1 Scope 1 2 Definitions Health and Safety 1 Specification for Construction Works Contracts Occupational health and safety

  10. Textured Occupancy Grids for Monocular Localization Without Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parr, Ronald

    , and Ronald Parr Abstract-- A textured occupancy grid map is an extremely versatile data structure. It can map representation, the textured occupancy grid, can now be used for humans, robots with laser- dimensional textured occupancy grid map. In such a map, three-dimensional space is discretized into a set

  11. Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Betty Lise

    1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if://blogs.stthomas.edu/realestate/2011/01/24/residential-real-estate-professionals-how-do-you- develop feedback! There is a connection between the output and the input! Therefore forces inputs to same voltage

  12. MEMS CHIP CO2 SENSOR FOR BUILDING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton Carl Greenwald

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to develop an affordable, reliable sensor to enable demand controlled ventilation (DCV). A significant portion of total energy consumption in the United States is used for heating or air conditioning (HVAC) buildings. To assure occupant safety and fresh air levels in large buildings, and especially those with sealed windows, HVAC systems are frequently run in excess of true requirements as automated systems cannot now tell the occupancy level of interior spaces. If such a sensor (e.g. thermostat sized device) were available, it would reduce energy use between 10 and 20% in such buildings. A quantitative measure of ''fresh air'' is the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) present. An inert gas, CO{sub 2} is not easily detected by chemical sensors and is usually measured by infrared spectroscopy. Ion Optics research developed a complete infrared sensor package on a single MEMS chip. It contains the infrared (IR) source, IR detector and IR filter. The device resulting from this DOE sponsored research has sufficient sensitivity, lifetime, and drift rate to meet the specifications of commercial instrument manufacturers who are now testing the device for use in their building systems.

  13. CX-005790: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5) install lighting (occupancy) sensors in municipal buildings, and 6) install light emitting diode (LED) traffic signals throughout the city. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD...

  14. CX-006307: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5) install lighting (occupancy) sensors in municipal buildings, and 6) install light emitting diode traffic signals throughout the city. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD...

  15. Micro-position sensor using faraday effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElfresh, Michael (Livermore, CA); Lucas, Matthew (Pittsburgh, PA); Silveira, Joseph P. (Tracy, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

  16. Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants the promise of a bright future ­ just like the green building movement. i #12;Post Occupancy Evaluation

  17. Building Adaptable Sensor Networks with Sensor Cubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussos, George

    of layers allows easy experiments, upgrades and extensions Small-scale sensor network Example sensor module- world network algorithm and power management behavior · Results from small scale tests can be compared (short packets and high bit rate reduce collision probability); Transmitter's MAC table logic: Small

  18. Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

  19. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Byungkun

    The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting - united with the rich details offered by sensor networks - prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we propose several techniques for ...

  20. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  1. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  2. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  3. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

  4. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  5. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop sensor technology and the networks that collect data from them. Present work clearly demonstrates

  6. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  7. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  8. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  9. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  10. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabaugh, M.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); O`Dell, C. [USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his ``Ten Point Initiative`` charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent ``Tiger Teams`` are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  11. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabaugh, M.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); O'Dell, C. (USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his Ten Point Initiative'' charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent Tiger Teams'' are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  12. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation. The solar radiation data, in W/m 2 , werelight sensor and solar radiation data are shown in Figure 2-exceed those of the solar radiation data. Figure 2-3. Light

  13. Energy Star Lighting Fixtures: How Does THAT Work? | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or include other special features, like motion sensors or automatic shut-off in daylight, to further help you reduce your lighting energy use. And the best part is that...

  14. IEQ and the impact on building occupants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Satish; Fisk, William J.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and its effects on health, comfort and performance of occupants is becoming increasingly essential. Facility managers are interested in IEQ's close relationship to energy use. Employers hope to enhance employee comfort and productivity, reduce absenteeism and health-care costs, and reduce risk of litigation. The rising interest in this field has placed additional pressure on the research community for practical guidelines on creating a safe, healthy and comfortable indoor environment.

  15. Common occupational classification system - revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Workforce planning has become an increasing concern within the DOE community as the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM or EM) seeks to consolidate and refocus its activities and the Office of Defense Programs (DP) closes production sites. Attempts to manage the growth and skills mix of the EM workforce while retaining the critical skills of the DP workforce have been difficult due to the lack of a consistent set of occupational titles and definitions across the complex. Two reasons for this difficulty may be cited. First, classification systems commonly used in industry often fail to cover in sufficient depth the unique demands of DOE`s nuclear energy and research community. Second, the government practice of contracting the operation of government facilities to the private sector has introduced numerous contractor-specific classification schemes to the DOE complex. As a result, sites/contractors report their workforce needs using unique classification systems. It becomes difficult, therefore, to roll these data up to the national level necessary to support strategic planning and analysis. The Common Occupational Classification System (COCS) is designed to overcome these workforce planning barriers. The COCS is based on earlier workforce planning activities and the input of technical, workforce planning, and human resource managers from across the DOE complex. It provides a set of mutually-exclusive occupation titles and definitions that cover the broad range of activities present in the DOE complex. The COCS is not a required record-keeping or data management guide. Neither is it intended to replace contractor/DOE-specific classification systems. Instead, the system provides a consistent, high- level, functional structure of occupations to which contractors can crosswalk (map) their job titles.

  16. Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To implement the Occupational Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees as an element of the DOE Integrated Safety Management System. Cancels: HQ 3790.2A. Canceled by DOE O 251.91. This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Bruce M. Carnes, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 9/18/02. Canceled by DOE N 251.91.

  17. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  18. ICLS performance specification SECTION 16512 -CLASSROOM LIGHTING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This section specifies an integrated classroom lighting and control system that provides: 1. Single source control sensors, photo sensors (if specified herein), Relay Control Interface with Modular receptacles - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS A. Drawings and general provisions of the Contract, including General

  19. Wireless Sensors and Networks for Advanced Energy Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, J.E.

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous national studies and working groups have identified low-cost, very low-power wireless sensors and networks as a critical enabling technology for increasing energy efficiency, reducing waste, and optimizing processes. Research areas for developing such sensor and network platforms include microsensor arrays, ultra-low power electronics and signal conditioning, data/control transceivers, and robust wireless networks. A review of some of the research in the following areas will be discussed: (1) Low-cost, flexible multi-sensor array platforms (CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, humidity, NH{sub 3}, O{sub 2}, occupancy, etc.) that enable energy and emission reductions in applications such as buildings and manufacturing; (2) Modeling investments (energy usage and savings to drive capital investment decisions) and estimated uptime improvements through pervasive gathering of equipment and process health data and its effects on energy; (3) Robust, self-configuring wireless sensor networks for energy management; and (4) Quality-of-service for secure and reliable data transmission from widely distributed sensors. Wireless communications is poised to support technical innovations in the industrial community, with widespread use of wireless sensors forecasted to improve manufacturing production and energy efficiency and reduce emissions. Progress being made in wireless system components, as described in this paper, is helping bring these projected improvements to reality.

  20. Occupational health experience with organic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

  1. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  2. A technical framework to describe occupant behavior for building energy simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner , William; Hong , Tianzhen

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Green buildings that fail to meet expected design performance criteria indicate that technology alone does not guarantee high performance. Human influences are quite often simplified and ignored in the design, construction, and operation of buildings. Energy-conscious human behavior has been demonstrated to be a significant positive factor for improving the indoor environment while reducing the energy use of buildings. In our study we developed a new technical framework to describe energy-related human behavior in buildings. The energy-related behavior includes accounting for individuals and groups of occupants and their interactions with building energy services systems, appliances and facilities. The technical framework consists of four key components: i. the drivers behind energy-related occupant behavior, which are biological, societal, environmental, physical, and economical in nature ii. the needs of the occupants are based on satisfying criteria that are either physical (e.g. thermal, visual and acoustic comfort) or non-physical (e.g. entertainment, privacy, and social reward) iii. the actions that building occupants perform when their needs are not fulfilled iv. the systems with which an occupant can interact to satisfy their needs The technical framework aims to provide a standardized description of a complete set of human energy-related behaviors in the form of an XML schema. For each type of behavior (e.g., occupants opening/closing windows, switching on/off lights etc.) we identify a set of common behaviors based on a literature review, survey data, and our own field study and analysis. Stochastic models are adopted or developed for each type of behavior to enable the evaluation of the impact of human behavior on energy use in buildings, during either the design or operation phase. We will also demonstrate the use of the technical framework in assessing the impact of occupancy behavior on energy saving technologies. The technical framework presented is part of our human behavior research, a 5-year program under the U.S. - China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency.

