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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

A field study of the actual lighting savings achievable from occupancy sensor use was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The study involved two seperate field assessments. The objective of the first test was to assess and effectively quantify the potential ``wasted-light`` hours associated with different occupant and space types associated with occupancy sensor control installations. These quantities are the primary factor in determining actual lighting energy savings associated with occupancy lighting control. The second test was conducted to explore the potential additional savings from more sensitive sensor equipment or better equipment adjustment that might reduce the need for delay timers. This information provides quantitative insight into the energy savings lost because of the limitations of current sensing equipment.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in Hanford Site facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing the cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include an assessment of the total potential savings from the application of sensors across the entire site. The study involved placing sensor test equipment in multiple office spaces in eight buildings that are part of the Hanford contractor facilities. Further testing was conducted to assess the effects of timer sensitivity adjustments on potential lighting energy savings. The results of this test indicated that up to 100% additional wasted-light energy can be saved by using timer sensitivity settings as low as 2.5 min, which is less than standard factory settings of usually 10 to 20 min. The analysis indicates that savings from lighting operations are affected by the work function and number of occupants in occupied spaces. The availability of daylight in a building space does not appear to have any noticeable aggregate effect on the quantity of wasted-light hours in occupied or unoccupied spaces. An assessment of the total potential savings for the entire Hanford Site included life-cycle costing that followed the federally accepted methodology. The life-cycle cost analysis was performed for a set of possible lighting wattages across the building spaces and occupant types identified from the initial analysis. Under current conditions, the potential savings is estimated to be $525,812/yr at an initial cost of $976,824. The total Net Present Value for the site is estimated at $3,539,926 with a simple payback period of 1.85 years.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A field demonstration of energy conservation using occupancy sensor lighting control in equipment rooms  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified energy savings potential of automatic equipment-room lighting controls, which was demonstrated by the field experiment described in this report. Occupancy sensor applications have gained popularity in recent years due to improved technology that enhances reliability and reduces cost. Automatic lighting control using occupancy sensors has been accepted as an energy-conservation measure because it reduces wasted lighting. This study focused on lighting control for equipment rooms, which have inherent conditions ideal for automatic lighting control, i.e., an area which is seldom occupied, multiple users of the area who would not know if others are in the room when they leave, and high lighting energy intensity in the area. Two rooms were selected for this study: a small equipment room in the basement of the 337 Building, and a large equipment area in the upper level of the 329 Building. The rooms were selected to demonstrate the various degrees of complexity which may be encountered in equipment rooms throughout the Hanford Site. The 337 Building equipment-room test case demonstrated a 97% reduction in lighting energy consumption, with an annual energy savings of $184. Including lamp-replacement savings, a total savings of $306 per year is offset by an initial installation cost of $1,100. The installation demonstrates a positive net present value of $2,858 when the lamp-replacement costs are included in a life-cycle analysis. This also corresponds to a 4.0-year payback period. The 329 Building equipment-room installation resulted in a 92% reduction in lighting energy consumption. This corresponds to annual energy savings of $1,372, and a total annual savings of $2,104 per year including lamp-replacement savings. The life-cycle cost analysis shows a net present value of $15,855, with a 5.8-year payback period.

Dagle, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Image Processing Occupancy Sensor  

Lighting controls offer significant potential for reducing that energy use, and new technologies that have emerged in recent years have enabled a wide range of innovative strategies, from room-level awareness of occupancy and daylight sensing to ...

6

Analyzing occupancy profiles from a lighting controls field study  

SciTech Connect

Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings, only one US study examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow one to determine, for example, the probability that an office is occupied for each hour of the workday. Occupancy profiles are useful for many purposes including: (1) predicting the effectiveness of occupancy sensors for reducing peak demand, (2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting and other electric loads and (3) providing lighting equipment manufacturers with detailed lighting operation data to help evaluate the impact of advanced lighting controls on equipment life. In this paper, we examine the occupancy profiles for 35 single person offices at a large office building in San Francisco and analyze the data to obtain average occupancy as a function of time of day. In addition, we analyzed the data to identify how the use of occupancy sensors may affect switching cycles and lamp life.

Rubinstein, Francis; Colak, Nesrin; Jennings, Judith; Neils, Danielle

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Market survey: Lighting loggers and occupancy loggers  

SciTech Connect

Six companies in the United States market lighting loggers, a class of devices that includes runtime and time-of-use lighting loggers and occupancy loggers. Runtime loggers are the simplest and least expensive loggers, measuring how long lights remain off or on -- data useful for assessing energy savings of lighting efficiency upgrades. Time-of-use loggers, manufactured by only one company, are more sophisticated and versatile, as well as more expensive. They record when and for how long lights are turned off and on--data useful for energy savings assessments and billing impact studies for buildings with time-of-use rates. Occupancy loggers are marketed by three companies in the United States. These loggers measure how long lights remain on when no one is in the room. Such data is useful for determining potential savings from occupancy sensors. Lighting loggers are most cost-effective when information is needed on lighting usage in individual spaces. Other methods can be more economical when overall lighting usage for a building or an entire floor is all that is needed. The simplicity of the loggers makes them accessible to anyone interested in assessing lighting savings, including end users, utilities, ESCOs, and consultants. But lighting and occupancy loggers are not always the least expensive or best way to assess lighting retrofit savings, and can be misapplied if used without a clear objective and understanding of the loggers` limitations.

Gregerson, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors October 4, 2013 - 4:20pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations...

9

Occupancy sensors for HVAC gaining in hotel industry  

SciTech Connect

The hotel industry is overcoming its skepticism as occupancy sensors with built-in thermistors to control heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) units demonstrate their ability to cut energy costs as much as 30%. Despite the successful demonstrations and acceptance by Holiday Inn, some hotel managers of other chains continue to resist. Occupancy sensors have either ultrasonic or infrared signals, but differ from lighting control devices by also having internal thermistors and remote door switches. This allows the rooms to reach comfort levels only when the guest is present since occupants are only minimally affected if temperatures are modified during unoccupied periods. The system works best for roadside-type motels rather than convention hotels, where occupants are in and out of their rooms.

Ladd, C.

1985-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

Intelligent light control using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing user comfort and reducing operation costs have always been two primary objectives of building operations and control strategies. Current building control strategies are unable to incorporate occupant level comfort and meet the operation goals ... Keywords: active sensing, intelligent buildings, light control, sensor networks

Vipul Singhvi; Andreas Krause; Carlos Guestrin; James H. Garrett, Jr.; H. Scott Matthews

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors October 7, 2013 - 9:09am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for vending machine occupancy sensors within the Federal sector. Benefits Vending machine occupancy sensors detect when no people are in the vicinity and powers down beverage vending machines. These systems do not completely turn off compressor, but reduce their run times. Application Vending machine occupancy sensors are applicable in most building categories where vending machines are present. Key Factors for Deployment Occupancy sensors or similar features should be an integral part of new vending machine purchases. Ranking Criteria Federal energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success are

12

Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences  

SciTech Connect

Occupancy sensor systems are gaining traction as an effective technological approach to reducing energy use in exterior commercial lighting applications. Done correctly, occupancy sensors can substantially enhance the savings from an already efficient lighting system. However, this technology is confronted by several potential challenges and pitfalls that can leave a significant amount of the prospective savings on the table. This report describes anecdotal experiences from field installations of occupancy sensor controlled light-emitting diode (LED) lighting at two parking structures and two parking lots. The relative levels of success at these installations reflect a marked range of potential outcomes: from an additional 76% in energy savings to virtually no additional savings. Several issues that influenced savings were encountered in these early stage installations and are detailed in the report. Ultimately, care must be taken in the design, selection, and commissioning of a sensor-controlled lighting installation, else the only guaranteed result may be its cost.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael; Royer, Michael P.; Sullivan, Greg P.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sensor Control Unit Light Submitted by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing need to conserve energy, more people are becoming conscious of energy consumption and are looking for ways to reduce costly waste associated with electricity. Though most consumers do not think about lighting until the light bulb fails or the power goes out, expenses incurred due to lighting have been found to be a large part of overall energy consumption and lighting has now become the focus of efforts aimed at reducing the high cost of electricity. The purpose of our project is to design an Automatic Light Control Device (ALCD) to help curb the high cost of internal lighting while creating a convenient effortlessly lighted environment for the consumer. Today, energy saving devices, such as occupancy or motion sensors, is used by a multiple of people for the conservation of power. Motion detectors cause lights to turn on after entering the room and off after no movement is detected for a certain amount of time. This unit is efficient; however, energy is loss due to the presence and absence of movement in a particular room by the sensor continuously activating on or off. Unneeded cycling uses more power and defeats the intended purpose of saving energy. The ALCD will save energy by eliminating false conditions, thereby minimizing light

Professor Joseph Picone; Ece Senior Design I; John Thompson; Marshalia Green; Brad Lowe; Lutrisha Johnson; Automatic Light Control Device

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Intelligent Light Control using Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing user comfort and reducing operation costs have always been two primary objectives of building operations and control strategies. Current building control strategies are unable to incorporate occupant level comfort and meet the operation goals simultaneously. In this paper, we present a novel utility-based building control strategy that optimizes the tradeo# between meeting user comfort and reduction in operation cost by reducing energy usage. We present an implementation of the proposed approach as an intelligent lighting control strategy that significantly reduces energy cost. Our approach is based on a principled, decision theoretic formulation of the control task. We demonstrate the use of mobile wireless sensor networks to optimize the tradeo # between fulfilling di#erent occupants' light preferences and minimizing energy consumption. We further extend our approach to optimally exploit external light sources for additional energy savings, a process called daylight harvesting. Also we demonstrate that an active sensing approach can maximize the mobile sensor network's lifetime by sensing only during most informative situations. We provide e#cient algorithms for solving the underlying complex optimization problems, and extensively evaluate our proposed approach in a proof-of-concept testbed using MICA2 motes and dimmable lamps. Our results indicate a significant improvement in user utility and reduced energy expenditure.

Vipul Singhvi Civil; Vipul Singhvi; Civil Engineering Dept; James H. Garrett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Evaluation of energy-efficiency in lighting systems using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In modern energy aware buildings, lighting control systems are put in place so to maximise the energy-efficiency of the lighting system without effecting the comfort of the occupant. In many cases this involves utilising a set of presence sensors, with ... Keywords: building, decision, efficiency, energy, lighting, network, sensor, support

Declan T. Delaney; Gregory M. P. O'Hare; Antonio G. Ruzzelli

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Lighting Controls/Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Lighting ControlsSensors Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Lighting...

17

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Intelligent Lighting System Using Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the use of Wireless Sensor Networks interfaced with light fittings to allow for daylight substitution techniques to reduce energy usage in existing buildings. This creates a wire free system for existing buildings with minimal disruption and cost.

Kumaar, A A Nippun; TSB, Sudarshan; 10.5121/ijasuc.2010.1402

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Automatic Projector Calibration with Embedded Light Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projection technology typically places several constraints on the geometric relationship between the projector and the projection surface to obtain an undistorted, properly sized image. In this paper we describe a simple, robust, fast, and low-cost method for automatic projector calibration that eliminates many of these constraints. We embed light sensors in the target surface, project Gray-coded binary patterns to discover the sensor locations, and then prewarp the image to accurately fit the physical features of the projection surface. This technique can be expanded to automatically stitch multiple projectors, calibrate onto nonplanar surfaces for object decoration, and provide a method for simple geometry acquisition.

Johnny C. Lee; Johnny C. Lee; Paul H. Dietz; Paul H. Dietz; Dan Maynes-Aminzade; Dan Maynes-aminzade; Scott E. Hudson; Scott E. Hudson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A multi-sensor based occupancy estimation model for supporting demand driven HVAC operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is a major energy consumer in buildings, and implementing demand driven HVAC operations is a way to reduce HVAC related energy consumption. This relies on the availability of occupancy information, which ... Keywords: HVAC, building energy consumption, demand driven, non-intrusive sensor, occupancy estimation

Zheng Yang; Nan Li; Burcin Becerik-Gerber; Michael Orosz

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Using simple light sensors to achieve smart daylight harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lighting is the largest single energy consumer in commercial buildings. In this paper, we demonstrate how to improve the effectiveness of daylight harvesting with a single light sensor on each window. Our system automatically infers the window orientation ... Keywords: building energy, lighting control, wireless sensor networks

Jiakang Lu; Dagnachew Birru; Kamin Whitehouse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Solid-state lamp with integral occupancy sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work demonstrated a retrofit proximity detector for fluorescent lamps using the lamp's own stray electric fields. This paper extends the retrofit sensor system to a solid-state (LED) lamp. The design and implementation ...

Cooley, John J.

24

List of Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensors Incentives Sensors Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 493 Lighting Controls/Sensors Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 493) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Furnaces Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Roofs Windows Yes AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit

25

The smart thermostat: using occupancy sensors to save energy in homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) is the largest source of residential energy consumption. In this paper, we demonstrate how to use cheap and simple sensing technology to automatically sense occupancy and sleep patterns in a home, and how to use ... Keywords: building energy, home monitoring, programmable thermostats, wireless sensor networks

Jiakang Lu; Tamim Sookoor; Vijay Srinivasan; Ge Gao; Brian Holben; John Stankovic; Eric Field; Kamin Whitehouse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

How much sense do room occupancy sensor controls make  

SciTech Connect

Hotel operators are faced with a confusing array of both remote and local guest room energy control devices. A wide variety of decentralized electronic room controllers, each with its own control logic and vendor claims are in competition with remote front desk microprocessor controls which are essentially ''blind'' to actual occupancy. This paper is a review of the characteristics of various controllers, their behaviour with different in-room environmental equipment, and guest reactions to the potpourri of available devices.

Becker, H.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Automatic projector calibration with embedded light sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projection technology typically places several constraints on the geometric relationship between the projector and the projection surface to obtain an undistorted, properly sized image. In this paper we describe a simple, robust, fast, and low-cost method ... Keywords: keystone correction, multi-projector stitching, object decoration, projector calibration, structured light

Johnny C. Lee; Paul H. Dietz; Dan Maynes-Aminzade; Ramesh Raskar; Scott E. Hudson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

An Isotropic Light Sensor for Measurements of Visible Actinic Flux in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low-cost isotropic light sensor is described consisting of a spherical diffuser connected to a single photodiode by a light conductor. The directional response to light is isotropic to a high degree. The small, lightweight, and rugged ...

J. C. H. van der Hage; S. R. de Roode

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Lighting Control Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types October 7, 2013 - 11:27am Addthis Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Also provided is a portable document format version of How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings. Typical Lighting Control Applications Type of Control Private Office Open Office - Daylit Open Office - Interior Occupancy Sensors ++ ++ ++ Time Scheduling + ++ ++ Daylight Dimming ++ ++ 0 Bi-Level Switching ++ + + Demand Lighting + ++ ++ ++ = good savings potential + = some savings potential 0 = not applicable Back to Top Occupancy Sensors Occupancy sensors are the most common lighting control used in buildings today. Two technologies dominate: infrared and ultrasonic. Infrared sensors

30

Design considerations of sub-mW indoor light energy harvesting for wireless sensor systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most wireless sensor networks, one common and major bottleneck is the limited battery lifetime. The frequent maintenance efforts associated with battery replacement significantly increase the system operational and logistics cost. Unnoticed power ... Keywords: Design consideration, PV cells wireless sensor node, energy harvesting, indoor light illuminance, maximum power point tracking, supercapacitor

W. S. Wang; T. O'Donnell; N. Wang; M. Hayes; B. O'Flynn; C. O'Mathuna

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ames, IA); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

Kopelman, Raoul (Ann Arbor, MI); Tan, Weihong (Ann Arbor, MI); Shi, Zhong-You (Ann Arbor, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Daylighting: Measuring the Performance of Light Shelves and Occupant-Controlled Blinds on a Dimmed Lighting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a day lighted space is both an art and a science. The biggest challenge facing the lighting designer is to admit only as much light as necessary and distribute it evenly throughout the space without introducing glare or heat. In warm climates such as Florida, it has become common practice in windowed spaces to specify blinds and glazing with high shading coefficients to control glare and minimize heat gain. However, this practice reduces the effectiveness of lighting systems that dim automatically. Improved systems are needed to capture natural daylight and distribute it uniformly throughout a space while controlling heat gain and glare. One such system is the light shelf. Light shelves shade the space from direct sunlight and reflect this sunlight onto the ceiling for a deeper and more uniform distribution. While this is not a new idea, little unbiased empirical data has been collected, outside the laboratory, that compares the performance (energy savings, uniformity, and level) of an automatic daylighting system. This study measures the effectiveness of light shelves and manually controlled horizontal blinds in an automatic daylighting system. Power consumption and interior work-plane lighting levels were compared in four essentially identical private offices. Two offices were configured with an interior light shelf, one with a white diffuse top surface and the other with a specular surface. The third office had no window treatment and the fourth office had horizontal blinds, which were manually adjusted by the user. All offices had two lamp fluorescent luminaires with dimming ballasts (min. 20%) controlled by a ceiling mounted photosensor. The study showed that daytime savings ranged from 29% to 46%, with the largest savings from the office with the light shelves. The office with horizontal blinds showed the poor savings (32%) and also the poorest light uniformity and level.

