Sample records for lighting metal halide

  1. Metal-halide perovskites for photovoltaic and light-emitting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-halide perovskites for photovoltaic and light-emitting devices September 15, 2015 at 4:30 pm36-428 Sam Stranks Massachusetts Institute of Technology peopleStranks...

  2. Metallic halide lights and lighting systems. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the design and operation of metallic halide lights and lighting systems. High pressure, high intensity, and low wattage discharge lamps are described. Citations discuss power sources, lamp life, lamp control circuits, thermal switches, and heat reflective coatings. Applications in sport stadium lighting, vehicle headlights, and crop-lighting are included. (Contains a minimum of 170 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce...

  4. Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    doctor aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Beks, Mark Louwrens Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps/ door Beks, M.L. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2008. Proefschrift. ISBN: 978

  5. Transport phenomena in metal-halide lamps a poly-diagnostic study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Nimalasuriya, Tanya Transport phenomena in metal-halide lamps : a poly-diagnostic study / by Tanya Nimalasuriya. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2007. Proefschrift. ISBN 978 aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van

  6. Deposition of refractory metal films by rare-gas halide laser photodissociation of metal carbonyls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, D.K.; Steinfeld, J.I.; Sethi, D.S.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Films of Cr, Mo, and W on quartz, Pyrex, Suprasil, and Al substrates were deposited by photodissociation of the respective hexacarbonyls using focused and pulsed radiation from rare-gas halide lasers. Cr was deposited by dissociation of Cr(CO)/sub 6/ using XeF (308 nm), KrF (249 nm), and ArF (193 nm) lasers. Mo and W were deposited from their respective hexacarbonyls at 249 and 193 nm. Pulse energies varied between 8 and 12 mJ. Pulse rates of 10--60 Hz were used. The pulse duration was about 10 ns. Depositions with substrates both parallel and perpendicular to the excimer radiation were attempted. Only in the case of perpendicular configuration were strongly adherent films observed. The deposition rates for thicknesses up to 3000 A appeared to be independent of the pulse rate for all three metals. The films exhibited strong adhesion to the substrate. Scanning electron microscope photographs of the films revealed the presence of continuous metal layers. Auger and x-ray analyses of the films indicated contamination from carbon and oxygen. The source of these impurities is most likely to be CO produced in the decarbonylation of the parent hexacarbonyl. Adhesion to the substrate is apparently enhanced by laser stimulated generation of strong binding sites on the surface.

  7. Bright Light-Emitting Diodes based on Organometal Halide Perovskite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Moghaddam, Reza Saberi; Lai, May Ling; Docampo, Pablo; Higler, Ruben; Deschler, Felix; Price, Michael; Sadhanala, Aditya; Pazos, Luis M.; Credgington, Dan; Hanusch, Fabian; Bein, Thomas; Snaith, Henry J.; Friend, Richard H.

    2014-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    a Keithley 2400 Source Measure Unit (SMU). Photon flux was measured simultaneously using a calibrated silicon photodiode centered over the light-emitting pixel. Radiance in W sr-1 m-2 and luminance in cd m-2 10 were calculated based...

  8. Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,DepartmentEnergyMetal

  9. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  10. anhydrous transcurium halides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of metal halide lamps are investigated, including acoustic resonance, spectral energy, and luminous efficacy. To operate metal halide lamps at intended conditions, (more)...

  11. Metal and Ceramic Thin Film Growth by Reaction of Alkali Metals with Metal Halides: A New Route for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachariah, Michael R.

    or metal oxide ceramic films are easily formed by the introduction of nitrogen or oxygen gases the precursors of sodium metal vapor, titanium tetrachloride (the limiting reagent), and either Ar or N2 gas, salt-free titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN), and titanium silicide (TixSiy) thin films have been

  12. Emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless indium halide lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, M.; Hochi, A.; Horii, S.; Matsuoka, T. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto (Japan). Lighting Research Lab.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrodeless HID lamp excited by microwave has been intensively investigated because of its long life, high efficacy and environmental aspect. This study reports excellent emission and spectral characteristics of electrodeless HID lamp containing indium halides. The authors investigate InI and InBr as ingredients, and measure the microwave excited spectra and luminous intensities of lamps which are made from spherical silica glass in 10--40 mm outer diameter and with various amounts of halides. It is well known that such indium halides in the usual metal-halide lamps have strong blue line emission at 410 and 451nm. But, in the authors` microwave excited lamps, continuous spectrum can be observed in addition in the visible region. Increasing input of power of microwave makes this continuous spectrum stronger. Below 1kW microwave input power, the spectrum of InBr lamp almost resembled the CIE standard illuminant D65. As a consequence of the spectrum, they found that the color rendering and the duv of InBr lamp were excellent as high as 95 and smaller than 0.002, respectively, in the region of 400--800W input power. The efficacy higher than 100 lm/W was further achieved at 400W. The authors confirm that the microwave excited indium halides lamps can be applicable to many fields of lighting.

  13. Lutetium gadolinium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Kanai S. (Newton, MA); Higgins, William M (Westborough, MA); Van Loef, Edgar V (Allston, MA); Glodo, Jaroslaw (Allston, MA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Lutetium gadolinium halide scintillators, devices and methods, including a composition having the formula Lu.sub.xGd.sub.(1-x)Halide and a dopant.

  14. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tom, Glenn M. (New Milford, CT); Brown, Duncan W. (Wilton, CT)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  15. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  16. Emission of Visible Light by Hot Dense Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    More, R.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1761 EMISSION OF VISIBLE LIGHT BY HOT DENSE METALS ByDE-AC52-07NA27344. HI FAN Emission of Visible Light by HotABSTRACT We consider the emission of visible light by hot

  17. Metal-halide perovskites for photovoltaic and light-emitting devices |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRodMIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

  18. ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS A. R. MACKINTOSH H. C. Mrsted Institute terres rares Ikgeres. Abstract. -The magnetic properties of the light rare earth metals are reviewed the last decade, the magnetism of the heavy rare earth metals is now rather well understood. The magnetic

  19. Actinide halide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Zwick, Bill D. (Santa Fe, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, David L. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  20. Actinide halide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  1. Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  2. Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Street Light and Traffic Light Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , street lights and traffic lights represent one of the largest categories of electricity used by a city. By retrofitting the street lights with energy efficient lamps such as high pressure sodium and metal halide and traffic lights with light-emitting... diode (LED) traffic signals, a city 1 In the 2003 and 2005 Texas State legislative sessions, the emissions reductions legislation in Senate Bill 5 was modified by House bill 3235, and House bill 1365...

  3. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyke, Stephen E. (Middleton, WI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  4. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemer, D.D. [Idaho National Laboratory, 12N 3167E, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  5. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  6. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Lunt, D.L.J. [Tucson Optical Research Corp., AZ (United States)

    1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously.

  7. High Photoluminescence E?ciency and Optically Pumped Lasing in Solution-Processed Mixed Halide Perovskite Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschler, Felix; Price, Michael; Pathak, Sandeep; Klintberg, Lina E.; Jarausch, David-Dominik; Higler, Ruben; Hu?ttner, Sven; Leijtens, Tomas; Stranks, Samuel D.; Snaith, Henry J.; Atatu?re, Mete; Phillips, Richard T.; Friend, Richard H.

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the photo-physical properties of organic-metallic lead-halide perovskites, which demonstrate excellent photovoltaic performance in devices with electron- and hole-accepting layers, helps to understand their charge photo...

  8. Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tew, Gregory N.

    Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light of lanthanide ions which is the focus of this report. Rare earth metal complexes have relatively good Combining polymeric architectures with metal ions produces hybrid materials with extremely rich properties

  9. Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Jana Pfeiffer; Martha R. Finck

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

  10. Halide and Oxy-halide Eutectic Systems for High Performance High...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Q2 Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High Performance High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids Corrosion in Very High-Temperature Molten Salt for Next Generation CSP Systems...

  11. Diamond films treated with alkali-halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A secondary electron emitter is provided and includes a substrate with a diamond film, the diamond film is treated or coated with an alkali-halide. 5 figs.

  12. Lanthanide doped strontium barium mixed halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundiah, Gautam; Bizarri, Gregory; Hanrahan, Stephen M; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a lanthanide-doped strontium barium mixed halide useful for detecting nuclear material.

  13. Enhanced Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium Halide/Copper...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium HalideCopper Photocathode. Enhanced Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium HalideCopper Photocathode. Abstract: The quantum efficiency of Cu...

  14. High voltage ignition of high pressure microwave powered UV light sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, J.D.; Cekic, M.; Wood, C.H. [Fusion U.V. Curing Systems Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial microwave powered (electrodeless) light sources have been limited to quiescent pressures of {approximately}300 Torr of buffer gas and metal-halide fills. The predominant reason for such restrictions has been the inability to microwave ignite the plasma due to the collisionality of higher pressure fills and/or the electronegativity of halide bulb chemistries. Commercially interesting bulb fills require electric fields for ionization that are often large multiples of the breakdown voltage for air. Many auxiliary ignition methods are evaluated for efficiency and practicality before the choice of a high-voltage system with a retractable external electrode. The scheme utilizes a high voltage pulse power supply and a novel field emission source. Acting together they create localized condition of pressure reduction and high free electron density. This allows the normal microwave fields to drive this small region into avalanche, ignite the bulb, and heat the plasma to its operating point (T{sub e} {approx} 0.5 eV). This process is currently being used in a new generation of lamps, which are using multi-atmospheric excimer laser chemistries and pressure and constituent enhanced metal-halide systems. At the present time, production prototypes produce over 900 W of radiation in a 30 nm band, centered at 308 nm. Similarly, these prototypes when loaded with metal-halide bulb fills produce over 1 kW of radiation in 30 nm wide bands, centered about the wavelength of interest.

  15. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  16. Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    computational modeling along with rapid material screening methods to identify halide salt mixtures with a melting point below 250C that are stable at temperatures well above...

  17. Effect of plasmonic losses on light emission enhancement in quantum-wells coupled to metallic gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadi, Toufik; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Sciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental work has shown significant luminescence enhancement from near-surface quantum-well (QW) structures using metallic grating to convert surface plasmon (SP) modes into radiative modes. This work introduces a detailed theoretical study of plasmonic losses and the role of SPs in improving light extraction from grated light-emitting QW structures, using the fluctuational electrodynamics method. The method explains experimental results demonstrating emission enhancement, light scattering, and plasmonic coupling in the structures. We study these effects in angle-resolved reflectometry and luminescence setups in InGaN QW structures with silver grating. In contrast to experiments, our model allows direct calculation of the optical losses. The model predicts that the plasmonic coupling and scattering increases light emission by a factor of up to three compared to a flat semiconductor structure. This corresponds to reducing the absorption losses from approximately 93% in the ungrated metallic structure to 75% in the grated structure. Lower losses are associated with a significant emission enhancement enabled by the SPs of silver/GaN interfaces, which are present in the blue/green wavelength range, and can be optimized by carefully nanostructuring the metal layer and by the positioning of the QW. In general, the enhancement results from the interplay of mode scattering, conversion of SP energy directly into light, and losses in the metallic grating. The reported losses are very high when compared to the losses present in modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Albeit, our work provides tools needed for further optimization of plasmonic light extraction, eventually leading to highly efficient LEDs.

  18. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1) Upgrade lighting and metal halide fixtures along Emma Street with light-emitting diode (LED) fixtures; 2) replace metal halide fixtures in Murphy and Hunt Parks; 3)...

  19. Metal-black scattering centers to enhance light harvesting by thin-film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, Robert E.

    Metal-black scattering centers to enhance light harvesting by thin-film solar cells Deep Panjwania as scattering centers to increase the effective optical thickness of thin-film solar cells. The particular type. Gold-black was deposited on commercial thin-film solar cells using a thermal evaporator in nitrogen

  20. Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

  1. Evaluation of Methods to Increase Light Under Ferry Terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Southard, John A.

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    To address concerns of resource agencies about the potential impacts of ferry terminal expansion on valuable habitat functions and resource use of nearshore areas, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), conducted field trials with off-the-shelf products that promote light passage through dock structures. These products included a SunTunnel, deck prisms, and a metal halide greenhouse light. Light measurements (photosynthetically active radiation, PAR) were also recorded beneath glass blocks and a metal grating installed at Clinton Ferry Terminal on Whidbey Island, WA. A review of other studies measuring the effects of dock shading and alternate dock materials was conducted. PAR measurements from this study were related to minimum requirements for eelgrass Zostera marina photosynthesis and to the known maximum photosynthetic ?saturation? rate for Z. marina. We also related PAR measurements to what we know about light effects on juvenile salmonid feeding and passage under overwater structures. Of the light technologies tested, the metal halide light, SunTunnel, glass blocks, and grating potentially provide enough light for eelgrass growth underneath a ferry terminal with similar construction to the Clinton Ferry Terminal. All of these technologies would potentially provide adequate light under conditions where eelgrass is located at its upper depth limit and a dock is close to the water surface. Light levels needed to allow fish to feed and to form schools are low (~ 1-2 mmol/m2/s), and much less than those required for photosynthesis. Our research indicates that installing any of the tested light products would likely maintain light levels under the dock above those required for active feeding by juvenile salmonids.

  2. Design of Optical Metamaterial Mirror with Metallic Nanoparticles for Broadband Light Absorption in Graphene Optoelectronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seungwoo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general metallic mirror (i.e., a flat metallic surface) has been a popular optical component that can contribute broadband light absorption to thin-film optoelectronic devices; nonetheless, such electric mirror with a reversal of reflection phase inevitably causes the problem of minimized electric field near at the mirror surface (maximized electric field at one quarter of wavelength from mirror). This problem becomes more elucidated, when the deep-subwavelength-scaled two-dimensional (2D) material (e.g., graphene and molybdenum disulfide) is implemented into optoelectronic device as an active channel layer. The purpose of this work was to conceive the idea for using a charge storage layer (spherical Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), embedded into dielectric matrix) of the floating-gate graphene photodetector as a magnetic mirror, which allows the device to harness the increase in broadband light absorption. In particular, we systematically examined whether the versatile assembly of spherical AuNP monolayer within ...

  3. LEDs for Energy Efficient Greenhouse Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Devesh; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light energy is an important factor for plant growth. In regions where the natural light source, i.e. solar radiation, is not sufficient for growth optimization, additional light sources are being used. Traditional light sources such as high pressure sodium lamps and other metal halide lamps are not very efficient and generate high radiant heat. Therefore, new sustainable solutions should be developed for energy efficient greenhouse lighting. Recent developments in the field of light source technologies have opened up new perspectives for sustainable and highly efficient light sources in the form of light-emitting diodes, i.e. LEDs, for greenhouse lighting. This review focuses on the potential of LEDs to replace traditional light sources in the greenhouse. In a comparative economic analysis of traditional vs. LED lighting, we show that the introduction of LEDs allows reduction of the production cost of vegetables in the long-run of several years, due to the high energy efficiency, low maintenance cost and lon...

  4. J. Am. Chem. SOC.1991, 113,9575-9585 9575 Mixed Aggregation of Lithium Enolates and Lithium Halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collum, David B.

    J. Am. Chem. SOC.1991, 113,9575-9585 9575 Mixed Aggregation of Lithium Enolates and Lithium Halides with Lithium 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidide(LiTMP) Patricia L. Hall, James H. Gilchrist, Aidan T. Harrison]-lithiumdi-tert-butylamide and conformationally locked [6Li]-lithium2,2,4,6,6-pentamethylpiperidide shed further light

  5. METALLICITY AS A SOURCE OF DISPERSION IN THE SNIa BOLOMETRIC LIGHT CURVE LUMINOSITY-WIDTH RELATIONSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bravo, E. [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Carrer Comte d'Urgell 187, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); DomInguez, I. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Badenes, C. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, via mentore Maggini snc, 64100 Teramo (Italy)], E-mail: eduardo.bravo@upc.edu, E-mail: inma@ugr.es, E-mail: carles@wise.tau.ac.il

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The recognition that the metallicity of Type Ia supernova (SNIa) progenitors might bias their use for cosmological applications has led to an increasing interest in its role in shaping SNIa light curves. We explore the sensitivity of the synthesized mass of {sup 56}Ni, M({sup 56}Ni), to the progenitor metallicity starting from pre-main-sequence models with masses M {sub 0} = 2-7 M {sub sun} and metallicities Z = 10{sup -5}-0.10. The interplay between convective mixing and carbon burning during the simmering phase eventually raises the neutron excess, {eta}, and leads to a smaller {sup 56}Ni yield, but does not change substantially the dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z. Uncertain attributes of the progenitor white dwarf, like the central density, have a minor effect on M({sup 56}Ni). Our main results are: (1) a sizeable amount of {sup 56}Ni is synthesized during incomplete Si-burning, which leads to a stronger dependence of M({sup 56}Ni) on Z than obtained by assuming that {sup 56}Ni is produced in material that burns fully to nuclear statistical equilibrium; (2) in one-dimensional delayed detonation simulations a composition dependence of the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) density gives a nonlinear relationship between M({sup 56}Ni) and Z and predicts a luminosity larger than previously thought at low metallicities (however, the progenitor metallicity alone cannot explain the whole observational scatter of SNIa luminosities); and (3) an accurate measurement of the slope of the Hubble residuals versus metallicity for a large enough data set of SNIa might give clues to the physics of DDT in thermonuclear explosions.

  6. Halide electroadsorption on single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocko, B.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wandlowski, T. [Univ. of Ulm (Germany). Dept. of Electrochemistry

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and phase behavior of halides have been investigated on single crystals of Ag and Au using synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques. The adlayer coverages are potential dependent. For all halides studied the authors found that with increasing potential, at a critical potential, a disordered adlayer transforms into an ordered structure. Often these ordered phases are incommensurate and exhibit potential-dependent lateral separations (electrocompression). The authors have analyzed the electrocompression in terms of a model which includes lateral interactions and partial charge. A continuous compression is not observed for Br on Ag(100). Rather, they find that the adsorption is site-specific (lattice gas) in both the ordered and disordered phases. The coverage increases with increasing potential and at a critical potential the disordered phase transforms to a well-ordered commensurate structure.

  7. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitz, James V. (Hinsdale, IL); Williams, Clayton W. (Chicago, IL)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  8. americium halides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions using unactivated alkyl electrophiles (e.g., halides and sulfonates). Although aryl and alkenyl ... Zhou, Jianrong (Jianrong Steve)...

  9. Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit: Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkerson, Andrea M.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area is a high flux lighting application in a high temperature environment, presenting a formidable challenge for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This retrofit is an Energy Savings Performance Contract ENABLE project under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program. If high flux LED technology performs well in a region with high ambient temperature and solar radiation, it can perform well in most outdoor environments. The design process for the Yuma retrofit has already provided valuable knowledge to CBP and DOE. The LED lighting system selected for the retrofit is expected to reduce energy consumption 69% compared to the incumbent quartz metal halide (QMH) lighting system. If the LED lighting system is installed, GATEWAY will continue to document and disseminate information regarding the installation and long-term performance so that others may also gain valuable knowledge from the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area lighting retrofit.

  10. Lanthanum halide scintillators for time-of-flight 3-D pet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karp, Joel S. (Glenside, PA); Surti, Suleman (Philadelphia, PA)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Lanthanum Halide scintillator (for example LaCl.sub.3 and LaBr.sub.3) with fast decay time and good timing resolution, as well as high light output and good energy resolution, is used in the design of a PET scanner. The PET scanner includes a cavity for accepting a patient and a plurality of PET detector modules arranged in an approximately cylindrical configuration about the cavity. Each PET detector includes a Lanthanum Halide scintillator having a plurality of Lanthanum Halide crystals, a light guide, and a plurality of photomultiplier tubes arranged respectively peripherally around the cavity. The good timing resolution enables a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner to be developed that exhibits a reduction in noise propagation during image reconstruction and a gain in the signal-to-noise ratio. Such a PET scanner includes a time stamp circuit that records the time of receipt of gamma rays by respective PET detectors and provides timing data outputs that are provided to a processor that, in turn, calculates time-of-flight (TOF) of gamma rays through a patient in the cavity and uses the TOF of gamma rays in the reconstruction of images of the patient.

  11. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, S.K. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel.

  12. Coupling mid-infrared light from a photonic crystal waveguide to metallic transmission lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.blanco@tecnalia.com, E-mail: r.hillenbrand@nanogune.eu [ICT-European Software Institute Division, Tecnalia, Ibaizabal Bidea, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain) [ICT-European Software Institute Division, Tecnalia, Ibaizabal Bidea, Ed. 202, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniería Bilbao, UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain); Sarriugarte, Paulo [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain)] [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Garcia-Adeva, Angel [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, E.T.S. Ingeniería de Bilbao, UPV-EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain)] [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, E.T.S. Ingeniería de Bilbao, UPV-EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain); Zubia, Joseba [Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniería Bilbao, UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain)] [Dpto. Electronica y Telecom., E.T.S. Ingeniería Bilbao, UPV/EHU, Alda. Urquijo, 48103 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain); Hillenbrand, Rainer, E-mail: andrea.blanco@tecnalia.com, E-mail: r.hillenbrand@nanogune.eu [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain) [Nanooptics Group, CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, 20018 Donostia–San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and theoretically study a hybrid structure consisting of a photonic crystal waveguide (PhC-wg) and a two-wire metallic transmission line (TL), engineered for efficient transfer of mid-infrared (mid-IR) light between them. An efficiency of 32% is obtained for the coupling from the transverse magnetic (TM) photonic mode to the symmetric mode of the TL, with a predicted intensity enhancement factor of 53 at the transmission line surface. The strong coupling is explained by the small phase velocity mismatch and sufficient spatial overlapping between the modes. This hybrid structure could find applications in highly integrated mid-IR photonic-plasmonic devices for biological and gas sensing, among others.