  3. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  4. Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Bharathan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an office. The reed switch, PIR sensor and our CC2530 basedus- ing Passive Infra Red (PIR) based motion sensors to8]. In most cases these PIR sensors are hard wired to the

  5. Occupational ALARA Program Guide for Use with Title 10, CFR, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational "as low as is reasonably achievable" (ALARA) program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. For completeness, this Guide also references detailed guidance provided in the DOE-STD-1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL (DOE 1999a), hereinafter referred to as the RCS.

  6. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  7. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

  8. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  9. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  10. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  11. Wireless Networked Lighting Systems for Optimizing Energy Savings and User Satisfaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Buildings consume more than one-third of the total primary energy in the US, and about two-thirds of the building primary energy use attributed to electricity [1]. Lighting accounts for 30% of the primary energy the overall energy consumption while constrained by possibly conflicting lighting preferences of the occupants

  12. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  13. Systems and methods for sensing occupancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasu, Aravind; Mathias, Dean; Liu, Chenguang; Christensen, Randy; Christensen, Bruce

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer implemented method for sensing occupancy of a workspace includes creating a difference image that represents luminance differences of pixels in past and current images of the workspace resulting from motion in the workspace, determining motion occurring in regions of the workspace based on the difference image, and altering a workspace environment based at least in part on the determined motion. The method also includes determining which pixels in the difference image represent persistent motion that can be ignored and determining which pixels representing motion in the difference image are invalid because the pixels are isolated from other pixels representing motion.

  14. Case Management - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites ProposedOccupational Health Services > Return to Work >

  15. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  16. Worksite Visits - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1 TableContactsOccupational Health Services

  17. Medical Exams - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical BehaviorSummerwelcome dayOccupational

  18. Tests gauge LED sensors for fuel-dye measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Lucke, Richard B.; Melville, Angela M.; Wright, Bob W.

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work was to develop a low cost, robust sensor to allow direct measurement of Solvent Red 164 dye concentration in off-road fuel at refineries and fuel terminals. Optical absorption sensors based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) are rugged, low-cost, have low power consumption, and can be designed to be intrinsically safe.LED-based systems have been used in a variety of chemical detection applications including heavy metals, pH, CO2, and O2. The approach for this work was to develop a sensor that could be mounted on a pipeline sight glass, precluding the need for direct contact of the sensor with the fuel. Below is described the design and testing of three different LED/photodiode sensors utilizing reflectance spectrometry for the measurement of dye concentration.

  19. Co-simulation Based Building Controls Implementation with Networked Sensors and Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors and actuators. This implementation has demonstrated an up to 57% savings in lighting electricity, WA, USA. Copyright 2011 ACM 978-1-4503-0749-9 ...$10.00 Keywords Integrated controls, lighting in the U.S. in 2010 while lighting alone in buildings is responsible for 18% of site electricity usage

  20. Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual...

  1. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

  2. PROMOTING ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE: A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilms, W.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim Criteria for Energy Conservation in New Buildings",Robert and others, "Energy Conservation Program Guide forDivision Promoting Energy Conservation Through Occupational

  3. A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting September 2012 This pamphlet is intended to provide a short summary...

  4. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle Measurements...

  5. Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,office buildings, comparing green with non-green buildings.On average, occupants in green buildings were more satisfied

  6. Red Galaxy Growth and the Halo Occupation Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. I. Brown; Zheng Zheng; Martin White; Arjun Dey; Buell T. Jannuzi; Andrew J. Benson; Kate Brand; Mark Brodwin; Darren J. Croton

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have traced the past 7 Gyr of red galaxy stellar mass growth within dark matter halos. We have determined the halo occupation distribution, which describes how galaxies reside within dark matter halos, using the observed luminosity function and clustering of 40,696 0.2red galaxies in Bootes. Half of 10^{11.9} Msun/h halos host a red central galaxy, and this fraction increases with increasing halo mass. We do not observe any evolution of the relationship between red galaxy stellar mass and host halo mass, although we expect both galaxy stellar masses and halo masses to evolve over cosmic time. We find that the stellar mass contained within the red population has doubled since z=1, with the stellar mass within red satellite galaxies tripling over this redshift range. In cluster mass halos most of the stellar mass resides within satellite galaxies and the intra-cluster light, with a minority of the stellar mass residing within central galaxies. The stellar masses of the most luminous red central galaxies are proportional to halo mass to the power of a third. We thus conclude that halo mergers do not always lead to rapid growth of central galaxies. While very massive halos often double in mass over the past 7 Gyr, the stellar masses of their central galaxies typically grow by only 30%.

  7. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  8. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  9. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  10. Energy Conservation in Sensor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    Chapter 4 Energy Conservation in Sensor and Sensor-Actuator Networks Ivan Stojmenovic 4 wireless network, and must work unattended. The limited energy budget at the individual sensor level

  11. Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katherine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    preventing energy waste during the red light mode is a moregreen lights was installed to help avoid energy waste, or inlight means that energy is being used to modify the temparature inside and therefore if I open my window it will waste energy.  

  12. Sensitive And Selective Chemical Sensor With Nanostructured Surfaces.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical sensor is provided which includes an optical resonator including a nanostructured surface comprising a plurality of nanoparticles bound to one or more surfaces of the resonator. The nanoparticles provide optical absorption and the sensor further comprises a detector for detecting the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment. In particular, a selective chemical interaction is provided which modifies the optical absorption of the nanoparticles or their environment, and an analyte is detected based on the modified optical absorption. A light pulse is generated which enters the resonator to interrogate the modified optical absorption and the exiting light pulse is detected by the detector.

  13. Sensors and actuators 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains the proceedings on sensors and actuators 1990. Topics covered include: Hot wire air flow meter for engine control systems, A technique for the real-time estimation of air-fuel ratio using molecular weight ratios, combustion knock sensing: Sensor selection and application issues, and An indirect sensing technique for closed-loop diesel fuel quantity control.

  14. Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg Occupational health and safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Effective safety at work can be accomplished only if the employees cooperate. You are obligated to · payAlbert Ludwig University of Freiburg Occupational health and safety Leaflet for employees Numerous laws and regulations have been passed to guarantee occupational health and safety. Industrial safety

  15. MINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    , e.g. the Health Care Corporation, Basic Medical Sciences, Pharmacy, etc. and that no definite safetyMINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING Wednesday, February 7 as the Committee's newest member. Dr. LeFort has completed the Occupational Health & Safety Certification Training

  16. Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    architects involved in energy-efficient design. It might beenergy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.energy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.

  17. Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mester, Rudolf

    1 Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming Hern´an Badino1Chrysler AG, Stuttgart Abstract. The computation of free space available in an environment is an essential, which builds a stochastic occupancy grid to address the free space problem as a dynamic pro- gramming

  18. ThermoSense: Occupancy Thermal Based Sensing for HVAC Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    ThermoSense: Occupancy Thermal Based Sensing for HVAC Control Alex Beltran Elect. Eng. & Comp Occupancy Sensing, Thermal Sensing, HVAC Control 1. INTRODUCTION From 1980 to 2010, energy in the United, November 13-14 2013, Rome, Italy. Copyright 2013 ACM 978-1-4503-2431-1/13/11 ...$15.00. (HVAC) consumed 42

  19. NIH POLICY MANUAL 1430 NIH OCCUPANT EVACUATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NIH POLICY MANUAL 1430 NIH OCCUPANT EVACUATION PLAN Issuing Office & Phone: ORS/DPS 496-1985 Release Date: 2/14/02 1. Explanation of Material Transmitted: This Chapter establishes the NIH Occupant life and property during emergencies in all buildings occupied by NIH employees. 2. Filing Instructions

  20. An examination of factors affecting high occupancy/toll lane demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appiah, Justice

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, high occupancy/toll (HOT) lanes have gained increasing recognition as a potential method of managing traffic congestion. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand for high occupancy vehicle...

  1. CROSS-CULTURAL EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONAL ENGAGEMENT BETWEEN ASIAN AMERICAN AND CAUCASIAN AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Quoc (Thai) My

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    values and no significant relationship with level of acculturation. Results from the study yielded two newly developed measures of occupational engagement, the Occupational Engagement Scale-Asian American (OES-AA) and Occupational Engagement...