Floyd, D. B.; Parker, D. S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

37

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I  

SciTech Connect

A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

38

Literature Review of the Effects of Natural Light on Building Occupants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents summary findings from a literature search of the term ''daylighting''-using natural light in a building to offset or replace electric lighting. According to the Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs 2000 BTS Core Databook, in 1998, commercial buildings consumed 32% of the total electricity in the United States, of which more than one-third went to lighting. Using daylighting systems and turning off the lights will help reduce this energy load. Electrical lighting adds to both the electrical and cooling loads in a commercial building. Utility costs can be decreased when daylighting is properly designed to replace electrical lighting. Along with the importance of energy savings, studies have demonstrated the non-energy-related benefits of daylighting. We compiled the data from books, periodicals, Internet articles, and interviews. The books, periodicals, and Internet articles provided the background information used to identify the main subjects of the paper. The interviews provided us with details related to specific buildings and companies that have integrated daylighting into their buildings.

Edwards, L.; Torcellini, P.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future June 16, 2010 - 12:01pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell It's a simple concept that's saving thousands of dollars in utility bills each year: when a room is empty, turn off the lights. This is the basic concept behind Sensor Switch, a Connecticut-based manufacturer of lighting control products. Sensor Switch's occupancy sensor devices turn off lights when spaces are vacant. They also make devices that dim or turn off lights when sufficient daylight is present. Both types of products provide cost effective energy savings in indoor spaces like office buildings and warehouses. "There's an increasing public demand to save energy, which directly impacts the demand for our products," said Ben Hahn, vice president. "A key part of

40

Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices: A Role for IEEE P1451  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controller Controller sensor actuator sensor sensor actuator actuator Building equipment Building equipment Building equipment Environmental Variables: Temperature Light Airflow Occupancy CO 2 É Fire É Figure 1. Shown is a generic diagram of the relationship between controller, actuators and sensors in a typical building control application. Sensors detect the key environmental parameters, while the controller "decides" which actuator is to be controlled and how. The actuators operate the building equipment, which, in turn affects the building environment. The physical connection between controller and actuator and controller and sensor usually takes place over wires carrying an analog signal. Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices A Role for IEEE P1451

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Assessing Moonlight Availability for Nighttime Environmental Applications by Low-Light Visible Polar-Orbiting Satellite Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next-generation U.S. polar-orbiting environmental satellite program, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), promises unprecedented capabilities for nighttime remote sensing by way of the day/night band (DNB) low-light visible sensor. The DNB ...

Steven D. Miller; Cynthia L. Combs; Stanley Q. Kidder; Thomas F. Lee

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Systematic study of the effect of short range correlations on the occupation numbers of the shell model orbits in light nuclei  

SciTech Connect

The role of short range correlations on the depletion of the Fermi sea is studied in light nuclei. The short range correlations are considered in an approximate treatment allowing a systematic study of nuclei in the region 4{le}{ital A}{le}40. The natural orbital'' representation is used for the determination of the occupation probabilities of the shell model orbits of the ground-state wave function. The depletion of the nuclear Fermi sea appears to be, on the average, about 32%.

Lalazissis, G.A.; Massen, S.E.; Panos, C.P. (Department of Theoretical Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54006 Thessaloniki (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Lighting Controls : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls Lighting Controls Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Lighting Controls The lighting controls scope of work is based upon the philosophy that occupants of commercial office buildings prefer natural light to electric light. The lighting controls system specified by the Times Company for its new headquarters building is a DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) based system with dimmable fixtures throughout the interior space. This allows the system to dim down the electric lighting in response to daylight admittance. It also provides for variable target set points for illuminance levels at the work plane. The Times Company intends to establish and adjust target set points on a departmental basis. The lighting control sequences are described within the specification 16575. These sequences utilize occupancy sensors, photo sensors, switches and a time clock to control the lighting in the interior space on each floor. The emergency lighting system is also described within the specification. The lighting control sequences are tied to Control Intent Diagrams that divide up the space on each floor into its various control zones. The overall intent is to provide electric light only when the space is occupied and to provide as little electric light as is necessary to achieve the target set point for the work plane in a given department. A department usually occupies multiple floors.

45

A post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and underfloor air distribution system in The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23E 23E A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building E.S. Lee, L.L. Fernandes, B. Coffey, A. McNeil, R. Clear Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory T. Webster, F. Bauman, D. Dickerhoff, D. Heinzerling, T. Hoyt University of California Berkeley Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 ! 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

46

New and Underutilized Technology: Bi-level Stairwell Lighting | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stairwell Lighting Stairwell Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Bi-level Stairwell Lighting October 7, 2013 - 8:53am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for bi-level stairwell lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits Bi-level stairwell lighting uses integral occupancy sensor motion detectors to monitor the stairwell. When occupancy is detected, the lights go to full level. When the space has been vacated after a programmed period, the fixture goes to a minimum level. Application Bi-level stairwell lighting is applicable in most multi-story buildings. Key Factors for Deployment Bi-level stairwell lighting is a good technology to implement concurrently with an overall building lighting improvement project. Ranking Criteria Federal energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success are

47

Image Processing Occupancy Sensor - Energy  

Better energy efficiency with adaptive time delays ... security systems integration Small form factor Low-cost, powerful processing hardware

48

Cornell University Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Electric Lighting Quality The CUSD lighting design team utilized energy efficient products that meshed well with our daylighting scheme. We chose to use fluorescent tubes or compact fluorescent bulbs with an energy consumption of between 15 and 30 Watts throughout the house. The ballasts for all lamps dim to a 1% light output, so the interior and exterior lights can be adjusted as the level of available daylight fluctuates. Light sensors have been placed in front of our two largest apertures, allowing us to control how much artificial light is supplied to each space. The control of our ballasts is intricate, but refined and tested to avoid dysfunctional dimming or switching. While automatic controls are included, manual user overrides are provided in case the occupant prefers

49

Non-Intrusive Occupancy Monitoring using Smart Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed information about a home's occupancy is necessary to implement many advanced energy-efficiency optimizations. However, monitoring occupancy directly is intrusive, typically requiring the deployment of multiple environmental sensors, e.g., motion, ... Keywords: Electricity, Energy, Grid

Dong Chen, Sean Barker, Adarsh Subbaswamy, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Building-level occupancy data to improve ARIMA-based electricity use forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of an office building is likely to correlate with the number of occupants, and thus knowing occupancy levels should improve energy use forecasts. To gather data related to total building occupancy, wireless sensors were installed in a ... Keywords: energy forecast, occupancy, office buildings, sensors

Guy R. Newsham; Benjamin J. Birt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Occupational Injuries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injuries Injuries Jacqueline Agnew, PhD Burden of Occupational Injury and Illness in U.S. * Study by Leigh et al., 1997 * Estimated incidence, mortality, direct & indirect costs- occupational injury & illness * 1992 data- primary and secondary sources o Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries o National Traumatic Occupational Fatality Study o Annual Survey of Occ. Injuries & Illnesses o Bureau of Labor Statistics, Health Care Financing Administration, etc. Direct & Indirect Costs * Indirect * Lost earnings * Fringe benefits * Home production * Training, restaffing, disruption * Time delays Direct & Indirect Costs * Direct * Physicians, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation, medication * Medical and indemnity insurance administration expenses

52

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

54

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses.Types of lighting include:

55

Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors and Controls Research Sensors and Controls Research The Emerging Technologies team conducts research into technologies related to building sensors and controls. They work with building systems-such as a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems-to analyze energy use and help occupants manage energy costs. Building controls have the potential to reduce building energy consumption by monitoring variables and other inputs, and then automatically responding in a predetermined fashion. Research between the Department of Energy, industry, and laboratories focuses on: Sensors Photo of a ceiling-mounted fire sprinkler. Sensors are designed to help building owners and operators better manage their energy use through automation. Sensors measure predefined variables, such as the amount of natural light coming in through an office window, and then feed this data into a building's control system. The control can then respond by adjusting the various building systems. For example, sensors may note when a person leaves a room and let controls know to turn off the lights, or can ensure that faucets only release water if someone's hand is waved.

56

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Occupant Behavior: Impact on Energy Use of Private Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of occupant behavior on building energy use is significant, and even so at the energy end use levels such as lighting, space cooling and heating. For atypical single-occupancy...

58

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Title Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3831E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., and Abby I. Enscoe Date Published 04/2010 Abstract An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirect pendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several months demonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to the baseline. Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

59

Advanced lighting guidelines, 1993: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten- Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers' representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. (Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Benya, J.R. (Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A New Digital Lighting Control System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Digital Lighting Control System A New Digital Lighting Control System Speaker(s): Charles Knuffke Date: June 29, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Francis Rubinstein When various Lighting Controls components are discussed, they're usually slotted into separate "silos" - Occupancy Sensors, Relay Panels, Dimming Controls, and Daylighting Controls. Trying to combine two or more of these into a single system usually requires a fair amount of technical expertise and often help from different manufacturers. Combine that with the need under LEED to get these systems commissioned, often without detailed sequence of operation information, and that helps to explains why many view Lighting Controls as overly complex. And try to integrate the Lighting Controls into a larger overall building management system so their

62

A New Light Sensing Module for Mica Motes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing A New Light Sensing Module for Mica Motesapplications require high - fidelity light sensors SensorNetwork Applications Light is an important information

Heemin Park; Jonathan Friedman; Vids Samanta; Jeff Burke; Mani B. Srivastava

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Design criteria for lighting and controls modifications OSW, CTF, COS buildings  

SciTech Connect

This project will retrofit the lighting systems in three (3) buildings at the Mound Plant. The buildings are Central Operational Support (COS), Component Test Facility (CTF) and operational Support West (OSW). This project consists of the installation of occupancy sensors in private offices, break areas and laboratories, automatic control lighting, (occupied/unoccupied) with the existing DDC system, removing selected light fixtures, replacing incandescent lighting and reprogramming some of the software controlling the operation of the air handling units in the a forementioned buildings.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Occupancy-driven energy management for smart building automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings are among the largest consumers of electricity in the US. A significant portion of this energy use in buildings can be attributed to HVAC systems used to maintain comfort for occupants. In most cases these building HVAC systems run on fixed ... Keywords: HVAC control system, occupancy detection system, wireless sensor network

Yuvraj Agarwal; Bharathan Balaji; Rajesh Gupta; Jacob Lyles; Michael Wei; Thomas Weng

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office  

SciTech Connect

An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Clothes Washers, Dehumidifiers, Dishwasher, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Pool Pumps, Programmable Thermostats,...

67

Direct Hire Occupations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Critical Shortage Occupational Coverage: ... General Engineer; 0803 Safety Engineer; 0804 ... Mechanical Engineer; 0840 Nuclear Engineer; 0850 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Ambient/Task Lighting Low Ambient/Task Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:51pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for low ambient/task lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits The low ambient/task lighting strategy improves the visual environment by adding controllable task fixtures that provide light directly where needed for a given task, while reducing the overhead (ambient) light level. Occupancy sensors can also be incorporated into the system. Application Low ambient/task lighting is applicable in most building categories. Key Factors for Deployment Low ambient/task lighting is suitable for most office spaces, including both cubicle and private office space environments, and should be

69

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multi-sensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 30% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years.

Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; Dave Watson; Steve Purdy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Occupational Medicine - Occupational Medicine Guiding Principles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the President's Fiscal Year 2011 Budget and Performance Plans" (June 11, 2009) DOE Human Capital Strategic Plan For additional information regarding the Occupational...

71

IMAGE PROCESSING OCCUPANCY SENSOR - Energy Innovation Portal  

Publication Number: 20110115910: Kind Code: A1: Official Filing: View the Complete Application at the US Patent & Trademark Office: Lab: National Renewable Energy ...

72

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program Richland Energy Services - Energy Efficient Commercial Lighting Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 70% of the total cost Program Info Expiration Date 9/30/2012 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T5/T8 with Electric Ballasts: $10 - $65 Hardwired CFL's: $40 - $80 Screw In CFL's: $3 - $12 Cold Cathode: $3 - $15 Ceramic Metal Halide Fixture: $30 - $50 LED's: $15 - $50 Induction: $80 - $400 High-output T5/T8: $50 - $180 Metal Halide/High Pressure Sodium: $80 - $400 Stairwell/Garage Fluorescent Fixture: $50 Occupancy Sensor/Timer: $30 - $60

73

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applicable Sector Commercial Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

74

Ameren Illinois - Lighting Rebates for Businesses (Illinois)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies CustomOthers pending approval, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Exit Signs, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy...

75

Lighting Group: Controls: IBECS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBECS IBECS Integrated Building Environmental Communications System Objective The overall technical goal of the IBECS project is to develop an integrated building equipment communications network that will allow appropriate automation of lighting and envelope systems to increase energy efficiency, improve building performance, and enhance occupant experience in the space. This network will provide a low-cost means for occupants to control local lighting and window systems, thereby improving occupant comfort, satisfaction and performance. A related goal is to improve existing lighting control components and accelerate development of new daylighting technologies that will allow daylighting to be more extensively applied to a larger proportion of building floor space.

76

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fiber optic geophysical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figs.

Homuth, E.F.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCCUPATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Dllte DepartmentAll Element~&Slte 06-16-2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building Number: WCB Building Name: WCB Name of Information System!«)r IT Project Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) ExhlbllProJect UIO 72 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - OMSS Finallxw.doc

80

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

Realt-Time Building Occupancy Sensing for Supporting Demand Driven HVAC Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of localised and real-time occupancy numbers can have compelling control applications for Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, a precise and reliable measurement of occupancy still remains difficult. Existing technologies are plagued with a number of issues ranging from unreliable data, maintaining privacy and sensor drift. More effective control of HVAC systems may be possible using a smart sensing network for occupancy detection. A low-cost and non-intrusive sensor network is deployed in an open-plan office, combining information such as sound level and motion, to estimate occupancy numbers, while an infrared camera is implemented to establish ground truth occupancy levels. Symmetrical uncertainty analysis is used for feature selection, and selected multi-sensory features are fused using a neuralnetwork model, with occupancy estimation accuracy reaching up to 84.59%. The proposed system offers promising opportunities for reliable occupancy sensing, capable of supporting demand driven HVAC operations.

Ekwevugbe, T.; Brown, N.; Pakka, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

84

The live test demonstration (LTD) of lighting retrofit technologies at the DOE Forrestal Building  

SciTech Connect

DOE`s Forrestal Building in Washington, DC, has successfully awarded a performance-based shared energy savings contract for retrofit of office and hallway lighting systems. The winning contractor estimates that the retrofit (and associated occupancy sensors) will lead to savings of up to 62% of the power currently used for lighting, with an estimated annual cost savings of $340,000. The retrofit will also increase lighting levels to required levels, while reducing total harmonic distortion on the lighting circuits. The performance-based shared energy savings approach to lighting retrofits will result in a guaranteed contract to maintain lighting levels and savings for the next seven years. Over the life of the contract, the shared energy savings approach will provide $1 million each for DOE and the contractor.

Halverson, M.A.; Schmelzer, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harris, L.G. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s ambient and task lighting components, 2) occupancy

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraints on Occupant Lighting choices and Satisfaction: A007 "Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsivedirectly. Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Occupancy-Based Lighting Control Systems: AReview. Lighting Residential Technology 42:415-431. Itron,Information Template Indoor Lighting Controls. Pacific Gas

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

89

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control conditioning strategies. Using strategies based on sensor network occupancy model predictions, weOBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á Descriptors I.6.5 [Simulation and Modeling]: Model Development; J.7 [Computers In Other Systems]: Command

Cerpa, Alberto E.

91

Connecticut Light & Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Heat pumps, Central Air conditioners, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Motors, HVAC Controls Active Incentive No...

92

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Commercial Customers: $10,000 per calendar year Municipal Customers: $15,000 per calendar year Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T-8/T-5 Lamp with Electronic Ballasts: $11 - $35/fixture Interior High Output Lamp with Electronic Ballasts: $100/fixture De-lamping: $4 - $9/lamp Lighting Sensors: $20/sensor LED Exit Signs: $20/fixture Provider Incentive Programs

93

Central Electric Cooperative - Non-Residential Lighting Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government, Tribal Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

94

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were substituted for the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires and evaluated for relative light quantity and performance. The demonstration results show energy savings of 52% from the initial conversion of HPS to the LED product. These savings were increased to 88% by using occupancy sensor controls that were ultimately set to reduce power to 10% of high state operation after a time delay of 2.5 minutes. Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. Staff at DOL Headquarters reported high satisfaction with the operation of the LED product.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Occupational Medicine Clinic | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Hours Monday-Friday 8:15am-5pm. Emergency coverage during the lunchtime hour (12-1pm) is available. The clinic is closed after 5pm and on weekends & holidays. Resources DOE Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICPA) Laser History and Eye Exam Form (doc) Location The Occupational Medicine Clinic is located in Building 490, 30 Bell Avenue. location map Get Maps and Directions One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and

96

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

97

Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors and Controls Sensors and Controls Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

98

Reflectance based optical fiber chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film chemical sensor undergoes changes in reflective optical properties when exposed to a chemical species. A thin metal film is deposited at the end of an optical fiber, and exposure of the thin film to the chemical species causes changes in the effective thickness of the thin film, thereby changing its reflective properties. A chemical detection system based on the thin film sensor includes a light source and an optical divider for dividing light from the light source into a first and second light path. The first light path leads to circuitry for providing a reference signal. The thin film chemical sensor receives light from the second light path, and a photoelectric detector detects light reflected from the chemical sensor and provides an electrical signal representative of the reflected light. Circuitry is provided for comparing the reference signal with the reflected light signal, thereby providing a measurement signal indicative of the presence of the chemical species. 5 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Pfeifer, K.B.; Ricco, A.J.