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS] [CanmetMATERIALS

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  14. Environmental and health aspects of lighting: Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clear, R.; Berman, S.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most discharge lamps, including fluorescent lamps, metal halide lamps, and high pressure sodium lamps, contain Mercury, a toxic chemical. Lighting professionals need to be able to respond to questions about the direct hazards of Mercury from accidentally breaking lamps, and the potential environmental hazards of lamp operation and disposal. We calculated the exposures that could occur from an accidental breakage of lamps. Acute poisoning appears almost impossible. Under some circumstances a sealed environment, such as a space station, could be contaminated enough to make it unhealthy for long-term occupation. Mercury becomes a potential environmental hazard after it becomes methylated. Mercury is methylated in aquatic environments, where it may accumulate in fish, eventually rendering them toxic to people and other animals. Lighting causes Mercury to enter the environment directly from lamp disposal, and indirectly from power plant emissions. The environmental tradeoffs between incandescent and discharge lamps depend upon the amounts released by these two sources, their local concentrations, and their probabilities of being methylated. Indirect environmental effects of lighting also include the release of other heavy metals (Cadmium, Lead and Arsenic), and other air pollutants and carbon dioxide that are emitted by fossil fuel power plants. For a given light output, the level of power plant emissions depends upon the efficacy of the light source, and is thus much larger for incandescent lamps than for fluorescent or discharge lamps. As disposal and control technologies change the relative direct and indirect emissions from discharge and incandescent lamps will change.

  15. Magnetic polarizations of electrons at dislocations in alkali halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClurg, Gene Roark

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interval. 25 NAGNETIC POLARIZATIONS OF ELECTRONS AT DISLOCATIONS IN ALKALI HALIDES 1. INTRODUCTION. The new magnetic effects observed in our laboratory on a number of single crystals of alkali halides are thought to be caused by electrons trapped... on d1slocations. The magnet1c properties are perhaps more interesting as a bas1c contribution to the sc1ence of magnetism than to a knowledge of d. islocations 1n these very pure, optically clear, s1ngle crystals of alkal1 halides. The gross magnet...

  16. Cross-coupling reactions of unactivated alkyl halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jianrong (Jianrong Steve)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    My graduate research at MIT has been focused on the development of palladium- or nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions using unactivated alkyl electrophiles (e.g., halides and sulfonates). Although aryl and alkenyl ...

  17. Reactions of nitrogen heterocycle-organolithium intermediates with lead halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jerry Neal

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACTIONS OF NITROGEN HETEROCYCLE- ORGANOLITHIUM INTERMEDIATES WITH LEAD HALIDES A Thesis by JERRY HEAL KINNEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University In partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree ot MASTER...) (Mem er) December 1970 ABSTRACT Reactions of Nitrogen Heterocycle-Organollthium intermediates With Lead Halides. (December l970) Jerry Neal Kinney, B. S. , Texas AE, M University Directed by: Dr. Choo-Seng Giam Reactions of nitrogen heterocycle...

  18. Evaluation of Methods to Increase Light under Large Overwater Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To address resource agency concerns about potential impacts of ferry terminal expansion on habitat functions and resource use of nearshore areas, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in partnership with the Washington State Department of Transportation, conducted field trials with several products that promote light passage through dock structures. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) measurements were compared with known minimum requirements for survival of eelgrass, Zostera marina, which provides critical habitat for the federally listed chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. PAR measurements were also related to what is known about the effects of light on juvenile salmonid feeding and passage under overwater structures. In general, the products predicted to provide the most to the least light were the grating, SunTunnel, metal halide greenhouse light, and prisms. All the light technologies tested could provide enough light for eelgrass underneath a ferry terminal, though multiples of some devices would be required. Because less light is required for fish to feed than for photosynthesis, any of the products would provide enough light for juvenile salmon to feed under the structure. The number and placement of these devices could be arranged to maximize light penetration for particular purposes in different situations.

  19. Effects of metallic absorption and the corrugated layer on the optical extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Baek-Woon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorption of a metallic cathode in OLEDs is analyzed by using FDTD calculation. As the light propagates parallel to the layer, the intensity of Ez polarization decreases rapidly. The intensity at 2.0 um from the dipole is less than a quarter of that at 0.5 um. The strong absorption by a cathode can be a critical factor when considering the increase of optical extraction by means of bending the optical layers. The calculation indicates that the corrugation of layers helps the guided light escape the guiding layer, but also increases the absorption into a metallic cathode. The final optical output power of the corrugated OLED can be smaller than that of the flat OLED. On the contrary, the corrugated structure with a non-absorptive cathode increases the optical extraction by nearly two times.

  20. Enhanced luminance of organic light-emitting diodes with metal nanoparticle electron injection layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Deang; Fina, Michael; Ren, Li; Mao, Samuel S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electron injection and luminance characteristics. The small009-5199-x Enhanced luminance of organic light-emittinglayer. Improved current and luminance characteristics were

  1. Computational screening of perovskite metal oxides for optimal solar light Ivano E. Castelli,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thygesen, Kristian

    of solar light to electrical energy in photovoltaic (PV) cells or to chemical energy using first principles quantum mechanical calcu- lations. Examples include the development of battery

  2. Metal-fueled HWR (heavy water reactors) severe accident issues: Differences and similarities to commercial LWRs (light water reactors)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, P.G.; Hyder, M.L.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Coryell, E.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences and similarities in severe accident progression and phenomena between commercial Light Water Reactors (LWR) and metal-fueled isotopic production Heavy Water Reactors (HWR) are described. It is very important to distinguish between accident progression in the two systems because each reactor type behaves in a unique manner to a fuel melting accident. Some of the lessons learned as a result of the extensive commercial severe accident research are not applicable to metal-fueled heavy water reactors. A direct application of severe accident phenomena developed from oxide-fueled LWRs to metal-fueled HWRs may lead to large errors or substantial uncertainties. In general, the application of severe accident LWR concepts to HWRs should be done with the intent to define the relevant issues, define differences, and determine areas of overlap. This paper describes the relevant differences between LWR and metal-fueled HWR severe accident phenomena. Also included in the paper is a description of the phenomena that govern the source term in HWRs, the areas where research is needed to resolve major uncertainties, and areas in which LWR technology can be directly applied with few modifications.

  3. Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract--In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Christian M.

    Journal of Light Emitting Diodes Vol 2 N0 1, April 2010 1 Abstract-- In metal organic vapor phase epitaxy we developed GaInN/GaN quantum well material suitable for 500 ­ 580 nm light emitting diodes at longer wavelengths. Index Terms-- a-plane GaN, GaInN, Green light emitting diode, m-plane GaN I

  4. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrah, L.A.; Allred, R.E.; Wilson, K.V. Jr.

    1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  5. Light-Induced Metal-Insulator Transition in a Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekstra, A. F. Th.; Roy, A. S.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Griessen, R.; Wijngaarden, R. J.; Koeman, N. J.

    2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth hydride films can be converted reversibly from metallic mirrors to insulating windows simply by changing the surrounding hydrogen gas pressure at room temperature. At low temperatures, in situ doping is not possible in this way as hydrogen cannot diffuse. However, our finding of persistent photoconductivity under ultraviolet illumination offers an attractive possibility to tune yttrium hydride through the T=0 metal-insulator transition. Conductivity and Hall measurements are used to determine critical exponents. The unusually large value for the product of the static and dynamical critical exponents appears to signify the important role played by electron-electron interactions.

  6. CX-004421: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program. 1) Upgrade lighting and metal halide fixtures along Emma Street with light-emitting diode (LED) fixtures; 2) replace metal halide fixtures in Murphy and Hunt Parks; 3)...

  7. Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Sign In About | Careers |

  8. Two dimensional metallic photonic crystals for light trapping and anti-reflective coatings in thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shemelya, Corey; DeMeo, Dante F.; Vandervelde, Thomas E. [The Renewable Energy and Applied Photonics Laboratories, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of a front-side contact design for thermophotovoltaics that utilizes metallic photonic crystals (PhCs). While this front-side grid replacement covers more surface area of the semiconductor, a higher percentage of photons is shown to be converted to usable power in the photodiode. This leads to a 30% increase in the short-circuit current of the gallium antimonide thermophotovoltaic cell.

  9. The dynamic behavior of thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Sebastian B., E-mail: sebastian.meier@belectric.com, E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com [Department of Materials Science VI: Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT RTC MAT IEC-DE, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hartmann, David; Sarfert, Wiebke, E-mail: sebastian.meier@belectric.com, E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT RTC MAT IEC-DE, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI: Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have received increasing attention during recent years due to their simple architecture, based on solely air-stabile materials, and ease of manufacture in ambient atmosphere, using solution-based technologies. The LEC's active layer offers semiconducting, luminescent as well as ionic functionality resulting in device physical processes fundamentally different as compared with organic light-emitting diodes. During operation, electrical double layers (EDLs) form at the electrode interfaces as a consequence of ion accumulation and electrochemical doping sets in leading to the in situ development of a light-emitting p-i-n junction. In this paper, we comment on the use of impedance spectroscopy in combination with complex nonlinear squares fitting to derive key information about the latter events in thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells based on the model compound bis-2-phenylpyridine 6-phenyl-2,2?-bipyridine iridium(III) hexafluoridophosphate ([Ir(ppy){sub 2}(pbpy)][PF{sub 6}]). At operating voltages below the bandgap potential of the ionic complex used, we obtain the dielectric constant of the active layer, the conductivity of mobile ions, the transference numbers of electrons and ions, and the thickness of the EDLs, whereas the transient thickness of the p-i-n junction is determined at voltages above the bandgap potential. Most importantly, we find that charge transport is dominated by the ions when carrier injection from the electrodes is prohibited, that ion movement is limited by the presence of transverse internal interfaces and that the width of the intrinsic region constitutes almost 60% of the total active layer thickness in steady state at a low operating voltage.

  10. ZnO light-emitting diode grown by plasma-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.Z.; Ye, Z.Z.; Zeng, Y.J.; Zhu, L.P.; Zhao, B.H.; Jiang, L.; Lu, J.G.; He, H.P.; Zhang, S.B. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a breakthrough in fabricating ZnO homojunction light-emitting diode by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Using NO plasma, we are able to grow p-type ZnO thin films on n-type bulk ZnO substrates. The as-grown films on glass substrates show hole concentration of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and mobility of 1-10 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal nitrogen-related emissions. A typical ZnO homojunction shows rectifying behavior with a turn-on voltage of about 2.3 V. Electroluminescence at room temperature has been demonstrated with band-to-band emission at I=40 mA and defect-related emissions in the blue-yellow spectrum range.

  11. Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on the Durability of a Light-Duty Diesel Aftertreatment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R. L.; Toops, T.; Wereszczak, A. A.; Fox, E. E.; Lance, M. J.; Cavataio, G.; Dobson, D.; Warner, J.; Brezny, R.; Nguyen, K.; Brookshear, D. W.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkali and alkaline earth metal impurities found in diesel fuels are potential poisons for diesel exhaust catalysts. A set of diesel engine production exhaust systems was aged to 150,000 miles. These exhaust systems included a diesel oxidation catalyst, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, and diesel particulate filter (DPF). Four separate exhaust systems were aged, each with a different fuel: ultralow sulfur diesel containing no measureable metals, B20 (a common biodiesel blend) containing sodium, B20 containing potassium, and B20 containing calcium, which were selected to simulate the maximum allowable levels in B100 according to ASTM D6751. Analysis included Federal Test Procedure emissions testing, bench-flow reactor testing of catalyst cores, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and measurement of thermo-mechanical properties of the DPFs. EPMA imaging found that the sodium and potassium penetrated into the washcoat, while calcium remained on the surface. Bench-flow reactor experiments were used to measure the standard nitrogen oxide (NOx) conversion, ammonia storage, and ammonia oxidation for each of the aged SCR catalysts. Vehicle emissions tests were conducted with each of the aged catalyst systems using a chassis dynamometer. The vehicle successfully passed the 0.2 gram/mile NOx emission standard with each of the four aged exhaust systems.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Action or Project Description 1) Replacement of the metal-halide lighting with light-emitting diode energy efficient lighting in the two multi- floor buildings constituting the...

  13. CX-002106: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Renewable Energy 1) Replacement of the metal-halide lighting with light-emitting diode energy efficient lighting in the two multi-floor buildings constituting the...

  14. Impact of the organic halide salt on final perovskite composition for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, David T.; Sai, Hiroaki; Wee Tan, Kwan; Estroff, Lara A.; Wiesner, Ulrich, E-mail: ubw1@cornell.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The methylammonium lead halide perovskites have shown significant promise as a low-cost, second generation, photovoltaic material. Despite recent advances, however, there are still a number of fundamental aspects of their formation as well as their physical and electronic behavior that are not well understood. In this letter we explore the mechanism by which these materials crystallize by testing the outcome of each of the reagent halide salts. We find that components of both salts, lead halide and methylammonium halide, are relatively mobile and can be readily exchanged during the crystallization process when the reaction is carried out in solution or in the solid state. We exploit this fact by showing that the perovskite structure is formed even when the lead salt's anion is a non-halide, leading to lower annealing temperature and time requirements for film formation. Studies into these behaviors may ultimately lead to improved processing conditions for photovoltaic films.

  15. Replacement of Lighting Fixtures with LED Energy Efficient Lights at the Parking Facility, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Brien

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC or Tribe) owns a six-story parking facility adjacent to its Potawatomi Bingo Casino (the Casino) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as well as a valet parking facility under the Casino (collectively, the Parking Facility). The Parking Facility contained 205-watt metal halide-type lights that, for security reasons, operated 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Starting on August 30, 2010, the Tribe replaced these fixtures with 1,760 state-of-the-art, energy efficient 55-Watt LED lights. This project resulted in an immediate average reduction in monthly peak demand of 238 kW over the fourth quarter of 2010. The average reduction in monthly peak demand from October 1 through December 31, 2010 translates into a forecast annual electrical energy reduction of approximately 1,995,000 kWh or 47.3% of the pre-project demand. This project was technically effective, economically feasible, and beneficial to the public not only in terms of long term energy efficiency and associated emissions reductions, but also in the short-term jobs provided for the S.E. Wisconsin region. The project was implemented, from approval by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to completion, in less than 6 months. The project utilized off-the-shelf proven technologies that were fabricated locally and installed by local trade contractors.

  16. Potential Environmental Impacts from the Metals in Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), and Light-Emitting Diode (LED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    the lighting products are to be categorized as hazardous waste under existing U.S. federal and California state in lighting products without compromising their performance and useful lifespan. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Energy to increase energy efficiency for general lighting. Therefore, consumers are replacing incandescent light

  17. Oxide Film Aging on Alloy 22 in Halide Containing Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Martin A.; Carranza, Ricardo M. [Dept. Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, Villa Maipu, 1650 (Argentina); Rebak, Raul B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, L-631, Livermore, CA, 94550-9698 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive and corrosion behaviors of Alloy 22 in chloride and fluoride containing solutions, changing the heat treatment of the alloy, the halide concentration and the pH of the solutions at 90 deg. C, was investigated. The study was implemented using electrochemical techniques, which included open circuit potential monitoring over time, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements carried out at open circuit and at passivity potentials. Corrosion rates obtained by EIS measurements after 24 h immersion in naturally aerated solutions were below 0.5 {mu}m/year. The corrosion rates were practically independent of solution pH, alloy heat treatment and halide ion nature and concentration. EIS low frequency resistance values increased with applied potential in the passive domain and with polarization time in pH 6 - 1 M NaCl at 90 deg. C. This effect was attributed to an increase in the oxide film thickness and oxide film aging. High frequency capacitance measurements indicated that passive oxide on Alloy 22 presented a double n-type/p-type semiconductor behavior in the passive potential range. (authors)

  18. A new polarizable force field for alkali and halide ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös University, 1518 Budapest 112, PO BOX 32 (Hungary)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed transferable potentials for alkali and halide ions which are consistent with our recent model of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. Following the approach used for the water potential, we applied Gaussian charge distributions, exponential repulsion, and r{sup ?6} attraction. One of the two charges of the ions is fixed to the center of the particle, while the other is connected to this charge by a harmonic spring to express polarization. Polarizability is taken from quantum chemical calculations. The repulsion between different species is expressed by the combining rule of Kong [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 2464 (1972)]. Our primary target was the hydration free energy of ions which is correct within the error of calculations. We calculated water-ion clusters up to 6 water molecules, and, as a crosscheck, we determined the density and internal energy of alkali-halide crystals at ambient conditions with acceptable accuracy. The structure of hydrated ions was also discussed.

  19. Surface plasmon dispersion engineering via double-metallic AU/AG layers for nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guangyu

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A double-metallic deposition process is used whereby adjacent layers of different metals are deposited on a substrate. The surface plasmon frequency of a base layer of a first metal is tuned by the surface plasmon frequency of a second layer of a second metal formed thereon. The amount of tuning is dependent upon the thickness of the metallic layers, and thus tuning can be achieved by varying the thicknesses of one or both of the metallic layers. In a preferred embodiment directed to enhanced LED technology in the green spectrum regime, a double-metallic Au/Ag layer comprising a base layer of gold (Au) followed by a second layer of silver (Ag) formed thereon is deposited on top of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on a sapphire/GaN substrate.

  20. Enhanced visible-light absorption of mesoporous TiO2 by co-doping with transition-metal/nitrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathis, John [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium (IV) oxide, TiO2, has been the object of intense scrutiny for energy applications. TiO2 is inexpensive, non-toxic, and has excellent corrosion resistance when exposed to electrolytes. A major drawback preventing the widespread use TiO2 for photolysis is its relatively large band gap of ~3eV. Only light with wavelengths shorter than 400 nm, which is in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, has sufficient energy to be absorbed. Less than 14 percent of the solar irradiation reaching the earth s surface has energy exceeding this band gap. Adding dopants such as transition metals has long been used to reduce the gap and increase photocatalytic activity by accessing the visible part of the solar spectrum. The degree to which the band gap is reduced using transition metals depends in part on the overlap of the d-orbitals of the transition metals with the oxygen p-orbitals. Therefore, doping with anions such as nitrogen to modify the cation-anion orbital overlap is another approach to reduce the gap. Recent studies suggest that using a combination of transition metals and nitrogen as dopants is more effective at introducing intermediate states within the band gap, effectively narrowing it. Here we report the synthesis of mesoporous TiO2 spheres, co-doped with transition metals and nitrogen that exhibit a nearly flat absorbance response across the visible spectrum extending into the near infrared.

  1. Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

  2. A Solid-State 199Hg NMR Study of Mercury Halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert E; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    550 (1998), 89-99. [25] R. E. Taylor, C. T. Carver, R. E.7 (1997), 333-336. [33] R. E. Taylor, Concepts Magn. Reson.Study of Mercury Halides R. E. Taylor 1 *, Shi Bai 2 , and

  3. Negishi Coupling of Secondary Alkylzinc Halides with Aryl Bromides and Chlorides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Chong

    An efficient palladium-catalyzed process has been developed for Negishi coupling of secondary alkylzinc halides with a wide range of aryl bromides and activated aryl chlorides. A palladium catalyst composed of a new ...

  4. Data:D11d1bae-eda6-4585-b951-b2b528ae0089 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authority Effective date: 20140601 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting Rates 400Watt Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http:...

  5. Data:B9cfcf3e-e2d7-48de-9d6c-f4f190e17797 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide...

  6. Data:2d616a7c-22e4-427e-91c6-c1eebd3a9a7d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide...

  7. Data:12819b61-8fb8-4289-afae-af2425c7504d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide...

  8. Data:A57c88dc-6b41-4d79-9187-6f171bb5c02f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide...

  9. Data:85cfbd33-bef5-4bdc-b995-d9fd9fb85e4d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    schedule is available for metered outdoor lighting service to any Customer. New or replacement light installations shall be limited to high pressure sodium and metal-halide...

  10. Data:0093754d-e47e-4628-8dbb-478029704327 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: C & L Electric Coop Corp Effective date: 20091207 End date if known: Rate name: Outdoor Lighting: Metal Halide 150 W Sector: Lighting...

  11. Data:0c210c5a-1625-4d48-b307-3c9976438eaa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ornamental Lighting- Acorn or Coach Lantern- 12000 Lumen Metal Halide with Fluted Concrete Decorative Base Pole Sector: Lighting Description: This rate is available to any...

  12. Data:F0cc7cde-b490-462d-a22a-7b05b67588be | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Waverly Municipal Elec Utility Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting: 1000 Watt Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Application Area security...

  13. Data:D4756294-e8a1-4be5-b639-42f0330152cb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Waverly Municipal Elec Utility Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lighting: 50 Watt Metal Halide or HPS Sector: Lighting Description: Application Area security...

  14. Data:C0499547-add6-4890-a78b-691c9e1c5086 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    End date if known: Rate name: SERVICE CLASSIFICATION NO. 5 Outdoor Lighting Service - ESS Shoebox Metal Halide 400W Sector: Lighting Description: APPLICABLE TO THE USE OF...