  2. Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    cadwallader, lee

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

  3. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  4. A Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) with Hybrid Source/Sensor Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna, Sanjay

    A Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) with Hybrid Source/Sensor Array Jiawei Friedrich Xu, Glauco light emitting LED and photo detector array, with on-chip control, driver electronics and improved performance. Keywords- Readout Integrated Circuit; Integrated circuit testing; CMOS image sensors; smart

  5. Accounting for the Occupancy Variable in Inverse Building Energy Baselining Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the typical load shapes for lighting and equipment for the specified daytypes. 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 1357911131517192123 Hour Density Average Weekday Average Weekend and Vacation Average Semester Break Weekday... variable against the lighting and equipment load shapes produced profiles reasonably similar to the occupancy profiles obtained by a walk-through survey, which shows the strong correlation between them. y = 1.721x - 0.8976 R2 = 0.9267 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - agent causing occupational Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pathology andor an occupational exposure defined by noxious agent, profession... as shown in fig. 1D. D) The tripartite network: disease-noxious agent-occupation is the...

  7. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  8. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G. (8544 Electric Ave., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  9. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Erika L. (Westmont, IL); Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  10. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  11. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  12. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

    1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  13. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  14. Recent results of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Marchiori; for the ATLAS Upgrade PPS Collaboration

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector has to undergo significant updates at the end of the current decade, in order to withstand the increased occupancy and radiation damage that will be produced by the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. In this presentation we give an overview of the recent accomplishments of the R&D activity on the planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS Inner Detector upgrade.

  15. Aircraft as a meteorological sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Meteorological Institute 2 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Photo cover: A KLM Airbus A330-200 landsAircraft as a meteorological sensor Using Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance data to derive upper air Meteorological Institute 3 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Aircraft as a meteorological sensor Using

  16. Wireless Sensor Technology to Optimize the Occupant's Dynamic Demand Pattern Within the Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Environmental Ergonomics, Boston Zhang H., Arens E., Huizinga C., Han T., 2010, Thermal sensations and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments, Building and Environment 45(2): 380-410 ...

  17. SciTech Connect: Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) CawithMicrofluidicJournal Article: Unitarity check

  18. Development of a Portable Wireless Sensor Network to Enhance Post-Occupancy Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noye,S.; North,R.; Fisk, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to identify ingredients for success and common operating issues to provide practical feedback for the building services industry (Cohen et al. 2001). This lead to the introduction of the Soft Landing framework (Way & Bordass 2007). Soft landing is based... discusses the practical challenges that need to be addressed for PO-Cx to be adopted by the building industry. The first challenge concerns how to incentivise PO-Cx. In the current product-based building services industry, the additional initial...

  19. Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing, an National Carbon Capture Center at ,iMA-110662 PT6

  20. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  1. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  2. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed to place the sensor nodes in the field. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  3. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  4. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  5. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  6. Modular sensor network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring (Berkeley, CA); Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul (Tracy, CA); Kershaw, Christopher Patrick (Hayward, CA); Kyker, Ronald Dean (Livermore, CA)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  7. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. NOx Sensor Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    needed to meet emission targets and enable widespread use of diesel vehicles with better fuel economies: We are developing a novel sensor with the potential to meet OEM cost and...

  9. Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama Description Totals R.Halls Wells- Metz Light ERS ETC SourceFour 25 25 50 degree ERS Strand Lighting 64 14 24 12 14 36 degree ERS ETC Source Four 15 15 36 degree ERS Strand Lighting 124 60 58 2 4 26 degree ERS ETC SourceFour 2 2 26 degree ERS Strand

  10. Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees Ling Shi , Agostino Capponi , Karl H. Johansson and Richard M. Murray Abstract

  11. AquaNodes: An Underwater Sensor Network Iuliu Vasilescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    modem and an optical mo- dem implemented using green light. The system of sensor nodes communicates communication and support for sensing and mobil- ity. The nodes in the system are connected acoustically for broadcast communication using an acoustic modem we de- veloped. For higher point to point communication

  12. AquaNodes: An Underwater Sensor Network Iuliu Vasilescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    and an optical mo- dem implemented using green light. The system of sensor nodes communicates with a TDMA communication and support for sensing and mobil- ity. The nodes in the system are connected acoustically for broadcast communication using an acoustic modem we de- veloped. For higher point to point communication

  13. Distributed, Adaptive Algorithm for Deployment of Nonholonomic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -wise continuous light distribution function. I. INTRODUCTION The problem of controlling networked robots has, manipulation in hazardous environments [1], ex- ploration, rescue missions, automatic surveillance [2] over a group of mobile sensors to solve a facility location problem [11] by using centroidal Voronoi

  14. EXTERIOR LIGHTING CASE STUDY For more information, visit PARTNERSHIPDEMONSTRATIONS.ORG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    EXTERIOR LIGHTING CASE STUDY » For more information, visit PARTNERSHIPDEMONSTRATIONS.ORG In 2013, UC Santa Barbara partnered with the SPEED team to demonstrate network controlled LED lighting sensors. These lighting controls allowed all the units to be incorporated into an adaptive mesh network

  15. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks Byungkun, MA 02139, USA ABSTRACT The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting ­ united propose several techniques for measuring work surface illuminance and ambient light using a sensor network

  16. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceEfeedstocks and the climateLife a Light

  17. Light' Darkness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceEfeedstocks and the climateLifeLight to

  18. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared atEffectquestionnairesU.S. EnergyEnergy EfficiencyLighting

  19. A 0.5m Pixel Frame-Transfer CCD Image Sensor in 110nm CMOS Keith Fife, Abbas El Gamal and H.-S. Philip Wong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Gamal, Abbas

    no metal layers to achieve maximum light sensitivity, while the rest of the image sensor is light shielded by several metal layers that are also used to distribute global control signals. The image sensor is designed/D implant masked out in between electrodes. No silicide is used in the pixel array area. STI is used

  20. Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Morante

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

  1. Advanced Design and Commissioning Tools for Energy-Efficient Building Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fixed external shade, photo-sensor and occupancy sensorAdequate solar shading, photo sensor and occupancy sensor

  2. Critical Simulation Based Evaluation of Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Chandrayee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fixed external shade, photo- sensor and occupancy sensorAdequate solar shading, photo sensor and occupancy sensor

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2013 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

  4. Light Water Reactor Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

  5. Compact, low-cost, and high-resolution interrogation unit for optical sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiesel, Peter; Schmidt, Oliver; Mohta, Setu; Johnson, Noble; Malzer, Stefan [Palo Alto Research Center Inc., 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Max Planck Research Group, Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, Guenther-Scharowsky-Strasse 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact wavelength detectors that resolve wavelength changes in the subpicometer range over a broad spectral range are presented. A photodiode array or position sensor device is coated with a linear variable filter that converts the wavelength of the incident light into a spatial intensity distribution. The centroid of the spatial distribution is determined by a differential readout of the two elements of the photodiode array or the position sensor device. The device can interrogate any optical sensor that produces a wavelength shift in response to a stimulus. The potential of this device was tested by interrogating fiber-Bragg-grating sensors.

  6. Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

  7. Safety Guidelines for Fieldwork Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Safety Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Safety Guidelines for Fieldwork Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Safety Department Environmental Safety Division University of Georgia Adapted from the Safety Guidelines for Field Researchers published by the Office of Environment, Health & Safety at University of California, Berkeley #12;Safety Guidelines

  8. Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such knowledge facilitates proper diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of chemical exposurerelated diseases Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University of chemicals and working towards greater collaboration with respect to sharing data and information

  9. Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides an overview summary of radiation doses from occupational exposures at the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration for the year 2013.

  10. Occupational neurotoxicology of organic solvents and solvent mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triebig, G. (Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of two field studies in painters and spray painters, the outcomes of examinations of workers with suspected work-related disease due to solvents, as well as data from an evaluation of an epidemiologic study in painters with confirmed occupational disease, are presented and discussed. The results of these studies and the experiences in occupational medicine in the Federal Republic of Germany do not support the assumption of high neurotoxic risks in solvent-exposed workers, which can be postulated from various epidemiologic studies from Scandinavian countries. Several factors may explain the different conclusions: (1) lower solvent exposures of German painters in the past decades; (2) false positive diagnosis of a toxic encephalopathy; (3) aetiological misclassification; (4) differences in legislation relevant for the acknowledgement of occupational diseases. In conclusion, there is a need for further well-designed epidemiologic studies in occupationally solvent-exposed workers. Suggestions regarding assessment of exposure and neurobehavioral tests are given.