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

CONVERGING REDUNDANT SENSOR NETWORK INFORMATION FOR IMPROVED BUILDING CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

Knowing how many people occupy a building, and where they are located, is a key component of building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, however, current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of both energy management and security systems. This topical report describes results from the first phase of a project to design, implement, validate, and prototype new technologies to monitor occupancy, control indoor environment services, and promote security in buildings. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In this project phase a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Analysis tools based on Bayesian probability theory were applied to the occupancy data generated by the sensor network. The inference of primary importance is a probability distribution over the number of occupants and their locations in a building, given past and present sensor measurements. Inferences were computed for occupancy and its temporal persistence in individual offices as well as the persistence of sensor status. The raw sensor data were also used to calibrate the sensor belief network, including the occupancy transition matrix used in the Markov model, sensor sensitivity, and sensor failure models. This study shows that the belief network framework can be applied to the analysis of data streams from sensor networks, offering significant benefits to building operation compared to current practice.

Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lighting management casebook  

SciTech Connect

Fifteen examples illustrate how lighting system projects can save energy as well as improve productivity and safety. The case histories include the use of programmable lighting, fiber optics, skylights, voltage reduction, ultrasonic and infrared sensors, and other strategies for improving lighting efficiency. Each case history includes the management approach, site information, and applications. (DCK)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Persistence of energy savings of lighting retrofit technologies at the Forrestal Building  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Forrestal Building, headquarters for the U.S. Department of Energy, was chosen for a major lighting retrofit project. The project replaced the aging fighting system newer, energy-efficient fixtures. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a three-part monitoring study at the Forrestal Building to (1) characterize building energy use, (2) empirically measure savings realized by the lighting retrofit, and (3) determine the persistence of energy savings. This report summarizes the findings from the third and final monitoring phase. Two data loggers were left installed at the Forrestal Building and data were collected for a 12-month period after the lighting retrofit was completed. An analysis-of-variance test indicated that the mean monthly lighting demand is increasing. A regression analysis performed on the data indicated that the mean monthly lighting demand for workdays is increasing at a rate of 0.3652{+-}0.1101 kW/mo. The nonworkday demand is increasing at a rate of 0.3408{+-}0.1027 kW/mo. During the same period, workday mean monthly plug load demand increased 0.0912{+-}0.0275 kW/mo., while nonworkday plug loads decreased slightly. The gradual increase, though significant, is reduced when compared to the 56% savings recorded after the lighting retrofit. The increase is attributed to a combination of occupants returning to original (pre-retrofit poor) behavior and a small set of occupancy sensors being defeated by building occupants. Degradation of lighting fixtures from {open_quotes}burn-in time{close_quotes} was ruled out because all burn-in time is expected in the first few months and the increasing trend persists over the 11 months of this study. Because the lighting demand was still increasing at the end of the study, without further data collection, it was not possible to determine when the increase would level out. Therefore, the true energy savings from the lighting retrofit remain unknown.

Chvala, W.D. Jr.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Halverson, M.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2011 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Francis M. Rubinstein, and Erik Page Series Title LBNL-5095E Pagination 25 Date Published September Keywords controls, daylighting, occupancy sensors, tuning Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of estimates of energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, this paper adds successive analytical filters to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on the meta-analysis, the best estimates of average energy savings potential are 24% for occupancy, 28% for daylighting, 31% for personal tuning, 36% for institutional tuning, and 38% for multiple approaches. The results suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10%) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

103

Adapting Wireless Technology to Lighting Control and Environmental Sensing  

SciTech Connect

Although advanced lighting control systems offer significant energy savings, the high cost of retrofitting buildings with advanced lighting control systems is a barrier to adoption of this energy-saving technology. Wireless technology, however, offers a solution to mounting installation costs since it requires no additional wiring to implement. To demonstrate the feasibility of such a system, a prototype wirelessly-controlled advanced lighting system was designed and built. The system includes the following components: a wirelessly-controllable analog circuit module (ACM), a wirelessly-controllable electronic dimmable ballast, a T8 3-lamp fixture, an environmental multi-sensor, a current transducer, and control software. The ACM, dimmable ballast, multi-sensor, and current transducer were all integrated with SmartMesh{trademark} wireless mesh networking nodes, called motes, enabling wireless communication, sensor monitoring, and actuator control. Each mote-enabled device has a reliable communication path to the SmartMesh Manager, a single board computer that controls network functions and connects the wireless network to a PC running lighting control software. The ACM is capable of locally driving one or more standard 0-10 Volt electronic dimmable ballasts through relay control and a 0-10 Volt controllable output, in addition to 0-24 Volt and 0-10 Volt inputs. The mote-integrated electronic dimmable ballast is designed to drive a standard 3-lamp T8 light fixture. The environmental multisensor measures occupancy, light level and temperature. The current transducer is used to measure the power consumed by the fixture. Control software was developed to implement advanced lighting algorithms, including open and closed-loop daylight ramping, occupancy control, and demand response. Engineering prototypes of each component were fabricated and tested in a bench-scale system. Based on standard industry practices, a cost analysis was conducted. It is estimated that the installation cost of a wireless advanced lighting control system for a retrofit application is at least 20% lower than a comparable wired system for a typical 16,000 square-foot office building, with a payback period of less than 3 years. At 30% market penetration saturation, a cumulative 695 Billion kWh of energy could be saved through 2025, a cost savings of $52 Billion.

Dana Teasdale; Francis Rubinstein; David S. Watson; Steve Purdy

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optical humidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

Tarvin, J.A.

1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

Optical humidity sensor  

SciTech Connect

An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

Tarvin, Jeffrey A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for high efficiency lighting equipment, occupancy...

107

Sensors & Controls | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sensors & Controls Sensors & Controls Sensors & Controls The Emerging Technologies team conducts research into technologies related to building sensors and controls. They work with building systems-such as a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems-to analyze energy use and help occupants manage energy costs. Building controls have the potential to reduce building energy consumption by monitoring variables and other inputs, and then automatically responding in a predetermined fashion. Research between the Department of Energy, industry, and laboratories focuses on: Sensors Photo of a ceiling-mounted fire sprinkler. Sensors are designed to help building owners and operators better manage their energy use through automation. Sensors measure predefined variables, such as the amount of

108

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

109

Development of a light force accelerometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the feasibility of a light force accelerometer was experimentally demonstrated. The light force accelerometer is an optical inertial sensor which uses focused laser light to levitate and trap glass microspheres ...

Butts, David LaGrange

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is investigating the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point would improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In Phase I, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. In phase II of the project, described in this report, we demonstrate that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. We also establish that analysis algorithms can be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications, and show that it may be possible to use sensor network pulse rate to distinguish the number of occupants in a space. Finally, in this phase of the project we also developed a prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy. This basic capability will be extended in the future by applying an algorithm-based inference to the sensor network data stream, so that the web page displays the likelihood that each monitored office or area is occupied, as a supplement to the actual status of each sensor.

Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluating post-occupancy performance : Daylighting The New York Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating post-occupancy performance Evaluating post-occupancy performance Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Evaluating post-occupancy performance "We aggressively pursued innovative designs to improve the quality of the workplace for our employees and to reduce energy use and other operating costs of our facility. The outcomes of this study confirm that we were successful. More importantly, our hope is that the energy efficient measures and designs documented in this independent study may inspire other companies' workplace designs." - Angelo Salvatore, Executive Director of Building Operations, The Times Company.

112

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lighting: 1.50bulb (32 watts) Delamping: 1.20-1.50ln. ft. or 0.05rated fixture watt Relamping: 1 - 1.25 Lighting Sensors: 15-60sensor, 0.04connected watt for...

113

Explosively pumped laser light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Dayton Power and Light - Business and Government Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conditioners, Chillers, Clothes Washers, Compressed air, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors,...

115

Total Light Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Management Light Management Why is saving Energy Important World Electricity Consumption (2007) Top 20 Countries 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 U n i t e d S t a t e s C h i n a J a p a n R u s s i a I n d i a G e r m a n y C a n a d a A f r i c a F r a n c e B r a z i l K o r e a , S o u t h U n i t e d K i n g d o m I t a l y S p a i n A u s t r a l i a T a i w a n S o u t h A f r i c a M e x i c o S a u d i A r a b i a I r a n Billion kWh Source: US DOE Energy Information Administration Lighting Control Strategies 4 5 6 Occupancy/Vacancy Sensing * The greatest energy savings achieved with any lighting fixture is when the lights are shut off * Minimize wasted light by providing occupancy sensing or vacancy sensing 7 8 Daylight Harvesting * Most commercial space has enough natural light flowing into it, and the amount of artificial light being generated can be unnecessary * Cut back on the production of artificial lighting by

116

Fiber-optic pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure wave sensor utilizing fiber optic interferometry techniques to determine pressure in a bar. Light from a fiber optic coil around the bar is mixed with light from a reference optical fiber to produce interference fringes as a function of time. These fringes over time are related to the pressure versus time existing in the bar. 2 figs.

Dingus, R.S.

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Seattle City Light - Vending Machine Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of VendingMiser Energy Efficient Vending Machines. VendingMiser reduces the energy consumption of cold drink vending machines by using an occupancy sensor to power down the...

118

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

119

Occupancy Simulation Schedule Appendix C -Occupancy Simulation Schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the electrical panel for run times commensurate with identified use profiles. The profiles enabled sought Figure C.1 and Figure C.2 present the load simulation and occupancy schedules for the lab homes highly insulating windows demonstration. The bases for occupancy simulation were data and analysis developed

120

IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 8, NO. 7, JULY 2008 1099 Fiber-Optic Sensor for Web Velocity Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light from the web surface (with no physical contact), the output of the fiber-optic sensorIEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 8, NO. 7, JULY 2008 1099 Fiber-Optic Sensor for Web Velocity Measurement Abstract--The design and development of a new fiber-optic sensor for measuring the velocity of a continuous

Pagilla, Prabhakar R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

PFP Emergency Lighting Study  

SciTech Connect

NFPA 101, section 5-9 mandates that, where required by building classification, all designated emergency egress routes be provided with adequate emergency lighting in the event of a normal lighting outage. Emergency lighting is to be arranged so that egress routes are illuminated to an average of 1.0 footcandle with a minimum at any point of 0.1 footcandle, as measured at floor level. These levels are permitted to drop to 60% of their original value over the required 90 minute emergency lighting duration after a power outage. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) has two designations for battery powered egress lights ''Emergency Lights'' are those battery powered lights required by NFPA 101 to provide lighting along officially designated egress routes in those buildings meeting the correct occupancy requirements. Emergency Lights are maintained on a monthly basis by procedure ZSR-12N-001. ''Backup Lights'' are battery powered lights not required by NFPA, but installed in areas where additional light may be needed. The Backup Light locations were identified by PFP Safety and Engineering based on several factors. (1) General occupancy and type of work in the area. Areas occupied briefly during a shiftly surveillance do not require backup lighting while a room occupied fairly frequently or for significant lengths of time will need one or two Backup lights to provide general illumination of the egress points. (2) Complexity of the egress routes. Office spaces with a standard hallway/room configuration will not require Backup Lights while a large room with several subdivisions or irregularly placed rooms, doors, and equipment will require Backup Lights to make egress safer. (3) Reasonable balance between the safety benefits of additional lighting and the man-hours/exposure required for periodic light maintenance. In some plant areas such as building 236-Z, the additional maintenance time and risk of contamination do not warrant having Backup Lights installed in all rooms. Sufficient light for egress is provided by existing lights located in the hallways.

BUSCH, M.S.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

Natural lighting and skylights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work. However, they are only two of the many, many elements which must be considered; and they, therefore, must be considered, always, in relation to the other elements. The achievement of good lighting depends on a reasonable understanding of three primary factors: one, the visual response to lighting; two, the availability and types of lighting; and three, methods for controlling light. This thesis is intended to supply enough information to provide a working knowledge of each of these facets. The human visual response is discussed in "Goals For Good Lighting." The availability and types of lighting are dealt with in the section on available light. The remainder of the thesis concerns methods for controlling light. The use of scale models for studying the natural lighting characteristics of buildings due to the building geometry, the fenestration details and the interior reflectance has been well established as pointed out in the earlier part of this thesis. With the completion of the work outlined herein, the feasibility of using scale models for studying skylights is also an established fact. The method of analysis by models can be a valuable tool to any designer who is concerned about day-lighting.

Evans, Benjamin Hampton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Contact Info | Occupational Medicine Clinic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Contact Info Occupational Medicine Joseph Falco, M.D. 344-3666 OMC Manager/Supervising Physician Staff Physicians Carol Davis, D.O. 344-3667 Board Certified - Occupational Medicine Eva Erens, M.D. 344-3668 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Jaishree Subramani, M.D. MPH 344-3669 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Health Promotion Program Michael Thorn, RN, MBA 344-8612 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Program Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Nancy Losinno, LCSW, CEAP 344-4567 EAP Manager Linda DiPierro 344-2733 Senior Occupational Medicine Assistant

124

Hydrogen Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sensor for detectingquantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces...

125

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

126

ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

127

Occupant Emergency Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupant Emergency Plans Occupant Emergency Plans On this page is the collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the...

128

Fiber-optic voltage sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, C.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fiber-optic voltage sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optic voltage sensor is described which includes a source of light, a reference fiber for receiving a known percentage of the light and an electrostrictive element having terminals across which is applied, a voltage to be measured. The electrostrictive element is responsive to the applied voltage to assume an altered physical state. A measuring fiber also receives a known percentage of light from the light source and is secured about the electrostrictive element. The measuring fiber is provided with a cladding and exhibits an evanescent wave in the cladding. The measuring fiber has a known length which is altered when the electrostrictive element assumes its altered physical state. A differential sensor is provided which senses the intensity of light in both the reference fiber and the measuring fiber and provides an output indicative of the difference between the intensities.

Wood, C.B.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Opportunities Benefits Office • Work-Life Balance Programs • International Services • Occupational Medicine • Salaries & Awards • Training & Qualifications The Human Resources and Occupational Medicine Division handles scientific and non-scientific employment, benefits, employee and labor relations, staff development, salaries and awards, employee records, and occupational medicine. For more information, click on the one of the services listed above. Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long-standing commitment to a policy of equal opportunity and diversity. Our goal is equality of opportunity in all aspects of employment, including placement, development programs, job assignments, transfers and promotions, without regard to race, color,

131

Lighting Group: Controls and Communications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communications Communications Controls and Communications The Controls and Communications research activity investigates how digital technologies, such as Bluetooth, can be applied to building lighting control systems to increase building efficiency and improve occupant comfort and productivity. Projects range from embedded device networks applied to building lighting systems, to WiFi and environmental sensing and monitoring. light switch Current Projects IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) Wireless Lighting Controls (with DUST Networks) HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Building Control Systems Integration Completed Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects 450 Golden Gate Project New Publications Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Devices: A Role for

132

Medical Surveillance in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Occupational in Occupational Health Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM The Johns Hopkins UniversHy Bloomberg School of Public Health + Compliance with legal requirements + Early detection (preclinical) and therapy - many established occupational diseases are not curable + Prevention of disease in co-worloccupational disease) * Suitable & acceptable test available + Early or latent stage to screen for

133

Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

LUSTER: wireless sensor network for environmental research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental wireless sensor network (EWSN) systems are deployed in potentially harsh and remote environments where inevitable node and communication failures must be tolerated. LUSTER---Light Under Shrub Thicket for Environmental Research---is a system ... Keywords: LiteTDMA, architecture, environmental science, implementation, mote, network protocol, storage, validation, wireless sensor network

L. Selavo; A. Wood; Q. Cao; T. Sookoor; H. Liu; A. Srinivasan; Y. Wu; W. Kang; J. Stankovic; D. Young; J. Porter

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

High fidelity lighting of Knossos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five kilometres from Heraklion, Crete is the Minoan Palace of Knossos. First discovered in 1878 by Minos Kalokairinos, the site today is most commonly associated with Sir Arthur Evans who bought the space in 1898 when Turkish occupation ceased in Crete. ... Keywords: Knossos, high fidelity graphics, physically based lighting, virtual archaeology

Ioannis Roussos; Alan Chalmers

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Coordination in wireless sensor-actuator networks: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless Sensor-Actuator Networks (WSANs) have a myriad of applications, ranging from pacifying bulls to controlling light intensity in homes automatically. An important aspect of WSANs is coordination. Unlike conventional Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), ... Keywords: Actuators, Coordination, Energy efficiency, Wireless sensor and actuator networks

Hamidreza Salarian; Kwan-Wu Chin; Fazel Naghdy

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Tips: Lighting May 4, 2012 - 3:16pm Addthis Lighting Choices Save You Money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Lighting Choices Save You Money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. What does this mean for me? Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about $50 per year. For the greatest savings, replace your old incandescent bulbs with ENERGY STAR-qualified bulbs. An average household dedicates about 10% of its energy budget to lighting. Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills. Timers and motion sensors save you even more money by reducing the amount of time lights are on but not being used.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The New York Times Headquarters Building Title Monitored lighting energy savings from dimmable lighting controls in The New York Times Headquarters Building Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6171E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fernandes, Luis L., Eleanor S. Lee, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, and Andrew McNeil Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 68 Issue A Pagination 498-514 Date Published 01/2014 Keywords Building energy-efficiency, daylighting, lighting control systems Abstract Digital addressable, dimmable lighting controls were introduced to the US market in the early 2000s with the promise of facilitating capture of potential energy savings with greater flexibility over their historic, typically unreliable, analog counterpart. The New York Times Company installed this emerging technology, after having tested the system thoroughly prior to procurement, in their new building in New York, New York. Four years after full occupancy in 2007, the owner agreed to participate in a post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting system to verify actual performance in the field. Annual lighting energy savings from daylighting, setpoint tuning and occupancy controls were determined for the daylit, open-plan office areas on three typical floors (6, 11, and 20th floors) of the 51-story high-rise tower. Energy savings were calculated from ballast control signal and occupancy data recorded by the manufacturer's lighting control system. The ballast data were calibrated with independent measurements of lighting energy consumption. Savings from dimming controls (daylighting and setpoint tuning) were 12.6 kWh/m2-yr (1.17 kWh/ft2-yr) for the daylit spaces on the three floors overall, or 20%, relative to ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Compared to the prescriptive code in effect at the time of the building's construction (ASHRAE 90.1-2001), savings were 21.0 kWh/m2-yr (1.95 kWh/ft2-yr) or 28%. Annual lighting energy use with all lighting control strategies was 33.9 kWh/m2-yr (3.15 kWh/ft2-yr) in the daylit, open plan zones on average for the three floors. A simple payback analysis was conducted.