  15. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting in Leavenworth, KS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Curry, Ku'uipo

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a commercial parking lot lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-State Lighting Technology GATEWAY Demonstration Program. The parking lot is for customers and employees of a Walmart Supercenter in Leavenworth, Kansas and this installation represents the first use of the LED Parking Lot Performance Specification developed by the DOE’s Commercial Building Energy Alliance. The application is a parking lot covering more than a half million square feet, lighted primarily by light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Metal halide wall packs were installed along the building facade. This site is new construction, so the installed baseline(s) were hypothetical designs. It was acknowledged early on that deviating from Walmart’s typical design would reduce the illuminance on the site. Walmart primarily uses 1000W pulse-start metal halide (PMH) lamps. In order to provide a comparison between both typical design and a design using conventional luminaires providing a lower illuminance, a 400W PMH design was also considered. As mentioned already, the illuminance would be reduced by shifting from the PMH system to the LED system. The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES) provides recommended minimum illuminance values for parking lots. All designs exceeded the recommended illuminance values in IES RP-20, some by a wider margin than others. Energy savings from installing the LED system compared to the different PMH systems varied. Compared to the 1000W PMH system, the LED system would save 63 percent of the energy. However, this corresponds to a 68 percent reduction in illuminance as well. In comparison to the 400W PMH system, the LED system would save 44 percent of the energy and provide similar minimum illuminance values at the time of relamping. The LED system cost more than either of the PMH systems when comparing initial costs. However, when the life-cycle costs from energy and maintenance were factored into the scenario, the LED system had lower costs at the end of a 10-year analysis period. The LED system had a 6.1 year payback compared to the 1000W PMH system and a 7.5 year payback versus the 400W PMH system. The costs reflect high initial cost for the LED luminaire, plus more luminaires and (subsequently) more poles for the LED system. The other major issue affecting cost effectiveness was that Leavenworth, Kansas has very low electricity costs. The melded rate for this site was $0.056 per kWh for electricity. However, if the national electricity rate of $0.1022/kWh was used the payback would change to between four and five years for the LED system. This demonstration met the GATEWAY requirements of saving energy, matching or improving illumination, and being cost effective. The project also demonstrated that the Commercial Building Energy Alliance (CBEA) specification works in practice. Walmart appreciated having an entire site lighted by LEDs to gain more experience with the technology. Walmart is reviewing the results of the demonstration as they consider their entire real estate portfolio.

  16. Amino Alcohols as Ligands for Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki Reactions of Unactivated Alkyl Halides, Including Secondary Alkyl Chlorides, with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Gregory C.

    Amino Alcohols as Ligands for Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki Reactions of Unactivated Alkyl Halides February 27, 2006; E-mail: gcf@mit.edu Early work in the area of palladium- and nickel-catalyzed cross of unactivated secondary alkyl halides is based on nickel/bathophenanthroline.4 This method can be applied

  17. Solid-State NMR/NQR and First-Principles Study of Two Niobium Halide Cluster Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Solid-State NMR/NQR and First-Principles Study of Two Niobium Halide Cluster Compounds Berislav : 10.1016/j.ssnmr.2014.02.001 #12;2 Abstract Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were

  18. Life cycle assessment of buildings technologies: High-efficiency commercial lighting and residential water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, S.L.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study the life cycle emissions and energy use are estimated for two types of energy technologies. The first technology evaluated is the sulfur lamp, a high-efficiency lighting system under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Fusion Lighting, the inventor of the technology. The sulfur lamp is compared with conventional metal halide high-intensity discharge lighting systems. The second technology comparison is between standard-efficiency and high-efficiency gas and electric water heaters. In both cases the life cycle energy use and emissions are presented for the production of an equivalent level of service by each of the technologies. For both analyses, the energy use and emissions from the operation of the equipment are found to dominate the life cycle profile. The life cycle emissions for the water heating systems are much more complicated. The four systems compared include standard- and high-efficiency gas water heaters, standard electric resistance water heaters, and heat pump water heaters.

  19. Enhancement of Raman Light Scattering in Dye-Labeled Rat Glioma Cells by Langmuir-Blodgett CNT-Bundles Arranged on Metal-Containing Conducting Polymer Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egorov, A S; Grushevskaya, H V; Krot, V I; Krylova, N G; Lipnevich, I V; Orekhovskaya, T I; Shulitsky, B G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have fabricated layered nanocomposite consisting of a nanoporous anodic alumina sublayer (AOA), an ultrathin metal-containing polymer Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film coating AOA, and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) - bundles which are arranged on the LB-film. MCNTs were preliminarily chemically modified by carboxyl groups and functionalized by stearic acid. We have experimentally observed an enhancement of Raman light scattering on surface plasmons in the LB-monolayers. This enhancement is due to charge and energy transfer. We demonstrate that propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence is quenched by the MCNT-bundles. A method of two-dimensional system imaging based on the MCNT-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been proposed. This method has been applied to visualize focal adhesion sites on membranes of living PI-labeled rat glioma cells.

  20. A mechanistic study of aryl halide reactions with lithium aluminum hydride 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Fu-Fan

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A M:"CHA~JISTIC STUDv OF ARYL HALID RHAC IC~JS ' ITH LITHIUM ALUM 'J"M HYDRIDE A Thesis FU-FAJJ CHUI'JG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in nartial fulfillment of the reauirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCI- JC... August Jo80 Major Subject: Chemistry A MECHANISTIC STUDY OF ARYL HALIDE REACTIONS 1'IITH LITHIUM ALUMINUM HYDRIDE A Thesis by FU-FAN CHUNG Approved as to style and content by; (Chairman of Co ittee) (Member) , . 7 1 (Member) (Member) i (Head...

  1. The origins of light and heavy r-process elements identified by chemical tagging of metal-poor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing interests in neutron star (NS) mergers as the origin of r-process elements have sprouted since the discovery of evidence for the ejection of these elements from a short-duration gamma-ray burst. The hypothesis of a NS merger origin is reinforced by a theoretical update of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers successful in yielding r-process nuclides with A>130. On the other hand, whether the origin of light r-process elements are associated with nucleosynthesis in NS merger events remains unclear. We find a signature of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers from peculiar chemical abundances of stars belonging to the Galactic globular cluster M15. This finding combined with the recent nucleosynthesis results implies a potential diversity of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers. Based on these considerations, we are successful in the interpretation of an observed correlation between [light r-process/Eu] and [Eu/Fe] among Galactic halo stars and accordingly narrow down the role of supernova nucleosynthesis in the r-process pr...

  2. Combined Cryo and Room-Temperature Ball Milling to Produce Ultrafine Halide Crystallites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    Combined Cryo and Room-Temperature Ball Milling to Produce Ultrafine Halide Crystallites AKASH milling at cryogenic temperature as well as room temperature (RT) has been carried out to prepare out in a high-energy ball mill, and it involves repeated deformation, cold-welding, fractur- ing

  3. COLOUR CENTRES IN DOPED ALKALI HALIDES. THE ROLE OF OXYGEN AND TITANIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    COLOUR CENTRES IN DOPED ALKALI HALIDES. THE ROLE OF OXYGEN AND TITANIUM IN THE LUMINESCENCE OF Li that the luminescence occurs by hole capture at a titanium defect site. However electron spin resonance has shown that the titanium is incorporated in the crystal as Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions with the possibility of charge compensa- tion

  4. alkali halide-alkaline earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alkali halide-alkaline earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Long range interactions...

  5. EECBG Success Story: New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach EECBG Success Story: New Sustainability Manager Delivers Savings for Delray Beach July 30, 2010 - 2:04pm Addthis Metal halide light...

  6. Data:A4423bc0-5f8d-4ef2-a967-bea6ed1f5fc9 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    street lighting near the Cooperative's electric distribution lines with existing transformers. MV Mercury Vapor; HPS High Pressure Sodium; MH Metal Halide; X Cobra Head...

  7. Data:89f6d69a-85f5-4a51-936d-0f72768c0a56 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    street lighting near the Cooperative's electric distribution lines with existing transformers. MV Mercury Vapor; HPS High Pressure Sodium; MH Metal Halide; X Cobra Head...

  8. U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act categorica...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop and install solar photovoltaic system on the roof of City Hall; 2) replace metal halide light fixtures in the City...

  9. Data:B59dfb6e-b3b5-4fbd-9a80-e551c3a1ed13 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    400 Watt Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):...

  10. THE EFFECTS OF HALIDE MODIFIERS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF THE LI-MG-N-H SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, D.; Gray, J.; Price, C.; Lascola, R.

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of different transition metal halides (TiCl{sub 3}, VCl{sub 3}, ScCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2}) on the sorption properties of the 1:1 molar ratio of LiNH{sub 2} to MgH{sub 2} are investigated. The modified mixtures were found to contain LiNH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2} and LiCl. TGA results showed that the hydrogen desorption temperature was reduced with the modifier addition in this order: TiCl{sub 3} > ScCl{sub 3} > VCl{sub 3} > NiCL{sub 2}. Ammonia release was not significantly reduced resulting in a weight loss greater than the theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The isothermal sorption kinetics of the modified systems showed little improvement after the first dehydrogenation cycle over the unmodified system but showed drastic improvement in rehydrogenation cycles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy identified the cycled material to be composed of LiH, MgH{sub 2}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

  11. Controlled Synthesis of Organic/Inorganic van de Waals Solid for Tunable Light-matter Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Lin; Cong, Chunxiao; Wu, Chunyang; Wu, Di; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, Hong; Zeng, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jiadong; Wang, Xingli; Fu, Wei; Yu, Peng; Fu, Qundong; Zhang, Zhuhua; Yakobson, Boris I; Tay, Beng Kang; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Sum, Tze Chien; Jin, Chuanhong; He, Haiyong; Yu, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Van de Waals (vdW) solids, as a new type of artificial materials that consisting of alternative layers bonded by weak interactions, have shed light on fantastic optoelectronic devices. As a result, a large variety of shining vdW devices have been engineered via layer-by-layer stacking of two-dimensional materials, although shadowed by the difficulties of fabrication. Alternatively, direct growth of vdW solids have been proved a scalable and swift way towards vdW solids, reflected by the successful synthesis of graphene/h-BN and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) vertical heterostructures from controlled vapor deposition. Enlightened by it, with a three-step deposition and reaction, we realize high-quality organic and inorganic vdW solids, using methylammonium lead halide as the organic part (organic perovskite) and 2D monolayers inorganic as counterpart. Being a perfect light absorbent, the electrons and holes generated in organic perovskite couple with its inorganic 2D companions, and behave dramaticall...

  12. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  13. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  14. Enhanced open voltage of BiFeO{sub 3} polycrystalline film by surface modification of organolead halide perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Pengjun [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Bian, Liang; Xu, Jinbao, E-mail: xujb@ms.xjb.ac.cn; Chang, Aimin [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Wang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Materials and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Department of Research and Development, Shanghai Shanshan Tech. Co., Ltd., Shanghai 201209, China and Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic-organolead halide perovskite CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} modified BiFeO{sub 3} polycrystalline film has been established. The composite photoelectrode presents much larger open voltage and several magnitudes superior photoelectric conversion performance in comparison to the ordinary BiFeO{sub 3} polycrystalline film. The I-V curve shows that the short-circuit current (J{sub sc}) is 1.74?mA·cm{sup ?2} and open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) is 1.62?V, the device's photon to current efficiency is over 1%. The large open voltage and high photovoltaic efficiency is believed to attributed to the spontaneous polarization of composite perovskite induced by BiFeO{sub 3} lattice and modified reduced work function of the modified BiFeO{sub 3} surface. Our results clearly show that the present BiFeO{sub 3}-CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} planar device is capable to generate a large voltage in macro scale under visible light, leading an approach to further applications on photodetectors and optoelectronic switch.

  15. Method for forming metal contacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  16. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDynNet-Zero Campus atEnergy New EmployeeEnergy

  17. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures to Save on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIREof Energy Investigates PortFreezers to SaveEnergy

  18. Determination of oxygen in molten alkali halide salts by proton activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai, C.M.; Dysart, M.E.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have recently used a lanthanum fluoride precipitation method to separate /sup 18/F produced from proton activation of /sup 18/O in alkali chloride and fluoride salts. The procedure was developed for studying dissolved oxide species in alkali halide melts. Determination of oxygen in these systems is important for research in batteries and in extractive metallurgy utilizing molten salts as solvents. The details are given oxygen determination in alkali chloride and fluoride systems.

  19. Reactions of nitrogen heterocycle-organolithium intermediates with lead halides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jerry Neal

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be lithium chloride. The organic layer was subjected to gentle heating (electric heating mantle) to remove THF. Concentrating the sample to 25$ of its original volume resulted In formation of black solid, 4. 2 g (41. 7$), identified as metallic lead... dichloride (92-95%) was recovered in the case of 2-pyridyl, 3-pyridyl, and 4-picolyl- lithium. The attempted preparations of unsymmetrical organolead compounds, R&PbR where R is ethyl or phenyl and R ' is 2-phenyl- pyridyl or I-phenylisoquinoiyl, via...

  20. Reactions of stannylamines and anionic main group metal halides : : a mild route to novel main group metal-nitrogen compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Robert James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rodriguez-Monge, L. ; Taylor, R. ; van de Streek, J. ; Wood,Rodriguez-Monge, L. ; Taylor, R. ; van de Streek, J. ; Wood,Rodriguez-Monge, L. ; Taylor, R. ; van de Streek, J. ; Wood,

  1. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500.degree. C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  2. Bandgap calculations and trends of organometal halide perovskites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castelli, Ivano E., E-mail: ivca@fysik.dtu.dk; Thygesen, Kristian S.; Jacobsen, Karsten W. [Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design (CAMD), Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); García-Lastra, Juan María [Center for Atomic-scale Materials Design (CAMD), Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, DK 4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production from the Sun requires a stable efficient light absorber. Promising candidates in this respect are organometal perovskites (ABX{sub 3}), which have been intensely investigated during the last years. Here, we have performed electronic structure calculations of 240 perovskites composed of Cs, CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}, and HC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} as A-cation, Sn and Pb as B-ion, and a combination of Cl, Br, and I as anions. The calculated gaps span over a region from 0.5 to 5.0 eV. In addition, the trends over bandgaps have been investigated: the bandgap increases with an increase of the electronegativities of the constituent species, while it reduces with an increase of the lattice constants of the system.

  3. Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density, translucent LaBr{sub 3} ceramics samples (3-inch diameter, > 1/8-inch thick) were fabricated by hot pressing, demonstrating the superior manufacturability of the ceramic approach over single crystal growth methods in terms of size capability and cost. (6) Despite all these advances, evidence has shown that LaBr{sub 3} is thermally unstable at temperatures required for the densification process. This is particularly true for material near the surface where lattice defects and color centers can be created as bromine becomes volatile at high temperatures. Consequently, after densification these samples made using chemically prepared ultrafine powders turned black. An additional thermal treatment in a flowing bromine condition proved able to reduce the darkness of the surface layer for these densified samples. These observations demonstrated that although finer ceramic powders are desirable for densification due to a stronger driving force from their large surface areas, the same desirable factor can lead to lattice defects and color centers when these powders are densified at higher temperatures where material near the surface becomes thermally unstable.

  4. Figure 5.19. Light micrographs showing the microstructure of duplex rolled metal IC381 solution treated at 1300 C for 26 hours and then quenched into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    of duplex rolled metal IC381 solution treated at 1300 °C for 26 hours and then quenched into water the microstructure of duplex rolled metal IC373 solution treated at 1300 QC for 26 hours amI then quenched into water solution treated at 1300 QC for 26 hours and then quenched into water. The llleasured volullle fraction

  5. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Kolopus, James A [ORNL; Neal, John S [ORNL; Cherepy, Nerine [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Payne, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Beck, P [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Burger, Arnold [Fisk University, Nashville; Rowe, E [Fisk University, Nashville; Bhattacharya, P. [Fisk University, Nashville

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  6. A mechanistic study of aryl halide reactions with lithium aluminum hydride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Fu-Fan

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A M:"CHA~JISTIC STUDv OF ARYL HALID RHAC IC~JS ' ITH LITHIUM ALUM 'J"M HYDRIDE A Thesis FU-FAJJ CHUI'JG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in nartial fulfillment of the reauirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCI- JC... of this stud!y :a to investigate possibility o f a. fr ee r a . 1 ca machina=--. by;;h:ch ". thium alum'num hydride may reduce organic ccmnounds. evzcus results have irdicated that thc reductior of o-allylcxy- 'oenzene diazonium icn by . ributyltin hydrioe...

  7. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Esherick, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Parmeter, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Rieger, Dennis J. (Tijeras, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  8. Development of a Phosphate Ceramic as a Host for Halide-contaminated Plutonium Pyrochemical Reprocessing Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalfe, Brian; Fong, Shirley K.; Gerrard, Lee A.; Donald, Ian W.; Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of halide anions in four types of wastes arising from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium required an immobilization process to be developed in which not only the actinide cations but also the halide anions were immobilized in a durable waste form. At AWE, we have developed such a process using Ca3(PO4)2 as the host material. Successful trials of the process with actinide- and Cl-bearing Type I waste were carried out at PNNL where the immobilization of the waste in a form resistant to aqueous leaching was confirmed. Normalized mass losses determined at 40°C and 28 days were 12 x 10-6 g?m-2 and 2.7 x 10-3 g?m-2 for Pu and Cl, respectively. Accelerated radiation-induced damage effects are being determined with specimens containing 238Pu. No changes in the crystalline lattice have been detected with XRD after the 239Pu equivalent of 400 years ageing. Confirmation of the process for Type II waste (a oxyhydroxide-based waste) is currently underway at PNNL. Differences in the ionic state of Pu in the four types of waste have required different surrogates to be used. Samarium chloride was used successfully as a surrogate for both Pu(III) and Am(III) chlorides. Initial investigations into the use of HfO2 as the surrogate for Pu(IV) oxide in Type II waste indicated no significant differences.

  9. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  10. Ambient-temperature superconductor symetrical metal-dihalide bis-(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K. which is high for organic superconductors.

  11. Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimotake, Hiroshi (Hinsdale, IL); Bartholme, Louis G. (Joliet, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  12. Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

    1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  13. Nickel-catalyzed cross-couplings of unactivated secondary and tertiary alkyl halides and photoinduced copper-mediated asymmetric C-N cross-couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zultanski, Susan L. (Susan Lyn)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 describes the development of two nickel-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling methodologies that employ alkyl halides as electrophiles. In Section 1.1, asymmetric [gamma]-alkylation relative to a carbonyl group is ...

  14. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  15. Development of a Phosphate Ceramic as a Host for Halide-Contaminated Plutonium Pyrochemical Reprocessing Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalfe, Brian; Fong, Shirley; Gerrard, Lee; Donald, Ian [MSRD, AWE plc, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Strachan, Denis; Scheele, Randall [PNNL, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of halide anions in four types of wastes arising from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium required an immobilization process to be developed in which not only the actinide cations but also the halide anions were immobilized in a durable, leach resistant form. AWE has developed such a process using Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} as the host material. Successful trials of the process using actinide-doped Type I waste (essentially a chloride-based waste) were carried out at PNNL where the immobilization of the waste in a form resistant to aqueous leaching was confirmed. Normalized mass losses determined using a modified MCC-1 test at 40 deg. C/28 days were 12 x 10{sup -6} g.m{sup -2} and 2.7 x 10{sup -3} g.m{sup -2} for Pu and Cl, respectively. Accelerated radiation-induced damage effects are being determined with specimens containing {sup 238}Pu. No changes in the crystalline lattice have been detected with XRD after the {sup 239}Pu equivalent of 400 years ageing. Confirmation of the process for Type II waste (an oxyhydroxide-based waste) is currently underway at PNNL. Differences in the ionic state of plutonium in the four types of waste have required different surrogates to be used. Samarium chloride was used successfully as a surrogate for both Pu(III) and Am(III) chlorides. Early investigations into the use of HfO{sub 2} as the surrogate for Pu(IV) oxide in Type II waste showed some apparent differences in the phase assemblages of the surrogate and actinide-based products. However XRD examination of the products at higher resolution has demonstrated there is no significant difference and that for this work HfO{sub 2} is a suitable surrogate for PuO{sub 2}. (authors)

  16. Data:Cf1b762a-e6c1-4c6b-b3f6-2de0515947a5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Street Lighting Metal Halide 250 W Overhead Sector: Lighting Description: The Purchase Cost Adjustment Clause, a charge per all kWh that varies monthly, applies to this rate....

  17. Data:38685f64-7610-4bcf-a3c7-8211d1c81b0b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lighting- 1000W Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):...

  18. Data:76725435-78e8-48fa-8f6e-181c5bff4a47 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lighting- 400W Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):...

  19. Data:5963c1a9-f6d6-45f9-ad1b-bd2f0849f0e4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lighting- 250W Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):...

  20. Tokyo Street Lights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    that you have only 17, no 16, no 15 seconds left to get to the other side before the light changes and the impatient American drivers put the pedal to the metal and it's road kill time. Talk about stress! In Tokyo, crossing the street is a leisurely...