  11. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

  12. Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

  13. Occupational status orientations and perception of opportunity: A racial comparison of rural youth from depressed areas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ameen, Bilquis Ara

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Occupational Expectation Anticipatory Deflection Perception of Opportunity Conclusions 18 20 22 26 27 CHAPTER IV, METHOD AND PROCEDURES, ~ ~ . . ~ ~ ~ 30 Source and Collection of Data Negro-White Background Characteristics Instruments... Summary of Findings on Occupational Aspirations, Expectations and Anticipatory Deflection by Race 25 A Comparison Between Negro and White Youth on Occupational Aspirations 42 A Comparison Between Negro and White Youth on Occupational Aspiration...

  14. Division of Occupational Health & Safety/ORS NIH Safety Programs in Support of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Division of Occupational Health & Safety/ORS NIH Safety Programs in Support of the NIH Animal Care and Use Program Occupational Safety and Health Protection for Federal Employees Poster NIH Safety Policies PM 1340 Occupational Safety and Health Management PM 1430 NIH Occupant Evacuation Plan PM 3015

  15. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    fluorescent lamps or new PL- lamp fixtures, and adding occupancy sensor controls and daylight controls to interior lighting fixtures in some of the facilities; 2) replace tennis...

  16. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Energy efficient retrofits occupancy sensors in the Police Department, City Hall, and Community Activities Center, 2) lighting...

  17. CX-005932: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heater time clocks) and replace roof, retrofit plumbing fixtures, thermostats, occupancy sensors, and lighting fixture replacements at Thalin Hall, 3) conduct feasibility study...

  18. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heater time clocks) and replace roof, retrofit plumbing fixtures, thermostats, occupancy sensors, and lighting fixture replacements at Thalin Hall; 3) conduct feasibility study...

  19. CX-000255: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recycling, Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls for City Hall, Energy efficient chiller and cooling tower for Environmental Services building, Comprehensive Community Energy...

  20. --No Title--

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    daylight harvesting; installing occupancy sensors; converting existing signs to light emitting diode (LED) ones; and installing vending machine misers. This project leverages...

  1. Combined raman and IR fiber-based sensor for gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, Jerry C; Chan, James W; Trebes, James E; Angel, Stanley M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A double-pass fiber-optic based spectroscopic gas sensor delivers Raman excitation light and infrared light to a hollow structure, such as a hollow fiber waveguide, that contains a gas sample of interest. A retro-reflector is placed at the end of this hollow structure to send the light back through the waveguide where the light is detected at the same end as the light source. This double pass retro reflector design increases the interaction path length of the light and the gas sample, and also reduces the form factor of the hollow structure.

  2. Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Rybkowski, Zofia; Aliber, Jennifer; Lange, Cathleen

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , London W1T 3JH, UK Building Research & Information Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rbri20 Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation Mardelle Mc... published: 08 Aug 2012. To cite this article: Mardelle McCuskey Shepley , Zofia Rybkowski , Jennifer Aliber & Cathleen Lange (2012): Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation, Building Research & Information, 40:6, 700-712 To link...

  3. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  4. Occupational orientations of Mexican American youth in selected Texas counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David Edgar

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOU1'H IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Sociology OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOUTH IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A. Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR. Approved as to style and oontent by: Chairman of' Committee . -e . ~ - c...

  5. Optical position sensor for determining the interface between a clear and an opaque fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An inexpensive, optical position sensor for measuring a position or length, x, along a one-dimensional curvilinear, coordinate system. The sensor can be used, for example, to determine the position of an interface between a clear and an opaque fluid (such as crude oil and water). In one embodiment, the sensor utilizes the principle of dual-fluorescence, where a primary fiber emits primary fluorescent light and a parallel secondary fiber collects a portion of the primary fluorescent light that is not blocked by the opaque fluid. This, in turn, excites secondary fluorescence in the secondary fiber at a longer wavelength. A light detector measures the intensity of secondary fluorescence emitted from an end of the secondary fiber, which is used to calculate the unknown position or length, x. Side-emitting fibers can be used in place of, or in addition to, fluorescent fibers. The all-optical sensor is attractive for applications involving flammable liquids.

  6. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: • Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. • Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. • Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  7. Dynamic solid state lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrich, Matthew (Matthew Henry)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy conservation concerns will mandate near-future environments to regulate themselves to accommodate occupants' objectives and best tend to their comfort while minimizing energy consumption. Accordingly, smart energy ...

  8. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    validated on metal-oxide (MOX) sensors. Our results show that the active sensing method obtains better classification performance than passive sensing methods, and also is more robust to additive Gaussian noise in sensor measurements. Second, we consider...

  9. Investigation of lane occupancy as a freeway control parameter for use during incident conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friebele, John Duncan

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    freeway safety warning device, using critical occupancy parameters, was developed and simulated in real-time. Evaluation of the simulated operation of the device revealed. that relia'cle detection of shock waves generated by freeway incidents... Detection of Shock Waves Page 38 Sensitivity of Occupancy Measurements 38 Occupancy Differential Concept Determination of' Occupancy D"' fzerence Parameters Det, ection of Shock Waves 41 RESULTS Critical Occupancy Concept Determination of Critical...

  10. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

  11. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  12. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  13. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  14. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  15. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  16. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated interferometric sensor depends on an appropriate performance function (e.g., desired displacement range, accuracy, robustness, etc.). In this dissertation, the performance limitations of a bundled differential intensity-modulated displacement sensor are analyzed, where the bundling configuration has been designed to optimize performance. The performance limitations of a white light Fabry-Perot displacement sensor are also analyzed. Both these sensors are non-contacting, but they have access to different regions of the performance-space. Further, both these sensors have different degrees of sensitivity to experimental uncertainty. Made in conjunction with careful analysis, the decision of which sensor to deploy need not be an uninformed one.

  17. Sustainable Office Lighting Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

  18. Sensors as Information Transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. David zook; Norbert Schroeder

    2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter reviews the mechanisms by which sensors gather information from the physical world and transform it into the electronic signals that are used in today's information and control systems. It introduces a new methodology for describing sensing mechanisms based on the process of information flow and applies it to the broad spectrum of sensors, instruments and data input devices in current use. We identify four distinct elemental transduction processes: energy conversion, energy dispersion, energy modulation and modulation of a material property. We posit that these four mechanisms form a complete set for describing information transduction in sensing systems.

  19. Magnetic differential torque sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemarquand, V.; Lemarquand, G. [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)] [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new torque sensor structure is presented. The basic idea is a simple torque sensor with a variable magnetic circuit excited by an axially magnetized permanent magnet ring. The circuit is constituted by iron toothed rings, whose teeth relative position changes whenever an applied torque twists the rotating shaft. A Hall probe measures the induction in an airgap where the induction is uniform. The new structure is an association of two previous ones, thus creating a differential system with the related advantages: diminution of thermal drifts, zero mean value for the signal. The new magnetic circuit is studied by calculating equivalent reluctances through energy calculations and by using electrical analogies.

  20. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  1. Controlled mobility in sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugihara, Ryo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Gupta. Optimizing energy-latency trade- o? in sensoras “Optimizing Energy-Latency Trade-o? in Sensor NetworksK. Gupta, “Optimizing Energy-Latency Trade-o? in Sensor

  2. Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures . Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures . Abstract:...

  3. Sensors & Measurement | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Research Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Sensors & Measurement...

  4. Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Lothian, Josh [ORNL

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

  5. Environmental and health aspects of lighting: Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most discharge lamps, including fluorescent lamps, metal halide lamps, and high pressure sodium lamps, contain Mercury, a toxic chemical. Lighting professionals need to be able to respond to questions about the direct hazards of Mercury from accidentally breaking lamps, and the potential environmental hazards of lamp operation and disposal. We calculated the exposures that could occur from an accidental breakage of lamps. Acute poisoning appears almost impossible. Under some circumstances a sealed environment, such as a space station, could be contaminated enough to make it unhealthy for long-term occupation. Mercury becomes a potential environmental hazard after it becomes methylated. Mercury is methylated in aquatic environments, where it may accumulate in fish, eventually rendering them toxic to people and other animals. Lighting causes Mercury to enter the environment directly from lamp disposal, and indirectly from power plant emissions. The environmental tradeoffs between incandescent and discharge lamps depend upon the amounts released by these two sources, their local concentrations, and their probabilities of being methylated. Indirect environmental effects of lighting also include the release of other heavy metals (Cadmium, Lead and Arsenic), and other air pollutants and carbon dioxide that are emitted by fossil fuel power plants. For a given light output, the level of power plant emissions depends upon the efficacy of the light source, and is thus much larger for incandescent lamps than for fluorescent or discharge lamps. As disposal and control technologies change the relative direct and indirect emissions from discharge and incandescent lamps will change.