142

Fibre-optic interferometric pressure sensor based on droplet-shaped PDMS elastomer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*gkakaran@eie.gr Keywords: white-light interferometer, fibre-optic pressure sensor, PDMS-based Fabry. In this work, we present a low pressure sensor based on white-light Fabry-Perot interferometer where poly used as low-coherent white-light source transmitted through a single-mode fibre (SMF-28). The light

Vlachos, Kyriakos G.

143

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation Utilizing Wireless Dimmable Lighting Control in a Shared-Space Office Yao preference and requirements vary · among individuals · with tasks · with time and age Lighting satisfaction occupants sharing an office? · Ethernet infrastructure How will the energy savings and user satisfaction

Agogino, Alice M.

144

Light-Light Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

Kanda, Naohiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Light-Light Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a long time, it is believed that the light by light scattering is described properly by the Lagrangian density obtained by Heisenberg and Euler. Here, we present a new calculation which is based on the modern field theory technique. It is found that the light-light scattering is completely different from the old expression. The reason is basically due to the unphysical condition (gauge condition) which was employed by the QED calcualtion of Karplus and Neumann. The correct cross section of light-light scattering at low energy of $(\\frac{\\omega}{m} \\ll 1)$ can be written as $ \\displaystyle{\\frac{d\\sigma}{d\\Omega}=\\frac{1}{(6\\pi)^2}\\frac{\\alpha^4} {(2\\omega)^2}(3+2\\cos^2\\theta +\\cos^4\\theta)}$.

Naohiro Kanda

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Modeling a Sensor to Improve its Efficacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robots rely on sensors to provide them with information about their surroundings. However, high-quality sensors can be extremely expensive and cost-prohibitive. Thus many robotic systems must make due with lower-quality sensors. Here we demonstrate via a case study how modeling a sensor can improve its efficacy when employed within a Bayesian inferential framework. As a test bed we employ a robotic arm that is designed to autonomously take its own measurements using an inexpensive LEGO light sensor to estimate the position and radius of a white circle on a black field. The light sensor integrates the light arriving from a spatially distributed region within its field of view weighted by its Spatial Sensitivity Function (SSF). We demonstrate that by incorporating an accurate model of the light sensor SSF into the likelihood function of a Bayesian inference engine, an autonomous system can make improved inferences about its surroundings. The method presented here is data-based, fairly general, and made with plu...

Malakar, N K; Knuth, K H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Sensors, Instrumentation Systems National security depends on science and technology. The...

148

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Bend, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sensor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, further, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Touch Light Through the Leaves: a tactile display for light and shadow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

You can feel something good and comfortable when you turn your palms up and the light falling onto your palms through the trees. "Touch Light Through the Leaves" begins from an imagination which we can touch the light through the leaves. We propose "Touch ... Keywords: interaction, light and shadow detection, sensor, tactile display

Kunihiro Nishimura; Yasuhiro Suzuki; Michitaka Hirose

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

New Beryllium Reference Material for Occupational Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The US National Nuclear Security Administration sponsored the development of ... Mich.; and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

152

R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings July 23, 2013 - 3:04pm Addthis Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms to detect movement and human presence in a room with an accuracy of more than 90 percent -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what

153

R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings R&D 100: Smart Sensors Mean Energy Savings July 23, 2013 - 3:04pm Addthis Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what had only been a motion detection before. The new sensor combines an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms to detect movement and human presence in a room with an accuracy of more than 90 percent -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, NREL. Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently developed a new smart occupancy sensor that adds optics to what

154

Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance...

155

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

156

Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Efficiency Vermont - newLIGHT Incentive Program (Vermont) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Programs Amount Lighting: 35-125 depending on the equipment installed LED Exit Sign: 35 Sensors: 40-200 depending on the equipment installed Expiration Date 12...

159

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

1992-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Eugene, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Humidity Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 21   Applications for humidity sensors...parts 5 to 40 0 to 50 Magnetic heads, LSIs, ICs Agriculture, forestry stockbreeding Greenhouse air conditioning 5 to 40 0 to 100 Air conditioning Dew prevention in tealeaf growing -10 to 60 50 to 100 Dew prevention Broiler farming 20 to 25 40 to 70 Health control Measurement Thermostatic bath -5 to 100 0 to...

162

Ethical Issues in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETillCAL ISSUES IN ETillCAL ISSUES IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 OH Ethical Issues * Autonomy * Confidentiality * Right to Know * Putcmalism * Informed Consent OH Ethical Issues * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others - Engineering controls - Exposure monitoring/ walk throughs - Health screening/ Health surveillance - Health promotion - Occupational Health Research Ethical Principles * Autonomy: The right to self-determination * Nonmaleficence: The duty to do no harm * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others * .Justice: Fairness or giving person what is due them OH Ethical Issues * Nonmale.ficence - High risk jobs - Second Party induced Hazards - Incompetent , wtethical, illegal practices

163

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

EPA_T1542_SECTOR_HotelA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lighting systems, ENERGY STAR qualified compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), and light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs. > Install occupancy sensors on lighting and HVAC systems in...

165

LED Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are semiconductor devices that produce light when an electrical current is applied....

166

Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

Nave, S.E.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program More Documents & Publications LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management

168

Energy Edge, Post-Occupancy Evaluation Project: The Eastgate Corporate Center Bellevue, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The Workspace Satisfaction Survey measures occupant satisfaction with the thermal, lighting, acoustical, and air quality aspects of the work environment. In addition to ratings of these ambient environmental features, occupants also rate their satisfaction with a number of functional and aesthetic features of the office environment as well as their satisfaction with specific kinds of workspaces (e.g. computer rooms, the lobby, employee lounge, etc.) Each section on ambient conditions includes questions on the frequency with which people experience particular kinds of discomforts or problems, how much the discomfort bothers them, and how much it interferes with their work. Occupants are also asked to identify how they cope with discomfort or environmental problems, and to what extent these behaviors enable them to achieve more satisfactory conditions. This report documents the results of this survey of the occupants of the Eastgate Corporate Center, Bellevue, Washington. 21 figs., 7 tabs.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wireless sensor network survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wireless sensor network (WSN) has important applications such as remote environmental monitoring and target tracking. This has been enabled by the availability, particularly in recent years, of sensors that are smaller, cheaper, and intelligent. These ... Keywords: Protocols, Sensor network deployment, Sensor network services, Survey, Wireless sensor network

Jennifer Yick; Biswanath Mukherjee; Dipak Ghosal

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Chapter 5: Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Lighting, : Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing High-Performance Engineering Design Lighting System Design Mechanical System Design Central Plant Systems Plumbing and Water Use Building Control Systems Electrical Power Systems Metering LANL | Chapter 5 High-Performance Engineering Design Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing By now, the building envelope serves multiple roles. It protects the occupants from changing weather condi- tions and it plays a key part in meeting the occupants' comfort needs. The heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and lighting (HVAC&L) systems complement the archi- tectural design, govern the building's operation and maintenance costs, and shape the building's long-term environmental impact. The architectural design maximizes the potential for a high-performance building, but it is the

173

Thermal sensor with an improved coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Optical Sensor Technology Development and Deployment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this ESP (Enhanced Surveillance) project are to evaluate sensor performance for future aging studies of materials, components and weapon systems. The goal of this project is to provide analysis capability to experimentally identify and characterize the aging mechanisms and kinetics of Core Stack Assembly (CSA) materials. The work on fiber optic light sources, hermetic sealing of fiber optics, fiber optic hydrogen sensors, and detection systems will be discussed.

B. G. Parker

2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of Low Cost Sensors for Hydrogen Safety Applications  

SciTech Connect

We are developing rugged and reliable hydrogen safety sensors that can be easily manufactured. Potential applications also require an inexpensive sensor that can be easily deployed. Automotive applications demand low cost, while personnel safety applications emphasize light-weight, battery-operated, and wearable sensors. Our current efforts involve developing and optimizing sensor materials for stability and compatibility with typical thick-film manufacturing processes. We are also tailoring the sensor design and size along with various packaging and communication schemes for optimal acceptance by end users.

Hoffheins, B.S.; Holmes, W., Jr.; Lauf, R.J.; Maxey, L.C.; Salter, C.; Walker, D.

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Occupational Safety Performance Trends | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety Trends More Documents & Publications Strategic Safety Goals EA-1954: Draft Environmental Assessment Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard...

177

2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster  

SciTech Connect

This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

ORAU

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

WEB RESOURCE: Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 9, 2007 ... The Occupational Outlook Handbook gives information on the training and education needed to go into engineering, earnings, job prospects,...

179

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Home Outreach Event Calendar for DOE Nuclear Weapons Workers Covered Facilities Database Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness...

180

Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Criteria Review and Approach Document 1.0 PURPOSE Subject: Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inqu v Acting Di...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Occupant Behavior, Egress, and Emergency Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Forman Williams, Director, Center for Energy Research, University ... Total evacuation of a tower assuming a full occupant load without visitors (19,800 ...

182

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act...

183

Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensor networks are becoming increasingly pervasive. Existing methods of aggregation in sensor networks offer mostly standard mathematical operators over homogeneous data types. In this paper, we instead focus on supporting emerging scenarios in which ...

Sanem Kabadayi; Adam Pridgen; Christine Julien

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High

186

Dynamic sensor tasking in heterogeneous, mobile sensor networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern sensor environments often attempt to combine several sensors into a single sensor network. The nodes of this network are generally heterogeneous and may vary with respect to sensor complexity, sensor operational ...

Jones, Peter B. (Peter B.), S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

188

Lighting Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Lighting is very critical in photography. The specimen should be placed on a background which will not detract from the resolution of the fracture surface. For basic lighting, one spotlight is suggested. The light is then raised or lowered, and

189

Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the seventh annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for EPRI's OHSD program.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the eighth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for the OHSD program.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Occupancy based demand response HVAC control strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 30% energy usage and for 50% of the electricity usage in the United States. Currently, most modern buildings still condition rooms assuming maximum occupancy rather than actual usage. As a result, rooms are ... Keywords: HVAC, demand response, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Alberto E. Cerpa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Occupancy change detection system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Lighting Group: Light Distribution Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrofit Alternatives to Incandescent Downlights Hotel and Institutional Bathroom Lighting Portable Office Lighting Systems Low Glare Outdoor Retrofit Luminaire LED Luminaires...

196

Lighting Research Center Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Outlaw lighting  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management programs by utilities and the federal government`s Green Lights program have made significant inroads in promoting energy-efficient lighting. But the Energy Policy Act now prohibits certain types of lighting. This article provides analysis to help architects determine new lamp performance compared with older lighting products.

Bryan, H.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A distributed fiber optic intrusion sensor capable of detecting intruders from the pressure of their weight on the earth's surface was investigated in the laboratory and in field tests. The presence of an intruder above or in proximity to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry, disturbances were monitored in long (several km) lengths of optical fiber. Narrow linewidth and low frequency drift in the laser were achieved through a combination of optical feedback and insulation of the laser cavity against environmental effects. The frequency drift of the laser, characterized using an all-fiber Mach Zehnder interferometer, was found to be less than 1 MHz/min, as required for operation of the intrusion detection system. Intrusions were simulated in a laboratory setting using a piezoelectric transducer to produce a controllable optical phase shift at the 2 km point of a 12 km path length. Interrogation of the distributed sensor was accomplished by repetitively gating light pulses from the stable laser into the sensing fiber. By monitoring the Rayleigh backscattered light with a photodetector and comparing traces with and without an induced phase shift, the phase disturbances were detected and located. Once the feasibility of such a sensor was proven in the laboratory, the experimental set up was transferred to Texas A&M's Riverside Campus. At the test site, approximately 40 meters of fiber optic cable were buried in a triangle perimeter and then spliced into the 12 km path length which was housed inside the test facility. Field tests were conducted producing results comparable to those found in the laboratory. Intrusions over this buried fiber were detectable on the ?-OTDR trace and could be localized to the intrusion point. This type of sensor has the potential benefits of heightened sensitivity, covertness, and greatly reduced cost over the conventional seismic, acoustic, infrared, magnetic, and fiber optic sensors for monitoring long (multi-km) perimeters.

Maier, Eric William

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Optical inverse-square displacement sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R + [Delta]R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as given in an equation. 10 figs.

Howe, R.D.; Kychakoff, G.

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Optical inverse-square displacement sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R+.DELTA.R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as ##EQU1##

Howe, Robert D. (San Mateo County, CA); Kychakoff, George (King County, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Behavioural reconfigurable and adaptive data reduction in body sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Body area sensor networks have been attracting more and more applications which focus on human behaviour and monitoring, ranging from simple positioning to medical applications. These BSNs inherit unique specifications since are composed of light-weight ...

Foad Dabiri; Hyduke Noshadi; Majid Sarrafzadeh

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Automatic Acquisition of Robot Motion and Sensor Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For accurate self-localization using probabilistic techniques, robots require robust models of motion and sensor characteristics. Such models are sensitive to variations in lighting conditions, terrain and other factors like robot battery strength. Each ...

A. Tuna Ozgelen; Elizabeth Sklar; Simon Parsons

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Evaluating office lighting environments: Second-level analysis  

SciTech Connect

Data from a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) of 912 work stations with lighting power density (LPD), photometric, and occupant-response measures were examined in a detailed, second-level analysis. Seven types of lighting systems were identified with different combinations of direct and indirect ambient lighting, and task lighting and daylight. The mean illuminances at the primary task location were within the IES target values for office task with a range of mean illuminances from 32 to 75 fc, depending on the lighting system. The median LPD was about 2.36 watts/sq ft, with about one-third the work stations having LPD's at or below 2.0 watts/sq ft. Although a majority of the occupants (69%) were satisfied about their lighting, the highest percentage of those expressing dissatisfaction (37%) with lighting had an indirect fluorescent furniture-mounted (IFFM) system. The negative reaction of so many people to the IFFM system suggests that the combination of task lighting with an indirect ambient system had an important influence on lighting satisfaction, even though task illuminances tended to be higher with the IFFM system. Concepts of lighting quality, visual health, and control were explored, as well as average luminance to explain the negative reactions to the combination of indirect lighting with furniture-mounted lighting.

Collins, B.L.; Fisher, W.S.; Gillette, G.L.; Marans, R.W.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations More Documents & Publications Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation

205

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and...

206

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SITE-APPS-ACCRED-BOUNDRY.pdf WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SI...

207

Occupational Electric Shocks, Electromagnetic Fields and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. , Fatal occupational electrocutions in the United States.Narrative Review: Electrocution and Life-ThreateningFatal occupational electrocutions in the United States. Inj

Vergara, Ximena Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Title Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Publication Type Report LBNL...

209

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit...

210

Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

Hwang, G. [Laboratory for Photonics and Nanostructures, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marcoussis 91460 (France); Hashimoto, H. [Department of EECE, Chuo University 1-13-27 Kasuga, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tracking locations of moving hand-held displays using projected light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lee et al. have recently demonstrated display positioning using optical sensors in conjunction with temporally-coded patterns of projected light. This paper extends that concept in two important directions. First, we enable such sensors to determine ...