  1. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

  2. Calcium looping process for high purity hydrogen production integrated with capture of carbon dioxide, sulfur and halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramkumar, Shwetha; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (i) gasifying a fuel into a raw synthesis gas comprising CO, hydrogen, steam, sulfur and halide contaminants in the form of H.sub.2S, COS, and HX, wherein X is a halide; (ii) passing the raw synthesis gas through a water gas shift reactor (WGSR) into which CaO and steam are injected, the CaO reacting with the shifted gas to remove CO.sub.2, sulfur and halides in a solid-phase calcium-containing product comprising CaCO.sub.3, CaS and CaX.sub.2; (iii) separating the solid-phase calcium-containing product from an enriched gaseous hydrogen product; and (iv) regenerating the CaO by calcining the solid-phase calcium-containing product at a condition selected from the group consisting of: in the presence of steam, in the presence of CO.sub.2, in the presence of synthesis gas, in the presence of H.sub.2 and O.sub.2, under partial vacuum, and combinations thereof.

  3. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  4. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  5. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  6. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  7. Further reduction of efficiency droop effect by adding a lower-index dielectric interlayer in a surface plasmon coupled blue light-emitting diode with surface metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chun-Han; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Hui; Yao, Yu-Feng; Shih, Pei-Ying; Chen, Horng-Shyang; Hsieh, Chieh; Kiang, Yean-Woei, E-mail: ywkiang@ntu.edu.tw; Yang, C. C., E-mail: ccycc@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Yang [Department of Energy and Refrigerating Air-Conditioning Engineering, Tung Nan University, 152 Beishen Road, Section 3, New Taipei City, 22202 Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Further reduction of the efficiency droop effect and further enhancements of internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and output intensity of a surface plasmon coupled, blue-emitting light-emitting diode (LED) by inserting a dielectric interlayer (DI) of a lower refractive index between p-GaN and surface Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated. The insertion of a DI leads to a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance spectrum and increases the LSP coupling strength at the quantum well emitting wavelength in the blue range. With SiO{sub 2} as the DI, a thinner DI leads to a stronger LSP coupling effect, when compared with the case of a thicker DI. By using GaZnO, which is a dielectric in the optical range and a good conductor under direct-current operation, as the DI, the LSP coupling results in the highest IQE, highest LED output intensity, and weakest droop effect.

  8. Theories of phosphorescence in organo-transition metal complexes - from relativistic effects to simple models and design principles for organic light-emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, B J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review theories of phosphorescence in cyclometalated complexes. We focus primarily on pseudooctahedrally coordinated $t_{2g}^6$ metals (e.g., [Os(II)(bpy)$_3$]$^{2+}$, Ir(III)(ppy)$_3$ and Ir(III)(ptz)$_3$) as, for reasons that are explored in detail, these show particularly strong phosphorescence. We discuss both first principles approaches and semi-empirical models, e.g., ligand field theory. We show that together these provide a clear understanding of the photophysics and in particular the lowest energy triplet excitation, T$_1$. In order to build a good model relativistic effects need to be included. The role of spin-orbit coupling is well-known, but scalar relativistic effects are also large - and are therefore also introduced and discussed. No expertise in special relativity or relativistic quantum mechanics is assumed and a pedagogical introduction to these subjects is given. It is shown that, once both scalar relativistic effects and spin-orbit coupling are included, time dependent density function...

  9. Wetting of Sodium on ??-Al2O3/YSZ Composites for Low Temperature Planar Sodium-Metal Halide Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, David M.; Coffey, Greg W.; Mast, Eric S.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Mansurov, Jirgal; Lu, Xiaochuan; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetting of Na on B”-Al2O3/YSZ composites was investigated using the sessile drop technique. The effects of moisture and surface preparation were studied at low temperatures. Electrical conductivity of Na/B”-Al2O3-YSZ/Na cells was also investigated at low temperatures and correlated to the wetting behavior. The use of planar B”-Al2O3 substrates at low temperature with low cost polymeric seals is realized due to improved wetting at low temperature and conductivity values consistent with the literature.

  10. Smart lighting: New Roles for Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Smart lighting: New Roles for Light in the Solid State Lighting World Robert F. Karlicek, Jr. Director, Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center Professor, Electrical, Systems and Computer Lighting · What is Smart Lighting · Technology Barriers to Smart Lighting · Visible Light Communications

  11. Commercial Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial lighting accounts for more than 20 percent of total commercial building energy use. The Energy Department works to reduce lighting energy use through research and deployment.

  12. Adsorption and Separation of Light Gases on an Amino-Functionalized Metal–Organic Framework: An Adsorption and In Situ XRD Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couck S.; Stavitski E.; Gobehiya, E.; Kirschhock, C.E.A.; Serra-Crespo, P.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Martinez Joaristi, A.; Gascon, J.; Kapteijn, F.; Baron, G. V.; Denayer J.F.M.

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) metal-organic framework was studied for its use in the separation of CO{sub 2} from CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} mixtures. Isotherms of methane, ethane, propane, hydrogen, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2} were measured. The atypical shape of these isotherms is attributed to the breathing properties of the material, in which a transition from a very narrow pore form to a narrow pore form and from a narrow pore form to a large pore form occurs, depending on the total pressure and the nature of the adsorbate, as demonstrated by in-situ XRD patterns measured during adsorption. Apart from CO{sub 2}, all tested gases interacted weakly with the adsorbent. As a result, they are excluded from adsorption in the narrow pore form of the material at low pressure. CO{sub 2} interacted much more strongly and was adsorbed in significant amounts at low pressure. This gives the material excellent properties to separate CO{sub 2} from other gases. The separation of CO{sub 2} from methane, nitrogen, hydrogen, or a combination of these gases has been demonstrated by breakthrough experiments using pellets of NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al). The effect of total pressure (1-30 bar), gas composition, temperature (303-403 K) and contact time has been examined. In all cases, CO{sub 2} was selectively adsorbed, whereas methane, nitrogen, and hydrogen nearly did not adsorb at all. Regeneration of the adsorbent by thermal treatment, inert purge gas stripping, and pressure swing has been demonstrated. The NH{sub 2}-MIL-53(Al) pellets retained their selectivity and capacity for more than two years.

  13. VOLUME 86, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 4 JUNE 2001 Light-Induced Metal-Insulator Transition in a Switchable Mirror

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    possibility to tune yttrium hydride through the T 0 metal-insulator transition. Conductivity and Hall

  14. Metal aminoboranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH2BH3)n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  15. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  16. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  17. Light trapping limits in plasmonic solar cells: an analytical investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Xing

    We analytically investigate the light trapping performance in plasmonic solar cells with Si/metallic structures. We consider absorption enhancements for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at planar Si/metal interfaces and ...

  18. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, E.C.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical method is described for separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500 C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode. 3 figs.

  19. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    may be the preferred option when it is desirable to have a point source rather than a linear light source. One main advantage of metal halide luminaires is lower maintenance...

  20. A low cost high flux solar simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel S.

    A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

  1. Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LIGHT!! #12;Light Properties Light travels at the speed of light `c' C = 3 x 108 m/s Or 190,000 miles/second!! Light could travel around the world about 8 times in one second #12;What is light?? Light is a "wave packet" A photon is a "light particle" #12;Electromagnetic Radiation and You Light is sometimes

  2. Porous light-emitting compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Bauer, Eve (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Alexander H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-emitting devices are prepared by coating a porous substrate using a polymer-assisted deposition process. Solutions of metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for metal precursor were coated onto porous substrates. The coated substrates were heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere. The result was a substrate with a conformal coating that did not substantially block the pores of the substrate.

  3. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylwester, Eric Robert

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr{sub 4}, HfBr{sub 4}, RfBr{sub 4}, NbBr{sub 5}, TaOBr{sub 3}, HaCl{sub 5}, WBr{sub 6}, FrBr, and BiBr{sub 3}. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub a}) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} was observed: RfBr{sub 4} > ZrBr{sub 4} > HfBr{sub 4}. The {Delta}H{sub a} values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of {sup 261}Rf was performed. {sup 261}Rf was produced via the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74{sub -6}{sup +7} seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78{sub -6}{sup +11} seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75{+-}7 seconds for {sup 261}Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant temperature) gas phase chromatography instrument to a thermochromatographic (variable temperature) instrument have been completed. Thermochromatography is a technique that can be used to study the volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} of longer-lived isotopes off-line, Future work will include a comparison between the two techniques and the use of thermochromatography to study isotopes in a wider range of half-lives and molecular structures.

  4. Metal inks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  5. Halide, Chromate, and Phosphate Impacts on LAW Glass for Dynamic Flowsheet 24590-WTP-MCR-PET-09-0037, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Revision 1 of this Model Change Request changed Equation 6 in Attachment Al only. Melter studies have shown that halide, chromium, and phosphates can cause precipitation of solids that can interfer the melting process. Pilot melter data now shows what concentrations LAW glass can tolerate. These limits shall be incorporated into the existing LAW glass algorithm per Attachment Al.

  6. Smart Lighting Controller!! Smart lighting!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Betty Lise

    1! Smart Lighting Controller!! #12;2! Smart lighting! No need to spend energy lighting the room if://blogs.stthomas.edu/realestate/2011/01/24/residential-real-estate-professionals-how-do-you- develop feedback! There is a connection between the output and the input! Therefore forces inputs to same voltage

  7. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or...

  8. Photovoltaic device having light transmitting electrically conductive stacked films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Michael F. (St. Paul, MN); Tran, Nang T. (St. Paul, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (St. Paul, MN); Gilbert, James R. (St. Paul, MN); Aspen, Frank E. (St. Paul, MN)

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A light transmitting electrically conductive stacked film, useful as a light transmitting electrode, including a first light transmitting electrically conductive layer, having a first optical thickness, a second light transmitting layer, having a second optical thickness different from the optical thickness of the first layer, and an electrically conductive metallic layer interposed between and in initimate contact with the first and second layers.

  9. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areas—vehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalks—or would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration luminaires, a networked control system was installed for additional evaluation and demonstration purposes. The capability of control system to measure luminaire input power was explored in this study. A more exhaustive demonstration and evaluation of the control system will be the subject of future GATEWAY report(s).

  10. Powder Metal Performance Modeling of Automotive Components ?AMD...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    parts before extending to light metal systems Optimization of the component geometry Tooling cost and parts making issues not yet discussed MSU has not considered impact of...

  11. Silicone metalization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  12. Cerenkov Light

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  13. Cerenkov Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bright blue glow from nuclear reactors is Cerenkov light. Karl Slifer describes how nuclear physicists can use this phenomenon to study the nucleus of the atom.

  14. Lighting Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When undertaking a lighting renovation in a Federal building, daylighting is the primary renewable energy opportunity. Photovoltaics (PV) also present an excellent opportunity. While this guide...

  15. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 {micro}m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 {micro}m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 {micro}m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available. 9 figs.

  16. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Ralph H. (San Ramon, CA); Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 .mu.m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 .mu.m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy.sup.3+ -doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 .mu.m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available.

  17. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: The first two noble metals operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Smith, M.E.; Miller, D.H.; Ritter, J.A.

    1991-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas systems. The facility is the first pilot-scale melter system capable of processing mercury, and flowsheet levels of halides and noble metals. In order to characterize the processing of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru, and Ag) on a large scale, the IDMS will be operated batchstyle for at least nine feed preparation cycles. The first two of these operations are complete. The major observation to date occurred during the second run when significant amounts of hydrogen were evolved during the feed preparation cycle. The runs were conducted between June 7, 1990 and March 8, 1991. This time period included nearly six months of ``fix-up`` time when forced air purges were installed on the SRAT MFT and other feed preparation vessels to allow continued noble metals experimentation.

  18. Sensitivity of alkali halide scintillating calorimeters with particle identification to investigate the DAMA dark matter detection claim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Nadeau; Michael Clark; P. C. F. Di Stefano; J. -C. Lanfranchi; S. Roth; M. von Sivers; Itay Yavin

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Scintillating calorimeters are cryogenic detectors combining a measurement of scintillation with one of phonons to provide particle identification. In view of developing alkali halide devices of this type able to check the DAMA/LIBRA claim for the observation of dark matter, we have simulated detector performances to determine their sensitivity by two methods with little model-dependence. We conclude that if performance of the phonon channel can be brought in line with those of other materials, an exposure of 10 kg-days would suffice to check the DAMA/LIBRA claim in standard astrophysical scenarios. Additionally, a fairly modest array of 5 kg with background rejection would be able to directly check the DAMA/LIBRA modulation result in 2 years.

  19. Contour forming of metals by laser peening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

  20. CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    637. CONCENTRATED SOLID SOLUTIONS OF NORMAL METALS By H. JONES, Imperial College. Department and Heine [1] in the light of the new knowledge of the Fermi surface revealed by experi- ments alloys is reviewed in the light of modern work on the nature of the Fermi surfaces in the noble metals

  1. Preparation of dinitrogen, hydrido, and carbonyl complexes of molybdenum and tungsten from higher halides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, A.P.; Makhaev, V.D.; Semenenko, K.N.

    1988-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The yields, physicochemical properties, and analyses of phosphine complexes of molybdenum and tungsten are shown. The reduction of molydenum pentachloride or tungsten hexachloride with metallic magnesium in THF in the presence of a tertiary organic phosphines in an atmosphere of nitrogen, hydrogen, or carbon monoxide provided a convenient method for the preparation of dinitrogen M(N/sub 2/)/sub 2/L/sub 4/, hydride MH/sub 4/L/sub 4/, or carbonyl M(CO)/sub 6/minus/x/L/sub x/ complexes respectively of molybdenum or tungsten (M = Mo, W; L - tertiary organic phosphine).

  2. Metal oxide films on metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Los Alamos, NM); Tiwari, Prabhat (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a thin film of a conductive alkaline earth metal oxide selected from the group consisting of strontium ruthenium trioxide, calcium ruthenium trioxide, barium ruthenium trioxide, lanthanum-strontium cobalt oxide or mixed alkaline earth ruthenium trioxides thereof upon a thin film of a noble metal such as platinum is provided.

  3. TOLERANCE OF HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR PLANTS: ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATIONBY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    CHAPTER 28 b TOLERANCE OF HEAVY METALS IN VASCULAR PLANTS: ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATIONBY CHINESE the roots take up colossal amounts of a toxic metal from soils and rapidly sequester into their above-ground hyperaccumulation in the light of accumulated knowledge on heavy metal tolerance in higher plants. 1.INTRODUCTION

  4. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  5. Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.

    1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

  6. Effects of ductile phase volume fraction on the mechanical properties of Ti-Al?Ti metal-intermetallic laminate (MIL) composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Richard David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I. J. Light Alloys - Metallurgy of the Light Metals, 3rdformed by reactive foil metallurgy. ? Materials Science andformed by reactive foil metallurgy. HIP reaction at (a) 1300

  7. Light Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A configuration of light pulses is generated, together with emitters and receptors, that allows computing. The computing is extraordinarily high in number of flops per second, exceeding the capability of a quantum computer for a given size and coherence region. The emitters and receptors are based on the quantum diode, which can emit and detect individual photons with high accuracy.

  8. Metals 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  9. Dendritic metal nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Song, Yujiang (Albuquerque, NM); Pereira, Eulalia F. (Vila Nova de Gaia, PT); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dendritic metal nanostructures made using a surfactant structure template, a metal salt, and electron donor species.

  10. Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Light Well: ATunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip G. Adamo,1 K. F. MacDonald,1,* Y. H. Fu,2 metal-dielectric structure creates a new type of tunable, nanoscale radiation source--a ``light well''. In the reported demonstration, tunable light is generated at an intensity of $200 W=cm2 as electrons with energies

  11. Electrophilic Metal Alkyl Chemistry in New Ligand Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Richard F. [University of Chicago] University of Chicago

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this project were to design new electrophilic metal alkyl complexes and to exploit these systems in fundamental studies of olefin polymerization and other important and new catalytic reactions. A key target reaction is insertion copolymerization of olefins and polar CH2=CHX vinyl monomers such as vinyl halides and vinyl ethers. During the period covered by this report we (i) investigated the properties of ortho-alkoxy-arylphosphine ligands in Ni-based olefin polymerization catalysts, (ii) studied the synthesis of double-end-capped polyethylene using group 4 metal catalysts that contain tris-pyrazolylborate ligands, (iii) explored the ethylene insertion reactivity of group 4 metal tris-pyrazolyl-borate complexes, (iv) showed that (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species undergo multiple insertion of silyl vinyl ethers, (v) synthesized and explored the reactivity of base-free Ni benzyl complexes that contain ortho-phosphino-arene sulfonate ligands, (vi) established the mechanism of the reaction of vinyl chloride with (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} catalysts, (vii) explored the role of cationic polymerization and insertion chemistry in the reactions of vinyl ethers with (?-diimine)PdMe{sup +} species, (viii) discovered a new class of self-assembled tetranuclear Pd catalysts that produce high molecular weight linear polyethylene and copolymerize ethylene and vinyl fluoride, and (ix) developed model systems that enabled investigation of cis-trans isomerization of {phosphine-sulfonate}Pd(II) complexes.

  12. Residential Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical squestionnairesquestionnaires AgreementLighting

  13. Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Lighting Inventory Lighting Theatre and Drama Description Totals R.Halls Wells- Metz Light ERS ETC SourceFour 25 25 50 degree ERS Strand Lighting 64 14 24 12 14 36 degree ERS ETC Source Four 15 15 36 degree ERS Strand Lighting 124 60 58 2 4 26 degree ERS ETC SourceFour 2 2 26 degree ERS Strand

  14. Dry halide method for separating the components of spent nuclear fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christian, Jerry Dale (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Thomas Russell (Rigby, ID); Kessinger, Glen F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a nonaqueous, single method for processing multiple spent nuclear fuel types by separating the fission- and transuranic products from the nonradioactive and fissile uranium product. The invention has four major operations: exposing the spent fuels to chlorine gas at temperatures preferably greater than 1200.degree. C. to form volatile metal chlorides; removal of the fission product chlorides, transuranic product chlorides, and any nickel chloride and chromium chloride in a molten salt scrubber at approximately 400.degree. C.; fractional condensation of the remaining volatile chlorides at temperatures ranging from 164.degree. C. to 2.degree. C.; and regeneration and recovery of the transferred spent molten salt by vacuum distillation. The residual fission products, transuranic products, and nickel- and chromium chlorides are converted to fluorides or oxides for vitrification. The method offers the significant advantages of a single, compact process that is applicable to most of the diverse nuclear fuels, minimizes secondary wastes, segregates fissile uranium from the high level wastes to resolve potential criticality concerns, segregates nonradioactive wastes from the high level wastes for volume reduction, and produces a common waste form glass or glass-ceramic.

  15. Dry halide method for separating the components of spent nuclear fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christian, J.D.; Thomas, T.R.; Kessinger, G.F.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a nonaqueous, single method for processing multiple spent nuclear fuel types by separating the fission and transuranic products from the nonradioactive and fissile uranium product. The invention has four major operations: exposing the spent fuels to chlorine gas at temperatures preferably greater than 1200 C to form volatile metal chlorides; removal of the fission product chlorides, transuranic product chlorides, and any nickel chloride and chromium chloride in a molten salt scrubber at approximately 400 C; fractional condensation of the remaining volatile chlorides at temperatures ranging from 164 to 2 C; and regeneration and recovery of the transferred spent molten salt by vacuum distillation. The residual fission products, transuranic products, and nickel- and chromium chlorides are converted to fluorides or oxides for vitrification. The method offers the significant advantages of a single, compact process that is applicable to most of the diverse nuclear fuels, minimizes secondary wastes, segregates fissile uranium from the high level wastes to resolve potential criticality concerns, segregates nonradioactive wastes from the high level wastes for volume reduction, and produces a common waste form glass or glass-ceramic. 3 figs.

  16. Metal Hydrides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,DepartmentEnergyMetalMetal

  17. Electrical excitation of colloidally synthesized quantum dots in metal oxide structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Vanessa Claire

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops methods for integrating colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) and metal oxides in optoelectronic devices, presents three distinct light emitting devices (LEDs) with metal oxides surrounding a QD ...

  18. LED Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light-Emitting diodes (LEDs) efficiently produce light in a fundamentally different way than any legacy or traditional source of light.

  19. Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us count theLienertLift Forces in a Light

  20. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing...

  1. Lead (II) selenite halides Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = Br, I): Synthesis and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdonosov, P. S., E-mail: berdonosov@inorg.chem.msu.ru; Olenev, A. V.; Dolgikh, V. A. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two lead selenite halides, Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}Br{sub 2} and Pb{sub 3}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}I{sub 2}, have been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and structurally characterized. These compounds are isotypic and can be considered 3D with a microporous framework composed of lead polyhedra (distorted Archimedean antiprisms formed by oxygen and halogen atoms). The framework contains channels oriented in the [010] direction. These channels contain selenium atoms, which are bound with framework oxygen atoms belonging to different lead polyhedra.

  2. Potential For Energy, Peak Demand, and Water Savings in California Tomato Processing Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trueblood, A. J.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - wattage metal halide lamps. Other support areas may be lit by inefficient T12 lighting. Replacing these lamps with T5, T8, light-emitting diode (LED), or induction lighting can result in significant electrical energy savings and reduce the peak...

  3. Enhanced Performance in Fluorene-Free Organometal Halide Perovskite Light Emitting Diodes using Tunable, Low Electron-Affinity Oxide Electron-Injectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Chua, Matthew R.; Musselman, Kevin P.; Li, Guangru; Lai, May-Ling; Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Greenham, Neil C.; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Friend, Richard H.; Credgington, Dan

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    perovskites using an ALD-based technique is typically challenging because conventional ALD requires pumping down to vacuum, which increases the deposition time and reduces scalability.[21] In particular, this would require heating the perovskite (typically... deposited in open-air at low temperatures (150 °C or below).[22,25] We were therefore able to directly load and unload the samples from the substrate holder, resulting in the samples only being heated for the time required to deposit the films (3 min...