  6. Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 sensors, passive infrared (PIR), video, sound, and badgeeffect of passive infrared (PIR) sensors on the performancebenefit of using additional PIR sensors in the estimation.

  7. Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Engineering Laboratory Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors are rapidly becoming the technology of choiceFuture Directions for Magnetic Sensors: HYBRIDMATERIALS Our goal is to develop the scientific expertise needed to allow modeling and simulation to become the driving force in improving magnetic sensors

  8. Sensor system for web inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sleefe, Gerard E. (1 Snowcap Ct., Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rudnick, Thomas J. (626 E. Jackson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119); Novak, James L. (11048 Malaguena La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

  9. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  10. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  11. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  12. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 #12;! #12;2 Disclaimer owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name Department of Energy; Dustin Davis, California Energy Commission; Adam Hinge, Sustainable Energy Partnerships

  13. Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors Shijun Qiu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors (Abstract) Shijun Qiu, Berkeley aagogino@euler.berkeley.edu Key Words : sensor networks, sensor fusion, sensor validation, micro-electromechanical systems, MEMS MEMS sensors make a rich design space of networked sensors viable. They can be deeply

  14. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  15. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  16. Real time perfusion and oxygenation monitoring in an implantable optical sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Hariharan

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in operating rooms. In the late 1970s Scott Wilbur of the Biox corporation designed an ear sensor that used light emitting diode and solid state photodetectors to develop a clinically accepted pulse oximeter. The fiberoptic cables of previous ear oximeters.... Traditional oximeters use two light emitting diodes that emit light at 660nm (red) and 940nm (infrared) wavelengths. At these wavelengths both oxyhemoglobin and reduced hemoglobin have different absorption spectra (Fig. 1). The ratio of absorbances...

  17. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Hafich, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband light-emitting diode. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3-2 .mu.m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft.

  18. Broadband light-emitting diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A broadband light-emitting diode is disclosed. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3--2 {micro}m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-divisionmultiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft. 10 figs.

  19. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  20. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  1. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  2. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  3. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  4. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  5. Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lighting complaints in the two main comparison groups.the lighting control profiles in the two comparison groups.lighting and acoustic quality in green buildings do not show a significant improvement in comparison

  6. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

  7. Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only by electrical lighting (481 trillion BTU vs. 1340only by electrical lighting (141 billion kWh vs. 393 billion

  8. EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bifano, Thomas

    EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting Homework for 9/10 1. Make an estimate (using if the patent is granted.) 3. What is a lumen? A lux? How are the two related? How would you use a lux meter, (Lux, Lumens/m2) Luminous Flux: Perceivable light power from a source, (Lumens) Use the lux meter

  9. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  10. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  11. Specific light in sculpture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, John William

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

  12. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

  13. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  14. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  15. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  16. Submission PDF Resonant secondary light emission from plasmonic Au

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, David G.

    of the United States of America Plasmonic nanostructures are of great current interest as chemical sensors to the background commonly observed in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and to the light emission generated). A common limitation of SERS for sensing adsorbed species is the background (6) that appears as a broad

  17. Ph. D. Major in Occupational Safety and Health Rev 10/18/2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in the application of scientific principles to anticipate, recognize, evaluate, control and manage occupational Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown and Pittsburgh and the Institute for Occupational research 5. Toxicology 6. Industrial hygiene including ventilation 7. Engineering control technology 8

  18. Growing a green job : essays on social movements and the emergence of a new occupation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammond, Ryan Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Professions and occupations play a central role in shaping institutional arrangements, organizational forms, and individual organizations. I argue the emergence and development of new occupations should be among the central ...

  19. Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

  20. Application of Geiger-mode photo sensors in Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamal Ahmed; Paul Buehler; Michael Cargnelli; Roland Hohler; Johann Marton; Herbert Orth; Ken Suzuki

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. In our institute we are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8x8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8x8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  1. Application of Geiger-mode photo sensors in Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Gamal; Cargnelli, Michael; Hohler, Roland; Marton, Johann; Orth, Herbert; Suzuki, Ken

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based photosensors (SiPMs) working in the Geiger-mode represent an elegant solution for the readout of particle detectors working at low-light levels like Cherenkov detectors. Especially the insensitivity to magnetic fields makes this kind of sensors suitable for modern detector systems in subatomic physics which are usually employing magnets for momentum resolution. In our institute we are characterizing SiPMs of different manufacturers for selecting sensors and finding optimum operating conditions for given applications. Recently we designed and built a light concentrator prototype with 8x8 cells to increase the active photon detection area of an 8x8 SiPM (Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-100P) array. Monte Carlo studies, measurements of the collection efficiency, and tests with the MPPC were carried out. The status of these developments are presented.

  2. Sensitivity enhancement of grating interferometer based two-dimensional sensor arrays using two-wavelength readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferhanoglu, Onur; Urey, Hakan

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffraction gratings integrated with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors offer displacement measurements with subnanometer sensitivity. However, the sensitivity of the interferometric readout may drop significantly based on the gap between the grating and the reference surface. A two-wavelength (2-{lambda}) readout method was previously tested using a single MEMS sensor for illustrating increased displacement measurement capability. This work demonstrates sensitivity enhancement on a sensor array with large scale parallelization ({approx}20,000 sensors). The statistical representation, which is developed to model sensitivity enhancement within a grating based sensor array, is supported by experimental results using a thermal sensor array. In the experiments, two lasers at different wavelengths (633 and 650 nm) illuminate the thermal sensor array from the backside, time-sequentially. The diffracted first order light from the array is imaged onto a single CCD camera. The target scene is reconstructed by observing the change in the first diffracted order diffraction intensity for both wavelengths. Merging of the data from two measurements with two lasers was performed by taking the larger of the two CCD measurements with respect to the reference image for each sensor. {approx}30% increase in the average sensitivity was demonstrated for a 160x120 pixel IR sensor array. Proposed architecture is also applicable to a variety of sensing applications, such as parallel biosensing and atomic force microscopy, for improved displacement measurements and enhanced sensitivity.

  3. SMART LIGHTING SYSTEMS ULTIMATE LIGHTING The Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    (Holistic Integrated Design) · Sensors as or more important than LEDs · Interconnected systems (human, building, grid) · Artistic Design Freedom · Illumination just not white · Fusion of Video and Illumination (Collapsing) Materials Processes Devices Materials & Subsystems Materials & Subsystems Integration Full

  4. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene programs at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

  5. Occupational exposure to DDT among mosquito control sprayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nhachi, C.F.B.; Kasilo, O.J. (Univ. of Zimbabwe, Harare (Zimbabwe))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DDT, a broad action insecticide whose use is restricted or banned in most industrialized countries is still often used for vector control in many tropical and developing countries. Despite the fact that DDT is accumulative and persistant in the ecosystem use of such substitutes as malathion or propoxur is not popular because these increases costs by 3.4 to 8.5 fold. As such DDT is economically attractive to poorer countries. As far as can be ascertained no systemic poisoning has resulted from occupational exposure to DDT. Due to the large particle size, the amount of DDT inhaled by workers is far less than the amount reaching exposed portions of skin. As such occupational exposure is mainly dermal or tropical. Occupational exposure to DDT studies have been done before. The present study is an analysis of some characteristics, (i.e. age, body size, relationship between plasma vitamin A and DDE levels, and smoking habits), of occupational exposure to DDT among spraymen in a Zimbabwe population.

  6. Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

  7. NIH POLICY MANUAL 1340 -NIH Occupational Safety and Health Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NIH POLICY MANUAL 1340 - NIH Occupational Safety and Health Management Issuing Office: ORS the responsibilities of NIH personnel to foster a safe work environment. 2. Filing Instructions: Remove: NIH Manual 1340, dated 11/29/96 Insert: NIH Manual Chapter 1340 dated 2/27/06 PLEASE NOTE: For information on

  8. Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California an efficient demand response HVAC control strategy, actual room usage must be considered. Temperature and CO2 are used for simulations but not for predictive demand response strategies. In this paper, we develop

  9. DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

  10. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  11. A Qualitative Understanding of Occupational Engagement in College Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjornsen, Abby Lea

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    that contribute to the decision-maker's fund of information and experience of the larger world, not just the world as processed when a career decision is imminent" (Krieshok, Black, & McKay, 2009, p. 284). The Occupational Engagement Scale - Student, OES-S (Cox...