Jay Summet; Rahul Sukthankar

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Lighting Group: Controls: Advanced Digital Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Digital Controls Advanced Digital Controls HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Objective The goal of this project is to hasten the adoption of digital lighting control systems to allow commercial building operators to optimize the neergy performance of their lighting systems, implement demand responsive control, and improve occupant comfort and productivity. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) Advance the adoption of digital lighting control systems by working with industry to embed IBECS technology into existing analog control and DALI products, and by developing compelling demonstrations of digital control systems for evaluation by early adopters. (2) In collaboration with equipment manufacturers, produce digital lighting system prototypes that demonstrate the advantages of digitally controlled lighting systems to innovative property managers and other energy stakeholders. A digitally controlled lighting system consists of lights that are individually controllable via a network. The advantages of digital control are:

213

Energy saving system for office lighting by using PSO and ZigBee network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to reduce the amount of wasted energy in office lighting and provide a major contribution to lowering overall energy consumption, we are developing a new energy saving system for office lighting by using adjustable lamp, ZigBee Wireless Sensor ... Keywords: PSO, energy saving system, office lighting, wireless sensor network, zigbee

Wa Si; Harutoshi Ogai; Tansheng Li; Masatoshi Ogawa; Katsumi Hirai; Hidehiro Takahashi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Story Validation and Approximate Path Inference with a Sparse Network of Heterogeneous Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jingjin Yu Steven M. LaValle jyu18@uiuc.edu lavalle@uiuc.edu Department of Electrical and Computer of the story and the length of the sensor observation history. Besides immediate applicability towards security sensors in office rooms. Buried pressure based vehicle sensors at traffic lights. Your thermostat at home

LaValle, Steven M.

215

Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corridors. The overall range of savings was six to 80 percent. The Advanced Lighting Guidelines On-Line Edition New Buildings Institute 2011 presents a table of lighting energy...

216

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard Qualification Standard Reference Guide JULY 2011 Occupational Safety This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... iii TABLES ........................................................................................................................................ iv ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. v PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

217

Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Headquarters Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics The Department of Energy recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy and fit Federal workforce. To that end, our occupational health care professionals at the Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics in Forrestal and Germantown provide the following services: Walk-in care. Assessment, nursing care and follow-up for minor illnesses and injuries on a walk-in basis. First-response. Emergency treatment to any employee, contractor or visitor experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency. Wellness seminars. A variety of workshops designed to educate participants on a wide range of health-related topics. Physician directed services: For employees whose physician has directed medical care such as allergy injections, blood pressure

218

Window Signaling Systems: Control Strategies & Occupant Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and L.M Parkins. 1984. Window-Opening Behavior in OfficeOccupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems," CBEDaly, A. 2002. Operable windows and HVAC systems. HPAC

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

Optical waveguide tamper sensor technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dielectric optical waveguides exhibit properties that are well suited to sensor applications. They have low refractive index and are transparent to a wide range of wavelengths. They can react with the surrounding environment in a variety of controllable ways. In certain sensor applications, it is advantageous to integrate the dielectric waveguide on a semiconductor substrate with active devices. In this work, we demonstrate a tamper sensor based on dielectric waveguides that connect epitaxial GaAs-GaAlAs sources and detectors. The tamper sensing function is realized by attaching particles of absorbing material with high refractive index to the surface of the waveguides. These absorbers are then attached to a lid or cover, as in an integrated circuit package or multi-chip module. The absorbers attenuate the light in the waveguides as a function of absorber interaction. In the tamper indicating mode, the absorbers are placed randomly on the waveguides, to form a unique attenuation pattern that is registered by the relative signal levels on the photodetectors. When the lid is moved, the pattern of absorbers changes, altering the photodetector signals. This dielectric waveguide arrangement is applicable to a variety of sensor functions, and specifically can be fabricated as a chemical sensor by the application of cladding layers that change their refractive index and/or optical absorption properties upon exposure to selected chemical species. An example is found in palladium claddings that are sensitive to hydrogen. A description of designs and a basic demonstration of the tamper sensing and chemical sensing functions is described herein.

Carson, R.F.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the ninth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 13 years (1995 2007) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. These injury data a...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eleventh annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 15 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

223

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This twelfth annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry is based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 16 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system. The...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the tenth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 14 years (1995 2008) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. The current OHSD da...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed. (auth)

Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors and their multiplexing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical sensor includes a thin film sandwiched between two fiber ends. When light is launched into the fiber, two reflections are generated at the two fiber/thin film interfaces due to a difference in refractive indices between the fibers and the film, giving rise to the sensor output. In another embodiment, a portion of the cladding of a fiber is removed, creating two parallel surfaces. Part of the evanescent fields of light propagating in the fiber is reflected at each of the surfaces, giving rise to the sensor output. In a third embodiment, the refractive index of a small portion of a fiber is changed through exposure to a laser beam or other radiation. Interference between reflections at the ends of the small portion give rise to the sensor output. Multiple sensors along a single fiber are multiplexed using an optical time domain reflectometry method.

Wang, Anbo (Blacksburg, VA)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for ACEQ sensors than for chem-bio sensors 1 Under groundlocations In contrast to chem-bio sensors, false positives (or Implementation, Part 1: Chem. -Bio-Sensors, ACER Report,

Gundel, Lara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Shape the light, light the shape - lighting installation in performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the lighting design theory Light Inside Out, which is the technique of shaping light toward a creation of lighting installation in performance (more)

Yu, Lih-Hwa, 1972-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office More Documents & Publications Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

230

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Authorization for High Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on

231

Giant magnetoresistive sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Digital Sensor Technology  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

234

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sensor readout detector circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

High temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Online distributed sensor selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A key problem in sensor networks is to decide which sensors to query when, in order to obtain the most useful information (e.g., for performing accurate prediction), subject to constraints (e.g., on power and bandwidth). In many applications the utility ... Keywords: approximation algorithms, distributed multiarmed bandit algorithms, sensor networks, submodular optimization

Daniel Golovin; Matthew Faulkner; Andreas Krause

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Micro-position sensor using faraday effect  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro-position sensor and sensing system using the Faraday Effect. The sensor uses a permanent magnet to provide a magnetic field, and a magneto-optic material positioned in the magnetic field for rotating the plane of polarization of polarized light transmitted through the magneto-optic material. The magnet is independently movable relative to the magneto-optic material so as to rotate the plane of polarization of the polarized light as a function of the relative position of the magnet. In this manner, the position of the magnet relative to the magneto-optic material may be determined from the rotated polarized light. The sensing system also includes a light source, such as a laser or LED, for producing polarized light, and an optical fiber which is connected to the light source and to the magneto-optic material at a sensing end of the optical fiber. Processing electronics, such as a polarimeter, are also provided for determining the Faraday rotation of the plane of polarization of the back-reflected polarized light to determine the position of the magnet relative to the sensing end of the optical fiber.

McElfresh, Michael (Livermore, CA); Lucas, Matthew (Pittsburgh, PA); Silveira, Joseph P. (Tracy, CA); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings Title Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zhou, Xin, Da Yan, Xiaoxin Ren, and Tianzhen Hong Keywords building simulation, energy use, lighting, modeling, occupant beh building, occupant beh building simulation, occupant behbuilding simulation Abstract Lighting consumes about 20 to 40% of total electricity use in large office buildings in the U.S. and China. In order to develop better lighting simulation models it is crucial to understand the characteristics of lighting energy use. This paper analyzes the main characteristics of lighting energy use over various time scales, based on the statistical analysis of measured lighting energy use of 17 large office buildings in Beijing and Hong Kong. It was found that the daily 24-hour variations of lighting energy use were mainly driven by the schedule of the building occupants. Outdoor illumination levels have little impact on lighting energy use in large office buildings due to the lack of automatic daylighting controls and relatively small perimeter areas. A stochastic lighting energy use model was developed based on different occupant activities during six time periods throughout a day, and the annual distribution of lighting power across those periods. The model was verified using measured lighting energy use of one selected building. This study demonstrates how statistical analysis and stochastic modeling can be applied to lighting energy use. The developed lighting model can be adopted by building energy modeling programs to improve the simulation accuracy of lighting energy use.

240

Flipping the Switch Lighting in Education and Hellems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as under-cabinet lights that were not heavily used. FixtureFinder was able to recognize fixture usage- cover light fixtures, infer their nominal wattage values and usage times. We considered other sensor the two data streams and looking for matched ON/OFF events, two true light usage events are discovered

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Poster: INPRESS: indoor climate prediction and evaluation system for energy efficiency using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern buildings include an indoor climate control system, installed and operated to maintain a comfortable environment for the building occupants. However, these climate control systems consume a significant amount of energy due to an inefficient control ... Keywords: energy efficiency, indoor climate, sensor network

Jae Yoon Chong; Jinwook Baek; Sukun Kim

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Micromechanical potentiometric sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A pattern of light : a new library for Newton and an analysis of the building type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural light can add clarity to the organization of buildings by distinguishing areas of occupation with varying quantities and qualities of illumination. Libraries are good to study in this regard because of their varying ...

Flavin, Colin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

246

MEMS CHIP CO2 SENSOR FOR BUILDING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to develop an affordable, reliable sensor to enable demand controlled ventilation (DCV). A significant portion of total energy consumption in the United States is used for heating or air conditioning (HVAC) buildings. To assure occupant safety and fresh air levels in large buildings, and especially those with sealed windows, HVAC systems are frequently run in excess of true requirements as automated systems cannot now tell the occupancy level of interior spaces. If such a sensor (e.g. thermostat sized device) were available, it would reduce energy use between 10 and 20% in such buildings. A quantitative measure of ''fresh air'' is the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) present. An inert gas, CO{sub 2} is not easily detected by chemical sensors and is usually measured by infrared spectroscopy. Ion Optics research developed a complete infrared sensor package on a single MEMS chip. It contains the infrared (IR) source, IR detector and IR filter. The device resulting from this DOE sponsored research has sufficient sensitivity, lifetime, and drift rate to meet the specifications of commercial instrument manufacturers who are now testing the device for use in their building systems.

Anton Carl Greenwald

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

248

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

250

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

251

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

253

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

254

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Goniometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goniometer Goniometer gonio-photometer Gonio-Photometer Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer The gonio-photometer (or goniometer for short) is able to measure the illuminance from each portion of a lamp or fixture. There are three main components to the goniometer: (1) the rotating table that the fixture or lamp is placed on, (2) the long arm with a mirror on the end that rotates around the fixture and (3) a light sensor that measures the light reflected by the mirror. The light source (whether it is in a fixture or not) is placed in the middle of the goniometer, sitting on the rotating table. The rotating table can be adjusted up and down to make sure that the light source is in the very center of the goniometer. When the lamp is positioned this way, the

255

Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings Achieving Comfort and Saving Energy with Sensor Networks in Buildings Speaker(s): Danni Wang Date: July 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 One of the fundamental objectives of an HVAC (heating, ventilation, air-conditioning) system is to create comfortable environments for occupants. The rule of thumb in building operation is the more energy a building consumes, the more comfortable it becomes. Saving energy and achieving comfort seem to conflict with each other. This might be true. However, are there opportunities to achieve both desires? In this talk, I will present a few case studies which demonstrate how we might both achieve comfort and save energy by using sensor networks in buildings. I will first report the latest thermal comfort survey results from around 150 commercial

256

Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting - united with the rich details offered by sensor networks - prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we propose several techniques for ...

Lee, Byungkun

257

This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems and construction; lighting design; analysis, specification and estimation of materials Designer Occupancy Planner Office Manager Project Designer Project Manager Residential Designer Sales. Understand some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited

Arnold, Jonathan

258

Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor  

SciTech Connect

A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chief Medical Officer: Occupational Medicine in Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Health and Safety Occupational health requirements provide for the medical support of employees through the prevention, management, and compensation of occupational injuries and illnesses. In addition, requirements for the medical assessment of employees working in the nuclear environment provide protection for those employees, their coworkers, and the public. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. A. General Occupational Health B. Hazard-Specific Occupational Health C. Hazardous Materials Occupational Health D. Nuclear Safety E. Medical Screening and Surveillance F. Former Worker Medical Screening and Compensation G. Epidemiology H. Injury and Illness Reporting and Recordkeeping A. General Occupational Health Federal Employees

260

CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-35, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate occupational radiation protection programs against DOE policy, standards, and regulatory requirements. The approach includes evaluation of essential programmatic elements of radiation protection programs with additional emphasis on implementation of the core functions of integrated safety management. CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Northern Lights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Lights Northern Lights Nature Bulletin No. 178-A February 6, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NORTHERN LIGHTS To a person seeing the Aurora Borealis or "northern lights" for the first time, it is an uncanny awe-inspiring spectacle. Sometimes it begins as a glow of red on the northern horizon, ominously suggesting a great fire, gradually changing to a curtain of violet-white, or greenish-yellow light extending from east to west. Some times this may be transformed to appear as fold upon fold of luminous draperies that march majestically across the sky; sometimes as a vast multitude of gigantic flaming swords furiously slashing at the heavens; sometimes as a flowing crown with long undulating colored streamers fanning downward and outward.

262

Occupational hazards associated with geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure to noise, H{sub 2}S, NH/sub 3/, hazardous chemicals and wastes, and heat are the major occupational health hazards associated with geothermal energy development - from drilling to power production. Exposures to these agents, although not unique to geothermal energy development, occur in situations peculiar to the industry. Reports show that occupational illnesses associated with geothermal energy development are increasing, while the corresponding rates from all power production are decreasing. Most of those related to geothermal energy result from the H{sub 2}S-abatement systems used in response to environmental pollution regulations.

Hahn, J.L.

1979-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:Occupancy-Based Energy Management System. The objective ofOccupancy-Based Energy Management System. The experiments to

Sohn, Michael D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Wireless Sensors and Networks for Advanced Energy Management  

SciTech Connect

Numerous national studies and working groups have identified low-cost, very low-power wireless sensors and networks as a critical enabling technology for increasing energy efficiency, reducing waste, and optimizing processes. Research areas for developing such sensor and network platforms include microsensor arrays, ultra-low power electronics and signal conditioning, data/control transceivers, and robust wireless networks. A review of some of the research in the following areas will be discussed: (1) Low-cost, flexible multi-sensor array platforms (CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, humidity, NH{sub 3}, O{sub 2}, occupancy, etc.) that enable energy and emission reductions in applications such as buildings and manufacturing; (2) Modeling investments (energy usage and savings to drive capital investment decisions) and estimated uptime improvements through pervasive gathering of equipment and process health data and its effects on energy; (3) Robust, self-configuring wireless sensor networks for energy management; and (4) Quality-of-service for secure and reliable data transmission from widely distributed sensors. Wireless communications is poised to support technical innovations in the industrial community, with widespread use of wireless sensors forecasted to improve manufacturing production and energy efficiency and reduce emissions. Progress being made in wireless system components, as described in this paper, is helping bring these projected improvements to reality.

Hardy, J.E.

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Toward a demonstration of a Light Force Accelerometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Light Force Accelerometer (LFA) is an optical inertial sensor in which radiation pressure from two counter-propagating laser beams optically confines a glass microsphere. Inertial acceleration of the device results in ...

Kotru, Krish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Embedded Sensor Technology Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber Sensors are poised to be used in future LEPs. The three primary vehicles for fiber sensors are Department 1, Joint Test Assembly (JTA), and Shelf Life (SL). The National Security Enterprise (NSE) community plans to incorporate optical sensors or systems into these vehicles. Additionally, hermetic sealing of optical systems is required if optical technology is to be integrated into LEP and future weapons applications. Hermetic seals will reduce the long-term risk of contamination which can degrade or incapacitate optical components. This study was funded through the Kansas City Plant's (KCP) ESC work package between 2007 and 2009 to develop optical sensors, identify commercial fiber sensors and hermetic connectors, and qualify these sensors against likely weapon lifetime environments.

Kennedy, Chris

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

Remote electrochemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

High-temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy efficient sensor node implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. ... Keywords: acoustic, distributed sensor network (dsn), dsp, fpga, seismic, vehicle classification, video

Jan R. Frigo; Eric Y. Raby; Sean M. Brennan; Christophe Wolinski; Charles Wagner; Francois Charot; Edward Rosten; Vinod K. Kulathumani

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Background Beyond the standard duty cycle data collection system used in the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle program, additional sensors were installed on three test vehicles to collect several safety-related signals of interest to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The real-time brake stroke, tire pressure, and weight information obtained from these sensors is expected to make possible a number of safety-related analyses such as determining the frequency and severity of braking events and tracking tire pressure changes over time. Because these signals are posted to the vehicle's databus, they also have the potential to be

271

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Sensors, Electronics & Instrumentation Express Licensing Acoustic Concentration Of Particles In Fluid Flow Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Hydrogen And Oxygen Mass Spectrometry Of The Terrestrial Magnetosphere Express Licensing Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Express Licensing Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Cylindrical Acoustic Levitator/Concentrator Negotiable Licensing Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Express Licensing Foil electron multiplier Express Licensing Hydrogen Sensor

272

PNNL: Available Technologies: Sensors  

Non-Contact Sensor for Measuring the Density and Speed of Sound of a Liquid Contained in a Pipeline or Vessel; Real-Time Fluid Viscometer in Contact ...