  4. Sustainable Office Lighting Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Sustainable Office Lighting Options Task Lighting: Task lighting is a localized method of lighting a workspace so that additional, unnecessary lighting is eliminated, decreasing energy usage and costs. Illumination levels in the targeted work areas are higher with task lighting than with the ambient levels

  5. Nanoengineering for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, E. Fred (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,Troy, NY); Koleske, Daniel David; Wetzel, Christian (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,Troy, NY); Lee, Stephen Roger; Missert, Nancy A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,Troy, NY); Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project performed in collaboration with researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Our collaborative effort was supported by Sandia's National Institute for Nanoengineering and focused on the study and application of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts to improve the efficiency of semiconductor light-emitting diodes for solid-state lighting applications. The project explored LED efficiency advances with two primary thrusts: (1) the study of nanoscale InGaN materials properties, particularly nanoscale crystalline defects, and their impact on internal quantum efficiency, and (2) nanoscale engineering of dielectric and metal materials and integration with LED heterostructures for enhanced light extraction efficiency.

  6. Possible hydride and methide transfer reactions: Reactions of Fe(CO){sub 4}R{sup -} (R=H, CH{sub 3}) and W(CO){sub 5}R{sup -} (R = H, CH{sub 3}, CL, Br, I) with metal carbonyl cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, P.; Striejewske, W.S.; Atwood, J.D. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactions of metal carbonyl cations (M(CO){sub 6}{sup +}, M = Mn, Re) with hydride-, methide- or halide-containing metal carbonyl anions Fe(CO){sub 4}R{sup -}, R = H, Me; W(CO){sub 5} (CH{sub 3}CN) and W(CO){sub 5}X{sup -}. In contrast, the tungsten hydride and methide complexes react, predominantly, by transfer of the hydride or methide to a carbonyl of the cation at a much faster rate. The iron hydride and methide complexes react by iron-based nucleophilicity involving a two-electron process.

  7. Metal-carbon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puretzky, A.A.; Hettich, R.L.; Jin, Changming; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tuinman, A.A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafine particles formed by XeCl laser photolysis of M(CO){sub 6}, M = V, Cr, Mo, and W, have been analyzed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry and other techniques. Novel metal carbide clusters, (MoC{sub 4}){sub n}, n = 1 {minus} 4 and (WC{sub 4}){sub m}, m = 1 {minus} 8, were detected and studied. The material produced by photolysis of V(CO){sub 6} shows a series of vanadium-oxygen clusters, V{sub x}O{sub 2x+2}, x = 2 {minus} 10. No clusters of any type were detected in the photolysis product of Cr(CO){sub 6}. Structures based on the experimental evidence are proposed and discussed in light of their chemical reactivity.

  8. Photochemical reductive elimination of halogen from transition metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Timothy R. (Timothy Raymond), 1982-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis and study of transition metal complexes that undergo halogen elimination when irradiated with UV and visible light. This chemistry is relevant for solar energy storage schemes in ...

  9. Light scattering by an array of electric and magnetic nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Light scattering by an array of electric and magnetic nanoparticles Braulio García-Cámara1, 2@unican.es Abstract: Light scattering by an array of alternating electric and magnetic nanoparticles is analyzed, "Polarization sensitive silicon photodiodes using nanostructured metallic grids," Appl. Phys. Lett. 94

  10. Phosphors containing boron and metals of Group IIIA and IIIB

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A phosphor comprises: (a) at least a first metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and elements of lanthanide series other than europium; (b) at least a second metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and scandium; (c) boron; and (d) europium. The phosphor is used in light source that comprises a UV radiation source to convert UV radiation to visible light.

  11. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  12. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  13. Light disappears rapidly (exponentially)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    #12;#12;#12;#12;Light disappears rapidly (exponentially) with depth At the same time, the color of the light shifts #12;#12;#12;#12;· Euphotic zone ­ plentiful light ­ 0-100 m (about) · Dysphotic zone ­ very, very little light ­ 100-1000 m (about) · Aphotic zone ­ no light ­ below 1000 m #12;Sunlight in Water

  14. Nanoantennas for enhanced light trapping in transparent organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voroshilov, Pavel M; Belov, Pavel A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a light-trapping structure offering a significant enhancement of photovoltaic absorption in transparent organic solar cells operating at infrared while the visible light transmission keeps sufficiently high. The main mechanism of light trapping is related with the excitation of collective oscillations of the metal nanoantenna arrays, characterized by advantageous field distribution in the volume of the solar cell. It allows more than triple increase of infrared photovoltaic absorption.

  15. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  16. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  17. New Light Sources for Tomorrow's Lighting Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krailo, D. A.

    can ever be saved on that monthly energy bill. During the past several years, many new light sources have been developed and introduced. These product introductions have not been limited to anyone lamp type, but instead may be found in fila ment..., fluorescent and high intensity discharge lamp families. Man , ufacturers of light sources have two basic goals for new product development. These goals are high efficiency lighting and improved colo'r rendering properties. High efficiency lighting may take...

  18. EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bifano, Thomas

    EK101 Engineering Light Smart Lighting Homework for 9/10 1. Make an estimate (using if the patent is granted.) 3. What is a lumen? A lux? How are the two related? How would you use a lux meter, (Lux, Lumens/m2) Luminous Flux: Perceivable light power from a source, (Lumens) Use the lux meter

  19. Specific light in sculpture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, John William

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

  20. Method and making group IIB metal - telluride films and solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basol, Bulent M. (Redondo Beach, CA); Kapur, Vijay K. (Northridge, CA)

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is disclosed forming thin films (13) of group IIB metal-telluride, such as Cd.sub.x Zn.sub.1-x Te (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1), on a substrate (10) which comprises depositing Te (18) and at least one of the elements (19) of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate and then heating the elements to form the telluride. A technique is also provided for doping this material by chemically forming a thin layer of a dopant on the surface of the unreacted elements and then heating the elements along with the layer of dopant. A method is disclosed of fabricating a thin film photovoltaic cell which comprises depositing Te and at least one of the elements of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate which contains on its surface a semiconductor film (12) and then heating the elements in the presence of a halide of the Group IIB metals, causing the formation of solar cell grade Group IIB metal-telluride film and also causing the formation of a rectifying junction, in situ, between the semiconductor film on the substrate and the Group IIB metal-telluride layer which has been formed.

  1. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and...

  2. Exciting White Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Windows that emit light and are more energy efficient? Universal Display’s PHOLED technology enables windows that have transparent light-emitting diodes in them.

  3. Metal-phosphate binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  4. PFP Emergency Lighting Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUSCH, M.S.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    NFPA 101, section 5-9 mandates that, where required by building classification, all designated emergency egress routes be provided with adequate emergency lighting in the event of a normal lighting outage. Emergency lighting is to be arranged so that egress routes are illuminated to an average of 1.0 footcandle with a minimum at any point of 0.1 footcandle, as measured at floor level. These levels are permitted to drop to 60% of their original value over the required 90 minute emergency lighting duration after a power outage. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) has two designations for battery powered egress lights ''Emergency Lights'' are those battery powered lights required by NFPA 101 to provide lighting along officially designated egress routes in those buildings meeting the correct occupancy requirements. Emergency Lights are maintained on a monthly basis by procedure ZSR-12N-001. ''Backup Lights'' are battery powered lights not required by NFPA, but installed in areas where additional light may be needed. The Backup Light locations were identified by PFP Safety and Engineering based on several factors. (1) General occupancy and type of work in the area. Areas occupied briefly during a shiftly surveillance do not require backup lighting while a room occupied fairly frequently or for significant lengths of time will need one or two Backup lights to provide general illumination of the egress points. (2) Complexity of the egress routes. Office spaces with a standard hallway/room configuration will not require Backup Lights while a large room with several subdivisions or irregularly placed rooms, doors, and equipment will require Backup Lights to make egress safer. (3) Reasonable balance between the safety benefits of additional lighting and the man-hours/exposure required for periodic light maintenance. In some plant areas such as building 236-Z, the additional maintenance time and risk of contamination do not warrant having Backup Lights installed in all rooms. Sufficient light for egress is provided by existing lights located in the hallways.

  5. Metal Hydrides - Science Needs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with traditions in metal hydride research Metal and Ceramic Sciences Condensed Matter Physics Materials Chemistry Chemical and Biological Sciences Located on campus of Tier...

  6. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting (Ventura, CA)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  7. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  8. Lighting and Daylight Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bos, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposing us to the latest products and technologies. Daylight Harvesting A system of controlling the direction and the quantity of light both natural and artificial within a given space. This implies: Control of fenestration in terms of size..., transmission and direction. Control of reflected light within a space. Control of electric light in terms of delivery and amount Daylight harvesting systems are typically designed to maintain a minimum recommended light level. This light level...

  9. EK101 Engineering Light Project: Evaluate Residential Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bifano, Thomas

    EK101 Engineering Light Project: Evaluate Residential Lighting Compare technical and economic characteristics of three sources of residential light. Two teams of four complete the same project Engineering Light Project: Evaluate Residential Lighting Project Assignment: Evaluate current options

  10. Heavy metal biosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Nathan J; Shapiro, Lucille; Hu, Ping; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods are provided for detection of certain heavy metals using bacterial whole cell biosensors.

  11. Reduced ultraviolet light induced degradation and enhanced light harvesting using YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} down-shifting nano-phosphor layer in organometal halide perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chander, Nikhil; Chandrasekhar, P. S.; Thouti, Eshwar; Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Dutta, Viresh; Komarala, Vamsi K. [Photovoltaic Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Khan, A. F., E-mail: khanafk@gmail.com [Photovoltaic Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, Government of India, New Delhi 110003 (India)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a simple method to mitigate ultra-violet (UV) degradation in TiO{sub 2} based perovskite solar cells (PSC) using a transparent luminescent down-shifting (DS) YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nano-phosphor layer. The PSC coated with DS phosphor showed an improvement in stability under prolonged illumination retaining more than 50% of its initial efficiency, whereas PSC without the phosphor layer degraded to ?35% of its initial value. The phosphor layer also provided ?8.5% enhancement in photocurrent due to DS of incident UV photons into additional red photons. YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} layer thus served a bi-functional role in PSC by reducing photo-degradation as well as enhancing energy conversion efficiency.

  12. Deficiencies of Lighting Codes and Ordinances in Controlling Light Pollution from Parking Lot Lighting Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal, Emily

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to identify the main causes of light pollution from parking lot electric lighting installations and highlight the deficiencies of lighting ordinances in preventing light pollution. Using an industry-accepted lighting...

  13. Gamma ray spectroscopy employing divalent europium-doped alkaline earth halides and digital readout for accurate histogramming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Drury, Owen B; Sturm, Benjamin W

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A scintillator radiation detector system according to one embodiment includes a scintillator; and a processing device for processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from the scintillator, wherein pulse digitization is used to improve energy resolution of the system. A scintillator radiation detector system according to another embodiment includes a processing device for fitting digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm based on identifying rise and decay times and performing a direct integration of fit parameters. A method according to yet another embodiment includes processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from a scintillator, wherein pulse digitization is used to improve energy resolution of the system. A method in a further embodiment includes fitting digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm based on identifying rise and decay times; and performing a direct integration of fit parameters. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  14. OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Perry

    OpenGL Lighting 13. OpenGL Lighting · Overview of Lighting in OpenGL In order for lighting to have an effect in OpenGL, two things are required: A light An object to be lit Lights can be set to any color determine how they reflect the light which hits them. The color(s) of an object is determined

  15. Metallic Carbon Nanotubes and Ag Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this DOE solar energy research was to understand how visible light interacts with matter, and how to make electric excitations evolve into separated electrons and holes in photovoltaic cells, especially in nanoparticles and nanowires. Our specific experiments focused on A) understanding plasmon enhanced spectroscopy and charge-transfer (metal-to-molecule) photochemistry on the surface of metallic particles and B) the spectroscopy and photochemistry of carbon nanotubes and graphene. I also worked closely with R. Friesner on theoretical studies of photo-excited electrons near surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles; this process is relevant to the Gratzel photovoltaic cell.

  16. Adaptive Street Lighting Controls

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components. In Part I, presenters Amy Olay of the City of...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC On November 11, 2010, in Welcome History of Incandescence History of LEDs Grand Challenges Our EFRC SSLS-EFRC Contacts News Publications...

  18. Light emitting device comprising phosphorescent materials for white light generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to phosphors for energy downconversion of high energy light to generate a broadband light spectrum, which emit light of different emission wavelengths.

  19. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  20. Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center demand responsive lighting systems ­ Importance of dimming ­ New wireless controls technologies · Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) #12;Objectives · Provide up-to-date information

  1. Light Rail Transit Strengthening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Light Rail Transit Improving mobility Easing congestion Strengthening our communities Central Corridor Communicating to the Public During Major Construction May 25, 2011 #12;2 Light Rail Transit;Light Rail Transit Central Corridor Route and Stations 3 · 18 new stations · 9.8 miles of new double

  2. Progress in transition metal-based enantioselective catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arp, Forrest O

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Chapter 1, the first enantioselective cross-coupling reactions of racemic secondary benzylic halides are described (eq 1). This method was applied to the syntheses of intermediates employed by other groups in the ...

  3. Metal catalyst technique for texturing silicon solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Zaidi, Saleem H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Textured silicon solar cells and techniques for their manufacture utilizing metal sources to catalyze formation of randomly distributed surface features such as nanoscale pyramidal and columnar structures. These structures include dimensions smaller than the wavelength of incident light, thereby resulting in a highly effective anti-reflective surface. According to the invention, metal sources present in a reactive ion etching chamber permit impurities (e.g. metal particles) to be introduced into a reactive ion etch plasma resulting in deposition of micro-masks on the surface of a substrate to be etched. Separate embodiments are disclosed including one in which the metal source includes one or more metal-coated substrates strategically positioned relative to the surface to be textured, and another in which the walls of the reaction chamber are pre-conditioned with a thin coating of metal catalyst material.

  4. Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

  5. Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand-blasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand@ust.hk Abstract: Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by scattering the light is one of the effective methods for large-area lighting applications. In this paper, we present a very simple and cost

  6. Metal phthalocyanine catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

  7. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clar...

  8. Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngagingVehicle TechnologiesEnergy

  9. NDE 701: Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, NewThis paper hasNC-1-BNational

  10. Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18,new2004_v1.3_5.0.zipFlorida4Visitors Chapter 5.1 (March

  11. Industrial Energy Conservation Potentials in North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barakat, M. G.; Singh, H.; Mallik, A. K.

    potentials, resulting from reducing lighting levels and improving lamps efficiency, exist in most manufactu ring facilities. Turning lights off in unoccupied areas is the most attractive lighting ECO, because the savings are considerable and the pay... and low pressure sodium, and metal halide have a high efficacy (lumen per Watt), and are recommended in places where lighting is needed for long periods of time. These lamps require a relatively long warm-up period before they can produce sufficient...

  12. Boron-Containing Red Light-Emitting Phosphors And Light Sources Incorporating The Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok Mani (Niskayuna, NY); Comanzo, Holly Ann (Niskayuna, NY); Manivannan, Venkatesan (Clifton Park, NY)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A boron-containing phosphor comprises a material having a formula of AD1-xEuxB9O16, wherein A is an element selected from the group consisting of Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, and combinations thereof; D is at least an element selected from the group consisting of rare-earth metals other than europium; and x is in the range from about 0.005 to about 0.5. The phosphor is used in a blend with other phosphors in a light source for generating visible light with a high color rendering index.

  13. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, Paul O. (Golden, CO); Kennedy, Cheryl E. (Lafayette, CO); Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO); Goggin, Rita M. (Englewood, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  14. PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Plants Chelating agents Pb hyperaccumulation Effects of pH on metal extraction Disposal options contaminants from soils Contaminants must be in harvestable portions of the plant (Wongkongkatep et al. 2003) Chelating Agents: desorb heavy metals from soil matrix and form water-soluble metal complexes (Shen et al

  15. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  16. Foundations and Light Compass Foundations and Light Compass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jennifer L.

    Foundations and Light Compass Case Study Foundations and Light Compass Case Study Jennifer L. WongQuantitative Sensor--centric Designcentric Design Light CompassLight Compass ­­ Models and Abstractions Contaminant Transport Marine Microorganisms Ecosystems, Biocomplexity What is a Light Compass?What is a Light

  17. Lighting and Surfaces 11.1 Introduction to Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, John P.

    Chapter 11 Lighting and Surfaces 11.1 Introduction to Lighting Three-dimensional surfaces can react to light, and how computer graphics simulates this. There are three species of light (or "illumination models"): 1. Intrinsic (self-emitting) 2. Ambient light (sometimes called "diffuse light") 3

  18. Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

  19. Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Summaries ELEMENT 2: ADVANCE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT 2.1 LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED light emitting diodes (LED) technology for general lighting applications by developing a task lamp

  20. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  1. Liquid Metal Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Sheng; Jie Zhang; Jing Liu

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series of complex transformation behaviors such as self-assembling of a sheet of liquid metal film into a single sphere, quick mergences of separate metal droplets, controlled self-rotation and planar locomotion of liquid metal objects can be realized. Meanwhile, it was also found that two accompanying water vortexes were induced and reliably swirled near the rotating liquid metal sphere. Further, effects of the shape, size, voltage, orientation and geometries of the electrodes to control the liquid metal transformers were clarified. Such events are hard to achieve otherwise on rigid metal or conventional liquid spheres. This finding has both fundamental and practical significances which suggest a generalized way of making smart soft machine, collecting discrete metal fluids, as well as flexibly manipulating liquid metal objects including accompanying devices.

  2. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  4. LED Lighting Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw-Meadow, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Municipal Street Lighting Consortium ? American Public Power Association (APPA) ? Demonstration in Energy Efficiency Development (DEED) ? Source of funding and database of completed LED roadway projects 6 Rules of the Road ESL-KT-11-11-57 CATEE 2011..., 2011 ? 9 Solar-Assisted LED Case Study LaQuinta Hotel, Cedar Park, Texas ? Utilizes 18 - ActiveLED Solar-Assisted Parking Lot Lights ? Utilizes ?power management? to extend battery life while handling light output ? Reduces load which reduces PV...

  5. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  6. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmund G. Brown Jr. Governor LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: SMART LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE LIGHTING's Future: Smart LightEmitting Diode Lighting in Residential Fans. California Energy Commission, PIER

  7. Comparing Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this exercise, students will use a light to demonstrate the difference between being energy-efficient and energy-wasteful, and learn what energy efficiency means.

  8. Total Light Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers total light management, and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  9. Lighting Technology Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Lighting Technology Panel for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009. 

  10. Hybrid Solar Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxey, L Curt [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid solar lighting systems focus highly concentrated sunlight into a fiber optic bundle to provide sunlight in rooms without windows or conventional skylights.

  11. Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    into the market. On the market side, DOE works closely with drivers, heat sinks, and optics. LEDs must be carefully energy efficiency program partners, lighting professionals,...

  12. Ultra-thin ohmic contacts for p-type nitride light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raffetto, Mark (Raleigh, NC); Bharathan, Jayesh (Cary, NC); Haberern, Kevin (Cary, NC); Bergmann, Michael (Chapel Hill, NC); Emerson, David (Chapel Hill, NC); Ibbetson, James (Santa Barbara, CA); Li, Ting (Ventura, CA)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor based Light Emitting Device (LED) can include a p-type nitride layer and a metal ohmic contact, on the p-type nitride layer. The metal ohmic contact can have an average thickness of less than about 25 .ANG. and a specific contact resistivity less than about 10.sup.-3 ohm-cm.sup.2.

  13. Above Code: What does that mean?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muns, S.

    Emitting Diode #0;? Pros: • Energy Efficient • Super-Long Life - 100,000 hrs #0;? Cons: Expensive• • Difficult to Produce “White” Light • Icing in outdoor applicationsgpp #0;?Consume as much as 75% less energy when switched "off” than other models #0... #0;? Available in Passive-Infrared & Ultrasonic #0;? Most common problem is mis-application #0;? “Pulse-Start” Metal Halide Halide #0;? T5 high-bay #0;? High-Efficiency Fixtures #0;? T8 with electronic ballast #0;? “Super-T8” systems L.E.D. - Light...

  14. Single Particle Spectroscopy Study of Metal-Film-Induced Tuning of Silver Nanoparticle Plasmon Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    coupling between the nanoparticle and the metal film. When the thickness of a thin silica spacer layer and can localize visible radiation to subwavelength dimensions and thus control light-matter interactions

  15. Second-harmonic generation in transition-metal-organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, C.C.; Harvey, M.A.; Cockerham, M.P.; Hand, H.M.; Chauchard, E.A.; Lee, C.H.

    1986-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The second-harmonic generation efficiencies of over 60 transition-metal-organic compounds in powder form were measured, using 1.06 ..mu..m light from a Nd:YAG laser. Most of the studied compounds were either group VI metal carbonyl arene, pyridyl, or chiral phosphine complexes. Four the complexes doubled the laser fundamental as well as or better than ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP). The study shows that the same molecular features (e.g., conjugation and low-lying spectroscopic charge transfer) that contribute to second-order optical nonlinearity in organic compounds also enhance second-order effects in transition-metal-organic compounds.