  12. Fiber-optic voltage sensor with cladded fiber and evanescent wave variation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, C.B.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities. 3 figs.

  13. Intrusion detection sensor testing tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, D.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrusion detection sensors must be frequently tested to verify that they are operational, and they must be periodically tested to verify that they are functioning at required performance levels. Concerns involving this testing can include: The significant amount of manpower required, inconsistent results due to variability in methods and personnel, exposure of personnel to hazardous environments, and difficulty in obtaining access to the areas containing some of the intrusion sensors. To address these concerns, the Department of Energy directed Sandia National Labs. to develop intrusion detection sensor testing tools. Over the past two years Sandia has developed several sensor testing tool prototypes. This paper describes the evolution of an exterior intrusion detection sensor tester and automatic data logger, and also describes various interior intrusion detection sensor test fixtures that can be remotely activated to simulate an intruder.

  14. Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

  15. a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gburzynski, Pawel

    transmitters #12;Sample sensors: #12;Sample sensors: PAR: Photosynthetically Active (solar) Radiation sensora Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental technology: a truly self configurable, low-cost, maintenance-free, ad-hoc sensor network (not based on Zig

  16. Platforms: Where the sensors are mounted.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    over the Sahara On September 18, 1994. #12;14 The sensor detects solar radiation that has been absorbed1 Platforms: Where the sensors are mounted. Sensors: Instruments on the platforms. ETM+ AVIRIS GER 1500 #12;2 Passive Sensors · Aerial Cameras · Visible or Thermal Active Sensors · Microwave (Radar

  17. HOMOLOGICAL SENSOR Vin de Silva 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghrist, Robert W.

    HOMOLOGICAL SENSOR NETWORKS Vin de Silva 1 and Robert Ghrist 2 Sensors and sense-ability A sensor) as well as vast networks of local sensors (for touch). 1Department of Mathematics, Pomona College. 2 possibilities lie in the domain of the small. Swarms of local sensors at micro- or nano- scale have

  18. Fiber-optic Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alcoz, Jorge Jose

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    modulates the power of the light reflected from it. An avalanche photodiode finally converts this optical signal into a voltage V(t) proportional to the acoustic pressure P(t). CHAPTER II BACKGROUND Over a decade ago external effects over optical... splitting ratio of 50/50 was used to direct the reflected light from the sensor to the detector. The unused forth fiber was terminated in matching liquid. The detection was performed by an avalanche photodiode, taking advantage of its high gain. The DG...

  19. Scanner position sensor for an integrated laser/film rangefiner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdanier, B. N.

    1985-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In an integrated laser/FLIR rangefinder a scanner position sensor comprising an LED of the array of LEDs of a forward looking infrared (FLIR) system, a reticle grating located at the image plane of LED optical path and a silicon detector positioned to receive the light passing through the reticle grating for producing a plurality of signals in response to light passing through each grating slot. One of the signals is selected for the synchronization logic for controlling the charging and firing of the laser. If there is no range return a second signal is selected for adjusting the position of the timing pulse.

  20. A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local that are challenging for a single vehicle system. In this paper, a new method for occupancy grid maps merging the proposed occupancy grid maps merging method is also introduced. Real-data tests are given to demonstrate

  1. Special Issue "Underwater Sensor Nodes and Underwater Sensor Networks" A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    aquatic environments. Marine surveillance, pollution detection and monitoring, and oceanographic data (salinity, conductivity, turbidity, pH, oxygen, temperature, depth, etc.) - Sediments and pollution sensor nodes - Acoustic sensors - Underwater sensor network architectures - Wired and wireless protocols

  2. Optics-less smart sensors and a possible mechanism of cutaneous vision in nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid Yaroslavsky; Chad Goerzen; Stanislav Umansky; H. John Caulfield

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Optics-less cutaneous (skin) vision is not rare among living organisms, though its mechanisms and capabilities have not been thoroughly investigated. This paper demonstrates, using methods from statistical parameter estimation theory and numerical simulations, that an array of bare sensors with a natural cosine-law angular sensitivity arranged on a flat or curved surface has the ability to perform imaging tasks without any optics at all. The working principle of this type of optics-less sensor and the model developed here for determining sensor performance may be used to shed light upon possible mechanisms and capabilities of cutaneous vision in nature.

  3. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Novikova; Eugeniy E. Mikhailov; Yanhong Xiao

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements.

  4. Concluding evaluation of a continuous haulage guidance sensor. Report of investigations, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammarco, J.J.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mining industry has the highest average annual fatality rate among major US industries. To address this, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (PRL), is conducting major research programs to reduce the hazard exposure of miners. One of the recently concluded programs at PRL developed the enabling technology for remote-controlled mining. An application involves the manual process of extracting and hauling coal where operators, in the tight confines of a mine, can be struck or caught by mobile machinery. The approach to remedy this problem uses a guidance system on the continuous haulage equipment so that it follows the continuous mining machine that extracts coal. This, in essence, involves sensor-based docking of the machines. Sensors functioning in the hostile mine environment of dust, methane gas, and water play the key role. Computer analysis of the mining machine`s movements and empirical machine characterizations established operating requirements and spatial limitations to ensure proper loading of coal into the haulage equipment. These data served in the selection of a guidance sensor. Technologies such as scanning laser systems and ultrasonic sensors have frequently been used in other applications, but were found unacceptable. However, a near-infrared sensor employing active targets met the requirements.

  5. Achievements of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Nellist

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the HL-LHC upgrade, the ATLAS experiment plans to introduce an all-silicon inner tracker to cope with the elevated occupancy. To investigate the suitability of pixel sensors using the proven planar technology for the upgraded tracker, the ATLAS Planar Pixel Sensor R&D Project (PPS) was established comprising 19 institutes and more than 90 scientists. The paper provides an overview of the research and development project and highlights accomplishments, among them: beam test results with planar sensors up to innermost layer fluences (> 10^16 n_eq cm^2); measurements obtained with irradiated thin edgeless n-in-p pixel assemblies; recent studies of the SCP technique to obtain almost active edges by postprocessing already existing sensors based on scribing, cleaving and edge passivation; an update on prototyping efforts for large areas: sensor design improvements and concepts for low-cost hybridisation; comparison between Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry results and TCAD simulations. Together, these results allow an assessment of the state-of-the-art with respect to radiation-hard position-sensitive tracking detectors suited for the instrumentation of large areas.

  6. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Becker, Frederick (Houston, TX); Boser, Bernhard E. (Berkeley, CA); Eldredge, Adam B. (Austin, TX); Fuller, Christopher K. (Livermore, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Hamilton, Julie K. (Tracy, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  7. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  8. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Sante Fe, NM); Chung, Brandon W. (Los Alamos, NM); Raistrick, Ian D. (Los Alamos, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  9. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  10. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  11. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  12. On the robustness of clustered sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jung Jin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    or fault tolerance capability of a sensor system. The redundancy degree of sensors plays two important roles pertaining to the robustness of a sensor network. First, the redundancy degree provides proper parameter values for robust estimator; second, we can...

  13. Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Systems Engineering Research Center Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report Editors Jonathan project titled "Massively Deployed Sensors," PSERC project T-31. We express our appreciation

  14. CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors physics and electronics or a chemical instrumentation course. The topics covered will include general theory of chemical recognition, electrochemical, optical, mass sensors and data reduction. Text: J

  15. Lighting and Daylight Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bos, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposing us to the latest products and technologies. Daylight Harvesting A system of controlling the direction and the quantity of light both natural and artificial within a given space. This implies: Control of fenestration in terms of size..., transmission and direction. Control of reflected light within a space. Control of electric light in terms of delivery and amount Daylight harvesting systems are typically designed to maintain a minimum recommended light level. This light level...

  16. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    peak demand management. Photo sensors for daylight drivenare done by local photo-sensors and control hardwaresensing device in a photo sensor is typically a photodiode,

  17. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensors: passive infrared (PIR), ultrasonic or acoustics.sensing technologies. PIR sensors respond to movements of anand typically used with PIR sensors to reduce the occurrence

  18. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  19. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  20. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and fourth vehicle downstream signature (five vehicleof Figures Upstream and downstream middle sensor raw signals2.2 Upstream and downstream middle sensor signature

  1. Flexible Pressure Sensors: Modeling and Experimental Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viana, J.C.

    Flexible capacitive pressure sensors fabricated with nanocomposites were experimentally characterized and results compared with simulations from analytical modeling. Unlike traditional diaphragm silicon pressure sensors, ...