273

Light Organizing/Organizing Light [Light in Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a street through alter nating areas of dark and light, welandscapes, streets and squares. Light summons our spiritfor changing light, both outside rooms (such as streets and

Schwartz, Martin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRIs Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2004 from sixteen participating companies.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

Evaluation of Occupational Magnetic Field Exposure Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a first step in assessing potential effects of EMF exposure guidelines on utility operations, EPRI sponsored a technical evaluation of the major occupational EMF exposure guidelines and an analysis of existing magnetic-field exposure databases. The research reported herein is a comprehensive extension of that work, that includes studies by several research groups on diverse topics related to guidelines.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Decentralized Dynamic Sensor Activation Protocol for Chemical Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the significant amount of energy consumed by chemical sensors for sensing, reducing sensing activity is critical for improving the lifespan of chemical sensor networks. In this paper, we consider a simple decentralized dynamic sensor activation ...

Shanika Karunasekera; Champake Mendis; Alex Skvortsov; Ajith Gunatilaka

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Integrated simulation environment for lighting design  

SciTech Connect

Lighting design involves the consideration of multiple performance criteria, from the earliest stages of conceptual design, through various stages of controls and operation in a project's life cycle. These criteria include: (1) the quantitative analysis of illuminance and luminance distribution due to daylighting and electric lighting; (2) qualitative analysis of the lighting design with photometrically accurate renderings of the designed environment; (3) analysis of energy implications of daylighting and electric lighting design and operation;, and (4) analysis of control strategies and sensor placement for maximizing energy savings from lighting control while providing visual comfort. In this paper we describe the development of an integrated decision-making environment that brings together several different tools, and provides the data management and process control required for a multi-criterion support of the design and operation of daylighting and electric lighting systems. The result is a powerful design and decision-making environment to meet the diverse and evolving needs of lighting designers and operators.

Pal, Vineeta; Papamichael, Konstantinos

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Multi-Sensor Single-Actuator Control of HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is common to control several rooms in a building with a single sensor in one of the rooms and a single actuator driving just one control element such as an air damper. New, low-cost, wireless sensor technology now offers the opportunity to replace the single sensor in one room with a network of sensors having at least one sensor per room. This paper addresses this multi-sensor, single-actuator control problem. We used computer simulations and optimization to study the problem. We designed a computer simulation of the heat transfer behavior of a section of a building that accounted for the effects of weather, building materials, ventilation, and loads from occupants and equipment. We considered ad hoc methods (such as averaging) of using information from multiple sensors. We also developed a new, model-free method of using information from multiple sensors that is based on a simple optimization procedure. The optimization procedure can be configured to optimize comfort or to optimize energy under comfort constraints. We compared the performance of the single-sensor strategy with the ad hoc strategies and optimized strategies using annual simulations of a four-room, perimeter section of a building and weather data from Sacramento, California. We report heating and cooling energy performance along with two comfort metrics, the average number of rooms within the ASHRAE comfort zone and the Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied (PDD). The results show that most of the multi-sensor control strategies do better than the single-sensor strategy on the basis of both energy performance and comfort. The energy-optimal strategy reduces energy consumption by 17% while reducing PDD from 30% to 24%. The comfort-optimal strategy reduces energy consumption by 4% while reducing PPD from 30% to 20%. The performance improvements occur primarily when the average load among all rooms is nearly zero, with some rooms requiring heating while others require cooling. Under these conditions, the single-sensor strategy either overcools or overheats, whereas the multi-sensor strategies use almost no energy.

Lin, C.; Auslander, D.; Federspiel, C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: March 8, 2010 3: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on AddThis.com... Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates The average number of persons occupying a car is 1.59 and has not changed

280

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SECURITY PLAN FOR THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM S January 23, 2009 ...

282

Occupational Health Programs - Jacqueline Agnew, PhD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Knowledge Base -Hospital - Construction -Brewery -Garment -Printing - Research Facilities Essential Components of Occupational & Environmental Health Programs 1 . Health...

283

Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

Grace, Karen M. (Ranchos de Taos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM); Honkanen, Seppo (Tucson, AZ)

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

284

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation Athanasius Zakhary Faculty University, Giza, Egypt (n.elgayar@fci-cu.edu.eg) #12;Abstract Forecasting hotel arrivals and occupancy simulation approach for the arrivals and occupancy forecasting problem. In this approach we simulate

Atiya, Amir

285

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposes an HVAC control strategy based on occupancy prediction and real time occupancy monitoring via simulation model. We dis- cuss the building parameters and the HVAC control strate- gies used for the energyOccupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California

Cerpa, Alberto E.

286

Hydrocarbon/Total Combustibles Sensor  

the invention is an electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor that is more reliable and reproducible than any other hydrocarbon sensor on the market today. The patented method for producing the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for ...

287

Colorado Springs Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Motors, Windows, Evaporative Coolers, Belts and Pulleys, HE Air Conditioning, NEMA Motors, Occupancy...

288

Tests gauge LED sensors for fuel-dye measurements  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work was to develop a low cost, robust sensor to allow direct measurement of Solvent Red 164 dye concentration in off-road fuel at refineries and fuel terminals. Optical absorption sensors based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) are rugged, low-cost, have low power consumption, and can be designed to be intrinsically safe.LED-based systems have been used in a variety of chemical detection applications including heavy metals, pH, CO2, and O2. The approach for this work was to develop a sensor that could be mounted on a pipeline sight glass, precluding the need for direct contact of the sensor with the fuel. Below is described the design and testing of three different LED/photodiode sensors utilizing reflectance spectrometry for the measurement of dye concentration.

Ozanich, Richard M.; Lucke, Richard B.; Melville, Angela M.; Wright, Bob W.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

289

Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions LED Lighting Facts LED lighting facts - A Program of the U.S. DOE DOE's LED Lighting Facts® program showcases LED products for general

290

Froth height level sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single sensor, comprised of a tube located near the foaming liquid, and another well away from the first, are used to determine the existence of foam in the vicinity of the probe. Two sensors a known distance apart can be used to locate the froth assuming a uniform froth density. The present invention utilizes the pressure differential existing between process chamber ambient pressure and the froth pressure to determine the existence of a froth and its location. Where froth density is not constant, multiple sensors at differing heights with respect to each other, or a single movable sensor, are used. Information derived using the multiple or movable sensor yields unambiguous froth density and height data.

Glaser, J.W.; Holmes, L.; Upadhye, R.S.; Wilder, J.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Bayesian based design of real-time sensor systems for high-risk indoor contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sudden release of toxic contaminants that reach indoor spaces can be hazardousto building occupants. To respond effectively, the contaminant release must be quicklydetected and characterized to determine unobserved parameters, such as release locationand strength. Characterizing the release requires solving an inverse problem. Designinga robust real-time sensor system that solves the inverse problem is challenging becausethe fate and transport of contaminants is complex, sensor information is limited andimperfect, and real-time estimation is computationally constrained.This dissertation uses a system-level approach, based on a Bayes Monte Carloframework, to develop sensor-system design concepts and methods. I describe threeinvestigations that explore complex relationships among sensors, network architecture,interpretation algorithms, and system performance. The investigations use data obtainedfrom tracer gas experiments conducted in a real building. The influence of individual sensor characteristics on the sensor-system performance for binary-type contaminant sensors is analyzed. Performance tradeoffs among sensor accuracy, threshold level and response time are identified; these attributes could not be inferred without a system-level analysis. For example, more accurate but slower sensors are found to outperform less accurate but faster sensors. Secondly, I investigate how the sensor-system performance can be understood in terms of contaminant transport processes and the model representation that is used to solve the inverse problem. The determination of release location and mass are shown to be related to and constrained by transport and mixing time scales. These time scales explain performance differences among different sensor networks. For example, the effect of longer sensor response times is comparably less for releases with longer mixing time scales. The third investigation explores how information fusion from heterogeneous sensors may improve the sensor-system performance and offset the need for more contaminant sensors. Physics- and algorithm-based frameworks are presented for selecting and fusing information from noncontaminant sensors. The frameworks are demonstrated with door-position sensors, which are found to be more useful in natural airflow conditions, but which cannot compensate for poor placement of contaminant sensors. The concepts and empirical findings have the potential to help in the design of sensor systems for more complex building systems. The research has broader relevance to additional environmental monitoring problems, fault detection and diagnostics, and system design.

Sreedharan, Priya; Sreedharan, Priya

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

When to Turn Off Your Lights When to Turn Off Your Lights When to Turn Off Your Lights August 30, 2012 - 7:53pm Addthis The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. What does this mean for me? The type of lights and the price of electricity determine whether it's best to turn lights off when you leave a room. Consider using sensors, timers, and other automatic lighting controls. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of bulb and the cost of electricity. The type of lightbulb you use is

293

When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

When to Turn Off Your Lights When to Turn Off Your Lights When to Turn Off Your Lights August 30, 2012 - 7:53pm Addthis The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. What does this mean for me? The type of lights and the price of electricity determine whether it's best to turn lights off when you leave a room. Consider using sensors, timers, and other automatic lighting controls. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of bulb and the cost of electricity. The type of lightbulb you use is

294

Energy harvesting Wheel Speed Sensor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a prototype energy harvesting autonomous sensor, called the Autonomous Wheel Speed Sensor (AWSS), that is targeted for operation in the Electronic Braking (more)

Parthasarathy, Dhasarathy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Two applications of the Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two important applications of the fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FFPI) sensor are investigated: (1) an optical binary switch for aerospace application, and (2) an FFPI weigh-in-motion sensor for measuring the weight of trucks traveling down a highway. In the fiber optical switch, the FFPI sensor is bonded to a copper cantilever to sense the elongation of cavity length induced by force applied to the end of the cantilever via a pushed button. Light from a superluminescent diode light source passes through a scanned Michelson interferometer and is reflected from a sensing FFPI and a reference FFPI to produce a fringe pattern. A secondary interferometer uses a distributed feedback laser light source to compensate for irregularities in the mechanical scanning rate of the moving stage to achieve precision measurement of the optical path difference. The system is calibrated by applying known weights to the cantilever. The elongation measured by the FFPI sensor shows excellent linearity as a function of the force applied, and little hysteresis was observed. By comparing the measured force to a threshold, the system produces a binary signal that indicates the state of the pilotactuated system; i. e., whether or not the button has been pushed. In FFPI weigh-in-motion sensors system, the FFPI sensors are installed in metal bars so that they will experience the strain induced by applied loads and are connected to the Signal Conditioning Unit (SCU). The SCU determines the induced phase shift in the FFPI and produces voltage outputs proportional to the phase shifts. Laboratory Material Testing System tests show that the fiber optic sensor response is a fairly linear function of the axial displacement. In highway tests the FFPI sensors showed strong responses and consistently reproduced the expected characteristics of truck wheel crossings. A falling weight deflectometer was used to calibrate the sensor response and predict unknown loads. All sensors in steel bars and aluminum bars showed excellent repeatability and accurate predictions, with an average relative percentage error within 2%. The study on sensor response variation with applied load positions shows a bell shaped distribution. Truck tests on the road sensors indicate that the repeatability of wheel crossings at similar position is good. The sensor can accurately measure axle spacing, speed, and truck class.

Xie, Zhaoxia

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Card - Occupational Safety Qualification Card - Occupational Safety FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-OccupationalSafety.docx Description Occupational Safety Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Chemical Processing

298

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Purpose The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers' compensation, and much more. This training will advance DOE's mission as follows: By providing medical and allied health professionals (eg, Industrial Hygiene) and their management with updates regarding medical services and

299

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Medicine Assistant PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medicine Medicine - Assistant PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Deparlment of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT iDafe 'Depauwerltal El.ment& iSlte June 10, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name :of,lnfonnation Systetnol"'ITiPtoJect Occupational Medicine - Assistant Exhlblt;ProJect UID Indirect funded Occupational Safety and Health NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email System Owner Local Privacy Act Offtcer

300

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Energy Employees' Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided In the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) System or IT ProJect Tracking Database Exhibit Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to do the same. Reducing the demand for energy produced from depletable resources and generating energy from renewable sources leaves more resources available for future use. Therefore, energy savings and sustainability go hand in hand. Occupant comfort can be maintained in conjunction with energy savings, and some sustainable practices enhance comfort. Properly planned and implemented construction programs can help ensure efficiently operating systems, reducing the consumption of valuable resources, while providing an acceptable indoor environment. The authors have more than 30 years combined experience working with Texas schools in mechanical, electrical, and plumbing engineering and design as well as energy management.

Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system of contractually-based nuclear safety standards to regulatory based requirements. Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule More Documents & Publications Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

303

Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Duquesne Light Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Varies Lighting: Varies widely by type Controls and Sensors: $10-$75 VFD for Chilled Water Loop $150/hp VFD for HVAC Fans: $80/hp Packaged Terminal AC: $45-$75/ton Food Service Equipment: Varies widely by type Refrigeration Equipment: Varies widely by type

304

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Light Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

Gordon Chalmers

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

306

Remote electrochemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

Integrated optical tamper sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of an monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

RF current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Electrochemical micro sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

310

EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extensively in concert lighting and are finding increased usage in dance lighting because refers to the upstage back curtain (is white or a light color), which can be us for lighting or special Mixer #12;Monitor House speaker Lighting System Control Board: Similar to the sound board, the light

Bifano, Thomas

311

Sensors-00997-2005 Low-Cost Surface Mount LED Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION EDs are being used far more commonly as light sources in optical chemical sensors due to the low-cost, low-power consumption, reliability and ever increasing range of devices and wavelengths available. The increased interest in LED sources has had a major impact on low-cost component based chemical sensors, where the main goal is to achieve analytical performance without the expense of more conventional instrumentation [1-5]. Typically a photodiode is used for detection, providing good sensitivity and a significant reduction in system cost. Usually the photodiode is operated at Vbias=0V and hence itself can be considered as a lowpower sensor, however, in addition to the detector, a good quality operational amplifier and mid-to-high resolution ADC are required to complete the device. These additional components not only increase system complexity and cost, but also add to the power requirements, which is of particular importance in battery-powered s

Sensor Films Results; Roderick L. Shepherd; William S. Yerazunis; Senior Member; King Tong Lau; Dermot Diamond

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

New and Underutilized Technology: Exterior LED/Solid State Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exterior LED/Solid State Lighting Exterior LED/Solid State Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Exterior LED/Solid State Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:55pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for exterior LED/solid state lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits LED lighting economics can work in high electric cost areas with high hours of use. Pricing continually decreases for LED lighting. This technology provides quality, white, even lighting with good color rendition. Greater cost savings can be achieved when combined with bi-level motion sensors to reduce light levels in parking areas, garages, and walkways. Application Exterior LED/solid state lighting is applicable in areas where security and visual performance are critical, including street lighting, parking lots,

313

List of Lighting Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 1032 Lighting Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-1000) CSV (rows 1001-1032) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Furnaces Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Roofs Windows Yes AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Texas Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government

314

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Integrated optical sensor  

SciTech Connect

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Integrated optical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

317

Capacitance pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

An Improved Humidity Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A common feature of all capacitance humidity sensors is their undesirable hysteresis effect due to the unequal adsorption and desorption of water vapor on the surfaces of their dielectric porous materials. To eliminate this error, an improved ...

Shixuan Pang; Hartmut Gral; Horst Jger

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Texas Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electric lighting electric lighting The SNAP House's lighting design aims for elegant simplicity in concept, use, and maintenance. Throughout the house, soft, ambient light is juxtaposed with bright, direct task lighting. All ambient and most task lighting is integrated directly into the architectural design of the house. An accent light wall between the bedroom and bathroom provides a glowing light for nighttime navigation.

320

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Light Emitting Diode (LED) Lighting and Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the most promising and unique energy efficient light source light emitting diode (LED) lighting. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the upcoming growth of the LED and LED lighting market. Future technical improvements to LEDs and systems are also emphasized. Discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from traditional lighting to LED lighting is provided. LED lighting technologies are covered in...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

323

Engage occupants | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

also impact how your systems run, especially if they do things like cover vents, remove light bulbs, and adjust thermostats ... signs that perhaps these systems aren't...

324

DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medical Services Contract Occupational Medical Services Contract DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract June 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that HPM Corporation, of Kennewick, Washington has been awarded an estimated $99 million contract to provide Occupational Medical Services at the DOE Hanford Site. HPM is a certified minority-owned, women-owned small business. This is a two-year hybrid contract with four-one-year option periods that includes firm-fixed price with award fee, cost reimbursement, and Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) components. As the Occupational Medical Services Contractor, HPM Corporation will: Provide occupational medical services to approximately 8,000

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid

326

Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

Lee Cadwallader

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

EPRI Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2004: Occupational Health and Safety Trends 1995-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fifth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2003 from fourteen participating companies.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

Modern lighting sources and controls for energy efficient lighting and a smart control algorithm application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important measure of prosperity of a nation. Energy has been the life-blood for continual progress of human civilization. Since the beginning of industrial revolution around two centuries ago, the global energy consumption has increased ... Keywords: energy efficiency, energy saving, fuzzy logic, modern lighting, sensors, smart controls

?afak Sa?lam; Blent Oral

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Biological Microsensors - Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science to deliver prototype solutions in applications ranging from biodetection to photovoltaics. Sensor development includes discrete sensors and sensor arrays based on...