  16. Literature Review of the Effects of UV Exposure on PV Modules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint presentation, originally presented at the NREL 2013 PV Module Reliability Workshop on Feb. 26-27, 2013 in Denver, CO, presents the literature review of the effects of prolonged UV exposure of PV modules, with a particular emphasis on UV exposure testing using artificial light sources, including fluorescent, Xenon, and metal halide lamps.

  17. Quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators for light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that free-space light has intrinsic quantum spin-Hall effect (QSHE) properties. These are characterized by a non-zero topological spin Chern number, and manifest themselves as evanescent modes of Maxwell equations. The recently discovered transverse spin of evanescent modes demonstrates spin-momentum locking stemming from the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in Maxwell equations. As a result, any interface between free space and a medium supporting surface modes exhibits QSHE of light with opposite transverse spins propagating in opposite directions. In particular, we find that usual isotropic metals with surface plasmon-polariton modes represent natural 3D topological insulators for light. Several recent experiments have demonstrated transverse spin-momentum locking and spin-controlled unidirectional propagation of light at various interfaces with evanescent waves. Our results show that all these experiments can be interpreted as observations of the QSHE of light.

  18. Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Bat-El; Gamliel, Shany; Etgar, Lioz, E-mail: lioz.etgar@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Chemistry, Casali Center for Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 90400 (Israel)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

  19. Reducing home lighting expenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aimone, M.A.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ways to reduce lighting expenses are summarized. These include: turning off lights when not in use; keeping fixtures and lamps clean; replacing lamps with more efficient types; using three-way bulbs; use of daylighting; buying fewer lamps and reducing lamp wattage; consider repainting rooms; replacing recessed fixtures with tracklighting; and using efficient lamps for outdoor use. (MCW)

  20. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM); Michelotti, Roy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  1. Light intensity compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  2. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  3. Understanding the movements of metal whiskers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor G. Karpov

    2015-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal whiskers often grow across leads of electric equipment and electronic package causing current leakage or short circuits and raising significant reliability issues. The nature of metal whiskers remains a mystery after several decades of research. In addition, metal whiskers exhibit a rather unusual dynamic property of relatively high amplitude movements under gentle air flow or, according to some testimonies, without obvious stimuli. Understanding the physics behind that motion would give additional insights into the nature of metal whiskers. Here, we quantitatively analyze several possible mechanisms potentially responsible for the observed movements: (1) minute air currents, (2) Brownian motion due to random bombardments with the air molecules, (3) mechanically caused movements, such as (a) externally transmitted vibrations of the sample, and (b) torque exerted due to material propagation along curved whiskers responsible for the whisker growth (similar to the known garden hose oscillations), (4) time dependent electric fields due to diffusion of ions across the metal surface, and (5) nonequilibrium electric field configurations making it possible for {\\it some} whiskers to move. For all these scenarios we provide numerical estimates. Our conclusion is that the observed movements are likely due to the minor air currents, intentional or ill-controlled, and that external mechanical vibrations could force such movements in a rather harsh environment or/and for whiskers with severe constrictions. We argue that under non-steady state conditions, such as caused by changes in the external light intensity, some whiskers can exercise spontaneous oscillations.

  4. Understanding the movements of metal whiskers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor G. Karpov

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal whiskers often grow across leads of electric equipment and electronic package causing current leakage or short circuits and raising significant reliability issues. The nature of metal whiskers remains a mystery after several decades of research. In addition, metal whiskers exhibit a rather unusual dynamic property of relatively high amplitude movements under gentle air flow or, according to some testimonies, without obvious stimuli. Understanding the physics behind that motion would give additional insights into the nature of metal whiskers. Here, we quantitatively analyze several possible mechanisms potentially responsible for the observed movements: (1) minute air currents, (2) Brownian motion due to random bombardments with the air molecules, (3) mechanically caused movements, such as (a) externally transmitted vibrations of the sample, and (b) torque exerted due to material propagation along curved whiskers responsible for the whisker growth (similar to the known garden hose oscillations), (4) time dependent electric fields due to diffusion of ions across the metal surface, and (5) nonequilibrium electric field configurations making it possible for {\\it some} whiskers to move. For all these scenarios we provide numerical estimates. Our conclusion is that the observed movements are likely due to the minor air currents, intentional or ill-controlled, and that external mechanical vibrations could force such movements in a rather harsh environment or/and for whiskers with severe constrictions. We argue that under non-steady state conditions, such as caused by changes in the external light intensity, some whiskers can exercise spontaneous oscillations.

  5. Understanding the movements of metal whiskers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor G. Karpov

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal whiskers often grow across leads of electric equipment and electronic package causing current leakage or short circuits and raising significant reliability issues. The nature of metal whiskers remains a mystery after several decades of research. In addition, metal whiskers exhibit a rather unusual dynamic property of relatively high amplitude movements under gentle air flow or, according to some testimonies, without obvious stimuli. Understanding the physics behind that motion would give additional insights into the nature of metal whiskers. Here, we quantitatively analyze several possible mechanisms potentially responsible for the observed movements: (1) minute air currents, (2) Brownian motion due to random bombardments with the air molecules, (3) mechanically caused movements, such as (a) externally transmitted vibrations of the sample, and (b) torque exerted due to material propagation along curved whiskers responsible for the whisker growth (similar to the known garden hose oscillations), (4) time dependent electric fields due to diffusion of ions across the metal surface, and (5) nonequilibrium electric field configurations making it possible for {\\it some} whiskers to move. For all these scenarios we provide numerical estimates. Our conclusion is that the observed movements are likely due to the minor air currents, intentional or ill-controlled, and that external mechanical vibrations could force such movements in a rather harsh environment or/and for whiskers with severe constrictions. We argue that under non-steady state conditions, such as caused by changes in the external light intensity, some whiskers can exercise spontaneous oscillations.

  6. New Cerium-Based Metal-Organic Scintillators for Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Neal, John S [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Van Loef, Edgar [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA; Markosyan, G [Radiation Monitoring Devices, Watertown, MA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously shown that a new class of scintillating materials can be developed based on the synthesis and crystal growth of rare-earth metal-organic compounds. The first scintillator of this type consisted of single crystals of CeCl3(CH3OH)4 that were grown from a methanol solution. These crystals were shown to be applicable to both gamma-ray and fast neutron detection. Subsequently, metal-organic scintillators consisting of the compound LaBr3(CH3OH)4 activated with varying levels of Ce3+ and of CeBr3(CH3OH)4 were grown in single crystal form. We have now extended the development of this new class of scintillators to more complex organic components by reacting rare-earth halides such as CeCl3 or CeBr3 with different isomers of propanol and butanol including 1-propanol, isobutanol, n-butanol, and tert-butanol. The reaction of CeCl3 or CeBr3 with these organics results in the formation of new and relatively complex molecular crystals whose structures were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These new metal-organic scintillating materials were grown in single crystal form from solution, and their scintillation characteristics have been investigated using X-ray-excited luminescence plus energy spectra obtained with gamma-ray and alpha-particle sources. If the reactions between the inorganic and organic components are not carried out under very dry and highly controlled conditions, molecular structures can be formed that incorporate waters of hydration. The present observation of scintillation in these hydrated rare-earth metal-organic compounds is apparently an original finding, since we are not aware of any previous reports of scintillation being observed in a material that incorporates waters of hydration

  7. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Reflectance Model how objects reflect light. Model light sources Algorithms for computing Shading: computing intensities within polygons Determine what light strikes what

  8. VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    VIRTUAL LIGHT: DIGITALLY-GENERATED LIGHTING FOR VIDEO CONFERENCING APPLICATIONS Andrea Basso method to improve the lighting conditions of a real scene or video sequence. In particular we concentrate on modifying real light sources intensities and inserting virtual lights into a real scene viewed from a fixed

  9. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  10. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200700251 Control of Specular and Diffuse Reflection of Light Using Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ilsoon

    reflectors are widely used in the back-light units of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels,[1­4] light-emitting diodes (LED)[5,6] and solar cell devices.[7,8] A perfect diffuse reflector is matter that reflects and low solar absorption, metals easily satisfy the general requirements for diffuse reflectors

  11. Ultrathin metal-semiconductor-metal resonator for angle invariant visible band transmission filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Yong Lee, Jae; Jay Guo, L., E-mail: guo@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present transmission visible wavelength filters based on strong interference behaviors in an ultrathin semiconductor material between two metal layers. The proposed devices were fabricated on 2?cm?×?2?cm glass substrate, and the transmission characteristics show good agreement with the design. Due to a significantly reduced light propagation phase change associated with the ultrathin semiconductor layer and the compensation in phase shift of light reflecting from the metal surface, the filters show an angle insensitive performance up to ±70°, thus, addressing one of the key challenges facing the previously reported photonic and plasmonic color filters. This principle, described in this paper, can have potential for diverse applications ranging from color display devices to the image sensors.

  12. Superconducting Detectors for Super Light Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonit Hochberg; Yue Zhao; Kathryn M. Zurek

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and study a new class of of superconducting detectors which are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit, mX > keV. We compute the rate of dark matter scattering off free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with all astrophysical and terrestrial constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  13. Superconducting Detectors for Super Light Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Yonit; Zurek, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and study a new class of of superconducting detectors which are sensitive to O(meV) electron recoils from dark matter-electron scattering. Such devices could detect dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit, mX > keV. We compute the rate of dark matter scattering off free electrons in a (superconducting) metal, including the relevant Pauli blocking factors. We demonstrate that classes of dark matter consistent with all astrophysical and terrestrial constraints could be detected by such detectors with a moderate size exposure.

  14. Surface plasmon polaritons locally excited on the ridges of metallic gratings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Surface plasmon polaritons locally excited on the ridges of metallic gratings B. Wang*, and P the surface plasmon polaritons that are locally excited on the ridges (between the indentations) of metallic by an intuitive microscopic model that shines new light on the role of surface plasmons in the transmission

  15. Science&TechnologyHighlights As the world's lightest metal, lithium is well positioned to meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , strategic investments have been made in metal-air, aluminum-ion, and all solid-state batteries; safety1 Science&TechnologyHighlights As the world's lightest metal, lithium is well positioned to meet, light- weight, high-energy density, lithium ion batteries are attractive for plug-in hybrid and battery

  16. Lakeview Light and Power- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lakeview Light and Power offers a commercial lighting rebate program. Rebates apply to the installation of energy efficient lighting retrofits in non-residential buildings. The rebate program is...

  17. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  18. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  19. Heavy Metal Humor: Reconsidering Carnival in Heavy Metal Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Gary Botts

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis considers Bakhtin?s carnivalesque theory by analyzing comedic rhetoric performed by two comedic metal bands. Through the theories of Johan Huizinga and Mikhail Bakhtin, Chapter I: I Play Metal argues that heavy metal culture is a modern...

  20. Nanosecond dynamics of a gallium mirror's light-induced reflectivity change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Albanis; S. Dhanjal; V. I. Emelyanov; V. A. Fedotov; K. F. MacDonald; P. Petropoulos; D. J. Richardson; N. I. Zheludev

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient pump-probe optical reflectivity measurements of the nano/microsecond dynamics of a fully reversible, light-induced, surface-assisted metallization of gallium interfaced with silica are reported. The metallization leads to a considerable increase in the interface's reflectivity when solid a-gallium is on the verge of melting. The reflectivity change was found to be a cumulative effect that grows with light intensity and pulse duration. The reflectivity relaxes back to that of alpha-gallium when the excitation is withdrawn in a time that increases critically at gallium's melting point. The effect is attributed to a non-thermal light-induced structural phase transition.

  1. Transition Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism in Metal Oxide Nanoparticles. Transition Metal Dopants Essential for Producing Ferromagnetism in Metal Oxide Nanoparticles....

  2. Buffer Layer Assisted Laser Patterning of Metals on Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asscher, Micha

    power. In general, absorbed laser power density above 10 MW/cm2 should be avoided, to conserve* Department of Physical Chemistry, The Farkas Center for Light Induced Processes, The Hebrew Uni tool of metallic thin films on surfaces due to their strong binding and the extremely high laser power

  3. Sandia Energy - (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting: Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the third and upcoming revolution (illumination). Topics cover the basics of light-emitting diode (LED) operation; a 200-year history of lighting technology; the importance of...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: (Lighting and) Solid-State Lighting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the third and upcoming revolution (illumination). Topics cover the basics of light-emitting diode (LED) operation; a 200-year history of lighting technology; the importance of...

  5. Columbia Water and Light- HVAC and Lighting Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water and Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and industrial customers for the purchase of high efficiency HVAC installations and efficient lighting. Incentives for certain...

  6. Reading Municipal Light Department- Business Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers incentives for non-residential customers to install energy efficient lights and sensors in existing facilities. In addition to rebates for the...

  7. Peninsula Light Company- Commercial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Peninsula Light Company (PLC) offers a rebate program for commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient lighting. Participating customers must be served by PLC commercial service....

  8. Light Duty Combustion Research: Advanced Light-Duty Combustion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    duty Diesel Combustion Research Advanced Light-Duty Combustion Experiments Paul Miles Sandia National Laboratories Light-Duty Combustion Modeling Rolf Reitz University of Wisconsin...

  9. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Metal roofing panel Shingle roofing Water & ice barrier Thermal Barrier Plywood Student: Arpit between the roof and the attic. · Apply modifications to traditional roofing assembly and roofing roof with only a water barrier between the plywood and the roofing panels. Metal roofing panel Shingle

  10. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  11. CX-004962: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    halide light fixtures in the City Hall and Community Center parking lots with light-emitting diode (LED) light fixtures; and 3) replace incandescent light bulbs on traffic...

  12. Efficient Light Sources Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, A. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews new lamp and lighting technology in terms of application and economic impact. Included are the latest advances in High Intensity Discharge systems, energy saving fluorescent lamps and ballasts, and the new state of the art high...

  13. Natural lighting and skylights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Benjamin Hampton

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    outlined herein, the feasibility of using scale models for studying skylights is also an established fact. The method of analysis by models can be a valuable tool to any designer who is concerned about day-lighting....

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  15. Light Vector Mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Milov

    2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews the current status of experimental results obtained in the measurement of light vector mesons produced in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions at different energies. The review is focused on two phenomena related to the light vector mesons; the modification of the spectral shape in search of Chiral symmetry restoration and suppression of the meson production in heavy ion collisions. The experimental results show that the spectral shape of light vector mesons are modified compared to the parameters measured in vacuum. The nature and the magnitude of the modification depends on the energy density of the media in which they are produced. The suppression patterns of light vector mesons are different from the measurements of other mesons and baryons. The mechanisms responsible for the suppression of the mesons are not yet understood. Systematic comparison of existing experimental results points to the missing data which may help to resolve the problem.

  16. Light and Plants Plants use light to photosynthesize. Name two places that light can come from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Light and Plants Plants use light to photosynthesize. Name two places that light can come from: 1 (CO2, a gas) from the air and turn it into SUGARS (food). This process is powered by energy from light plants) for energy. Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) is a combination of red light and blue

  17. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  18. Light and Energy -Daylight measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light and Energy - Daylight measurements #12;Light and Energy - Daylight measurements Authors: Jens;3 Title Light and Energy Subtitle Daylight measurements Authors Jens Christoffersen, Ásta Logadóttir ........................................................................................................ 5 Daylight quantity

  19. Light as a Healing Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. (1991). Meridians conduct light. Moskow: Raum and Zeit.the bod’ys absorption of light. Explore, 9(2), doi: https://01). The healing use of light and color. Health Care Design

  20. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  1. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  2. July 18, 2012 Using QECBs for Street Lighting Upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lighting technologies (e.g. light-emitting diodes, induction lighting) can reduce street light energy

  3. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: White Light Creation Architectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Creation Architectures White Light Creation Architectures Overview of SSL White Light Creation Architectures The entire spectral range of visible light can be...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Lighting Developments to 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateLighting Developments to 2030 Lighting Developments to 2030 videobanner Lighting Technologies, Costs, and Energy Demand: Global Developments to 2030 V iew Slides: Lighting...

  6. Interior Light Level Measurements Appendix F -Interior Light Level Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix F ­ Interior Light Level Measurements #12;F.1 Appendix F - Interior Light Level. A potential concern is that a lower VT glazing may increase electric lighting use to compensate for lost qualify and quantify a representative loss of daylighting, and therefore electric lighting use

  7. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  8. Lighting affects appearance LightSource emits photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, David

    1 Lighting affects appearance #12;2 LightSource emits photons Photons travel in a straight line). And then some reach the eye/camera. #12;3 Basic fact: Light is linear Double intensity of sources, double photons reaching eye. Turn on two lights, and photons reaching eye are same as sum of number when each

  9. Smart Lighting: A Second Wave in Solid State Lighting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    Smart Lighting: A Second Wave in Solid State Lighting? OIDA Conference on Green Photonics Bob Karlicek Director, Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute June 2010 #12;2 Outline · The First Wave of Solid State Lighting · Complex Dynamics in the Supply Chain · What

  10. Optical properties of inhomogeneous metallic hydrogen plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broeck, N Van den; Tempere, J; Silvera, I F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the optical properties of hydrogen as it undergoes a transition from the insulating molecular to the metallic atomic phase, when heated by a pulsed laser at megabar pressures in a diamond anvil cell. Most current experiments attempt to observe this transition by detecting a change in the optical reflectance and/or transmittance. Theoretical models for this change are based on the dielectric function calculated for bulk, homogeneous slabs of material. Experimentally, one expects a hydrogen plasma density that varies on a length scale not substantially smaller than the wave length of the probing light. We show that taking this inhomogeneity into account can lead to significant corrections in the reflectance and transmittance. We present a technique to calculate the optical properties of systems with a smoothly varying density of charge carriers, determine the optical response for metallic hydrogen in the diamond anvil cell experiment and contrast this with the standard results. Analyzing recent e...

  11. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrnes, Larry Edward (Rochester Hills, MI); Kramer, Martin Stephen (Clarkston, MI); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  12. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, J.P.; Andraka, C.E.; Lukens, L.L.; Moreno, J.B.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other. 3 figs.

  13. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  14. Actinide metal processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sauer, Nancy N. (Los Alamos, NM); Watkin, John G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plnium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is provided together with a low temperature process of preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrte. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage.

  15. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  16. Flip-chip light emitting diode with resonant optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, James M.; Bogart, Katherine H.A.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A flip-chip light emitting diode with enhanced efficiency. The device structure employs a microcavity structure in a flip-chip configuration. The microcavity enhances the light emission in vertical modes, which are readily extracted from the device. Most of the rest of the light is emitted into waveguided lateral modes. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on dielectric substrates (e.g., gallium nitride LEDs grown on sapphire substrates) in general due to better thermal dissipation and lower series resistance. Flip-chip configuration is advantageous for microcavity LEDs in particular because (a) one of the reflectors is a high-reflectivity metal ohmic contact that is already part of the flip-chip configuration, and (b) current conduction is only required through a single distributed Bragg reflector. Some of the waveguided lateral modes can also be extracted with angled sidewalls used for the interdigitated contacts in the flip-chip configuration.

  17. Sneaky light stop

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemore »to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.« less

  18. Pupillary efficient lighting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Jewett, Don L. (Mill Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lighting system having at least two independent lighting subsystems each with a different ratio of scotopic illumination to photopic illumination. The radiant energy in the visible region of the spectrum of the lighting subsystems can be adjusted relative to each other so that the total scotopic illumination of the combined system and the total photopic illumination of the combined system can be varied independently. The dilation or contraction of the pupil of an eye is controlled by the level of scotopic illumination and because the scotopic and photopic illumination can be separately controlled, the system allows the pupil size to be varied independently of the level of photopic illumination. Hence, the vision process can be improved for a given level of photopic illumination.

  19. Light emitting ceramic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  20. Light harvesting arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light harvesting array useful for the manufacture of devices such as solar cells comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2, and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  1. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coops, Melvin S. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  2. Divalent metal nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVries, Gretchen Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal nanoparticles hold promise for many scientific and technological applications, such as chemical and biological sensors, vehicles for drug delivery, and subdiffraction limit waveguides. To fabricate such devices, a ...

  3. Production of magnesium metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN); Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN); Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN); Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  4. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 4 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each

  5. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 3 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: "Dimmability." Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light

  6. MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 5 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each area 3. Shut

  7. LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SECTION 3 LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology 2. Sources & luminaires 3. Controls #12;SECTION 3SECTION 3 DISCUSSION: COMMON LIGHTING TERMINOLOGY 1. What are the definitions of the following lighting terms? 2. Do you use these terms in professional practice? 3. What other lighting terminology do you use

  8. LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    LIGHTING 101 1. Common terminology 2. Sources and luminaires 3. Controls #12;SECTION 2 DISCUSSION: COMMON LIGHTING TERMINOLOGY 1. What are the definitions of the following lighting terms? 2. Do you use these terms in professional practice? 3. What other lighting terminology do you use on the job? SLIDE 14

  9. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal Immobilization, and Catalytic Applications. Functionalized Silicone Nanospheres: Synthesis, Transition Metal...