  2. Detectors and Sensors | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detectors and Sensors SHARE Detectors and Sensors 201303163 Extreme Filter for Low-Output Thermocouples in High EMI Environments 201303179 Internal Tube Inspection System...

  3. A MECHANICAL STRAIN SENSOR FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A MECHANICAL STRAIN SENSOR FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS AND PHOTOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF LARGE ...................................................................................................... 17 A MECHANICAL STRAIN SENSOR FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS ....... 21 3.1 Introduction

  4. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  5. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  6. Nanostructured Electrochemical Sensors Based on Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors Based on Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Voltammetric Analysis of Lead, Mercury and Nanostructured Electrochemical Sensors Based on Functionalized Nanoporous Silica...

  7. Enabling Long-Lived Sensor Networks Through Solar Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Hsu; Sadaf Zahedi; Jonathan Friedman; Aman Kansal; Vijay Raghunathan; Mani Srivastava

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long - Lived Sensor Networks through Solar Energy Harvestingsolar energy harvesting and storage device for sensor

  8. Energy efficient sensor network implementations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigo, Janette R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raby, Eric Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brennan, Sean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kulathumani, Vinod [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.; Rosten, Ed [CAMBRIDGE UNIV.; Wolinski, Christophe [IRISA; Wagner, Charles [IRISA; Charot, Francois [IRISA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

  9. ANNUAL DOE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE | 2013 REPORT | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014Energy ANNUAL DOE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE |

  10. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bornstein, Jonathan G. (Miami, FL); Friedman, Peter S. (Toledo, OH)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  11. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  12. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  13. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  14. Fuel cell CO sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen Andreas (Rochester, NY); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Gutowski, Stanley (Pittsford, NY); Neutzler, Jay Kevin (Rochester, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY); Weisbrod, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. A CO sensor includes the PEM-probe, an electrical discharge circuit for discharging the PEM-probe to monitor the CO concentration, and an electrical purging circuit to intermittently raise the anode potential of the PEM-probe's anode to at least about 0.8 V (RHE) to electrochemically oxidize any CO adsorbed on the probe's anode catalyst.

  15. Kyler Nelson Light Timer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    designated by the user, the Arduino board will dim the light to save energy. The user designates the time instance, the light is dimmed using pulse width modulation (PWM) in the Arduino's pin number 11

  16. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  17. Occupational Radiation Protection Record-Keeping and Reporting Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational radiation protection record-keeping and reporting program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  18. Analysis and Design of a Test Apparatus for Resolving Near-Field Effects Associated With Using a Coarse Sun Sensor as Part of a 6-DOF Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancliffe, Devin Aldin

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    assumption is no longer valid. ................................................................. 19 Figure 9 Light rays striking the photovoltaic cells from a source infinitely far away are parallel and therefore make the same angle with the cells... boresight vector and the light source ? , ? Unit vectors indicated by the carat symbol (^) ? Angle between the sensor X-Y plane and the photovoltaic cells Vi Voltage on the i th photovoltaic cell H Scale height from the sensor X-Y plane to the plane...

  19. UAV sensor and survivability issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the most significant tradeoffs between the operating altitude and the complexity and cost of UAVs and sensors. Low altitudes allow less complex, smaller sensors and platforms, but are vulnerable to ground fire. High altitudes require more numerous and capable sensors, but provide wider swaths for more rapid coverage and reduced vulnerability to ground fire. It is shown that for mission requirements and air defenses that higher is not necessarily better and that optimal flight altitudes exist that can be determined analytically.

  20. AIRPORT LIGHTING Session Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    AIRPORT LIGHTING Session Highlights In May 2002, the Airport Technical Assistance Program, also known as AirTAP, sponsored three airport-lighting training sessions at different locations in Minnesota information on airport lighting and navigational aid equipment selection, funding, maintenance, and operation

  1. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  2. Light emitting device comprising phosphorescent materials for white light generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphors for energy downconversion of high energy light to generate a broadband light spectrum, which emit light of different emission wavelengths.

  3. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  4. Sensors for Safety & Performance Stationary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles · Interfacial Stability of Thin Film H2 Sensors · Sensors for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems · Micro-Machined Thin Film H2 Gas Sensors · Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Fuel Cell Monitoring #12;Discussion Points Barriers ·Cost ·Application ·Lifetime ·Flexibility ·Public

  5. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  6. MINIMIZATION OF SENSOR USAGE FOR TARGET TRACKING IN A NETWORK OF IRREGULARLY SPACED SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrell, Darryl

    MINIMIZATION OF SENSOR USAGE FOR TARGET TRACKING IN A NETWORK OF IRREGULARLY SPACED SENSORS Thomas address the following scenario: a single target moves through a field of stationary sensors with known locations. At each time epoch, each sensor is either active or not; each active sensor outputs either target

  7. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 4, NO. 4, AUGUST 2004 395 Sensor Technologies for Monitoring Metabolic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Denise

    IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 4, NO. 4, AUGUST 2004 395 Sensor Technologies for Monitoring Metabolic Michelle Wilson, Member, IEEE Abstract--A review of optical, chemical, and biological sensors to detect-on-a-chip research instrumentation. The sensors reviewed include optical sensors, at both research and commercial

  8. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  9. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  10. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance readable sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Yibo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring of physiological biomarkers is fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. We describe here the development of molecular sensors which can be read by magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry. MR is an ...

  12. Do it yourself lighting power survey: lighting power audit for use with the Massachusetts type watts per square foot method of calculating a building's lighting power budget

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advantages of the self-audit approach to energy conservation are presented. These are that it is cheaper to do it yourself; the employees become part of the corporate conservation effect; and no one knows the building and its needs better than the occupant. Steps described in the lighting survey procedure are: (1) divide the building into categories; (2) determine the total square footage for each category; (3) assign a power allowance for each category; (4) multiply the total square footage for each category by the respective power allowances; (5) add the budget sub-totals for each category to determine total building budget; and (6) walk through the building room-by-room and calculate the connected lighting load fixture-by-fixture. Some worksheets are provided. (MCW)

  13. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  14. Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand-blasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand@ust.hk Abstract: Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by scattering the light is one of the effective methods for large-area lighting applications. In this paper, we present a very simple and cost

  15. Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial building operation, along with increased comfort and control for occupants, through the implementation of advanced technologies. This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies. This paper is actually a synthesis of five other white papers: the first describes the market assessment including estimates of market potential and energy savings for sensors and control strategies currently on the market as well as a discussion of market barriers to these technologies. The other four cover technology pathways: (1) current applications and strategies for new applications, (2) sensors and controls, (3) networking, security, and protocols and standards, and (4) automated diagnostics, performance monitoring, commissioning, optimal control and tools. Each technology pathway chapter gives an overview of the technology or application. This is followed by a discussion of needs and the current status of the technology. Finally, a series of research topics is proposed.

  16. Inverse Modeling Using a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for Personalized Daylight Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Inverse Modeling Using a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for Personalized Daylight Harvesting Ryan: predictive: daylight harvesting: piecewise linear regression: building energy efficiency Abstract: Smart light levels, discretized by sub-hourly sun angles. Applied on two days of daylight and ten days

  17. Demo Abstract: ThermoSense: Thermal Array Sensor Networks in Building Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    the heating, cooling, ventilation and lighting of a building to optimize energy usage. Categories and Subject-Based Ap- plication Systems]: Real-time and embedded systems 1. INTRODUCTION Energy usage has increasedDemo Abstract: ThermoSense: Thermal Array Sensor Networks in Building Management Varick L. Erickson

  18. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  19. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  20. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  1. WESBES: A Wireless Embedded Sensor for Improving Human Comfort Metrics using Temporospatially Correlated Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Hewlett; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When utilized properly, energy management systems (EMS) can offer significant energy savings by optimizing the efficiency of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, difficulty often arises due to the constraints imposed by the need to maintain an acceptable level of comfort for a building’s occupants. This challenge is compounded by the fact that human comfort is difficult to define in a measurable way. One way to address this problem is to provide a building manager with direct feedback from the building’s users. Still, this data is relative in nature, making it difficult to determine the actions that need to be taken, and while some useful comfort correlations have been devised, such as ASHRAE’s Predicted Mean Vote index, they are rules of thumb that do not connect individual feedback with direct, diverse feedback sensing. As they are a correlation, quantifying effects of climate, age of buildings and associated defects such as draftiness, are outside the realm of this correlation. Therefore, the contribution of this paper is the Wireless Embedded Smart Block for Environment Sensing (WESBES); an affordable wireless sensor platform that allows subjective human comfort data to be directly paired with temporospatially correlated objective sensor measurements for use in EMS. The described device offers a flexible research platform for analyzing the relationship between objective and subjective occupant feedback in order to formulate more meaningful measures of human comfort. It could also offer an affordable and expandable option for real world deployment in existing EMS.