331

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office Buildings: An Evaluation of Sampled Data from Five European Countries Speaker(s): John Stoops Date: January 3,...

332

Part 835-Occupational Radiation Protection Authority: 42 U.S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

''Development of the 1996 Proposed Amendment to 10 CFR part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection,'' (regulatory development document, November 1996) which may be viewed...

333

A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing...

334

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

335

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the United States and explores policy alternatives and effects related to conversion of existing HOV lanes to high occupancy toll lane operations. References Retrieved...

336

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

337

Window signalling systems: control strategies and occupant behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant response to window control signaling systems (CBEDaly, A. (2002). Operable windows and HVAC systems. HPACK. (2008). The use of windows as controls for indoor

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,quality survey in office buildings, comparing green withnon-green buildings. On average, occupants in green

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency...

340

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential or commercial? The IECC...

342

Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

344

Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance  

SciTech Connect

This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Passive Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Sensors Passive Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Mineral maps can be used to show the presence of hydrothermal minerals and mineral assemblages Stratigraphic/Structural: Map structures/faults and regional strain rates Hydrological: Map surface water features Thermal: Map surface temperatures Dictionary.png Passive Sensors: Sensors that measure energy which is naturally available in the environment. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

346

Occupational safety and health law handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

Sarvadi, D.G. [ed.; Keller; Heckman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Recent results of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector has to undergo significant updates at the end of the current decade, in order to withstand the increased occupancy and radiation damage that will be produced by the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. In this presentation we give an overview of the recent accomplishments of the R&D activity on the planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS Inner Detector upgrade.

Giovanni Marchiori; for the ATLAS Upgrade PPS Collaboration

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy and lighting design  

SciTech Connect

A detailed examination of the current energy conservation practices for lighting systems is presented. This first part of a two-part presentation covers the following: energy and lighting design; lighting and energy standards; lighting efficiency factors; light control and photometrics; lighting and the architectural interior; luminaire impact on the environment; basic design techniques; the lighting power budget; and conservation through control.

Helms, R.N.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Light Emitting Diodes and General Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Emitting Diodes and General Lighting Speaker(s): Martin Moeck Date: August 6, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 We give a short overview on high-power light emitting diodes,...

351

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Wireless Sensor Network Fundamentals Speaker(s): Steven Lanzisera Date: February 8, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kevin Kircher Wireless sensor networks have been promising to provide easy data collection and control capability to applications ranging from scientific data collection, disaster recover, national security, and more. The user experience, however, has been filled with confusing terminology, complicated systems, and a lack of interoperability between vendors. Users with a background in the technology and fundamentals are better able to understand system capabilities, make decisions, and end up with a network that meets their needs. Although a sufficient coverage of this topic is at least a semester course, the goal of this talk is to give a brief

352

Capacitive proximity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Evaluating the performance robustness of fixed and movable shading devices against diverse occupant behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the diverse operating conditions, weather conditions, space users, and occupant preferences of buildings, it is commonplace to provide occupants with multiple means to adapt their immediate indoor environment. However, numerous studies have shown ... Keywords: building performance simulation, occupant behaviour, occupant comfort, robust building design, stochastic occupant modelling

William O'Brien

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Evaluation of Lighting and Lighting Control Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy efficient lighting and lighting controls have been a means to significant energy savings for many facilities around the world. Advances in lighting sources often allow for the conservation of quality of light while providing more flexibility in the control of light. Additionally, advances in core technologies within the lighting marketplace regularly lead to the introduction of new lamps, fixtures and controls. With the rapid introduction of new products and designs, it is important to ...

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Implantable medical sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Chemical sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Lighting Group: Controls: PIER Lighting Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIER Lighting Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects Objective Lighting controls are often expensive, complex, hard to commission properly and difficult to...

359

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated...

360

Preliminary field demonstration of a fiber-optic TCE sensor. [Trichloroethylene (TCE)  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a differential-absorption fiber-optic sensor for use in groundwater and vadose zone monitoring of certain volatile organochlorines. The principle of detection is a quantitative, irreversible chemical reaction that forms visible light-absorbing products. The sensor has been evaluated against gas chromatographic (GC) standard measurements and has demonstrated accuracy and sensitivity sufficient for the environmental monitoring of trace levels of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform. This sensor is currently under evaluation in monitoring well and vadose zone applications. In this paper, we describe the principles of the existing single measurement sensor technology and show preliminary field-test results. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Angel, S.M.; Langry, K.; Roe, J.; Colston, B.W. Jr.; Daley, P.F.; Milanovich, F.P.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Tactile sensing using elastomeric sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GelSight, namely, elastomeric sensor, is a novel tactile sensor to get the 3D information of contacting surfaces. Using GelSight, some tactile properties, such as softness and roughness, could be gained through image ...

Jia, Xiaodan (Xiaodan Stella)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Advanced Sensors for Multifunctional Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more precision, most of the examples are related to multifunctional gas ... Still , those systems do not have the information capacity of natural biologic ... shape- memory devices, temperature sensors, and liquid-viscosity sensors as well.

363

Liquid Water Content of Fogs and Hazes from Visible Light Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is proposed for measuring the liquid water content of fogs and hazes. It consists of a planar circular light sensor placed perpendicular to and coaxial with a narrow collimated light beam of a visible wavelength. The direct light ...

H. Gerber

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Sensors for Underground Distribution Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of different sensors are needed for underground distribution applications. These include sensors for temperature monitoring to track possible overload issues and other issues that can cause heating in underground systems (for example, arcing), sensors for fault detection and characterization, and sensors for voltage and current monitoring to support a wide range of applications (for example, SCADA, volt/var control, and load flow management). In 2008, EPRI evaluated the present state of medium-...

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sensor applications. They have the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, low cost, and low power consumption. However ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Carriers. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,Vapor Sensors. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2008,Absorption. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2009,

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming Hern´an Badino1Chrysler AG, Stuttgart Abstract. The computation of free space available in an environment is an essential, which builds a stochastic occupancy grid to address the free space problem as a dynamic pro- gramming

Mester, Rudolf

368

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources Binghamton University State University of New York P.O. Box 6000 Health Services, IN-204 (607) 777-4610, Fax: (607) 777-2881 Health is strictly for the use of the Occupational Health and Safety Program for Laboratory Animal Resources and may

Suzuki, Masatsugu

369

STATE OF CALIFORNIA HOTEL / MOTEL TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX WAIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR STATE AGENCIES) HOTEL MOTEL OPERATORS: RETAIN THIS WAIVER FOR YOUR FILES TO SUBSTANTIATE YOUR REPORTS of the State Agency indicated below; that the charge for the occupancy at the above establishment on the dates of California. $ OCCUPANCY DATES AMOUNT PAID California State University, Fullerton STATE AGENCY NAME 800 North

de Lijser, Peter

370

POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for optimally controlling HVAC systems in buildings based on actual occupancy levels. POEM is comprised for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based are then fused with an occupancy prediction model us- ing a particle filter in order to determine the most

Cerpa, Alberto E.

371

Estimation of building occupancy levels through environmental signals deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of estimating the occupancy levels in rooms using the information available in standard HVAC systems. Instead of employing dedicated devices, we exploit the significant statistical correlations between the occupancy levels and ... Keywords: Inference, Parametric and Nonparametric methods, System Identification

Afrooz Ebadat, Giulio Bottegal, Damiano Varagnolo, Bo Wahlberg, Karl H. Johansson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

PreHeat: controlling home heating using occupancy prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home heating is a major factor in worldwide energy use. Our system, PreHeat, aims to more efficiently heat homes by using occupancy sensing and occupancy prediction to automatically control home heating. We deployed PreHeat in five homes, three in the ... Keywords: energy, environment, home heating, prediction, sensing

James Scott; A.J. Bernheim Brush; John Krumm; Brian Meyers; Michael Hazas; Stephen Hodges; Nicolas Villar

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbon Monoxide Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; ... the sensor ensures reproducibility and reduces the need for calibration of every sensor coming off the ...

374

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Composite sensor membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Satyanarayana, Srinath (Berkeley, CA); Yue, Min (Albany, CA)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lean blowoff detection sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

Carbon dioxide sensor  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Miniaturized wireless sensor network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses an overview of the wireless sensor networks. It is shown that MEMS/NEMS technologies and SIP concept are well suited for advanced architectures. It is also shown analog architectures have to be compatible with digital signal techniques to develop smart network of microsystem.

Lecointre, Aubin; Dubuc, David; Katia, Grenier; Patrick, Pons; Aubert, Herv; Muller, A; Berthou, Pascal; Gayraud, Thierry; Plana, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optical position sensor for determining the interface between a clear and an opaque fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inexpensive, optical position sensor for measuring a position or length, x, along a one-dimensional curvilinear, coordinate system. The sensor can be used, for example, to determine the position of an interface between a clear and an opaque fluid (such as crude oil and water). In one embodiment, the sensor utilizes the principle of dual-fluorescence, where a primary fiber emits primary fluorescent light and a parallel secondary fiber collects a portion of the primary fluorescent light that is not blocked by the opaque fluid. This, in turn, excites secondary fluorescence in the secondary fiber at a longer wavelength. A light detector measures the intensity of secondary fluorescence emitted from an end of the secondary fiber, which is used to calculate the unknown position or length, x. Side-emitting fibers can be used in place of, or in addition to, fluorescent fibers. The all-optical sensor is attractive for applications involving flammable liquids.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

380

Shape memory alloy thaw sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

Shahinpoor, Mohsen (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sensor system for web inspection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

Sleefe, Gerard E. (1 Snowcap Ct., Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rudnick, Thomas J. (626 E. Jackson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119); Novak, James L. (11048 Malaguena La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Navigation protocols in sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop distributed algorithms for adaptive sensor networks that respond to directing a target through a region of space. We model this problem as an online distributed motion planning problem. Each sensor node senses values in its perception space ... Keywords: Sensor networks, motes, navigation, potential field, robotics

Qun Li; Daniela Rus

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program July 2009 A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to become familiar with and utilize the services and benefits authorized under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOIPCA). There are several Federal entities that support implementation of EEOICPA. Each of these entities serves a critical and unique role in this process. Briefly, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers'

384

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The familiar level of this module is designed to provide the basic information to meet the requirements that are related to 10 CFR 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection," in the following DOE Functional Area Qualification Standards: DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management DOE-STD-1151-2002, Facility Representative DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager DOE-STD-1178-2004, Technical Program Manager DOE-STD-1155-2002, Transportation and Traffic Management DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection

385

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers February 1, 2010 Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well-being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening

386

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) March 17-18, 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW): Registration, Directions, Lodging, and Access REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE SYSTEM The 2014 DOE Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar will be held March 17-18 in Room 4A-104 of the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, DC. Register for the 2014 OMWW at http://hsspublic.energy.gov/Workshops/CMO/2014/Registration.aspx. The deadline for registration will be January 17, 2014 in order to comply with conference system requirements. Upon completing the registration, you will immediately receive a confirmatory email. An additional confirmatory email will be sent to registrants shortly after January 17th (once all

387

Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, traditional industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

cadwallader, lee

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Next Generation Light Source  

Next Generation Light Source Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination High Entry Barrier 71 ...

389

Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Lothian, Josh [ORNL

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

First Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first dwarf galaxies, which constitute the building blocks of the collapsed objects we find today in the Universe, had formed hundreds of millions of years after the big bang. This pedagogical review describes the early growth of their small-amplitude seed fluctuations from the epoch of inflation through dark matter decoupling and matter-radiation equality, to the final collapse and fragmentation of the dark matter on all mass scales above \\~10^{-4} solar masses. The condensation of baryons into halos in the mass range of ~10^5-10^{10} solar masses led to the formation of the first stars and the re-ionization of the cold hydrogen gas, left over from the big bang. The production of heavy elements by the first stars started the metal enrichment process that eventually led to the formation of rocky planets and life. A wide variety of instruments currently under design [including large-aperture infrared telescopes on the ground or in space (JWST), and low-frequency arrays for the detection of redshifted 21cm radiation], will establish better understanding of the first sources of light during an epoch in cosmic history that was largely unexplored so far. Numerical simulations of reionization are computationally challenging, as they require radiative transfer across large cosmological volumes as well as sufficently high resolution to identify the sources of the ionizing radiation. The technological challenges for observations and the computational challenges for numerical simulations, will motivate intense work in this field over the coming decade.

Abraham Loeb

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Dynamic solid state lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation concerns will mandate near-future environments to regulate themselves to accommodate occupants' objectives and best tend to their comfort while minimizing energy consumption. Accordingly, smart energy ...

Aldrich, Matthew (Matthew Henry)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Reducing Barriers To The Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute completed the four-year research project, Reducing Barriers to the Use of High-Efficiency Lighting Systems. The initial objectives were: (1) identifying barriers to widespread penetration of lighting controls in commercial/industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and (2) making recommendations to overcome these barriers. The addition of a fourth year expanded the original project objectives to include an examination of the impact on fluorescent lamps from dimming utilizing different lamp electrode heating and dimming ratios. The scope of the project was narrowed to identify barriers to the penetration of lighting controls into commercial-industrial (C/I) applications that employ fluorescent lamp technologies, and to recommend means for overcoming these barriers. Working with lighting manufacturers, specifiers, and installers, the project identified technological and marketing barriers to the widespread use of lighting controls, specifically automatic-off controls, occupancy sensors, photosensors, dimming systems, communication protocols and load-shedding ballasts. The primary barriers identified include cost effectiveness of lighting controls to the building owner, lack of standard communication protocols to allow different part of the control system to communicate effectively, and installation and commissioning issues. Overcoming the identified barriers requires lighting control products on the market to achieve three main goals: (1) Achieve sufficient functionality to meet the key requirements of their main market. (2) Allow significant cost reduction compared to current market standard systems. Cost should consider: hardware capital cost including wiring, design time required by the specifier and the control system manufacturer, installation time required by the electrician, and commissioning time and remedial time required by the electrician and end user. (3) Minimize ongoing perceived overhead costs and inconvenience to the end user, or in other words, systems should be simple to understand and use. In addition, we believe that no lighting controls solution is effective or acceptable unless it contributes to, or does not compromise, the following goals: (1) Productivity--Planning, installation, commissioning, maintenance, and use of controls should not decrease business productivity; (2) Energy savings--Lighting controls should save significant amounts of energy and money in relation to the expense involved in using them (acceptable payback period); and/or (3) Reduced power demand--Society as a whole should benefit from the lowered demand for expensive power and for more natural resources. Discussions of technology barriers and developments are insufficient by themselves to achieve higher penetration of lighting controls in the market place. Technology transfer efforts must play a key role in gaining market acceptance. The LRC developed a technology transfer model to better understand what actions are required and by whom to move any technology toward full market acceptance.

Peter Morante

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated interferometric sensor depends on an appropriate performance function (e.g., desired displacement range, accuracy, robustness, etc.). In this dissertation, the performance limitations of a bundled differential intensity-modulated displacement sensor are analyzed, where the bundling configuration has been designed to optimize performance. The performance limitations of a white light Fabry-Perot displacement sensor are also analyzed. Both these sensors are non-contacting, but they have access to different regions of the performance-space. Further, both these sensors have different degrees of sensitivity to experimental uncertainty. Made in conjunction with careful analysis, the decision of which sensor to deploy need not be an uninformed one.

Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Lighting When you're shopping for lightbulbs, compare lumens and use the Lighting Facts label to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want. You can save money and energy while lighting your home and still maintaining good light quantity and quality. Consider energy-efficient lighting options to use the same amount of light for less money. Learn strategies for comparing and buying lighting products and using them efficiently. Featured Lighting Choices to Save You Money Light your home for less money while using the same amount of light. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home.

395

Active Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Active Sensors Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Sensors Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Active Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Remote Sensing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Detect fault and ground movement, delineate faults, create high-resolution DEMS, quantify fault kinemaics, develop lineament maps, Geophysical Monitoring Hydrological: Can give indications about subsurface geothermal fluid flow Thermal: Dictionary.png Active Sensors: Sensors that emit their own source of energy then measure the

396

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or framework and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, J.A.; Stoddard, L.M.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or frame work and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, James A. (Thornton, CO); Stoddard, Lawrence M. (Arvada, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Human Behavior Meets Building Intelligence: How Occupants Respond to Open Window Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems,"Occupants Respond to Open Window Signals Katie Ackerly andincorporate operable windows for the benefits of personal

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

Two terminal micropower radar sensor  

SciTech Connect

A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory Architectural Lighting Analysis in Virtual Lighting Laboratory Speaker(s): Mehlika Inanici Date: July 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney Virtual Lighting Laboratory is a Radiance-based lighting analysis tool and methodology that proposes transformations in the utilization of computer visualization in lighting analysis and design decision-making. It is a computer environment, where the user has been provided with matrices of illuminance and luminance values extracted from high dynamic range images. The principal idea is to provide the laboratory to the designer and researcher to explore various lighting analysis techniques instead of imposing limited number of predetermined metrics. In addition, it introduces an analysis approach for temporal and spatial lighting

402

New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lighting industry is driven to provide light sources and lighting systems that, when properly applied, will produce a suitable luminous environment in which to perform a specified task. Tasks may include everything from office work, manufacturing and inspection to viewing priceless art objects, selecting the right chair for your living room, and deciding which produce item to select for tonight's dinner. While energy efficiency is a major consideration in any new lighting system design, the sacrifice of lighting quality may cost more in terms of lost productivity and user dissatisfaction than can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in filament, fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Manufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved color rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take the form of either increasing lamp efficiency (lumens of light delivered per watt of power consumed) or decreasing lamp size, thus making a more easily controlled light source that places light where it is needed. The manufacturer's second goal is to produce lamps that render colors accurately while maintaining high efficiency. This paper will discuss new introductions in light sources and lighting systems and how they may impact the design of luminous environments of the future.