  10. Radioluminescent lighting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The glow-in-the-dark stereotype that characterizes the popular image of nuclear materials is not accidental. When the French scientist, Henri Becquerel, first discovered radioactivity in 1896, he was interested in luminescence. Radioluminescence, the production of light from a mixture of energetic and passive materials, is probably the oldest practical application of the unstable nucleus. Tritium-based radioluminescent lighting, in spite of the biologically favorable character of the gaseous tritium isotope, was included in the general tightening of environmental and safety regulations. Tritium light manufacturers would have to meet two fundamental conditions: (1) The benefit clearly outweighed the risk, to the extent that even the perceived risk of a skeptical public would be overcome. (2) The need was significant enough that the customer/user would be willing and able to afford the cost of regulation that was imposed both in the manufacture, use and eventual disposal of nuclear materials. In 1981, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were investigating larger radioluminescent applications using byproduct nuclear material such as krypton-85, as well as tritium. By 1982, it appeared that large source, (100 Curies or more) tritium gas tube, lights might be useful for marking runways and drop zones for military operations and perhaps even special civilian aviation applications. The successful development of this idea depended on making the light bright enough and demonstrating that large gas tube sources could be used and maintained safely in the environment. This successful DOE program is now in the process of being completed and closed-out. Working closely with the tritium light industry, State governments and other Federal agencies, the basic program goals have been achieved. This is a detailed report of what they have learned, proven, and discovered. 91 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (JF)

  11. Molten metal reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  12. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Quigley, Gerard P. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  13. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  14. absorbing long-wavelength light: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    But, as promising as this development is, long-term operational to 15% with solid-state hole transporters and organometal halide perovskite absorbers6-9. In addition Cai,...

  15. Gallium nanoparticles grow where light is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. F. MacDonald; W. S. Brocklesby; V. I. Emelyanov; V. A. Fedotov; S. Pochon; K. J. Ross; G. Stevens; N. I. Zheludev

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of metallic nanoparticles has a long tradition in linear and nonlinear optics [1], with current emphasis on the ultrafast dynamics, size, shape and collective effects in their optical response [2-6]. Nanoparticles also represent the ultimate confined geometry:high surface-to-volume ratios lead to local field enhancements and a range of dramatic modifications of the material's properties and phase diagram [7-9]. Confined gallium has become a subject of special interest as the light-induced structural phase transition recently observed in gallium films [10, 11] has allowed for the demonstration of all-optical switching devices that operate at low laser power [12]. Spontaneous self-assembly has been the main approach to the preparation of nanoparticles (for a review see 13). Here we report that light can dramatically influence the nanoparticle self-assembly process: illumination of a substrate exposed to a beam of gallium atoms results in the formation of nanoparticles with a relatively narrow size distribution. Very low light intensities, below the threshold for thermally-induced evaporation, exert considerable control over nanoparticle formation through non-thermal atomic desorption induced by electronic excitation.

  16. Project Profile: Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergy MITis PV

  17. Windows and lighting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity -- factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout the indoor environment, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Windows and lighting are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program. Despite important achievements in reducing building energy consumption over the past decade, significant additional savings are still possible. These will come from two complementary strategies: (1) improve building designs so that they effectively apply existing technologies and extend the market penetration of these technologies; and (2) develop advanced technologies that increase the savings potential of each application. Both the Windows and Daylighting Group and the Lighting System Research Group have made substantial contributions in each of these areas, and continue to do so through the ongoing research summarized here. 23 refs., 16 figs.

  18. AIRPORT LIGHTING Session Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Administration advisory circulars, available online at www.faa.gov or by mail at the following address: Federal Aviation Administration, Airports 800 Independence Ave. S.W. Washington, D.C. 20591 To qualify for federal AND NAVIGATIONAL AIDS A complete list of federal regulations for airfield lighting is located in Federal Aviation

  19. Sweetness and light 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Katie

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Sweetness and Light. A novel. Judi lives in a nice, clean house with her seventeen year old stepson, who won’t talk to her in anything but monosyllables. His father, Nelson, and she are struggling to relate to each ...

  20. High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed Metal/Metal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference High-Temperature Zirconia Oxygen Sensor with Sealed MetalMetal Oxide Internal Reference...

  1. Superposed Coherent and Squeezed Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fesseha Kassahun

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We first calculate the mean photon number and quadrature variance of superposed coherent and squeezed light, following a procedure of analysis based on combining the Hamiltonians and using the usual definition for the quadrature variance of superposed light beams. This procedure of analysis leads to physically unjustifiable mean photon number of the coherent light and quadrature variance of the superposed light. We then determine both of these properties employing a procedure of analysis based on superposing the Q functions and applying a slightly modified definition for the quadrature variance of a pair of superposed light beams. We find the expected mean photon number of the coherent light and the quadrature variance of the superposed light. Moreover, the quadrature squeezing of the superposed output light turns out to be equal to that of the superposed cavity light.

  2. Light-harvesting materials: Soft support for energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolley, Ryan M.; Helm, Monte L.

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To convert solar energy into viable fuel sources, coupling light-harvesting materials to catalysts is a critical challenge. Now, coupling between an organic supramolecular hydrogel and a non precious metal catalyst has been demonstrated to be effective for photocatalytic H2 production. Ryan M. Stolley and Monte L. Helm are at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA, USA 99352. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. e-mail: Monte.Helm@pnnl.gov

  3. Fluorination of the cyanogen halides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Raymond Anthony

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Thesis Sy Raymond Anthony Ward Approved as to styl and content byt ~ rmen o o e c ~ ea o spar men A~act Some cyanogen halldee were fluorinated under varloua condltlona, and th? producte analyaed to deterelne th? couree of reaction. F...

  4. Transformations in Lighting: The Ninth Annual Solid-State Lighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in DOE's "Transformations in Lighting" Solid-State Lighting (SSL) R&D Workshop. DOE SSL Portfolio Manager James Brodrick kicked off Day 1 by observing that although LED...

  5. Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

  6. Mechanically flexible organic electroluminescent device with directional light emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Schaepkens, Marc

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanically flexible and environmentally stable organic electroluminescent ("EL") device with directional light emission comprises an organic EL member disposed on a flexible substrate, a surface of which is coated with a multilayer barrier coating which includes at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent organic polymer and at least one sublayer of a substantially transparent inorganic material. The device includes a reflective metal layer disposed on the organic EL member opposite to the substrate. The reflective metal layer provides an increased external quantum efficiency of the device. The reflective metal layer and the multilayer barrier coating form a seal around the organic EL member to reduce the degradation of the device due to environmental elements.

  7. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  8. Nonequilibrium lighting plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dakin, J.T. (GE Lighting, Nela Park, Cleveland, OH (US))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the science of a variety of devices employing nonequilibrium lighting plasmas is reviewed. The devices include the fluorescent lamp, the low-pressure sodium lamp, the neon sign, ultraviolet lamps, glow indicators, and a variety of devices used by spectroscopists, such as the hollow cathode light source. The plasma conditions in representative commercial devices are described. Recent research on the electron gas, the role of heavy particles, spatial and temporal inhomogeneities, and new electrodeless excitation schemes is reviewed. Areas of future activity are expected to be in new applications of high-frequency electronics to commercial devices, new laser-based diagnostics of plasma conditions, and more sophisticated models requiring more reliable and extensive rate coefficient data.

  9. The Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, A.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  11. Fusion pumped light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pappas, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  12. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Vitek, John Michael [ORNL; Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Wilson, Mahlon [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garzon, Fernando [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Connors, Dan [GenCell Corp; Rakowski, Jim [Allegheny Ludlum; Gervasio, Don [Arizona State University

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  13. Solar light bulb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.A.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for generating light directly using solar energy is provided herein. It includes a concentrator and accumulator for the sun's rays to generate a concentrated beam of visible solar radiation. A distributor shaft is provided for distributing the beam of visible solar radiation. A fork is provided in the distributor shaft to define a plurality of branch lines, each provided with a mirror at the intersection to direct the beam down the respective branch line to permit parallel fractions of the beam to be reflected off the respective mirrors and to pass down the respective branch line. A solar bulb is provided including a double walled upper bulbous portion including the inlet from the branch line and a pair of heat outlet tubes, and a double walled lower bulbous portion, the upper portion thereof being divergently reflective, with the lower portion having walls which are either transparent or translucent to provide greater light diffusion, and the space between the two walls being maintained under vacuum to provide heat insulation values. A structure is provided within the solar bulb for the absorption and radiation of the concentrated beam of visible solar radiation. Preferably structure is provided connected to the solar bulb to draw in outside air in the summer to direct it past the solar bulb and to air vent hot air produced at the solar bulb to the outside, thereby providing light with minimal heat in the summer. The same structure is operated in the winter to draw in household air to direct it past the solar bulb and to recirculate such heated air produced at the solar bulb to the house, thereby providing light and heat in the winter.

  14. Metallic coating of microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

  15. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  16. Hard metal composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  17. Metal alloy identifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  18. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal

  19. Wick for metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved wick for a metal vapor laser is made of a refractory metal cylinder, preferably molybdenum or tungsten for a copper laser, which provides the wicking surface. Alternately, the inside surface of the ceramic laser tube can be metalized to form the wicking surface. Capillary action is enhanced by using wire screen, porous foam metal, or grooved surfaces. Graphite or carbon, in the form of chunks, strips, fibers or particles, is placed on the inside surface of the wick to reduce water, reduce metal oxides and form metal carbides.

  20. Turbo-Charged Lighting Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, W. H. II

    TURBO-CHARGED LIGHTING DESIGN William H. Clark II Design Engineer O'Connell Robertson & Assoc Austin/ Texas ABSTRACT The task of the lighting designer has become very complex, involving thousands of choices for fixture types and hundreds...

  1. Webinar: Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting, originally presented on November 13, 2012.

  2. Faster than Light Quantum Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Y. Shiekh

    2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Faster than light communication might be possible using the collapse of the quantum wave-function without any accompanying paradoxes.

  3. Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Lithium Metal Anodes for Rechargeable Batteries. Abstract: Rechargeable lithium metal batteries have much higher energy density than those...

  4. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION level of each multi-tier garage. · General lighting must have occupant sensing controls with at least one control step between 20% and 50% of design lighting power · No more than 500 watts of rated

  5. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION 5 Additions and Alterations Any alteration that increases the connected lighting load must meet all No measures required OUTDOOR LIGHTING11/20/2014 #12;SECTION 5 BACKLIGHT, UPLIGHT, AND GLARE (BUG) RATINGS

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING CEC-CF-6R-LTG-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-LTG-01 Residential Lighting (Page 1 of 6) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: 2008 Residential Compliance Forms August 2009 1. Kitchen Lighting Does project

  7. Arnold Schwarzenegger, LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;#12;Prepared By: Lighting Research Center Andrew Bierman, Project Lead Troy, New York 12180 Managed ByArnold Schwarzenegger, Governor LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM PROJECT 3.2 ENERGY EFFICIENT LOAD- SHEDDING LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research

  8. Slow-light solitons revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Rybin; I. P. Vadeiko; A. R. Bishop

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate propagation of slow-light solitons in atomic media described by the nonlinear $\\Lambda$-model. Under a physical assumption, appropriate to the slow light propagation, we reduce the $\\Lambda$-scheme to a simplified nonlinear model, which is also relevant to 2D dilatonic gravity. Exact solutions describing various regimes of stopping slow-light solitons can then be readily derived.

  9. Self-assembled photosynthesis-inspired light harvesting material and solar cells containing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Chinnasamy, Muthiah (Raleigh, NC); Fan, Dazhong (Raleigh, NC)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell is described that comprises: (a) a semiconductor charge separation material; (b) at least one electrode connected to the charge separation material; and (c) a light-harvesting film on the charge separation material, the light-harvesting film comprising non-covalently coupled, self-assembled units of porphyrinic macrocycles. The porphyrinic macrocycles preferably comprise: (i) an intramolecularly coordinated metal; (ii) a first coordinating substituent; and (iii) a second coordinating substituent opposite the first coordinating substituent. The porphyrinic macrocycles can be assembled by repeating intermolecular coordination complexes of the metal, the first coordinating substituent and the second coordinating substituent.

  10. Laser remote sensing of backscattered light from a target sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, John D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser remote sensing apparatus comprises a laser to provide collimated excitation light at a wavelength; a sensing optic, comprising at least one optical element having a front receiving surface to focus the received excitation light onto a back surface comprising a target sample and wherein the target sample emits a return light signal that is recollimated by the front receiving surface; a telescope for collecting the recollimated return light signal from the sensing optic; and a detector for detecting and spectrally resolving the return light signal. The back surface further can comprise a substrate that absorbs the target sample from an environment. For example the substrate can be a SERS substrate comprising a roughened metal surface. The return light signal can be a surface-enhanced Raman signal or laser-induced fluorescence signal. For fluorescence applications, the return signal can be enhanced by about 10.sup.5, solely due to recollimation of the fluorescence return signal. For SERS applications, the return signal can be enhanced by 10.sup.9 or more, due both to recollimation and to structuring of the SERS substrate so that the incident laser and Raman scattered fields are in resonance with the surface plasmons of the SERS substrate.

  11. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  12. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  13. Speed of Sound in metal Speed of Sound in metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jaehoon

    the metal rod and metal bar. 2. Acquire a metal bar or rod and measure its mass. Use the meter stick and measure and record the length in meters. Use the vernier calipers and measure the other dimensionBar Select the Smart Tool. Position the Smart tool so that the vertical line bisects the pulse. The (x

  14. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  15. Calixarene supported transition metal clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephanie Merac

    2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a series of calix[n]arene polynuclear transition metal and lanthanide complexes. Calix[4]arenes possess lower-rim polyphenolic pockets that are ideal for the complexation of various transition metal ...

  16. Activation of flue gas nitrogen oxides by transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.E.; Finseth, D.H.; Pennline, H.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur and nitrogen oxides are major flue gas pollutants released by coal-fired electric power plants. In the atmosphere these oxides are converted to sulfuric and nitric acids, which contribute to the acid rain problem. Most of the nitrogen oxides present in coal-derived flue gas exist as the relatively inert and water-insoluble nitric oxide (NO), thus presenting a difficult removal problem. We present preliminary studies intended to establish basic homogeneous chemistry of transition metal complexes with nitrogen oxides. The transition metals considered in this work are volatile carbonyl complexes. The metal carbonyls took up nitric oxide homogeneously in the gas phase. Iron required uv light for reaction with NO, but the same result is expected with the application of heat. Metal carbonyls also reacted with nitrogen dioxide but produced polynuclear metal species. Oxygen did not attack the carbonyl or nitrosyl complexes. Results indicate high potential for NO/sub x/ removal from stack gases by sorption onto supported metal carbonyl complexes. The solid form allows ease in separation from the flue gas. Regeneration of the sorbent might be achieved by treating with CO to liberate NO/sub x/ by displacement or by heating to decompose and drive off NO/sub x/.

  17. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  18. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, L.J.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  19. Electroless metal plating of plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Lawrence J. (Chicago, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for plating main group metals on aromatic polymers is carried out by the use of a nonaqueous solution of a salt of an alkali metal in a positive valence state and a main group metal in a negative valence state with contact between the solution and polymer providing a redox reaction causing the deposition of the main group metal and the reduction of the polymer. Products from the process exhibit useful decorative and electrical properties.

  20. Upgrading platform using alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, John Howard

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing sulfur, nitrogen or metals from an oil feedstock (such as heavy oil, bitumen, shale oil, etc.) The method involves reacting the oil feedstock with an alkali metal and a radical capping substance. The alkali metal reacts with the metal, sulfur or nitrogen content to form one or more inorganic products and the radical capping substance reacts with the carbon and hydrogen content to form a hydrocarbon phase. The inorganic products may then be separated out from the hydrocarbon phase.

  1. Methods of recovering alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L; Rigali, Mark J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Approaches for alkali metal extraction, sequestration and recovery are described. For example, a method of recovering alkali metals includes providing a CST or CST-like (e.g., small pore zeolite) material. The alkali metal species is scavenged from the liquid mixture by the CST or CST-like material. The alkali metal species is extracted from the CST or CST-like material.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: efficient LED lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Solid-State Lighting Solid state lighting (SSL), which uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs), has the potential to be 10 times more energy...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Light Creation Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechnologiesLight Creation Materials Light Creation Materials Overview of SSL Light Creation Materials Different families of inorganic semiconductor materials can...

  4. Ecological Consequences of Artificial Night Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piselli, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Artificial Night Lighting Catherine Rich and Travisof artificial night lighting. This book provides editedage of modern urban lighting was ushered in. Coincidentally,

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Solid-State Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Developments to 2030 On July 30, 2012, in Lighting Technologies, Costs, and Energy Demand: Global Developments to 2030 View Slides: Lighting Technologies, Costs, and...

  6. LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verderber, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REFERENCES Task Report to Lighting Systems Research,Berkeley Laboratory, "Lighting Control System Market1980). Task Report to Lighting Systems Research, Lawrence

  7. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

  8. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A Rational View of LM-79 Reports, IES Files, and Product Variation Gary Steinberg, GE Lighting Solutions Solid-State Street Lighting: Calculating Light Loss Factors Dana Beckwith,...

  9. Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Association of Energy Services Companies Calculating Light Loss Factors for Solid-State Lighting Systems Chad Stalker, Philips Lumileds Lighting Intro to MSSLC's...

  10. Light propagation and Imaging in Indefinite Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photolithography by polarized light,” Applied PhysicsZhang, “Imaging visible light using anisotropic metamaterialcross-sectional review of the light propagation of TE mode (

  11. A fluctuational electrodynamics model for the optimization of light-extraction efficiency in thin-film light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikkilä, Oskari, E-mail: oskari.heikkila@aalto.fi; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of thin film light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has enabled the enhancement of the light extraction beyond geometrical limits but more quantitative understanding of the underlying optical processes is required to fully optimize the extraction. We present first-principle calculations of the light extraction efficiency and optical energy flow in thin-film LEDs. The presented model generalizes the methods of fluctuational electrodynamics to excited semiconductors and simultaneously accounts for wave optical effects, e.g., interference and near-field coupling as well as the internal absorption of the light-emitting material in determining the rate of light emission and internal dissipation in the optical cavity formed by a planar LED. The calculations show that in structures with a metallic mirror, the emissivity of the active region can approach unity at selected wavelengths, even when the nominal emissivity of the active region is only moderate. However, the results also show that near-field coupling of emission from the active region to the mirror can provide a substantial non-radiative loss channel reducing the maximum light extraction efficiency to 0.67 in our example setup. These losses can be partly compensated by the efficient photon recycling enabled by thick active regions that quench emission to confined modes and thereby reduce parasitic absorption.

  12. Advances in Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumber, A. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    colour rendition. The quartz-halogen incandescent lam s operate at higher temperatures, and have a somewhat higher efficacy, but they are rarely used except for special applicati ns. 3-2 High Intensity Discharge Lamps. Mercury is the grandfather... of the H.I.D. lamps. Its blue-green light, has been used almost exclusively for streetlighti and, often with colour-improving phospho it is still being used in industrial and commercial applications. Reactor-type ballasted mercury lamps can now...

  13. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi J.; Koltai, Rita; McGowan, Terry

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This GATEWAY report discusses the problems of pedestrian lighting that occur with all technologies with a focus on the unique optical options and opportunities offered by LEDs through the findings from two pedestrian-focused projects, one at Stanford University in California, and one at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. Incorporating user feedback this report reviews the tradeoffs that must be weighed among visual comfort, color, visibility, efficacy and other factors to stimulate discussion among specifiers, users, energy specialists, and in industry in hopes that new approaches, metrics, and standards can be developed to support pedestrian-focused communities, while reducing energy use.

  14. Lighting Test Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting Sign In About

  15. Lighting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan City Yujiang River ValleyLighting

  16. Fabrication of metallic glass structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cline, C.F.

    1983-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

  17. Integrated decontamination process for metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

  18. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of...

  19. When asked to envision a typical workspace, most of us imagine neutral colors, generic cubicles, and fluorescent lights. The work done in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and metal is actually a carefully positioned network of optical instruments that Caltech scientists use of Jeff Kimble, William L. Valentine Professor and professor setup to transport laser light through

  20. Spray casting of metallic preforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

  1. Functional Metal Phosphonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Houston Phillipp

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................... 39 12 Zr6 prepared at 205 ?C with HF as a solubilizing agent ................................ 43 13 Layered structure of Zn(O3PC6H4CN)(H2O) and Mn(O3PC6H4CN)(H2O) viewed along the c-axis. The coordinating water molecules are between... acid groups form hydrogen-bonded pairs in in Zn(O3PC6H4CO2H)(H2O) and Mn(O3PC6H4CO2H)(H2O). ..................... 55 15 Inorganic layered structure common to divalent metal phosphonates. Octahedral metal ions are coordinated by five phosphonate...

  2. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  3. FLUIDIC: Metal Air Recharged

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, Cody

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidic, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed and deployed the world's first proven high cycle life metal air battery. Metal air technology, often used in smaller scale devices like hearing aids, has the lowest cost per electron of any rechargeable battery storage in existence. Deploying these batteries for grid reliability is competitive with pumped hydro installations while having the advantages of a small footprint. Fluidic's battery technology allows utilities and other end users to store intermittent energy generated from solar and wind, as well as maintain reliable electrical delivery during power outages. The batteries are manufactured in the US and currently deployed to customers in emerging markets for cell tower reliability. As they continue to add customers, they've gained experience and real world data that will soon be leveraged for US grid reliability.