  2. Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

  3. Fiber optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensor for molten material analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hansheng; Rai, Awadesh K.; Singh, Jagdish P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor, including a laser light source, a harmonic separator for directing the laser light, a dichroic mirror for reflecting the laser light, a coupling lens for coupling the laser light at an input of a multimode optical fiber, a connector for coupling the laser light from an output of the multimode optical fiber to an input of a high temperature holder, such as a holder made of stainless steel, and a detector portion for receiving emission signal and analyzing LIBS intensities. In one variation, the multimode optical fiber has silica core and silica cladding. The holder includes optical lenses for collimating and focusing the laser light in a molten alloy to produce a plasma, and for collecting and transmitting an emission signal to the multimode optical fiber.

  4. Office of Occupational Medicine. FY 1993, Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, we have assessed every DOE site at least once, many twice. With the information collected during these visits, EH-43 is developing a solid understanding of the occupational medical program activities at each site and will be better able to monitor progress. The assessment staff provided more specific technical assistance than in the past, especially in the area of compliance. In addition, the cardiovascular medical guidelines are near completion and the personnel assurance, firefighters, and protective force personnel medical guidelines are ready for the concurrence process.

  5. 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Standards

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF8/%2AAdministration 97 Occupational

  6. Occupational Radiation Protection Program (10 CFR 835) | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge,8 8Energy Occupational

  7. Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department of EnergyReporting Occupational Radiation

  8. Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. Payne FW. Energy management control system handbook.5] F. W. Payne. Energy management control system hand- book.Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:

  9. Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings. ” Proceedings,on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, ACEEE, Washington DC,System User Interface for Building Occupants. ” ASHRAE

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - air-conditioning systemsfor occupant Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Collection: Biology and Medicine 3 Introduction Prior research has shown that energy savings are Summary: conditions for human occupancy. American Society of Heating,...

  11. Low-cost coarse airborne particulate matter sensing for indoor occupancy detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekly, Kevin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the energy-efficient smart building, occupancy detection andare being added to smart buildings to ensure the quality ofvaluable information for smart buildings. An important next

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutants occupational Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    info@pacinst.org www.pacinst.org Summary: will be the greatest beneficiary of air pollution improvements in terms of occupational safety and health. The Pacific......

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving effective occupational Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology 14 VECIMS 2003 -International Symposium on Virtual Environments, Human-Computer Interfaces, and Measurement Systems Summary: with probabilistic encoding of occupancy...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing occupational injuries Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory's occupational medicine office are analyzed to reduce and... injuries. Ergonomics--The Science of Fitting the Job to the Worker From the work bench to the garden......

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - age human occupations Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    occupations among a population. This dynamics is assessed with a database... of wedding certificates that can be seen as a network made of links between (fathers and sons)...

  16. Summary Report: Post-Occupancy Evaluation Surveys in K-12 Learning Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were designated as “green” buildings (defined here as havingrecent discussions in the green building industry, regardingthe impacts that green buildings have on their occupants.

  17. Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Summaries ELEMENT 2: ADVANCE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT 2.1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED light emitting diodes (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp

  18. Occupancies of individual orbits, and the nuclear matrix element of the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menendez, J.; Poves, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFT-UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F. [IPHC, IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the variation of the nuclear matrix element (NME) for the neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of {sup 76}Ge when the wave functions are constrained to reproduce the experimental occupancies of the two nuclei involved in the transition. In the interacting shell model description the value of the NME is enhanced about 15% compared to previous calculations, whereas in the QRPA the NME's are reduced by 20%-30%. This diminishes the discrepancies between both approaches. In addition, we discuss the effect of the short-range correlations on the NME in light of the recently proposed parametrizations based on a consistent renormalization of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} transition operator.

  19. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  20. Information-based self-organization of sensor nodes of a sensor network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Teresa H. (Castro Valley, CA); Berry, Nina M. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor node detects a plurality of information-based events. The sensor node determines whether at least one other sensor node is an information neighbor of the sensor node based on at least a portion of the plurality of information-based events. The information neighbor has an overlapping field of view with the sensor node. The sensor node sends at least one communication to the at least one other sensor node that is an information neighbor of the sensor node in response to at least one information-based event of the plurality of information-based events.

  1. New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krailo, D. A.

    , pioneered for headlam~for the automotive industry, has led to the development of halo en capsule lamps for general lighting. The original90-watt family PAR 38 lamps using tungsten halogen capsules produces the sa amount of useful light in the beam as a I... quartz PAR lamps with similar benefi . Each of these tungsten halogen capsule PAR wattages are av ilable in narrow spot, spot, and flood beam patterns. The most recent developments in the PAR halogen psule family include two entirely new lamp designs...

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  3. LED Lighting Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw-Meadow, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Municipal Street Lighting Consortium ? American Public Power Association (APPA) ? Demonstration in Energy Efficiency Development (DEED) ? Source of funding and database of completed LED roadway projects 6 Rules of the Road ESL-KT-11-11-57 CATEE 2011..., 2011 ? 9 Solar-Assisted LED Case Study LaQuinta Hotel, Cedar Park, Texas ? Utilizes 18 - ActiveLED Solar-Assisted Parking Lot Lights ? Utilizes ?power management? to extend battery life while handling light output ? Reduces load which reduces PV...

  4. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  5. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MG. (2010). Balancing energy conservation and occupant needsReport   Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in

  6. Total Light Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers total light management, and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  7. Lighting Technology Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Lighting Technology Panel for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009. 

  8. Comparing Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this exercise, students will use a light to demonstrate the difference between being energy-efficient and energy-wasteful, and learn what energy efficiency means.

  9. Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research and design. Quality LED luminaires require program designed to successfully move solid-state lighting precise design of several components -LED arrays, electronic into the...

  10. OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Perry

    OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting · Overview of Lighting in OpenGL In order for lighting to have an effect in OpenGL, two things are required: A light An object to be lit Lights can be set to any color determine how they reflect the light which hits them. The color(s) of an object is determined

  11. Light intensity compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  12. Splayed mirror light pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, P.D. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An expression is given for the transmission of the rectangular-section mirror light pipe. The expression is used to model throughputs for simulated solar conditions over a calender year. It is found that the splaying of a mirror light pipe results in a significant increase in throughputs particularly in winter months. (author)

  13. Reducing home lighting expenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aimone, M.A.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ways to reduce lighting expenses are summarized. These include: turning off lights when not in use; keeping fixtures and lamps clean; replacing lamps with more efficient types; using three-way bulbs; use of daylighting; buying fewer lamps and reducing lamp wattage; consider repainting rooms; replacing recessed fixtures with tracklighting; and using efficient lamps for outdoor use. (MCW)

  14. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  15. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  16. Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback and workplace culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback years to their design, performance and evaluation. The successful delivery of green buildings requires within economic means. Occupant comfort and behaviour can have a significant impact on green building

  17. Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

  18. APPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    for (check): Medical Studies Health Care Administration Dental Studies Occupational Therapy VeterinaryAPPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health You are able to complete this application by simply typing your information into the spaces

  19. Indra Prasad Paneru Livelihood strategy and occupational vulnerability of street ice cream vendors in Kathmandu Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Indra Prasad Paneru Livelihood strategy and occupational vulnerability of street ice cream vendors in Kathmandu Valley Livelihood strategy and occupational vulnerability of street ice cream vendors in Kathmandu-cream vendors of Kathmandu valley, Case study of Jawalakhel, Ratnapark area and Balaju area' explores

  20. The Application and Energy Savings Potential of Occupancy Counters/Transmitters in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medlin, J. W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    because the occupancy is below the design occupancy. In hot and humid climates, such as the Gulf Southwest, a considerable portion of the cooling energy in a commercial building is expended cooling and dehumidifying the air needed to maintain fresh air...