Krailo, D. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

An Inexpensive CO Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 An Inexpensive CO Sensor A schematic of the prototype CO passive sensor. Carbon moNOxide is a colorless, odorless, toxic gas whose primary source indoor is the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. This gas can be a potential problem in any house that uses combustion appliances for space or water heating, cooking, or idling an automobile in an attached garage. Although most appliances work correctly, a problem can exist in houses when the appliance is unventilated or its ventilation system does not properly eliminate exhaust gases from the house. Since Americans spend 90% of their time indoors and 65 to 70% in their residences, understanding how and when CO builds up indoors could save lives. We have very little systematic data on how CO hazards are distrubuted in the indoor environment, but mortality

404

Fiber optic hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Rigid particulate matter sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

407

Optical high acidity sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Nekimken, Howard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carey, W. Patrick (Lynnwood, WA); O' Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NOx Sensor Development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

Underground Distribution Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising costs of new infrastructure, increasing demand, and a declining number of available workers will drive utilities to operate as efficiently as possible. The practice of overbuilding infrastructure to improve or maintain reliability will be viewed as cost-inefficient. Utilities will be forced to operate distribution systems more dynamically and efficiently. Distribution sensors will help provide the needed information to utilities to achieve the goal of dynamic efficiency. The Underground Distributi...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

411

Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Property:HPBD/DateOfOccupancy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DateOfOccupancy DateOfOccupancy Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: H High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database Pages using the property "HPBD/DateOfOccupancy" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) H High Performance Buildings Database + January 4 + High Performance Buildings Database + January 6 + High Performance Buildings Database + October 2 +

413

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ultra-wideband impedance sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

Sandia National Laboratories has created a method and apparatus for measuring the position of an object. It relies on the attenuation of fluorescence light carried inside a fluorescent optical fiber to determine the position of an object.

418

Broadband light-emitting diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A broadband light-emitting diode. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3-2 .mu.m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft.

Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Klem, John F. (Sandia Park, NM); Hafich, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Broadband light-emitting diode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A broadband light-emitting diode is disclosed. The broadband light-emitting diode (LED) comprises a plurality of III-V compound semiconductor layers grown on a semiconductor substrate, with the semiconductor layers including a pair of cladding layers sandwiched about a strained-quantum-well active region having a plurality of different energy bandgaps for generating light in a wavelength range of about 1.3--2 {micro}m. In one embodiment of the present invention, the active region may comprise a first-grown quantum-well layer and a last-grown quantum-well layer that are oppositely strained; whereas in another embodiment of the invention, the active region is formed from a short-period superlattice structure (i.e. a pseudo alloy) comprising alternating thin layers of InGaAs and InGaAlAs. The use a short-period superlattice structure for the active region allows different layers within the active region to be simply and accurately grown by repetitively opening and closing one or more shutters in an MBE growth apparatus to repetitively switch between different growth states therein. The broadband LED may be formed as either a surface-emitting LED or as an edge-emitting LED for use in applications such as chemical sensing, fiber optic gyroscopes, wavelength-divisionmultiplexed (WDM) fiber-optic data links, and WDM fiber-optic sensor networks for automobiles and aircraft. 10 figs.

Fritz, I.J.; Klem, J.F.; Hafich, M.J.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Lighting Options for Homes.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

Baker, W.S.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Seattle City Light - New Construction Incentive Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seattle City Light - New Construction Incentive Program Seattle City Light - New Construction Incentive Program Seattle City Light - New Construction Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Analysis Assistance: Contact Seattle City Light Commissioning Assistance: Contact Seattle City Light Prescriptive Commercial Rebates Lighting: $0.02 - $0.23/kWh saved or $3 - $86/fixture Lighting Controls: $0.20 - $0.26/kWh saved or $30 - $90/sensor HVAC Controls: $0.20 - $0.23 Chillers: $0.23-$0.34 per kWh saved Air Conditioners: $0.20 -$0.23 per kWh saved Heat Pumps $0.20-$0.27 per kWh saved Economizers: $0.20 - $0.23 Cooling Towers: $0.23 - $0.27 Server Virtualization: $150 per server removed

422

Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Seattle City Light - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate 70% of cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: $0.02 - $0.23/kWh saved or $3 - $86/fixture Lighting Controls: $0.20 - $0.26/kWh saved or $30 - $90/sensor HVAC Controls: $0.20 - $0.23 Chillers: $0.23-$0.34 per kWh saved Air Conditioners: $0.20 -$0.23 per kWh saved Heat Pumps $0.20-$0.27 per kWh saved

423

Mobile lighting apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

424

Using an Embedded Device Network for Lighting and Building Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using an Embedded Device Network for Lighting and Building Equipment Using an Embedded Device Network for Lighting and Building Equipment Control Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Date: December 5, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare IBECS, an implementation of an Embedded Device Network designed to allow communications between lighting systems, building equipment, and sensors and meters will be presented during this seminar. IBECS is a low-cost network infrastructure that piggybacks on existing Ethernets to allow control of building loads at an added cost under $5/control point. Several core components of the IBECS technology have been developed and tested at LBNL including: a network/ballast interface, an addressable light switch, a motorized blind interface, an environmental sensor (capable of measuring

425

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial, Industrial, and Agricultural...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting: 15fixture LED Exit Sign: 5sign Occupancy Sensors: 5switch Commercial Air Conditioning Units: 40ton Plate CoolersPre-Coolers: 500unit Dairy Refrigeration...

426

Chain Stores and Franchises Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Door; LED Reach-In Case Lighting and Occupancy Sensors; Evaporator andor Condenser Fan ECM Motors; Night Curtains; Beverage Cooler Controls; Floating Head Pressure...

427

CX-004761: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to include Communities and Business, Photovoltaic Systems, insulated roofs, light emitting diode lamps, thermostats and occupancy sensors. North Carolina must comply with State...

428

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Employees Occupational Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the EEOICPA is the responsibility of the Department of Labor (DOL). The DOL is supported in its role by the DOE, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Justice (DOJ). If you would like more information about the benefits available under the EEOICPA, please visit DOL's web page or see the EEOICPA pamphlet.

429

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building Energy Use Speaker(s): Hung-Wen (Richard) Lin Date: January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Tianzhen Hong Measured energy use of buildings demonstrates large discrepancies even between buildings with the same function and located in similar climates. Among various factors contributing to the discrepancies, occupant behavior is found to be a key factor. How occupants set the comfort criteria, interact with building components and systems, and respond to environmental discomfort directly affects the operation of buildings and thus their energy use. On the other hand, it is also important to find out what sort of design methods can reduce building consumption in new and existing

430

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

431

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning Speaker(s): Ryota Shirai Date: August 31, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Naoya Motegi...

432

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback Speaker(s): Geoff Levermore Date: June 28, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This presentation will describe some of...

433

Density Functional Theory Based Calculations of Site Occupancy in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the site occupancy behavior based on two .... First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials ... Forming-Crush Simulation Optimization Using Internal State Variable Model.

434

PROCEEDINGS Open Access Occupational cancer in developed countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of occupational exposures have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. About one third of the factors identified as definite or probable human carcinogens were first investigated in the workplace and these exposures exact a considerable toll on working populations. There are many additional workplace exposures that are suspect carcinogens that require further evaluation to ensure a safe work environment. Information from occupational investigations is also relevant to the general population because many occupational exposures can be found outside the workplace. Much of our understanding about occupational cancer has been obtained from studies largely composed of white men in developed countries. The movement of industry from developed to developing countries underscores the need for future investigations to include more diverse populations. What do we know? Studies of exposures in the workplace have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs on the Evaluation of

Aaron Blair; Loraine Marrett; Laura Beane Freeman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Integrated simulation environment for lighting design  

SciTech Connect

Lighting design involves the consideration of multiple performance criteria, from the earliest stages of conceptual design, through various stages of controls and operation in a project's life cycle. These criteria include: (1) the quantitative analysis of illuminance and luminance distribution due to daylighting and electric lighting; (2) qualitative analysis of the lighting design with photometrically accurate renderings of the designed environment; (3) analysis of energy implications of daylighting and electric lighting design and operation;, and (4) analysis of control strategies and sensor placement for maximizing energy savings from lighting control while providing visual comfort. In this paper we describe the development of an integrated decision-making environment that brings together several different tools, and provides the data management and process control required for a multi-criterion support of the design and operation of daylighting and electric lighting systems. The result is a powerful design and decision-making environment to meet the diverse and evolving needs of lighting designers and operators.

Pal, Vineeta; Papamichael, Konstantinos

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

437

Occupation-number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to 2049 nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of =1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, Michael G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Papenbrock, Thomas F [ORNL; Wild, S. M. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, M; Wild, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

440

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Shape memory alloy thaw sensors  

SciTech Connect

A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

Geometry-dependent lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper we introduce geometrydependent lighting that allows lighting parameters to be defined independently and possibly discrepantly over an object or scene based on the local geometry. We present and discuss Light Collages, a lighting design system with geometry-dependent lights for effective feature-enhanced visualization. Our algorithm segments the objects into local surface patches and places lights that are locally consistent but globally discrepant to enhance the perception of shape. We use spherical harmonics for efficiently storing and computing light placement and assignment. We also outline a method to find the minimal number of light sources sufficient to illuminate an object well with our globally discrepant lighting approach. Index Terms Lighting design, scientific illustration, discrepant lighting, light placement, silhouette enhancement, proximity shadows, spherical harmonics I.

Chang Ha Lee; Xuejun Hao; Amitabh Varshney

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Lighting Group: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New in the Lighting Group For more information on what's new in the Lighting Group, please contact: Francis Rubinstein Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4096...

444

Light in the city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on enhancing the awareness of light for the pedestrian,and using light as a way of revealing the structure of the city and its relation to the cosmos. It proposes that aesthetic qualities of light inform ...

Srinivasan, Kavita, 1976-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Specific light in sculpture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

Powell, John William

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Energy_Savings_Light_Emitting_Diodes_Niche_Lighting_Apps.pdf...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergySavingsLightEmittingDiodesNicheLightingApps.pdf EnergySavingsLightEmittingDiodesNicheLightingApps.pdf EnergySavingsLightEmittingDiodesNicheLightingApps.p...

447

Stochastic binary sensor networks for noisy environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a stochastic framework for detecting anomalies or gathering events of interest in a noisy environment using a network consisting of binary sensors. A binary sensor is an extremely coarse sensor, capable of measuring data to only 1-bit ... Keywords: energy consumption, energy efficiency, noisy environments, sensor networks, simulation, stochastic binary sensors, wireless networks

T. Nguyen; Dong Nguyen; Huaping Liu; Duc A. Tran

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Argonne...

449

Available Technologies: Plasmonic Nanocube Sensor  

Berkeley Lab researchers Hung-Jen Wu and John T. Groves have developed a plasmonic nanocube sensor a low cost, label free optical detection tool ...

450

PC Board Mountable Corrosion Sensors  

Sandia National Laboratories has created sensors to identify and assess the pervasive and expensive problem of corrosion in applications ranging from ...

451

Portable Chemical Sensors for Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Sensors for Environmental and State of Health Monitoring Emerging nano technologies are transforming microsensor research and development, a key enabler of Sandia's...

452

Mobility in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 802.15.4 radio (for wireless operation) as well as thewireless sensor network protocol, significant power can be saved during network operations.

Mehta, Ankur Mukesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Prospects for LED lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state lighting using light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has the potential to reduce energy consumption for lighting by 50% while revolutionizing the way we illuminate our homes, work places, and public spaces. Nevertheless, substantial technical challenges remain in order for solid-state lighting to significantly displace the well-developed conventional lighting technologies. We review the potential of LED solid-state lighting to meet the long-term cost goals.

Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Gee, James Martin; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for lighting control systems in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities is on the rise with the demand for increased energy savings. With lighting accounting for almost 23% of grid load, there is significant opportunity to reduce lighting load while improving the quality of light for customers. Lighting control systems are becoming more intelligent as the need for them to interface with building control systems and demand response systems also increases. Lighting control systems use...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

Composite Lighting Simulations with Lighting Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A whole variety of different techniques for simulating global illumination in virtual environments have been developed over recent years. Each technique, including Radiosity, Monte-Carlo ray- or photon tracing, and directional-dependent Radiance computations, is best suited for simulating only some special case environments. None of these techniques is currently able to efficiently simulate all important lighting effects in non-trivial scenes. In this paper, we describe a new approach for efficiently combining different global illumination algorithms to yield a composite lighting simulation: Lighting Networks. Lighting Networks can exploit the advantages of each algorithm and can combine them in such a way as to simulate lighting effects that could only be computed at great costs by any single algorithm. Furthermore, this approach allows a user to configure the Lighting Network to compute only specific lighting effects that are important for a given task, while avoiding a costly simulation of the full global illumination in a scene. We show how the light paths computed by a Lighting Network can be described using regular expressions. This mapping allows us to analyze the composite lighting simulation and ensure completeness and redundant-free computations. Several examples demonstrate the advantages and unique lighting effects that can be obtained using this technique. 1

Philipp Slusallek; Marc Stamminger; Wolfgang Heidrich; Jan-Christian Popp; Hans-peter Seidel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fluorescent sensor for mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

457

Expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expendable oceanographic sensor apparatus is deployed from an airplane or a ship to make oceanographic observations in a profile of the surface-to-ocean floor, while deployed on the floor, and then a second profile when returning to the ocean surface. The device then records surface conditions until on-board batteries fail. All data collected is stored and then transmitted from the surface to either a satellite or other receiving station. The apparatus is provided with an anchor that causes descent to the ocean floor and then permits ascent when the anchor is released. Anchor release is predetermined by the occurrence of a pre-programmed event.

McCoy, Kim O. (Carmel, CA); Downing, Jr., John P. (Port Townsand, WA); DeRoos, Bradley G. (Worthington, OH); Riches, Michael R. (Silver Spring, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Thin film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Lighting Group: Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Links Organizations Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) International Commission on Illumination (CIE) International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) International Association of Energy-Efficient Lighting Lightfair International Energy Agency - Task 21: Daylight in Buildings: Design Tools and Performance Analysis International Energy Agency - Task 31: Daylighting Buildings in 21st Century National Association on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions (NCQLP) National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors (NAILD) International Association of Lighting Management Companies (NALMCO) Research Centers California Lighting Technology Center Lighting Research Center Lighting Research at Canada Institute for Research in Construction

460

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "lighting occupancy sensors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Plant and Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publicationshouseplantligh t.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach "Artificial" light comes from many kinds of bulbs that emit different wavelengths of light; Many plants...

462

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Angle Limit," Phys. Rev. Lett., 99: 134801 (2007). 33 Researchers Produce Firsts with Bursts of Light BNL researchers have generated extremely short pulses of light that are the...

463

Light Metals 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... Softcover book: Light Metals 2008 Volume 2: Aluminum Reduction. Hardcover book and CD-ROM: Light Metals 2009...

464

Lighting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Lighting Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Lighting Incentives...

465

Lighting Systems Test Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement equipment with light beam Lighting Systems Test Facilities NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be...

466

Lighting and Daylighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by using daylighting, or the process of using natural sunlight, windows, and skylights to provide lighting.

467

Light Laboratory, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hubbell Lighting Photometric Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 12) Solid State Lighting Luminaires - Color Characteristic Measurements. [22/S04] IES LM-16:1993 Practical Guide to Colorimetry of Light Sources. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Energy Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Road Vista, San Diego, CA [200823- 0] Light Laboratory, Inc ... GA. CSA Group, Alpharetta, GA [200732- 0] Cooper Lighting Photometric Laboratory ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

470

Looking For Light.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In my search for the way light can dictate the overall expression of an image, I have found that light is the means that activates (more)

Lindholm, Kevin R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

LBNL Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED and ballast berkeley lamp workstation light switch Overview | What's New | Publications | Software | Facilities | People | Contact Us | Links Sources and Ballasts | Light...

472

Properties of Light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scattering of Light. Exploration: Sunset in a glass. ... How would you design a camera that could see through a sand storm? Invisible Light. ...

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

473

Lighting and Daylighting Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by using daylighting, or the process of using natural sunlight, windows, and skylights to provide lighting.

474

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z