  4. Metal enrichment processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schindler; A. Diaferio

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many processes that can transport gas from the galaxies to their environment and enrich the environment in this way with metals. These metal enrichment processes have a large influence on the evolution of both the galaxies and their environment. Various processes can contribute to the gas transfer: ram-pressure stripping, galactic winds, AGN outflows, galaxy-galaxy interactions and others. We review their observational evidence, corresponding simulations, their efficiencies, and their time scales as far as they are known to date. It seems that all processes can contribute to the enrichment. There is not a single process that always dominates the enrichment, because the efficiencies of the processes vary strongly with galaxy and environmental properties.

  5. Posters | Posters --721 Exploring lighting cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Posters | Posters -- 721 Exploring lighting cultures Beyond light and emotions Vincent LAGANIER 1 , Jasmine van der POL 2 1. Lighting Applications Services (LiAS), Philips Lighting, France vincent.laganier@philips.com 2

  6. LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verderber, R.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Floors Floor Area Lighting Power Density Light Output Lampenergy den- sity and power density for lighting to 3.5 kWh/Lighting Level (Lumens/Watt) (Footcandles) Power Density (

  7. Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important.

  8. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  9. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  10. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  11. Radioluminescent lighting for Alaskan runway lighting and marking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, G.A.; Leonard, L.E.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alaska and other far northern areas have special logistical, environmental, and economic problems that make radioluminescent (RL) lighting applications, especially in the area of airport lighting, an attractive alternative to electrical systems and flare pots. Tests and demonstrations of prototype systems conducted in Alaska over the past two years have proved the basic technological worth of RL airport lighting systems for civilian and military use. If regulatory issues and other factors identified during these tests can be favorably resolved and if the system and its components can be refined through production engineering, attractive applications for RL airfield lighting systems in Alaska and other remote locations could result.

  12. Energy Savings Estimates of Light Emitting Diodes in Niche Lighting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in Niche Lighting Applications Prepared for: Building Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Navigant...

  13. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

  14. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstone, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a point of comparison with LED lighting product embodieda fairer comparison between off- grid LED lighting and other

  15. Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls - 2015 Peer Review Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships: Advanced Lighting Controls - 2015 Peer Review...

  16. Overcoming Common Pitfalls: Energy Efficient Lighting Projects...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Overcoming Common Pitfalls: Energy Efficient Lighting Projects Overcoming Common Pitfalls: Energy Efficient Lighting Projects Transcript Presentation More Documents & Publications...

  17. Light Meson Distribution Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Arthur; P. A. Boyle; D. Brömmel; M. A. Donnellan; J. M. Flynn; A. Jüttner; H. Pedroso de Lima; T. D. Rae; C. T. Sachrajda; B. Samways

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculated the first two moments of the light-cone distribution amplitudes for the pseudoscalar mesons ($\\pi$ and $K$) and the longitudinally polarised vector mesons ($\\rho$, $K^*$ and $\\phi$) as part of the UKQCD and RBC collaborations' $N_f=2+1$ domain-wall fermion phenomenology programme. These quantities were obtained with a good precision and, in particular, the expected effects of $SU(3)$-flavour symmetry breaking were observed. Operators were renormalised non-perturbatively and extrapolations to the physical point were made, guided by leading order chiral perturbation theory. The main results presented are for two volumes, $16^3\\times 32$ and $24^3\\times 64$, with a common lattice spacing. Preliminary results for a lattice with a finer lattice spacing, $32^3\\times64$, are discussed and a first look is taken at the use of twisted boundary conditions to extract distribution amplitudes.

  18. Light modulating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauh, R.D.; Goldner, R.B.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity are disclosed. 1 fig.

  19. Energy and lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in research for new types of lighting with increased efficacies (lumens/watt) are discussed in the following areas: (1) high-frequency, solid-state ballasts, (2) isotopic enhancement of mercury isotopes, (3) magnetic augmentation, (4) electrodeless, ultra-high frequency, (5) tuned phosphors, (6) two-photon phosphors, (7) heat mirrors, and (3) advanced control circuits to take advantage of daylight and occupancy. As of 1985, improvements in efficacy have been accomplished on an economic basis to save energy for (1) high-frequency ballasts (25%), (2) isotopic enhancement (5%), and (8) advanced control circuits (up to 50%). Most of these advances depend on a deeper understanding of the weakly ionized plasma as a radiating and diffusing medium. 3 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Light modulating device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA); Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a device for transmitting light, means for controlling the transmissivity of the device, including a ceramic, reversibly electrochromic, crystalline element having a highly reflective state when injected with electrons and charge compensating ions and a highly transmissive state when the electrons and ions are removed, the crystalline element being characterized as having a reflectivity of at least 50% in the reflective state and not greater than 10% in the transmissive state, and means for modulating the crystalline element between the reflective and transmissive states by injecting ions into the crystalline element in response to an applied electrical current of a first polarity and removing the ions in response to an applied electrical current of a second polarity.

  1. Ultrafast Magnetic Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarov, Sergey V; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel concept for efficient dynamic tuning of optical properties of a high refractive index subwavelength nanoparticle with a magnetic Mie-type resonance by means of femtosecond laser radiation. This concept is based on ultrafast generation of electron-hole plasma within such nanoparticle, drastically changing its transient dielectric permittivity. This allows to manipulate by both electric and magnetic nanoparticle responses, resulting in dramatic changes of its extinction cross section and scattering diagram. Specifically, we demonstrate the effect of ultrafast switching-on a Huygens source in the vicinity of the magnetic dipole resonance. This approach enables to design ultrafast and compact optical switchers and modulators based on the "ultrafast magnetic light" concept.

  2. Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald (Silver Spring, MD)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

  3. anticorrelation light yield: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Light Engineering Websites Summary: Smart lighting: New Roles for Light in the Solid State Lighting World Robert F. Karlicek, Jr as the largest supplier of LED Lighting...

  4. LED Lighting Off the Grid

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D. & Kammen, D. M. Decentralized energy systems for clean electricity access. Nature Climate Change accepted, in press, (2015). Off-Grid Status Quo : Fuel Based Lighting...

  5. Pedestrian-Friendly Nighttime Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This November 19, 2013 webinar presented issues and considerations related to pedestrian-friendly nighttime lighting, such as color rendering, safety, and adaptation. When it comes to outdoor...

  6. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  7. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  8. Utility lighting summit proves illuminating

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utility-lighting-summit-proves-illuminating Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  9. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  10. Lighting with Paint FABIO PELLACINI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellacini, Fabio

    Lighting with Paint FABIO PELLACINI Dartmouth College and FRANK BATTAGLIA, R. KEITH MORLEY, animation, rendering, optimization, painting ACM Reference Format: Pellacini, F., Battaglia, F., Morley, R

  11. Arnold Schwarzenegger LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute; David Shiller, Environmental Protection Agency. Program Advisory Committee: Ron Lewis Corporation; Don Aumann, California Lighting Technology Center; Holly Larsen, Larsen Communications

  12. Light-by-Light Scattering Effect in Light-Cone Supergraphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renata Kallosh; Pierre Ramond

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a relatively simple explanation of the light-cone supergraph prediction for the UV properties of the maximally supersymmetric theories. It is based on the existence of a dynamical supersymmetry which is not manifest in the light-cone supergraphs. It suggests that N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory is UV finite and N=8 supergravity is UV finite at least until 7 loops whereas the $n$-point amplitudes have no UV divergences at least until $L=n+3$. Here we show that this prediction can be deduced from the properties of light-cone supergraphs analogous to the light-by-light scattering effect in QED. A technical aspect of the argument relies on the observation that the dynamical supersymmetry action is, in fact, a compensating field-dependent gauge transformation required for the retaining the light-cone gauge condition $A_+=0$.

  13. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map OrganizationFAQTrending: Metal Oxo

  14. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site Map OrganizationFAQTrending: Metal

  15. METALS DESIGN HANDBOOK DISCLAIMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE899 06 Revision 0 METALS

  16. Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print

  17. Metal coupled emission process

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergy Metal Organic Heat Carrierscom,

  18. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  19. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  20. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datta, Ravindra (Iowa City, IA); Singh, Ajeet (Iowa City, IA); Halasz, Istvan (Iowa City, IA); Serban, Manuela (Iowa City, IA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  1. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  2. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  3. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  4. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Jian (New Milford, CT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  5. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  6. Metallic Stents for Tracheobronchial Pathology Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrano, Carolina, E-mail: carolina.serrano@unizar.es [University of Zaragoza, Surgical Pathology Unit, Animal Pathology Department (Spain)] [University of Zaragoza, Surgical Pathology Unit, Animal Pathology Department (Spain); Laborda, Alicia, E-mail: alaborda@unizar.es [University of Zaragoza, Minimally Invasive Techniques Research Group (GITMI) (Spain)] [University of Zaragoza, Minimally Invasive Techniques Research Group (GITMI) (Spain); Lozano, Juan M., E-mail: juamauloz@gmail.com [Marly Clinic, Radiology Department (Colombia); Caballero, Hugo, E-mail: hugocaballero2007@gmail.com [Marly Clinic, Pulmonology Department (Colombia)] [Marly Clinic, Pulmonology Department (Colombia); Sebastian, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.sebastian@ono.es [Lozano Blesa Clinical University Hospital, Pulmonology Department (Spain)] [Lozano Blesa Clinical University Hospital, Pulmonology Department (Spain); Lopera, Jorge, E-mail: lopera@uthscsa.edu [Health Science Center, Interventional Radiology Deparment (United States)] [Health Science Center, Interventional Radiology Deparment (United States); Gregorio, Miguel Angel de, E-mail: mgregori@unizar.es [University of Zaragoza, Minimally Invasive Techniques Research Group (GITMI) (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present the 7-year experience of the treatment of benign and malignant tracheobronchial stenoses using metallic stents. Patients and Methods: One hundred twenty-three stents were inserted in 86 patients (74 benign and 12 malignant stenoses). Ninety-seven stents were placed in the trachea and 26 in the bronchi. The procedures were performed under fluoroscopic and flexible bronchoscopic guidance with the patient under light sedation. In cases of severe stenotic lesions or obstructions, laser resection was performed before stent placement. Clinical and functional pulmonary data were recorded before and 3 months after the procedure. Follow-up involved clinical data and radiographic techniques at 48 h and at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month intervals. Results: The technical success was 100 %. Dyspnea disappearance, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and pulmonary functional data improvement was observed in all patients (p < 0.001). Complications were detected in 23 patients (26.7 %). Mean follow-up time was 6.3 {+-} 1.2 months in patients with malignant lesions and 76.2 {+-} 2.3 months patients with in benign lesions. By the end of the study, 100 % of patients with malignant pathology and 6.7 % of patients with benign lesions had died. Conclusion: Endoluminal treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis with metallic stents is a therapeutic alternative in patients who are poor candidates for surgery. In unresectable malignant lesions, the benefit of metallic stenting is unquestionable. In benign lesions, the results are satisfactory, but sometimes other interventions are required to treat complications. New stent technology may improve these results.

  7. Final Scientific/Technical Report "Arc Tube Coating System for Color Consistency"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelow, Roger; Jenson, Chris; Kazenski, Keith

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has enabled the use of coating materials using low cost application methods on light sources to positively affect the output of those sources. The coatings and light source combinations have shown increased lumen output of LED fixtures (1.5%-2.0%), LED arrays (1.4%) and LED powered remote phosphor systems â?? Philips L-Prize lamp (0.9%). We have also demonstrated lifetime enhancements (3000 hrs vs 8000 hrs) and shifting to higher CRI (51 to 65) in metal halide high intensity discharge lamps with metal oxide coatings. The coatings on LEDs and LED products are significant as the market is moving increasingly more towards LED technology. Enhancements in LED performance are demonstrated in this work through the use of available materials and low cost application processes. EFOI used low refractive index fluoropolymers and low cost dipping processes for application of the material to surfaces related to light transmission of LEDs and LED products. Materials included Teflon AF, an amorphous fluorinated polymer and fluorinated acrylic monomers. The DOE SSL Roadmap sets goals for LED performance moving into the future. EFOIâ??s coating technology is a means to shift the performance curve for LEDs. This is not limited to one type of LED, but is relevant across LED technologies. The metal halide work included the use of sol-gel solutions resulting in silicon dioxide and titanium dioxide coatings on the quartz substrates of the metal halide arc tubes. The coatings were applied using low cost dipping processes.

  8. Metal deposition using seed layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  9. Magnetic metallic multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hood, R.Q.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons.

  10. ``Towards Strange Metallic Holography'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Tong, David; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We initiate a holographic model building approach to 'strange metallic' phenomenology. Our model couples a neutral Lifshitz-invariant quantum critical theory, dual to a bulk gravitational background, to a finite density of gapped probe charge carriers, dually described by D-branes. In the physical regime of temperature much lower than the charge density and gap, we exhibit anomalous scalings of the temperature and frequency dependent conductivity. Choosing the dynamical critical exponent z appropriately we can match the non-Fermi liquid scalings, such as linear resistivity, observed in strange metal regimes. As part of our investigation we outline three distinct string theory realizations of Lifshitz geometries: from F theory, from polarized branes, and from a gravitating charged Fermi gas. We also identify general features of renormalization group flow in Lifshitz theories, such as the appearance of relevant charge-charge interactions when z {ge} 2. We outline a program to extend this model building approach to other anomalous observables of interest such as the Hall conductivity.

  11. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  12. OLED lighting devices having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus (Regensburg, DE); Antoniadis, Homer (Mountain View, CA)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  13. Device structure for OLED light device having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Antoniadis; Homer (Mountain View, CA), Krummacher; Benjamin Claus (Regensburg, DE)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  14. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  15. Efficient bottom cathodes for organic light-emitting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jie; Duggal, Anil R.; Shiang, Joseph J.; Heller, Christian M. [General Electric Global Research, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)

    2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Bilayers of aluminum and an alkali fluoride are well-known top cathode contacts for organic light-emitting devices but have never been successfully applied as bottom contacts. We describe a bilayer bottom cathode contact for organic electronic devices based on reversing the well-known top cathode structure such that the aluminum, rather than the alkali fluoride, contacts the organic material. Electron-only devices were fabricated showing enhanced electron injection from this bottom contact. Kelvin probe, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments, and thermodynamic calculations suggest that the enhancement results from n doping of the organic material by dissociated alkali metals.

  16. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindroos, J., E-mail: jeanette.lindroos@aalto.fi; Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H. [Department of Micro and Nanosciences, Aalto University, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si.

  17. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, P., E-mail: pdutta2@central.uh.edu; Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P. [Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States); Martinez, J. [Materials Evaluation Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 77085 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ?10{sup 7?}cm{sup ?2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300?cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  18. Electroluminescence property of organic light emitting diode (OLED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Özdemir, Orhan; Kavak, Pelin; Saatci, A. Evrim; Gökdemir, F. P?nar; Menda, U. Deneb; Can, Nursel; Kutlu, Kubilay [Y?ld?z Technical University, Department of Physics, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Tekin, Emine; Pravadal?, Selin [National Metrology Inst?tute of Turkey (TUB?TAK-UME), Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport properties of electrons and holes were investigated not only in a anthracene-containing poly(p-phenylene-ethynylene)- alt - poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPE-PPV) polymer (AnE-PVstat) light emitting diodes (OLED) but also in an ITO/Ag/polymer/Ag electron and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer/Au hole only devices. Mobility of injected carriers followed the Poole-Frenkel type conduction mechanism and distinguished in the frequency range due to the difference of transit times in admittance measurement. Beginning of light output took place at the turn-on voltage (or flat band voltage), 1.8 V, which was the difference of energy band gap of polymer and two barrier offsets between metals and polymer.

  19. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  20. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; /SLAC; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Harkay, K.; /Argonne; Hernandez-Garcia; /Jefferson Lab; Legg, R.; /Wisconsin U., SRC; Padmore, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; /Brookhaven; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  1. Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 years if operated 10 hours a day. The technology, however, is far from new. Nikola Tesla demonstrated induction lighting in the late 1890s around the same time that his rival,...

  2. Using QECBs for Street Lighting Upgrades: Lighting the Way to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summarizes how the City of San Diego leveraged 13.1 million in qualified energy conservation bonds to increase the size of a street lighting upgrade project. Author: Lawrence...

  3. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  4. 46th Street Pilot Street Lighting Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Street to 48th Street) as standard high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting comparison corridor #12;The over time #12;Initial Lighting Comparison #12;Lighting Project Location #12;Street Light Layout 3046th Street Pilot Street Lighting Project A Joint Venture: Hennepin County & City of Minneapolis

  5. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  6. Identifying Lights with their Switches Jayadev Misra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Jayadev

    Identifying Lights with their Switches Jayadev Misra 09/07/2012 Problem Description Given are N switches and N lights where each switch controls exactly one light and each light is controlled by exactly of selecting some number of switches and turning them on, and, presumably, noting the lights that come

  7. Self-Metallization of Photocatalytic Porphyrin Nanotubes Zhongchun Wang,, Craig J. Medforth, and John A. Shelnutt*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelnutt, John A.

    , light-energy conversion, and ca- talysis. Porphyrins are attractive building blocks for these nano in vertical orientations confirm a hollow tubular structure with open ends rather than a solid cylindrically(I)-thiourea complex, the metal is deposited exclusively within the hollow interior of the nanotubes, forming

  8. Analytica Chimica Acta 573574 (2006) 913 Metal oxide thin films as sensing layers for ozone detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytica Chimica Acta 573­574 (2006) 9­13 Metal oxide thin films as sensing layers for ozone. Their structural, electrical and ozone sensing properties were analyzed. Structural investigations carried out with ultraviolet light and subsequent oxidation in ozone atmosphere at room temperature. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Electronically conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a conducting oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the conducting oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The conducting metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.17/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.-1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at the gas stream temperature. The optical response of the conducting oxide materials is proposed to result from the high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity of the conducting metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration and electronic conductivity. These changes in effective carrier densities and electronic conductivity of conducting metal oxide films and nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary conducting metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

  10. Plasmonic transparent conducting metal oxide nanoparticles and films for optical sensing applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R; Wang, Congjun; Andio, Mark A

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a method of detecting a change in a chemical composition by contacting a doped oxide material with a monitored stream, illuminating the doped oxide material with incident light, collecting exiting light, monitoring an optical signal based on a comparison of the incident light and the exiting light, and detecting a shift in the optical signal. The doped metal oxide has a carrier concentration of at least 10.sup.18/cm.sup.3, a bandgap of at least 2 eV, and an electronic conductivity of at least 10.sup.1 S/cm, where parameters are specified at a temperature of 25.degree. C. The optical response of the doped oxide materials results from the high carrier concentration of the doped metal oxide, and the resulting impact of changing gas atmospheres on that relatively high carrier concentration. These changes in effective carrier densities of conducting metal oxide nanoparticles are postulated to be responsible for the change in measured optical absorption associated with free carriers. Exemplary doped metal oxides include but are not limited to Al-doped ZnO, Sn-doped In.sub.2O.sub.3, Nb-doped TiO.sub.2, and F-doped SnO.sub.2.

  11. Metal Vaporization from Weld Pools A. BLOCK-BOLTEN and T. W. EAGAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    an upper limit on the tem- perature produced on the surface of the metal due to evapo- rative cooling.4 · 5 to a direct reading emission spectrometer. The chamber was supplied with a lens guiding the light and the electrode. The hearth was water cooled and the entire system was purged with argon flow. The rotating water-cooled

  12. Effect of Surface Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials on Interaction with Osteoblast Cells , English, L1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

    of the oxide film formed on stainless steel and titanium-aluminium-vanadium metal alloys subjected to different of osteoblast cells. A more comprehensive understanding of such relationships can lead to better biomaterial using white light profilometry and atomic force microscopy. The chemical composition of the oxide layers

  13. Interference of nonlinear response components in degenerate four-photon spectroscopy of ultrathin metal films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyrev, Yu V; Petnikova, V M; Rudenko, K V; Shipova, A Yu; Shuvalov, Vladimir V [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a specific dip in the spectral dependence of the nonlinear response of ultrathin metal films observed by the method of degenerate four-photon spectroscopy is caused by a change in the phases of interfering components of the electron nonlinear susceptibility. This allows one to measure the time scale of subpicosecond intraband processes using picosecond light pulses. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  14. Influence of alkyl chain substitution on sexithienyl-metal interface morphology and energetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Achim

    of devices, such as organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, or field effect transistors, lower- ing-pass cylindrical mirror analyzer with an energy resolution of 0.15 eV measured as 80% to 20% intensity drop for a metal Fermi edge and a photon energy of 22 eV. The secondary electron cutoffs CO for determi- nation

  15. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

  16. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  17. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, Harold B. (Evans, GA); Imrich, Kenneth J. (Grovetown, GA)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  18. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Li, Wenguang (Elgin, IL); Bailey, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gao, Yuan (Brewer, ME)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  19. Metal recovery from porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sturcken, E.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  20. Saturable absorption and 'slow light'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian C Selden

    2006-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative evaluation of some recent 'slow light' experiments based on coherent population oscillations (CPO) shows that they can be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. Therefore they do not provide an unambiguous demonstration of 'slow light'. Indeed a limiting condition on the spectral bandwidth is not generally satisfied, such that the requirements for burning a narrow spectral hole in the homogeneously broadened absorption line are not met. Some definitive tests of 'slow light' phenomena are suggested, derived from analysis of phase shift and pulse delay for a saturable absorber